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VOL. 132 | NO. 136 | Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Council Takes Up Sanitation Worker Benefits

By Bill Dries

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Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, July 11, on grants of $50,000 each for the 14 surviving city sanitation workers from the 1968 strike along with a supplemental retirement plan for sanitation workers hired after the strike.

The proposed grants, which Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland announced last week, would cost approximately $896,000 from the city’s general fund reserve and another $442,000 from the city’s solid waste fund.

The council meets at 3:30 p.m. at City Hall, 125, N. Main St. Follow @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols, for live meeting coverage and updates from council committee sessions earlier in the day.

The proposal, which the council will discuss at its 2:15 executive session, comes as the city prepares for 2018 events to mark the 50th anniversary of the sanitation workers strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Four of the 14 sanitation workers from the 1968 strike still work for the city of Memphis.

The Memphis City Council on Tuesday will discuss proposed grants for 14 surviving participants of the 1968 sanitation workers strike, plus a supplemental retirement plan for sanitation workers hired since then. (Daily News File/Andrew J. Breig)

An 11 a.m. committee session takes up a proposal by council chairman Berlin Boyd and councilman Philip Spinosa to start discussions about possibly replacing or restructuring the Downtown Memphis Commission and the Riverfront Development Corp. The council begins to explore the future of both bodies days after Terence Patterson announced his immediate resignation last week as president and CEO of the DMC.

The council last month delayed approval of the Downtown Memphis Commission budget until September. None of the DMC funding is city taxpayer money, but because the DMC board is nominated by the mayor and approved by the council, the council must OK the group’s budget.

Up for a third and final vote Tuesday are the last unresolved items from the city budget season: proposed increases in the city’s stormwater and sanitary sewer fees.

In planning and development items, the council votes Tuesday on a used car lot operated by Car Choice of Jonesboro, Arkansas, on the site of the old Platinum Plus Club at 2514 Mount Moriah Road north of American Way.

Also on the agenda is a vote on Richmark Homes LLC’s Park Place planned development, which includes three single-family homes on about a half-acre at the southeast corner of East Irvin Drive and Park Avenue.

In other agenda items, the council will vote on setting a July 25 public hearing and council vote on Makowsky Ringel Greenberg’s Overton Gateway planned development. The proposed development, which includes apartment buildings on both sides of Sam Cooper Boulevard at East Parkway, has drawn some opposition from homeowners in the area, and the Land Use Control Board is recommending the council reject the proposal.

RECORD TOTALS DAY WEEK YEAR
PROPERTY SALES 51 223 1,152
MORTGAGES 55 189 861
FORECLOSURE NOTICES 25 45 144
BUILDING PERMITS 149 541 2,593
BANKRUPTCIES 24 120 581
BUSINESS LICENSES 14 65 264
UTILITY CONNECTIONS 0 0 0
MARRIAGE LICENSES 0 0 0