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VOL. 132 | NO. 123 | Wednesday, June 21, 2017

After Warmbier's Death, US Weighs Travel Ban on North Korea

By JOSH LEDERMAN, Associated Press

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WASHINGTON (AP) – The Trump administration is considering banning travel by U.S. citizens to North Korea, officials said Tuesday, as outrage grew over the death of American student Otto Warmbier and President Donald Trump declared it a "total disgrace."

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who has the authority to cut off travel to North Korea with the stroke of the pen, has been weighing such a move since late April, when American teacher Tony Kim was detained in Pyongyang, a senior State Department official said. No ban is imminent, but deliberations gained new urgency after Warmbier's death, said the official, who requested anonymity to discuss internal diplomatic discussions.

From Capitol Hill to the White House, pressure mounted for a tough U.S. response, even as U.S. diplomats sought to protect others Americans from facing a similar fate. Three other U.S. citizens, including Kim, are still being held in North Korea.

"It's a total disgrace what happened to Otto. That should never ever be allowed to happen," Trump said in the Oval Office. In a possible rebuke of his predecessor, President Barack Obama, Trump added of Warmbier: "Frankly, if he were brought home sooner, I think the result would have been a lot different."

Warmbier, 22, died Monday in his home state of Ohio, his family said, just days after being released in a coma by North Korea. The former University of Virginia student had been visiting North Korea on a tour group when he was detained, sentenced to 15 years hard labor for subversion, and held for more than 17 months. The circumstances of his coma and death remain unclear.

Barring Americans from stepping foot in North Korea would mark the latest U.S. step to isolate the furtive, nuclear-armed nation, and protect U.S. citizens who may be allured by the prospect of traveling there. Nearly all Americans who have gone to North Korea have left without incident. But some have been seized and given draconian sentences for seemingly minor offenses.

The U.S. government strongly warns Americans against traveling to North Korea, but doesn't prohibit it, despite other sanctions targeting the country. It's unclear exactly how many Americans go to North Korea every year. Those who typically do travel from China, where tour groups market trips to adventure-seekers.

Some of those companies – including China-based Young Pioneer Tours, which took Warmbier to Pyongyang – have now stopped taking Americans. Other travel companies say they're considering a similar restriction.

In Congress, Democrats and Republicans found bipartisan consensus in denouncing the North. Several senators said they were considering a travel ban. In the House, lawmakers lined up behind legislation from Rep. Adam Schiff, a Democrat, and Rep. Joe Wilson, a Republican.

Under their proposal, the Treasury Department would be ordered to prohibit all financial transactions related to travel to North Korea by Americans, unless specifically authorized by a U.S. license. No licenses would be issued for tourism.

The Trump administration doesn't need an act of Congress to bar Americans from traveling to North Korea.

Under existing law, all it would take is a designation by Tillerson – called a "geographic travel restriction" – to make all American passports invalid for travel to North Korea. To back up the designation, Tillerson could assert that Americans face "imminent danger" to their health or safety if they travel there, an easily defendable assertion in the wake of Warmbier's death.

The U.S. doesn't currently prohibit its passports from being used to travel to any countries, even though financial restrictions limit U.S. travel to Cuba and elsewhere. If a ban were placed on North Korea, an American who violated it could face a fine and up to 10 years in prison for a first offense.

Schiff said a new law was important to show Congress' unity on North Korea, arguing that financial measures through the Treasury Department might be more effective than a passport ban because it would deter travel companies ferrying Americans.

"This has the merits of protecting Americans from going to a place of increasing danger, but also drying up one source of our currency for North Korea," Schiff said in an interview.

Short of a total ban, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., proposed that prospective American travelers complete a form declaring they won't hold the U.S. government responsible for what happens. He said the form would require Americans to affirm they're aware of what's transpired to other U.S. citizens, such as Warmbier, whom the senator said was "murdered" by the North.

"If people are that stupid that they still want to go to that country, then at least they assume the responsibility for their welfare," McCain said.

The U.S. and North Korea have no diplomatic relations. The U.S. is pressing Pyongyang to halt its nuclear weapons development and urging China and other countries to starve the North of funding for the program. The secret negotiations over Warmbier's release are some of the only known direct contacts between the nations in recent years.

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Associated Press writers Ken Thomas, Matthew Lee, Matthew Pennington and Richard Lardner contributed to this report.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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