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Editorial Results (free)

1. You Gotta Have Heart: UT’s 2017 Recruiting Class -

Butch Jones did it again. The Tennessee football coach gave opponents press conference fodder with another one-liner while putting his spin on the Vols’ 2017 signing class.

It happened a day after the Feb. 1 National Signing Day when UT’s class was rated No. 17 nationally in the 247Sports composite rankings.

2. Back-to-Back Dak? Dobbs Shines at Senior Bowl -

To say Tennessee quarterback Joshua Dobbs might be the next Dak Prescott is a stretch. Or is it? Prescott, the former Mississippi State quarterback, caught the eye of the Dallas Cowboys with his MVP performance in the 2016 Senior Bowl. The Cowboys chose Prescott in the fourth round (No. 135 overall pick) of the 2016 NFL Draft, and it proved a fruitful pick.

3. Full Text of Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State Address -

Here is the full text of Gov. Bill Haslam's annual State of the State address as prepared for delivery to a joint convention of the Tennessee General Assembly on Monday.

Speaker Harwell, Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speakers Pro Tem Tracy and Johnson, Members of the 110th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers, General Slatery, Commissioners, Friends, Guests, fellow Tennesseans, and for the seventh year in a row, the woman voted best first lady in the land, Crissy. My kids even made it this year.

4. Last Word: Connecting Downtown, Tranquil Treasure and Gas Tax Complexities -

Temple over the Tigers Wednesday in Philadelphia 77-66. East Carolina at the Forum is coming up Saturday. Grizz and Raptors at the Forum Wednesday evening and the Grizz win 101 – 99. The Grizz are on the road starting Friday against the Trail Blazers.

5. Grizzlies' Defense Betrays Them in Loss to Bulls -

In the first quarter, the Grizzlies allowed 14 points. In the second quarter, they allowed 38. And down the stretch, when their defense had to make stops, the Grizzlies weren’t up to the task.

6. Robinson’s Success Warrants Any Title He Wants -

In the immediate aftermath of the Tennessee Titans’ turnaround season, Jon Robinson’s title was expanded to executive vice president and general manager.

7. View From the Hill: Taxing Online Sales Not Such an Easy Fix -

Cumberland Transit owner Allen Doty isn’t sure if a rule requiring major out-of-state retailers to collect Tennessee sales taxes will create more equity for his shop.

But Doty, who has been selling everything from bicycles to kayaks and camping gear for 34 years in Nashville, is definitely tired of people shopping in his store for hours, snapping a picture of shoes they like, then going home and buying them online “just to avoid sales tax.”

8. Logistics Sector Preps for Logging Devices -

While Memphis’ distribution and logistics sectors continued to prosper in 2016, legislative changes and proposed improvements to the infrastructure of Lamar Avenue were among the year’s top local headlines for the industry.

9. Memphis Health Care Thrives With Investments, Growth -

Methodist Healthcare made a “great commitment” to Memphis this year. Those are the words of Methodist University Hospital CEO Jeff Liebman, who referenced the health care system’s multimillion-dollar investment into its flagship hospital at 1265 Union Ave., part of a master plan that will give the facility a modern overhaul.

10. Nonprofits Raised Value In 2016 In Many Ways -

In any given year, charitable giving might rise or fall. But when the Chronical of Philanthropy analyzed the giving of the country’s 50 largest cities via Internal Revenue Service data, it captured a larger sample size: 2006 through 2012.

11. Last Word: TNReady Scores, Ikea Day and 901REnews -

Snap goes the streak. Cavs over the Grizz in Cleveland Tuesday 103-86. The Cavs are here Wednesday without LeBron James, Kevin Love or Kyrie Irving. For the Grizz, we shall see about Deyonta Davis who came out of Tuesday’s game with a left foot injury.

12. TBI File Details Critical Points in Police Bratcher Shooting -

There were several points at which the encounter between Memphis Police and Jonathon Bratcher at South Parkway and Mississippi Boulevard this past January might have gone differently.

At one point, the officer following Bratcher, after he saw him driving erratically, considered breaking it off. But then Bratcher veered into a car in front of St. Andrew AME Church.

