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Editorial Results (free)

1. Hurricane Florence Begins Days of Rain, Wind on Carolina Coast -

WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — The big slosh has begun, and the consequences could be disastrous.

Hurricane Florence's leading edge battered the Carolina coast Thursday, bending trees and shooting frothy sea water over streets on the Outer Banks, as the hulking storm closed in with 105 mph winds for a drenching siege that could last all weekend.

2. The big slosh: Florence begins days of rain, wind on coast -

The big slosh: Florence begins days of rain, wind on coast

By JONATHAN DREW, Associated Press

WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — The big slosh has begun, and the consequences could be disastrous.

Hurricane Florence's leading edge battered the Carolina coast Thursday, bending trees and shooting frothy sea water over streets on the Outer Banks, as the hulking storm closed in with 105 mph (165 kph) winds for a drenching siege that could last all weekend.

3. The big slosh: Florence begins days of rain, wind on coast -

The big slosh: Florence begins days of rain, wind on coast

By JONATHAN DREW, Associated Press

WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — The big slosh has begun, and the consequences could be disastrous.

Hurricane Florence's leading edge battered the Carolina coast Thursday, bending trees and shooting frothy sea water over streets on the Outer Banks, as the hulking storm closed in with 105 mph (165 kph) winds for a drenching siege that could last all weekend.

4. Trump Rejects Official Puerto Rico Hurricane Death Toll -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Thursday rejected the official conclusion that nearly 3,000 people died in Puerto Rico from last year's Hurricane Maria, arguing without evidence that the number was wrong and calling it a plot by Democrats to make him "look as bad as possible."

5. 'Big and vicious': Hurricane Florence Closes in on Carolinas -

WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — Motorists streamed inland on highways converted to one-way routes Tuesday as more than 1 million people in three states were ordered to get out of the way of Hurricane Florence, a hair-raising storm taking dead aim at the Carolinas with 130 mph winds and potentially ruinous rains.

6. Surge, wind, rain, floods: Hurricane Florence could hit hard -

Surge, wind, rain, floods: Hurricane Florence could hit hard

By JONATHAN DREW, Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Hurricane Florence churned Tuesday toward the Eastern Seaboard as a storm of "staggering" size, forcing a million people to evacuate the coast. Many more were left to wonder where they might be safe if days of torrential rains unleash floods from the mountains to the sea.

7. Carolinas Brace for Extremely Dangerous Hurricane Florence -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Florence rapidly strengthened into a potentially catastrophic Category 4 hurricane on Monday as it closed in on North and South Carolina, carrying winds and water that could wreak havoc over a wide stretch of the eastern United States later this week.

8. Shooting Suspect Able to Buy Guns Despite Mental Illness -

BALTIMORE (AP) — Even though the suspect in a shooting at a Florida video game tournament had been hospitalized for mental illness, authorities say he was able to legally purchase the two handguns he was carrying at the time of the attack.

9. How Memphis Can Learn from Detroit: Creating an Inclusive Comeback Story -

The City of Detroit intends to create the most inclusive comeback story America has ever told.

Detroit is the largest African-American majority city in the country with a population over 400,000. Memphis is the second largest.

10. Politicians Target Immigration Law After Arrest in Iowa Case -

MONTEZUMA, Iowa (AP) — The disappearance of a well-liked college student from America's heartland had touched many people since she vanished one month ago while out for a run. But the stunning news that a Mexican man living in the U.S. illegally has allegedly confessed to kidnapping and murdering her thrust the case into the middle of the contentious immigration debate and midterm elections.

11. Southwind’s New GM Poised to Put His Exclamation Point on Next Tournament -

The stories all told of how Dustin Johnson’s 177-yard slam dunk 9-iron shot ended the FedEx St. Jude Classic’s 61-year run with a thundering exclamation point.

12. Events -

Circuit Playhouse will present the regional premiere of “Death of a Streetcar Named Virginia Woolf: A Parody” Friday, June 1, through June 24 at 51 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org for times and tickets.

13. Events -

Circuit Playhouse will present the regional premiere of “Death of a Streetcar Named Virginia Woolf: A Parody” Friday, June 1, through June 24 at 51 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org for times and tickets.

