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VOL. 11 | NO. 29 | Saturday, July 21, 2018

July 20-26, 2018: This week in Memphis history

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2012: Loeb Properties Inc. of Memphis closed on its $7 million acquisition of eight acres of the Overton Square entertainment district from Denver-based Overton Square Investors LLC.

1993: Plans to demolish the Hickman Building at 248 Madison Avenue were delayed by Harry Grossman, the Florida owner of the building. Grossman’s attorneys told Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter they were prepared to start demolition later on a ninth floor penthouse portion of the building heavily damaged in an April fire.

1937: On the front page of The Daily News, three wild west shows have been booked for the upcoming Mid-South Fair. They are the Matt Hinkle Rodeo, George Adams Rodeo and Graham’s Western Riders. The fair prizes for the rodeo include $500 for grand champion cowboy, $200 for champion bronc rider and $100 champion steer rider as well as champion steer wrestler. The George Adams rodeo featured exhibitions by women - or “cowgirls” — and Graham’s featured “juvenile riders.”

1862: Union General William T. Sherman enters Memphis which becomes the headquarters of the U.S. Army’s Fifth Division. Later in his memoirs, Sherman recalls: “The weather was intensely hot. … I made my own camp in a vacant lot near Mr. Moon’s house, and gave my chief attention to the construction of Fort Pickering … to perfect the drill and discipline of the two divisions under my command: and to the administration of civil affairs.”

Sherman noted later in his memoirs that at that point in the war, neither Congress nor the president had set any rules about the status of slaves and that various Union military commands had different policies. Memphis fell to Union forces before President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation of 1863.

“Therefore in Memphis, we received all fugitives, put them to work on the fortification, supplied them with food and clothing and reserved the question of payment of wages for future decision. No force was allowed to be used to restore a fugitive slave to his master in any event; but if the master proved his loyalty, he was usually permitted to see his slave, and if he could persuade him to return home, it was permitted.”

Source: “Memoirs of General William T. Sherman”

RECORD TOTALS DAY WEEK YEAR
PROPERTY SALES 72 282 10,218
MORTGAGES 89 303 11,249
FORECLOSURE NOTICES 0 0 1,301
BUILDING PERMITS 288 762 22,934
BANKRUPTCIES 45 316 6,535
BUSINESS LICENSES 30 79 4,160
UTILITY CONNECTIONS 28 77 3,096
MARRIAGE LICENSES 5 44 2,170