13. TBI Report Details Critical Points in Police Bratcher Shooting -

There were several points at which the encounter between Memphis Police and Jonathon Bratcher at South Parkway and Mississippi Boulevard this past January might have gone differently.

At one point, the officer following Bratcher after he saw him driving erratically considered breaking it off. But then Bratcher veered into a car in front of St. Andrew AME Church.

14. December 2-8, 2016: This week in Memphis history -

2014: Black Lives Matter “die-in” march and protest on Beale Street draws a group of 50 protesters by the district’s Christmas tree at Beale and Rufus Thomas Boulevard.

1986: The Daily News marks its 100th anniversary with a party at The Peabody hotel that features columnist Louis Rukeyser. It is also the 100th anniversary of the Statue of Liberty, and Rukeyser decries some of the commercialism and corporate sponsorship surrounding the renovation of the monument.

15. Memphis Tigers’ Jake Elliott Doesn’t Just Get His Kicks From Field Goals -

While senior Tigers placekicker Jake Elliott has been a so-called model of consistency – he’s 184-of-184 on point-after attempts – the designation is a bit limiting.

Elliott, after all, just earned yet another Special Teams Player of the Week honor. The American Athletic Conference recognized the University of Memphis kicker after he went 3-of-3 in field goals with making all six PATs in a 51-7 win over SMU.

16. Bad Week for Jones Means Losing On, Off the Field -

If Tennessee football coach Butch Jones thought last Saturday night was bad in Columbia, South Carolina, he had no idea what was waiting when he got back to Knoxville.

Fans were still stewing over UT’s 24-21 loss to unranked South Carolina. It dropped the then-ranked No. 18 Vols (5-3, 2-3 SEC) out of the polls and probably out of contention for the East Division title and SEC Championship game.

17. More Rest for Gasol, Conley Means More Minutes for Young Grizzlies -

Five games into their season, the Memphis Grizzlies have provided a small sample size that is simultaneously encouraging, confounding and still mildly concerning. 

Through games of Wednesday, Nov. 2, the Grizzlies were 3-2. Nothing wrong with that record given the team has a new coach in David Fizdale, is employing a new style of offense, and has new starters and rookies in the rotation. Yet they also needed overtime – at home – to dispatch the Washington Wizards (0-3) and the New Orleans Pelicans (0-5).

18. More Black Students, and Memphis Students, Suspended in Tennessee Schools -

Half of suspensions across Tennessee in the 2014-15 school year were handed out in just 8 percent of schools, many of which serve black students in Memphis.

Statewide, 20 percent of black male students were suspended at least once that year. Black students were also more than five times as likely as white students to be suspended.

19. Vols Get Midterm B Despite Back-to-Back Losses -

Tennessee’s football team is spending this week’s open date trying to get healthy after a rugged four-game stretch of SEC football in which they defeated Florida and Georgia and lost to Texas A&M and Alabama.

20. Northwest Arkansas Paramedics in Short Supply -

BENTONVILLE, Ark. (AP) — A mock-up of an ambulance filled one corner of the classroom and simulated hospital rooms took up the opposite wall, but Grant Wilson's students one recent morning were focused on the 3-inch-thick books in front of them simply labeled "Paramedic Textbook."

21. Last Word: In Defense of The Cossitt, Joe Royer and 3 Months Since The Bridge -

Citizens of Memphis, I rise in defense of the city’s first public library. Not in its original much-loved state but in defense of its much-ridiculed modernization.

No, I will not follow that with a defense of John Calipari or the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s location in Cleveland instead of Memphis or the late Mo’ Money Taxes and the company’s commercials. But I reserve the right to, at some future date, defend the big silver sculpture thing on the northeast corner of Front and Poplar at the Cannon Center.

22. Events -

American Home Shield, a ServiceMaster company, will host a job fair Tuesday, Oct. 11, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at its Memphis contact center, 6399 Shelby View Drive, suite 104. The company is looking to fill 50 sales positions. Dress is business professional, and candidates should bring a resume. Sales experience preferred. Visit careers.ahs.com for more information.

23. Meet Olli -

With deep and well-funded resources such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, the Knoxville region is no stranger to innovation in science and technology.

But a new kid on the block, Local Motors, has the potential to spark a whole new era of manufacturing innovation and make Knoxville a hotbed for a technology sector widely considered to be truly revolutionary – self-driving cars.