14. AP Journalists Recall Covering MLK Assassination -

Nancy Shipley was working in a news office in Nashville, Tennessee, when the call came 50 years ago. Gene Herrick was in Chicago routing photos to newspapers when his phone rang. Jack Thornell got the call in New Orleans; Kathryn Johnson heard the news in Atlanta.

15. Walker Named President Of Black Swan Digital Forensics -

Jim Walker has been named president of Memphis-based Black Swan Digital Forensics, the only forensics lab in the U.S. that focuses exclusively on data recovery from digital devices such as cellphones, vehicle systems, computers and social media accounts. Walker comes to Black Swan after more than 30 years of military and public service at the federal, state and local level, including eight years as Alabama’s director of homeland security and more than 20 years in the U.S. Army, where he was an Airborne Ranger and retired as a lieutenant colonel.

16. Rotating Forrest Bust Out of Capitol Gains Momentum -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s days in the State Capitol could be numbered. Lt. Gov. Randy McNally, an Oak Ridge Republican, says he could support a move to rotate Forrest’s bust out of the Capitol and make sure Capitol displays are “more reflective of the entire history of Tennessee.”

17. How Should ‘Good People’ React to Racist Ideology? -

Southern nationalists planning to lead rallies in Murfreesboro and Shelbyville are banking on Republican ideas and protection to spread their views, a burr under the saddle for state lawmakers in the controlling party.

18. Buffett Buys Big Into Haslam Family's Pilot Flying J -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – Warren Buffett's company is acquiring a major stake in Pilot Flying J truck stops and it will take over a majority stake within about five years from the family of Cleveland Browns owner Jimmy Haslam and Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

19. NARCAN Useful Against Opioid Overdose -

With the number of overdose deaths from opioids such as OxyContin, Vicodin and Percocet at all-time highs, a new nasal spray is now available to counteract overdoses, and it can be acquired at local pharmacies without a prescription.

20. Pamela Urquieta Paves Innovative Pathways -

Pamela Urquieta has worked closely with about 100 student innovators, and led workshops for another 1,000, during her two-year tenure as program coordinator at LITE Memphis. LITE, which stands for Let’s Innovate Through Education, is a Memphis-based nonprofit that focuses on connecting students with internship and entrepreneurship opportunities.

21. Yellen Defends Bank Regulations Passed After 2008 Crisis -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen on Friday emphatically defended the web of regulations the Fed helped enact after the 2008 financial crisis, saying it helped restore the banking system's health and disputing criticism that the rules have hurt lending.

22. Heavy Rain, Winds, Tornado Warnings as Cindy Heads Inland -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — High tides in the wake of a weakening Tropical Depression Cindy prompted a voluntary evacuation in a coastal Louisiana town Thursday, and the storm's effects were being felt throughout the Southeast, with intermittent bands of heavy rain, blasts of high wind and periodic warnings of possible tornadoes in multiple states.

23. Gunman Who Shot Congressman Had History of Anti-GOP Activity -

BELLEVILLE, Ill. (AP) – The gunman who shot a top GOP congressman and several other people Wednesday at a baseball practice outside the nation's capital had a long history of lashing out at Republicans and once frightened a neighbor by firing a rifle into a field behind his Illinois house.

24. $100M Wind Project Suspended Following Tennessee Moratorium -

CROSSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A more than $100 million wind farm project in Tennessee has been put on hold after state lawmakers passed a yearlong moratorium on new turbines being installed in the state.

25. From Bedroom to Boardroom, Supreme Court is in Your Business -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Quick, name a Supreme Court justice. OK, name three. One of the current justices, Stephen Breyer, once noted wryly that their names are less well-known than those of the Three Stooges.

26. Gatlinburg Reopens -

I couldn’t believe my eyes late the night of Nov. 28 as I mindlessly scrolled through my Twitter feed and began seeing videos of drivers frantically passing through massive walls of flame shooting skyward along the road.

27. Deep South Drought Kills Crops, Threatens Herds, Dries Lakes -

ATLANTA (AP) – Six months into a deepening drought, the weather is killing crops, threatening cattle and sinking lakes to their lowest levels in years across much of the South.

The very worst conditions – what forecasters call "exceptional drought" – are in the mountains of northeast Alabama and northwest Georgia, a region known for its thick green forests, waterfalls and red clay soil.

