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Editorial Results (free)

1. Equality of Partners a Problem for Titan Owners -

It’s the question that won’t go away – will the Tennessee Titans be sold. On the day the Titans formally introduced Jon Robinson as general manager and Mike Mularkey as head coach, team president Steve Underwood admitted that the NFL is not happy with the team’s ownership structure, which is split evenly among Bud Adams’ heirs.

2. Mike Norvell Era Starts with Optimism And a Raise-the-Bar Recruiting Class -

In a few minutes, first-year coach Mike Norvell would be standing behind a lectern providing assembled media a summary of his first recruiting class at the University of Memphis.

“Not a good class,” he would say, “a great class, a home-run-hitting class.”

3. U of M Notebook: ‘Bad Loss,’ Says Josh Pastner -

A two-game losing streak in a college basketball season isn’t that unusual. But for the University of Memphis, the current two-game skid has set off alarms.

The Tigers’ strength this season has been their defense. But at Cincinnati last Thursday the Bearcats shot 50 percent in beating Memphis 76-72. A dreadful East Carolina team scored its first American Athletic Conference victory on Sunday, Jan. 23, in an 84-83 win over Memphis at FedExForum and shot 61.5 percent in the first half. Guard B.J. Tyson hit 6 of 10 shots from long range and finished with 26 points.

4. Last Word: The View Across The Harbor, Crosstown Undercurrents and Bonnaroo -

The fishing puns are overpowering as Bass Pro Shops expresses its interest in redeveloping Mud Island River Park, on the other side of the city harbor from the Pyramid Bass Pro Shops opened at just this past May.
Bass Pro Shops is one of five companies to express interest in Mud Island as part of the process by the Riverfront Development Corporation to go a different way with the park.
The RDC released the names of the companies Thursday.
Earlier this month, we outlined the RVC Outdoor Destinations proposal.
We don’t know nearly as much about what Bass Pro Shops has in mind or the other three firms.
All five now head for what amounts to a second round in which they submit specific plans to a search committee of the RDC including how they will pay for their plans.

5. St. Jude, Methodist, Le Bonheur Prep For a Year of Expansion -

Flush with updated master plans, plentiful resources and abundant cash to spend, the arrival of 2016 finds at least three Memphis hospitals with ambitious New Year’s resolutions.

A flurry of announcements over the past month has set the stage for a veritable building and investment boom Downtown and in the medical district between Methodist University Hospital, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The activity will play out starting this year and beyond, resulting in everything from expanded campus footprints to the deployment of new cutting-edge equipment.

6. The Week Ahead: Jan. 4, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? 2016 has kicked off with a full calendar – from an Elvis birthday celebration to a haunted pub crawl. So whether you’re still making your New Year’s resolutions or already have broken a few, here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about...

7. Robilio Names Top Staff in Clerk’s Office -

Memphis City Court Clerk Kay Robilio has appointed her front office as she prepares to take the oath of office Friday, Jan. 1, as the first new city court clerk in 20 years.

8. Deadly Shooting in Chattanooga Voted Top Story of 2015 -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The fatal shooting of four Marines and a sailor in Chattanooga has been voted the top Tennessee news story of 2015.

Muhammad Abdulazeez, a 24-year-old naturalized U.S. citizen, opened fire on a recruiting center and a reserve facility on July 16. The FBI recently described the attack as an act "inspired and motivated by foreign terrorist propaganda."

9. City Leaders to Take Oath On New Year’s Day -

Memphis Mayor-elect Jim Strickland takes the oath of office Jan. 1.

Strickland will be joined in the oath by 13 Memphis City Council members and new City Court clerk Kay Robilio.

10. Robilio Names Top Staff in Clerk's Office -

Memphis City Court Clerk Kay Robilio has appointed her front office as she prepares to take the oath of office Friday, Jan. 1, as the first new city court clerk in 20 years.

11. Northwestern Defense Tough, But Give Edge to UT -

There’s nothing like spending the Christmas holidays in Florida, and Tennessee’s football team will savor every minute of it for the second consecutive year.

The Vols (8-4) board a flight Saturday morning to Tampa, Fla., where they will spend almost a week before the Jan. 1 Outback Bowl against Northwestern (10-2).

12. Thomas & Betts Parent ABB To Open New Mississippi Facility -

Power and automation technology group ABB is bringing 300 jobs to Senatobia, Miss., with a recently announced manufacturing facility.

The project will create 200 new jobs within three years and add 100 more within five years.