24. Fourth Bluff Momentum Grows With $5 Million Grant -

They’ve been called the “things between things” in Downtown Memphis.

In the earliest plans for the city of Memphis, they were part of the Promenade – a section of public land that includes the city’s first public library, the river view behind what is now the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, and Memphis Park and Mississippi River Park below it on the other side of Riverside Drive.

25. Green Renaissance -

As director of Shelby Farms Park Conservancy, Jen Andrews has been on the front lines of what can fairly be called a green revival in Memphis. And she is amazed at how much change has occurred over the last decade, a rebirth that spans not just across the miles but now seems embedded in the city’s psyche.

26. For the First Time This Season, Vols Set to Play as Underdog -

You almost can feel Tennessee is a football team of destiny as the most difficult games of the schedule loom Saturday at Texas A&M and Oct. 15 against Alabama at Neyland Stadium.

There aren’t many successful Hail Mary passes, but the Vols got one last Saturday and beat Georgia 34-31 in Athens. Tennessee trailed Georgia 17-0 in the first half.

27. Z-Bo, Baldwin May Fit Well On Grizzlies’ Second Unit -

In a film session not long before the Grizzlies started preseason play, first-year coach David Fizdale wanted to drive home a point about veteran Zach Randolph’s offensive productivity – especially to the young point guards vying to be Mike Conley’s backup this season.

28. Z-Bo, Baldwin May be Nice Fit on Grizzlies’ Second Unit -

In a film session not long before the Grizzlies started preseason play, first-year coach David Fizdale wanted to drive home a point about veteran Zach Randolph’s offensive productivity – especially to the young point guards vying to be Mike Conley’s backup this season.

29. Stein Says She’s the Choice in ‘Voter Revolt’ -

Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein told a group of Memphis supporters this week that she didn’t become politically active until she was 50 years old. But she had been active long before that in “social movements” where the focus was a cause and not necessarily a candidate.

30. The Week Ahead: October 3-9 -

Well, Memphis, it’s a new month and your Grizzlies return to the court for another season of thrills under a new head coach, David Fizdale. The week starts off with a presidential visit – no, not one of the frontrunners, but a Green Party candidate who will be stumping in Crosstown. Here's what else you need to know in The Week Ahead...

31. Logistical Nightmare -

Lamar Avenue is a $300 million problem. Rush hour on Lamar turns into several hours, and for the hundreds of distribution centers located near the corridor, just-in-time delivery is nearly impossible in the face of miles of congested traffic.

32. Coach Cliché Strikes the Right Note for Tennessee -

Coach Cliché tells us it was just another game. Coach Cliché tells us the next game is always bigger than the last one. And, yes, Coach Cliché tells us you build things brick by brick.

33. Official: One-Third of Calls to VA Suicide Hotline Roll Over -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than one-third of calls to a suicide hotline for troubled veterans are not being answered by front-line staffers because of poor work habits and other problems at the Department of Veterans Affairs, according to the hotline's former director.

34. Last Word: Talking Terms on Beale, Bolton High's Past and DeAngelo Williams -

There will be a funeral in south Memphis Friday at Metropolitan Baptist Church for seven of the 10 people – three adults and seven children -- who died not quite two weeks ago in a house fire on Severson Street. The remaining three funerals follow into the weekend.

35. What’s Worse Than Dating A Gator? Another Loss -

If you’re a Tennessee fan hurting from the 11-game losing streak against Florida, put yourself in Corey Vereen’s shoes.

UT’s senior defensive end is from Winter Garden, Florida, and he’s 0-for-3 against his buddies back home. That’s not the worst part for Vereen.

36. Good Cops Greater Than All Quarterbacks -

I have read and listened to quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s reasons for protesting the American flag and the National Anthem.

He is not without some valid points – at least when looking through his chosen lens – and I give him much credit for voicing his concerns and for his recent pledge to donate $1 million and proceeds from his now runaway NFL jersey sales.

37. The Fading Accuracy of Political Polling -

Joe Carr says he couldn’t believe the deficit when U.S. Rep. Diane Black trounced him in the August election to recapture Tennessee’s 6th Congressional District seat.