28. The Fading Accuracy of Political Polling -

Joe Carr says he couldn’t believe the deficit when U.S. Rep. Diane Black trounced him in the August election to recapture Tennessee’s 6th Congressional District seat.

29. Last Word: As The Wheel Tax Turns, New Zoo Poll and Once Every Dozen Years -

When the school year ends, that’s not necessarily when leaders of school systems can take it easy.

That’s because the business of school systems is about looking months if not years ahead on your mental calendar.

30. Pro-Nuclear GOP Senator Urges Tennessee to Reject Wind Farm -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander is urging his fellow Tennesseans to oppose what he calls an "unsightly" wind farm near the Cumberland Mountain State Park.

The longtime supporter of nuclear power argued on the Senate floor this week that the 23 wind turbines Apex Clean Energy wants to install are "massive" and would spoil the "natural beauty of our state."

31. Memphis Jewish Home's Bobby Meadows Wins National Honor -

Bobby G. Meadows III, executive director of Memphis Jewish Home & Rehab, has been awarded the 2016 Young Executive Award by the Association of Jewish Aging Services. The award honors an executive younger than 45 who demonstrates significant potential in health care management by virtue of his or her cumulative achievements or innovative results in management or administration.
As executive director of MJHR, Meadows is responsible for day-to-day operations of the only glatt (strict) kosher, rehab long-term care facility in Tennessee and surrounding states. Operations include the oversight of more than 300 staff members, 160 patients, and a kosher deli.

32. Michigan Urges Toughest Lead Rules in U.S. After Flint Crisis -

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan would have the toughest lead-testing rules in the nation and require the replacement of all underground lead service pipes in the state under a sweeping plan that Gov. Rick Snyder and a team of water experts unveiled Friday in the wake of Flint's water crisis.

33. Tennessee Craft Week Shines Light on Handcraft Artisans -

This fall the legacy of handmade craft art in Tennessee is getting some big promotion from a statewide weeklong celebration that coincides with American Craft Week in October.

“We want to put a spotlight on and build an appreciation for crafts artists,” said Teri Alea, executive director of Tennessee Craft. “They show up in lots of different ways throughout the community. Craft, especially high-end, is a big business and it has a big impact on the state economy.”

34. Stones’ Nashville Connections Go Way Back -

While Brad Paisley lives what he calls “a bucket list item” by singing while playing his guitar in typically showy fashion as the opening act for The Rolling Stones, the most important guitarist in rock ‘n’ roll history and a man idolized by Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood will be sitting in his house on Blueberry Hill in the hills of northern Davidson County.

35. Regulators Move Toward Operating License for Nuclear Plant -

SPRING CITY, Tenn. (AP) – Federal regulators have voted to grant an operating license for the Unit 2 reactor at the Tennessee Valley Authority's Watts Bar nuclear plant as long as regulatory requirements are met.

36. Anson VII Has Arrived -

My great-great-great-great grandfather Elijah Fleming had eight kids and no middle name.

According to an essay by a distant cousin of mine, five of the eight left their South Carolina homes “the night the stars fell.”

37. Trezevant Selects New Chief Operating Officer -

Kent Phillips has been named chief operating officer of Trezevant, a continuing care community at 177 N. Highland St. in Memphis. Phillips has more than 25 years of experience in managing retirement communities.

38. Milk Industry Fights Back Against 'Anti-Dairy Folks' -

NEW YORK (AP) – The milk industry is fed up with all the sourness over dairy.

As Americans continue turning away from milk, an industry group is pushing back at its critics with a social media campaign trumpeting the benefits of milk. The association says it needs to act because attitudes about milk are deteriorating more rapidly, with vegan groups, non-dairy competitors and other perceived enemies getting louder online.

39. Trezevant Selects New Chief Operating Officer -

Kent Phillips has been named chief operating officer of Trezevant, a continuing care community at 177 N. Highland St. in Memphis. Phillips has more than 25 years of experience in managing retirement communities.

40. Senators: Widen Medicaid Program for Frail Seniors -

WASHINGTON (AP) – More than a dozen U.S. senators from both parties are calling on the Obama administration to broaden a Medicaid program for the nation's frailest seniors, calling it a proven alternative to pricier nursing home care as states seek to limit long-term medical costs.

