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VOL. 132 | NO. 173 | Thursday, August 31, 2017

'Easy Money' Made Selling Army Weapons Stolen by US Soldiers

By KRISTIN M. HALL, Associated Press

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NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – More than $1 million in weapons parts and sensitive military equipment was stolen out of Fort Campbell, Kentucky, and sold in a vast black market, some of it to foreign buyers through eBay, according to testimony at a federal trial this week.

The equipment – some of it re-sold to buyers in Russia, China, Mexico, Hong Kong, Kazakhstan and Ukraine – included machine gun and rifle parts, body armor, helmets, gun sights, generators, medical equipment and more.

John Roberts, of Clarksville, Tennessee, was being tried Wednesday in Nashville on charges of wire fraud, conspiracy to steal and sell government property, and violating the Arms Export Control Act. Six soldiers and his civilian business partner made plea deals in exchange for their testimony.

That former business partner, Cory Wilson, testified that they would find soldiers selling military items through classified ads or on Facebook, and then ask them for more expensive and harder-to-find items. It was "fast easy money," Wilson said.

The soldiers they targeted were often young and broke or needed money for drugs, Wilson said, so "there were a lot of items and good money to be made."

Wilson said Roberts set up multiple accounts to sell the equipment on eBay. They removed packaging that identified it as government property and used fake descriptions on shipping labels to avoid suspicion, he said.

Under questioning from Roberts' defense attorney, David Cooper, Wilson acknowledged that he initially lied to investigators about knowing the equipment wasn't allowed to be shipped overseas.

Michael Barlow, a former Fort Campbell platoon sergeant who pleaded guilty to theft of government property and conspiracy, testified that they started small, but eventually escalated to truckloads of military equipment. He said Roberts even gave him a "Christmas list" of items he wanted the soldiers to steal in Afghanistan and bring back to the United States.

"They wanted more and more, mostly weapons parts," Barlow testified.

Barlow said his company came home with five large cargo containers filled with equipment as the U.S. military drew down troops and closed bases in Afghanistan. Barlow said he and other soldiers sometimes got $1,000 to $2,000 per truckload.

One non-commissioned officer was even charging civilian buyers $500 to come onto Fort Campbell to select items for purchase, Barlow said.

The conspiracy allegedly continued from 2013 into 2016. Text messages between the soldiers and the civilians pointed to regular meet-ups to swap cash for ballistic plates, helmets, scopes and gun sights, according to Chief Warrant Officer 2 Sarah Perry, an agent with the Army Criminal Investigation Command.

One sergeant, identified in court as "E5 Rick," texted Roberts about going on "hunting trips" while on duty, which meant he was breaking into cars to steal equipment, Perry testified on Tuesday.

The Army identified about five surplus stores around Fort Campbell that were selling military equipment through backdoor deals, she said.

Roberts' defense attorney David Cooper asked Perry if she could prove that the equipment offered on eBay, or that Roberts had pictures of on his phone, was stolen from Fort Campbell. Perry said that in many cases she could not, because many of the stolen items did not have serial numbers, but were similar to items reported stolen.

Another former Fort Campbell soldier, Jonathan Wolford, testified on Wednesday that he and another soldier, Dustin Nelson, took about 70 boxes of weapons parts and other gear, some of it labeled with the name of their company, to Wilson and Roberts, who paid them $1,200.

They were both in charge of their company's arms supply room at the time, Wolford said, and started selling equipment that wasn't listed in the company's property books, including machine gun barrels, M4 rifle parts, pistol grips, buttstocks and other items typically used to repair weapons.

Asked in court why he didn't ask for more money, Wolford said, "I was making a little bit of money. I didn't pay anything for it."

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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RECORD TOTALS DAY WEEK YEAR
PROPERTY SALES 128 183 20,949
MORTGAGES 130 174 24,535
FORECLOSURE NOTICES 0 23 8,633
BUILDING PERMITS 163 359 42,696
BANKRUPTCIES 61 116 14,018
BUSINESS LICENSES 24 46 6,447
UTILITY CONNECTIONS 29 85 13,596
MARRIAGE LICENSES 24 47 5,116

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