38. 2 More Universities Furl Confederate-Themed Mississippi Flag -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Two more Mississippi universities have stopped flying the state's flag, which prominently features the Confederate battle emblem.

Mississippi State University and the Mississippi University for Women confirmed Tuesday that they had taken down the state's flag from outdoor flagpoles over the summer. The universities' actions came after state lawmakers failed to act on changing the flag this year.

39. The World at your Doorstep -

There is nothing you can’t get delivered these days. If you can imagine owning it, it’s only a matter of time before it can be in your possession, brought to your front door within minutes, hours or days from the first moment you even conjured the thought of having it.

40. Downtown Office Market Picking Up, Industrial Market Could Get Hotter -

Memphis’ office and industrial markets saw strong second quarters, with increased absorption and positive outlooks for the rest of the year.

The quarter was dominated by ServiceMaster Global Holdings’ announcement that it was moving its headquarters from East Memphis to the shuttered Peabody Place mall. The home services and tech company will transform the former mall into a $27 million, Class A office building.

41. Matching Donations Available for Transportation Projects -

Two Memphis-based transportation projects have been selected in a nationwide search to qualify for a $100,000 donation match through the TransitCenter.

The projects take a fresh look at how public transportation is funded and motivated by the community’s needs.

42. Oklahoma City Districts Worth A Visit -

Sitting under an umbrella at a little pizza joint in the Paseo Arts District it’s hard to imagine I’m in Oklahoma City.

With a locally brewed F5 Ale in hand, the ultra-hoppy beer feels more Pacific Northwest than American Heartland. But the scorching heat and hints of Southwest architecture places me in Oklahoma.

43. Last Word: Conley Makes It Official, No "Figure Heads" and Early Voting Opens -

Mike Conley signed on the dotted line about an hour before the press conference confirming that he and the Grizz front office have closed on the deal that makes him the highest paid player in NBA history… for now.

44. Former Titan Dyson Finally Reaching His Goal -

When is it too late to go back to school and prepare for a new career? Most experts and older students who’ve returned to school at 30, 40, 50 – or even 60 and beyond – will tell you there’s really no limit as long as an older student is motivated and focused.

45. Media Use in America Up a Full Hour Over Just Last Year -

NEW YORK (AP) – The typical American adult is using media for a full hour a day more than just last year, with smartphones accounting for most of the increase.

People spent an average of 10 hours, 39 minutes each day with smartphones, tablets, TV, radio, computers and video games during the first three months of 2016, according to a Nielsen company study released this week. It was nine hours, 39 minutes during the same period in 2015.

46. Symbols of War Keep Dragging Us Down -

More than 150 years ago, we fought our nation’s most bloody war, a conflagration that claimed 620,000 lives, almost as many as were killed in all other American war efforts combined.

Despite the horror of it all, we just can’t seem to learn a lesson, possibly because of Southern hardheadedness, and a century and a half later, we seem doomed to an eternal task: pushing Sisyphus’ rock to the top of a hill only to have it chase us back to the bottom.

47. Fairgrounds Revitalization Efforts Start Slow and Anew -

The Fairgrounds and the Mid-South Coliseum aren’t a priority of the new administration at City Hall.

And that’s fine with groups trying to chart a future for both.

“The building is in good shape. It’s not in a condition that can’t be mothballed for awhile,” said Chooch Pickard of the Coliseum Coalition. “We can take our time in planning for the Coliseum and the Fairgrounds and do it right. There’s no need to rush. We can take our time, find out what everyone really wants to do with it and raise the money.”

48. Last Word: Orlando, Rain Delay At Southwind and Church Health Center's Move -

Many of us were watching the streets of our own city closely this weekend – the places where people gather for good times when the weather is warm and the sky is clear. Lately some of those places have been the settings for vivid and sudden reminders that all is not well in our city.

49. It’ll Leave A Mark -

THE MARKS WE’RE LEAVING. People were hooking up, shooting up and throwing up in the woods, on benches and in cars and right in front of children on the greensward. Like the weeds, pretty much everywhere. Like the privet, pretty much out of control. Like the shell and the rose garden and the lake and the forest and the picnic grounds and the pride of a city, pretty much left for dead.