41. TVA: Watts Bar More Than 90 Percent Complete -

SPRING CITY, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Valley Authority says work on the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant is more than 90 percent complete.

The federal agency announced a target completion date for the plant's Unit 2 reactor of December 2015.

42. Deadline to Clear Up Health Law Eligibility Near -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Hundreds of thousands of people who signed up under the new health care law risk losing their taxpayer-subsidized insurance unless they act quickly to resolve questions about their citizenship or immigration status. The government warned on Tuesday that they have just over three weeks to show that they're eligible.

43. Fannie, Freddie Post Profits in Second Quarter -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Government-controlled mortgage companies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac posted profits for the April-June period as the U.S. housing market continued to recover. Gains in recent years have enabled them to fully repay their government aid after being rescued during the financial crisis in 2008.

44. Obama: Power Plant Rule Will Shrink Power Prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a sweeping initiative to curb pollutants blamed for global warming, the Obama administration unveiled a plan Monday aimed at cutting carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by nearly a third by 2030. But it delays the deadline for some states to begin complying until long after President Barack Obama leaves office.

45. TVA: Watts Bar Set for December 2015 Completion -

SPRING CITY, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Valley Authority says work on the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant has moved from large-scale construction to completion and testing of individual plant systems.

46. Events -

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Memphis is seeking Feb. 2 Home Team Huddle party hosts. Participants will host a “Super Sunday” party in their homes, businesses, schools or churches and collect donations for Memphis Habitat during halftime. Hosts who sign up by Thursday, Jan. 30, will receive a party pack with posters, supplies and promotion ideas. For more info, visit memphishabitat.com/hometeamhuddle or call 322-3517.

47. Lawmakers Push to Delay Huge Flood Insurance Hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A bipartisan group of lawmakers Tuesday unveiled legislation that would delay for about four years several changes to the federal government's flood insurance program that are threatening to sock thousands of people with unaffordable premium hikes.

48. New Model Brings Ford Back to Funeral Business -

Memphis political icon Harold Ford Sr. is changing careers again. In this case, it is a return to the Ford family business for the 11-term U.S. representative, who has been a Washington consultant and lobbyist since he opted not to seek re-election in 1996.

49. Work Begins on Project at TVA's Gallatin Plant -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The Tennessee Valley Authority is beginning work this week on part of a project that will reduce emissions at its coal-burning power plant in Gallatin.

The Tennessean reports workers are set to start pouring concrete for a 370-foot chimney, which is part of a $1.1 billion project that aims to produce cleaner air by cutting certain emissions by up to 96 percent.

50. Obama Pitches Mortgage Overhaul as Housing Rallies -

PHOENIX (AP) – Buoyed by an improving housing market, President Barack Obama on Tuesday proposed a broad overhaul of the nation's mortgage finance system, including winding down government-backed Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. He declared that taxpayers should never again be left "holding the bag" for the mortgage giants' bad bets.

51. Historic Transformation -

Around nine years ago Scott Blake was walking to St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral when he noticed a window in the tower at the historic James Lee House in Victorian Village had been blown out, exposing it to the elements.

52. Propelling City Forward Bloodworth’s Design Goal -

As he grew up in Memphis, Russell E. “Rusty” Bloodworth was fascinated by art, design and the use of space.

As a young boy his appetite for creation – through art and using household materials to build little communities – grew.

53. Meadows Named Director of Memphis Jewish Home & Rehab -

Bobby Meadows has joined Memphis Jewish Home & Rehab as executive director. Meadows, a licensed nursing home administrator, has 13 years of nursing home experience, including 11 as an executive director. Most recently, he served for six years at Allenbrooke Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Memphis.

54. Census Data Another Sign Economy has Bottomed Out -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Five years after the housing bust, the U.S. economy is showing signs of finally bottoming out.

Americans are on the move again after putting their lives on hold and staying put. More young adults are leaving their parents' homes to take a chance with college or the job market, while once-sharp declines in births are leveling off and poverty is slowing.

55. New Firm Brings Fresh Perspective to Industry -

The past few years have been among the toughest ever for interior designers, but Lynne Catron chooses to view the downturn as an opportunity, not a hardship.