50. In Memphis, We’d Rather Move the 3-Point Line Up -

While the Cleveland Cavaliers must be lauding NBA concussion protocol and the cover that gave them for keeping Kevin Love off the court in Game 3 of the NBA Finals, let’s look forward to possible NBA rule tweaks as soon as next season.

51. Brush With Death Recalled, Part 1 -

I was 50 when I died. April 21, 2002. I can’t forget the date.

A few weeks earlier, I saw an old friend, Cotton, at a memorial service for a mutual friend. In the early 1980s, Cotton and I were in the same golf group. After the service, we reminisced about a golf outing that no one involved could forget.

52. Last Word: Delayed Reaction, UTHSC Simulates and Ali Takes On The Fords -

If you like to unplug on the weekends, you probably got plugged back in sooner than expected Sunday to the violent rampage Downtown Saturday evening. It ended with a Memphis Police officer dead – run over at Beale and B.B. King – allegedly by a suspect in the shootings of three people on Downtown’s northern end – two of them in critical condition – less than a half hour earlier.

53. Laser Quest Closing In Poplar Plaza -

Laser Quest, a longtime tenant in the Poplar Plaza shopping center, is set to close on Sunday, May 29.

“We have been a proud part of the Memphis community for the last 20 years and as a company continue to grow,” said Phillips Aldis, director of sales and marketing for the laser-tag chain headquartered in Canada.

54. Grand Carousel’s New Home Ready for Construction -

By mid-summer 2017, the historic Memphis Grand Carousel will be spinning in its new home at the Children’s Museum of Memphis.

On April 27, designshop pllc garnered the necessary approvals from the Board of Adjustment to begin work on a 20,000-square-foot addition to the Midtown museum to house the carousel and event rentals. The new building on the northwest corner of the campus will connect to the existing museum and older administration building.

55. Robots Are Taking Tennessee’s Jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

56. Middle Tennessee construction can’t meet demand -

When it comes to residential real estate around Middle Tennessee, there are plenty of buyers but not nearly enough sellers, says Heather Benjamin with Reliant Realty’s Benjamin McConnell Group. And new construction just can’t keep up with the demand.

57. Southland Mall Sells In Foreclosure -

1215 E. Shelby Drive
Memphis, TN 38116
Sale Amount: $4.3 million

Sale Date: March 31, 2016
Buyer: 1215 East Shelby Drive Holdings LLC
Seller: Southland Mall Shopping Center LLC
Details: Southland Mall, Memphis’ first enclosed mall when it opened 50 years ago, has sold for $4.3 million in foreclosure.

58. Pacific Hires Damon Stoudamire as Basketball Coach -

STOCKTON, Calif. (AP) – University of Memphis assistant coach Damon Stoudamire was hired Wednesday, March 16, as the new coach at the University of the Pacific. Stoudamire, who also played for the Memphis Grizzlies for three seasons (2005-2008) and later served as a Grizzlies assistant coach, was introduced on the Stockton, Calif., campus Wednesday by Pacific's athletic director, Ted Leland.

59. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

60. Kilzer on a New Pulpit But Still Finding Sanctuary in Music -

“I died in Paris,” said John Kilzer, who spoke from the pulpit of Calvary Episcopal Church as part of the church’s annual Lenten Preaching Series.

The 50-something singer-songwriter and Methodist minister was telling the story of his spiritual death in November 1991 while on a European tour for Geffen Records and Peter Asher Management.

61. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

62. Strong US Job Growth in February Helps Dispel Recession Fears -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A robust February jobs report showcased a resilient U.S. economy just as fears of a new recession had begun to surface.

Economic reports in recent weeks had fueled anxieties about a looming downturn: Manufacturers were slumping. Stocks had plummeted. China was slowing sharply along with other emerging markets. The rising dollar had crushed exports.

63. Grammy Museum Opens in Mississippi Delta -

CLEVELAND, Miss. (AP) – The second and only official Grammy Museum outside of Los Angeles opened Saturday in the Mississippi Delta, cradle of the blues.

Organizers chose Cleveland, Mississippi – two hours north of the state capital Jackson – for the nearly $20 million project and promise one of the most advanced museums in the country. It's a smaller but updated version of its sister museum in California and employs high-definition touchscreens and interactive technology to chronicle American music history from before the first Grammy Awards in 1959 to the present.