56. Obama's New Budget: Higher Taxes for the Wealthy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama unveiled a $3.8 trillion spending plan on Monday that seeks to achieve $4 trillion in deficit reduction over the next decade but does little to restrain growth in the government's huge health benefit programs, a major cause of future deficits.

57. Obama Details Broader Housing Plan -

FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AP) – President Barack Obama called on Congress Wednesday to make it easier for millions of additional homeowners to refinance their mortgages at lower interest rates even if they owe more than their homes are worth. He conceded that his administration's housing plans so far have not lived up to their promise.

58. Back into the Fold -

Before there was South Bluffs, there was French Fort.

Before the Hernando DeSoto Bridge was built and city zoning regulations placed more distance between commercial, industrial and residential areas, this neighborhood by the trio of older Mississippi River bridges south of Downtown survived in one of the most historic and isolated parts of the city.

59. Building Reactor at TVA Bellefonte Plant on Agenda -

CHATTANOOGA (AP) – The Tennessee Valley Authority has a message for opponents of it finishing a long-shuttered, 37-year-old nuclear plant in northeast Alabama: No costumes.

A month after zombie-costumed protesters paraded in Chattanooga to oppose TVA reviving what they described as a "corpse of a power plant," the nation's largest public utility has posted a new ban on costumes at its board meeting Thursday.

60. TVA: Rate Increases Could be Considered -

KNOXVILLE (AP) – A rate increase for Tennessee Valley Authority customers may be in the works when the utility's board meets Thursday in Knoxville.

A spokesman for the utility said details about rates will have to wait until the Thursday discussion of next year's budget.

61. Fannie Mae Loss Widens; Asking Taxpayers for $2.8B -

NEW YORK (AP) – Government-controlled mortgage company Fannie Mae said Friday that its second-quarter loss widened as it continues to seek loan modifications to help reduce defaults amid the ongoing difficulties in the housing and mortgage markets.

62. Dem Luckett Touts Economic Record in Miss Gov's Race -

CLARKSDALE, Miss. (AP) — Bill Luckett still vividly remembers his first work in helping renovate buildings. He was a ninth grader, and he sanded walls for house painters in his hometown of Clarksdale.

63. Planners Discuss Future of Uptown West -

Butterflies to jobs to fountains. Those were among the one-word suggestions for the Uptown West area Thursday, June 30, at the first of three public hearings held by a steering committee to guide future development of the area.

64. TVA Says Power Grid Not Fragile, Despite Storms -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – As the Tennessee Valley Authority continues to repair storm damage that temporarily knocked out some electricity distribution, the utility insists its transmission system is not fragile.

65. Report: Sales of Foreclosed Homes Fell in Q1 -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Sales of homes in some stage of foreclosure declined in the first three months of the year, but they still accounted for 28 percent of all home sales – a share nearly six times higher than what it would be in a healthy housing market.

66. TVA Plan Calls for More Nuclear Power, Less Coal -

CHATTANOOGA (AP) – A Tennessee Valley Authority plan designed to guide decision making recommends greater use of nuclear power, natural gas and renewable resources and less reliance on coal in the next two decades.

67. Discount for Foreclosed Homes Widened in 2010 -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – The gap between the average sale price of a foreclosed home and that of other properties grew wider last year, giving homebuyers who snapped up bank-owned homes big discounts.

68. Businesses Seek Health Payment Reform -

Regardless of whether court challenges to health care reform are successful, businesses are likely to continue pushing for a key component of the new legislation – payment reform.

Businesses are looking for ways to control costs, improve quality and reward successful treatments instead of paying more for readmissions and longer hospital stays.

69. Census: Fast-Growing US Areas Show Big Income Drop -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Call it the migration bust: Many of the fast-growing U.S. areas during the housing boom are now yielding some of the biggest income drops in the economic downturn.

That could have broad impact on the political map in the coming weeks. Voter discontent over the economy and related issues such as immigration head to the polls on Nov. 2 to decide whether to keep Democrats in Congress.

70. White House Doubts Need to Halt All Foreclosures -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A top White House adviser questioned the need Sunday for a blanket stoppage of all home foreclosures, even as pressure grows on the Obama administration to do something about mounting evidence that banks have used inaccurate documents to evict homeowners.

71. Residents, Biz Owners to Discuss Cleaborn Redevelopment -

Residents and business owners in the Vance Avenue area meet Tuesday evening to review plans for the revitalization of the area, including a progress report on the redevelopment of the Cleaborn Homes public housing development.

72. TVA to Clean up Permanent Housing on Campsites -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Tennessee Valley Authority will start cleaning up public campsites where people have set up permanent housing and other structures.

During a board meeting Thursday in Jackson, TVA President and CEO Tom Kilgore showed pictures of campgrounds and other areas where people had built decks onto parked mobile homes and installed large propane tanks or docks.

73. Millions of Medicaid Kids Don't Get Medical Exams -

MIAMI (AP) - Almost three-quarters of children on Medicaid in nine states are not getting all of their legally required medical, vision and hearing examinations, including immunizations, according to a new government study.

74. TVA Reservoirs Above Seasonal Levels -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - Tennessee Valley Authority reservoirs are above seasonal levels because of above-average rainfall last year.

The federal utility said Thursday that all nine hydroelectric dams on the Tennessee River and most of the 20 power-producing tributary dams are generating at maximum capacity.

75. Obama Report: 95,000 Jobs To Come Each Month -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. is likely to average 95,000 more jobs each month this year, while personal savings will remain high as credit remains tight, according to a White House report released Thursday.

76. House of Cards -

It’s a little more than halfway through the first meeting of the state Senate’s Commerce, Labor and Agriculture Committee in 2009, in a nondescript hearing room in Nashville’s Legislative Plaza.

Four bank executives from around the state are seated at a table in front of a row of senators. A line of questioning is about to put the bankers on the hot seat.

77. Obama Promotes Energy Efficiency Program -

President Barack Obama said Tuesday that home insulation “is sexy,” his newest appeal for Congress to pass incentives for homeowners who make their homes more energy efficient.

“Here’s what’s sexy about it. It saves money,” the president said at a Northern Virginia Home Depot store. He was joined at the outlet by members of Congress representing Virginia and labor and business leaders involved in services to lower homeowners’ use of natural resources.

78. Beyond Halloween -

The signs are already up in some stores around the city – especially those open 24 hours a day. They remind Halloween minded patrons not to wear any kind of masks or face coverings into the stores or risk being mistaken for robbers. What we fear is the basis for Halloween as we know it. What we believe others fear is part of the evolving tradition. Combine the two and you are past Halloween and into a civic discussion that has a season of its own.

79. Homeowners in Financial Trouble Often Redefault -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Lenders are ramping up efforts to avoid home foreclosures, but a report by bank regulators says more than half of borrowers who get help fall behind again.

More than 50 percent of homeowners with loans modified in the first half of last year had missed at least two months of payments a year later, the federal Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Office of Thrift Supervision said Wednesday.

80. Builders, Firefighters Differ on Sprinkler Rules -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - Firefighters and safety advocates say they could triumph over the "last bastion of America's fire problem" – the family home – if officials require sprinklers in every new home.

81. Marijuana Farming Rebounds in Economic Hard Times -

BARBOURVILLE, Ken. (AP) - Machete-wielding police officers have hacked their way through billions of dollars worth of marijuana in America's top pot-growing states to stave off a bumper crop sprouting in the tough economy.

82. Environmentalists Seek to Bar TVA Nuclear Reactor -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - Five environmental groups petitioned federal regulators Wednesday to block the only commercial nuclear reactor now under construction in the United States – an unfinished 1970s-era reactor the Tennessee Valley Authority is working to complete after three decades in mothballs.

83. Freddie Mac Seeks $6.1B in US Aid after Loss -

WASHINGTON (AP) - Mortgage giant Freddie Mac is looking for $6.1 billion in additional government aid as the cost to taxpayers from the housing market bust keeps growing.

The McLean, Virginia-based company, seized by federal regulators in September, on Tuesday posted a loss of $9.9 billion, or $3.14 per share, for the quarter ending March 31. That compared with a loss of $149 million, or 66 cents a share, in the year-ago period.

84. RealtyTrac: April Foreclosures Rise 32 Percent -

MIAMI (AP) - The number of U.S. households faced with losing their homes to foreclosure jumped 32 percent in April compared with the same month last year, with Nevada, Florida and California showing the highest rates, according to data released Wednesday.