64. Regions Brings New Format, Technology to New Branches -

When Regions Bank holds the grand opening for its new Downtown branch at 88 Union Ave. on March 17, one of the things on display will be a vision of what Regions sees as the future of banking.

65. Meeting the Demands of a Rapidly Aging Population -

When Gov. Bill Haslam gave his annual State of the State address on February 1, he proposed a $34.8 billion plan providing new spending on colleges and universities, road projects and a large deposit into Tennessee’s emergency budget reserves.

66. Glazed With Tradition, Gibson’s Keeps Customers Coming Back -

While word-of-mouth and nostalgia might get customers in the door of Gibson’s Donuts, great donuts and a commitment to customer service are what keep them coming back.

Gibson’s has been a Memphis icon since Lowell Gibson and his brother opened it in 1967 at 760 Mount Moriah Road, the East Memphis locale where it’s still going strong nearly 50 years later.

67. Glazed with Tradition, Gibson’s Donuts Keeps Customers Coming Back -

While word-of-mouth and nostalgia might get customers in the door of Gibson’s Donuts, great donuts and a commitment to customer service are what keep them coming back.

Gibson’s has been a Memphis icon since Lowell Gibson and his brother opened it in 1967 at 760 Mount Moriah Road, the East Memphis locale where it’s still going strong nearly 50 years later.

68. Fenced Out -

There’s a major problem in Memphis when it comes to minorities: African-Americans make up 63 percent of the population but garner less than 1 percent of total business receipts within Memphis, according to the most recent U.S. Census data.

69. Last Word: New Minority Business Numbers, The House Affair and The Heights -

The recently revived discussion on minority business in Memphis is about to go back on the front burner again. Fueling the intensity are new U.S. Census numbers. They show the percentage of business receipts in Memphis produced by black-owned businesses has dropped since the 2007 census numbers showed a 1.08 percent share of those receipts by black-owned businesses. That in a city whose population is 63 percent African-American.
The drop to below one percent is even though the overall receipts in 2012 were higher than they were in 2007.
Madeline Faber is the first to report the new numbers as part of a cover story in our weekly, The Memphis News, that will be on the streets and in the racks Saturday, on-line Friday afternoon.
The numbers are such a telling story and such an important indicator that we broke it out as its own story in advance of the cover story.

70. Memphis CFO Brian Collins 'Constantly at 50,000 Feet' -

If you think about the city’s chief financial officer at all, you might imagine a robotic figure forever tethered to numbers and a desk, taking a microscopic view of life in search of where to squeeze out a few more dollars here, a few more dollars there.

71. Last Word: Kroger Disses Clarence Saunders, Mud Island Plans and The Australians -

What is old has become new again. And judging by your reaction to Andy Meek’s story on the Kroger plans for online ordering of groceries, what is old has gone viral as well.
Here are the basics:
You order from a list of items and Kroger fills the order and has it waiting for you to pick up.
When you think about the idea of supermarkets, which originated here in Memphis with Piggly Wiggly, it’s enough to make the Piggly Wiggly founder himself, Clarence Saunders, spin in his grave.
Before he came up with the idea of taking store shelves from behind the counter and putting them out there for you to get your own stuff from them, you would tell your grocer what you wanted and he would write it down on a paper bag and get it for you, wrap it up and present it to you.
Saunders changed all of that as you know if you’ve seen the Pink Palace’s child-sized replica of a Piggly Wiggly store from the start of the 20th century.
A century later, no paper bags and you can still walk among the shelves if you wish.
Perhaps this isn’t that extreme. Maybe this is simply a swing of the pendulum, back toward the middle ground.
Saunders tried to push it even further with his Keedoozle stores that followed Piggly Wiggly. In those stores, the items were lined up in what amounted to vending machines with shoppers releasing an item from the vertical row with a key.
Here Saunders went too far. He mashed the bread.

72. Last Word: The Big Fizzle, John Jay Hooker's Exit And "A Great Sports Town" -

Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it – isn’t that how the saying goes?
In our case, it might be better to say everybody talks about the television weather coverage but nobody does anything about it.
As we all know now, Memphis dodged the “blizzard” warning artfully and passive-aggressively teased by several television stations who shall go un-named here because they know who they are and you do too.
That’s because they spent much of the day of "the blizzard that wasn’t" whining about the reaction from viewers who complained about the hype and then the promos the stations ran the day of the big fizzle.
We didn’t get much in the way of snow in Memphis, but we got a couple of feet of hype.