85. Police Investigating Death of Freddie Mac Official -

WASHINGTON (AP) - The chief financial officer of money-losing mortgage giant Freddie Mac was found dead in his basement early Wednesday morning in what police said was an apparent suicide.

A law enforcement official familiar with the investigation said it was an apparent hanging. He declined to be identified because the investigation was ongoing.

86. Bill Tries to Limit Frivolous Nursing Home Suits -

Supporters of legislation designed to curtail frivolous lawsuits against Tennessee’s nursing home industry say the measure will lead to improved care for the elderly, but opponents of the bill and a recent study say otherwise.

87. Mortgage Delinquencies Up for 8th Straight Quarter -

CHICAGO (AP) - The number of people who were late making their mortgage payments shot up 53 percent in the fourth quarter of 2008 from the same period in 2007, according to data provided by TransUnion LLC.

88. Median Home Prices Down Nationwide in Q4 -

Home prices fell in nearly nine out of every 10 U.S. cities in the fourth quarter of last year as low-cost foreclosures flooded the market and the housing market’s decline spread nationwide.

The National Association of Realtors reported Thursday that median sales prices of existing homes declined in 134 of 153 metropolitan areas compared to the same period in 2007. Sales fell in all but six states.

89. IBM to Help Build Broadband Network in Power Lines -

NEW YORK (AP) - IBM Corp. is throwing its considerable weight behind an idea that seemed to have faded: broadband Internet access delivered over ordinary power lines.

90. New Mortgage Caps Reduce Options in Pricey Metros -

WASHINGTON (AP) - People looking to buy more expensive homes next year will have fewer options to find financing because Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will have lower limits on the size of loans they can buy.

91. Election Fever -

Topped by the presidential race between Democrat Barack Obama and Republican John McCain, today’s ballot features a special City Council election as well as eight city of Memphis charter amendments and two Shelby County charter amendments.

92. States Cut Spending, Put Projects on Hold -

With the economy in a slide and the credit markets seized up, states are slashing budgets, eliminating jobs, putting major construction projects on hold and nervously waiting to see whether their shriveled pension funds recover.

93. TVA Increases Rates By 20 Percent -

The Tennessee Valley Authority’s largest electric rate increase in more than three decades took effect Wednesday as thousands of consumers already are struggling to pay their power bills and avoid service cutoffs.

94. Huge TVA Electric Rate Increase Takes Effect -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Valley Authority's largest electric rate increase in more than three decades takes effect Wednesday as thousands of consumers already are struggling to pay their power bills and avoid service cutoffs.

95. Weak Rules Cripple Appraiser Oversight -

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) - As soaring home prices set the stage for America's great housing meltdown, a critical step in making sure those home sales were a fair deal - the real estate appraisal - was undermined from within.

96. Mortgages Up, National, Local Reports Show -

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke said in a speech given last week at a Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. conference in Virginia that the Fed is unveiling new policies this week that will provide a salve to the bruised mortgage market.

97. Homeowner Nightmares: Mortgage Crunch Impact Spreading Far and Wide -
The walls are bare, the closets are empty, and Connie and Timothy Pent and their two teenage children are living out of boxes as they wait for a dreaded knock at the door of their three-bedroom house in Ocala, Fla.

98. Real Estate Industry Adjusts to Changing Subprime Lending -

With foreclosures skyrocketing and mortgage lenders falling by the wayside, the current subprime lending fiasco is making headlines daily.

But no matter how bad it gets, Fran Warner said she believes the market will weather the storm, just as it has before.

99. Self-Storage Comes of Age -

For the longest time, it was perhaps the runt of the litter in the field of commercial real estate.

But the 120,000-square-foot, climate-controlled, state-of-the-art self-storage facility that H. Keith Russell is building in Horn Lake is a strong example that the entire self-storage industry has grown up.

100. Trezevant Manor Foundation Names Development Director -

Martha Boyd was named director of development for the Trezevant Manor Foundation.

The New York Times Co. Broadcast Media Group announced that Bruce Moore was named news director of WREG-TV in Memphis, effective Jan. 30. Moore is a 15-year veteran of WVEC-TV in Norfolk, Va. He served as assistant director of WVEC-TV for seven years. He graduated from the University of Georgia.