73. Northwestern Defense Tough, But Give Edge to UT -

There’s nothing like spending the Christmas holidays in Florida, and Tennessee’s football team will savor every minute of it for the second consecutive year.

The Vols (8-4) board a flight Saturday morning to Tampa, Fla., where they will spend almost a week before the Jan. 1 Outback Bowl against Northwestern (10-2).

74. Grizzlies Know Survive and Advance Isn’t Just a Motto for Postseason -

When the Memphis Grizzlies saw their 2015-16 schedule, they knew from season’s start to mid-December would be especially challenging.

Or to be blunt about it: dangerous and potentially disastrous if the injury bug had bitten hard.

75. Business Leaders Forging New Identity for Summer Avenue -

Summer Avenue was home to the city’s first McDonald’s, the world’s first Holiday Inn and a small part of what was called the Broadway of America when the completion of U.S. 70 in 1927 took it across the U.S.

76. Ready for Launch -

Five hundred new companies in 10 years. That’s the idea that founded EPIcenter, short for Entrepreneurship-Powered Innovation Center, an organization looking to catalyze the entrepreneurial movement in Memphis.

77. Getting Ahead This Holiday Season -

One of the biggest misconceptions about the holidays is that your career can take a back seat until January. Don’t get me wrong. Family festivities and reconnecting with close friends is important. But putting your career on the back burner for two months is a big mistake.

78. Regions to Trade Two Downtown Branches for One -

Regions Bank is combining two of its Downtown branches into a new location at 88 Union Ave.

The new 3,500-square-foot location, at the northwest corner of Main Street and Union Avenue, will be renovated over the next few months.

79. The Week Ahead: Nov. 9, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from revenge on the Warriors to crime reduction through urban planning…

It’s still election season in 70 percent of the city, which sounds like a weather forecast – part warning and part advisory.
But the seven-day outlook calls for an increased chance of political engagement this week. Early voting in the set of five Memphis City Council runoff races continues this week at eight satellite locations as well as the Downtown site, 157 Poplar Ave.
The runoff elections in council districts 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 will determine the identity of a council that will have at least six, possibly seven new members. Super District council members Philip Spinosa and Martavius Jones, the two confirmed new faces on the council, were elected outright on Oct. 8.

80. Design Board Approves New Peabody Place Facade -

The Downtown Memphis Commission’s Design Review Board approved a multitude of Downtown projects Wednesday, Nov. 4, including new Peabody Place Tower signage and Central Station plans that include an outdoor Malco movie screen.

81. Success Looks Like Five-Game Win Streak For Vols -

Leaves are changing colors, a chill is in the fall air and Tennessee’s football schedule is getting softer.

Happens every year.

We’ve all heard by now how Tennessee is the best 3-4 team in college football. Now is the time to prove it.

82. Tigers Counting on Avery Woodson to Hit Threes -

The surprise is gone. Last season, University of Memphis shooting guard Avery Woodson was an unknown to opponents, or at least was a player that teams would make prove he was a legitimate 3-point threat.

83. Craving Cooper-Young -

If a neighborhood can be said to possess whatever the real estate equivalent is of that new car smell – a sense that there’s something new here to enjoy, of possibilities, of happy things to come – Cooper-Young would seem to have that, in spades.

84. Tigers Give Up 752 Yards, Still Beat Cincinnati To Remain Undefeated -

Playing on ESPN’s national stage Thursday, Sept. 24, the University of Memphis showed the country what it can do on offense.

And what it can’t yet do on defense.

But in the end, on the right side of a 53-46 victory over Cincinnati at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium before 45,172 fans, the Tigers also showed they could overcome just about anything.

85. Despite Rhetoric, Florida Game Critical for Tennessee's Butch Jones -

Tennessee’s Butch Jones will coach the biggest game of his three-year tenure with the Vols – and probably the biggest of his entire coaching career – at Florida on Saturday.

Like it or not, Jones is carrying the weight of UT’s 10-game losing streak to Florida on his shoulders.

86. College Football Notebook: SEC Fumbles in Week 2 Action -

The chant “S-E-C, S-E-C!” still lives. In, you know, a mocking way.

Last weekend No. 18 Arkansas was upset 16-12 by Toledo, No. 6 Auburn needed overtime to dispense with FCS program Jacksonville State, and No. 23 Tennessee blew a 17-0 lead over then-No. 19 Oklahoma and fell 31-24 in double overtime.

87. Shifting Memphis Media Market, Like Every Other, In Flux -

Lauren Lee never picks up a newspaper. Which isn’t much of a surprise because she’s 33 years old, works in marketing, and has the technological savvy and finger dexterity to operate a smartphone.

88. Bona Fide -

When the Bona Fide Blues Festival takes a set of stages in Overton Square and the Cooper-Young neighborhood next month, it will mark a return that’s been a long time coming.

But it also will offer something new.

89. Preparation Enhances Chances for Small-Business Success -

The term “small business” is the ultimate misnomer.

In 2011, according to U.S. Census Bureau data, there were 5.68 million employer firms in the United States. And firms with fewer than 500 workers accounted for 99.7 percent of those businesses. Businesses with fewer than 20 workers made up 89.8 percent.

90. Fred’s Reports Second-Quarter Loss -

The toughest part of guiding a ship, Fred’s Inc. CEO Jerry Shore told analysts Thursday, Aug. 27, is changing its direction.

91. Fred’s Reports Second-Quarter Loss -

The toughest part of guiding a ship, Fred’s Inc. CEO Jerry Shore told analysts Thursday, Aug. 27, is changing its direction.

92. Fred’s Reports Second-Quarter Loss -

The toughest part of guiding a ship, Fred’s Inc. CEO Jerry Shore told analysts Thursday, Aug. 27, is changing its direction.

93. The Remarkable Life of Dr. Richard Briggs -

Richard Briggs is recognized in East Tennessee as a respected heart and lung surgeon, a one-time county commissioner and most recently an elected state senator, the Republican who defeated Stacey Campfield in 2014, ending his rather colorful tenure in the General Assembly.

94. Best Hotel Rooms in Nashville – With or Without Helicopter -

Tod Roadarmel, director of sales and marketing for the nearly 2-year-old Omni Hotel downtown, is awestruck by the vitality of Nashville’s hospitality industry. In town since 1988, he remembers when pre-Bridgestone Arena Broadway was not a place you’d want to be late at night.

95. Ramsey Clear in Push to Politicize Supreme Court -

Republican Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey has a penchant for igniting flames of partisanship, and the retirement of Tennessee Supreme Court Justice Gary Wade is no exception.

96. This week in Memphis history: July 17-23 -

1986: Stevie Wonder brings his In Square Circle Tour to the Mid-South Coliseum

1965: On the front page of The Daily News, an ad for the first 50 lots in Lakeland at $50 down and “small monthly payments.” The ad also promises membership in the Lakeland Fun and Recreation Club.

97. A Zoo With a View Toward Conservation -

Two western lowland gorilla babies were born at the Knoxville Zoo in June. Around the same time, a rare snake and an equally rare piglike little thing made their debuts, as well.

Few things are cuter than baby animals, and they can be quite a draw when the public can view them.

98. Modern Throwback Over the Moon Diapers Finds Growth in Online Sales -

New parents often look to their own mothers for support and advice, but Courtney Moser found a business partner in her mother, Janice Bogott. The pair operates Over the Moon Diapers, a web-based distributor for cloth diapers, breastfeeding accoutrements and other baby supplies.

99. Why Americans Are Getting New Credit Cards -

NEW YORK (AP) – A big change is happening inside your wallet.

U.S. banks, tired of spending billions each year to pay back fleeced consumers, are in the process of replacing tens of millions of old magnetic strip credit and debit cards with new cards that are equipped with computer chips that store account data more securely.

100. Wal-Mart Keeps It All in the Family, Chair Passed to Penner -

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) – Wal-Mart is passing the chairmanship of the world's largest retailer from the eldest son of late founder Sam Walton to a third generation.

The company said that board Chairman Rob Walton will step down and be succeeded by Vice Chairman Greg Penner, who is his son-in-law.