13. Memphis, Shelby County Home Sales Rise in November -

Memphis is closing out 2015 on a high note, with 1,099 total home sales recorded for November.

Sales in Memphis and Shelby County are up 6 percent compared to November 2014, which saw 1,033 home sales, according to data provided by real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com.

14. Editorial: Neighborhoods are the Battleground in Grocery Wars -

The development of grocery clusters in Germantown and Midtown raises some important questions about supermarkets in other parts of the city.

If these clusters of retailers, each aimed at different segments of a larger, overlapping market, are the reality of a supermarket business that was dominated by one chain not too long ago, how will Memphis’ food deserts be affected?

15. Council Approves Smart Meter Pact, Compromises on Water Rate Hike, Idlewild Gate -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, Dec. 1, a $240-million five-year contract between Memphis Light Gas and Water Division and Elster Solutions LLC to outfit most of the city with Smart Meters.

16. The Week Ahead: Nov. 16, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from a Stax lecture on music and the Vietnam War to Hillary Clinton’s visit…

17. Whisenhunt’s Failed Tenure Now Easier to Understand -

It was only one game, one win, but it was clear in the aftermath Sunday just how much the Tennessee Titans needed the victory they got in overtime against the New Orleans Saints.

After an emotional week highlighted by the firing of Ken Whisenhunt, interim coach Mike Mularkey and the remainder of Whisenhunt’s staff was able to rally the team and find a way to end a six-game losing streak that derailed the 2015 season almost from the start.

18. Traits That Lead to Better Finances -

Ray’s Take Saving money isn’t all about whether or not you know how to score the bargain of the century every time. It has more to do with your habits and attitude toward money. Understanding the impact of personal traits on finances is essential for building wealth.

19. Posturing Against Supreme Court Is a Waste of Money -

Legislation rejecting the U.S. Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage ruling faces major constitutional questions and, if passed, could put a financial burden on Tennessee taxpayers.

When the high court declared gay and lesbian couples have the right to be married across the United States, overturning state laws to the contrary, Tennessee’s Republican legislators started brainstorming for methods to work around the decision or to defy it. The Republican Caucus still hasn’t announced the outcome.

20. Five City Council Races Destined for Runoffs -

The identity of the Memphis City Council that will take office in January with six new members was still in flux at the end of a very long and frustrating Oct. 8 election night.

The races for four of those six open seats and the seat now held by an appointee to the council are going to a Nov. 19 runoff election – one week before Thanksgiving.

21. Wharton’s Accomplishments Weighted With Controversy -

It’s a set of events just about any incumbent would envy during a re-election bid.

Overnight riverboat cruises on the Mississippi River picked up just as Beale Street Landing opened in mid-2014. In late April, the long-dormant Pyramid reopened as a Bass Pro Shops megastore with a hotel and other attractions.

22. Karlen Evins Finds Her ‘Most Authentic Self’ in Farming -

A diminutive Karlen Evins walks from her vegetable garden to the reassembled church in which she lives, her arms full of just-picked corn, tomatoes, herbs and okra, and drops them on her kitchen counter.

23. Karlen Evins Finds Her ‘Most Authentic Self’ in Farming -

A diminutive Karlen Evins walks from her vegetable garden to the reassembled church in which she lives, her arms full of just-picked corn, tomatoes, herbs and okra, and drops them on her kitchen counter.

24. Memphis Mayor's Race Poised For Close Finish -

A political summer dominated by the campaign for Memphis mayor begins turning toward fall Friday, Sept. 18, with the opening of the early voting period in advance of the Oct. 8 election day.

All 16 early voting sites are open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Oct. 3.

25. Memphis City Council Approves Retirement Freeze, Debate on Impact Continues -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Sept. 15, to a freeze on the city’s deferred retirement program in an effort to bolster police ranks and keep the force from dropping below 2,000 officers.

26. ULI Panel Tackles Soulsville’s Dilemma as Shadyac Reveals Concept -

Local shareholders and national development leaders got deep in the heart of Soulsville USA this week with an all-day deliberation on how to bring placemaking to one of Memphis’ struggling historical areas.

27. Shelby County Housing Market Sees Steady Summer -

Home sales continued to strengthen in Memphis and Shelby County last month with a hefty $243 million in recorded sales – an increase of 25 percent from August 2014’s total revenue.

Home sales saw a 22 percent increase in August with 1,504 sales recorded in the county compared to 1,233 sales in August 2014, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com.

28. Death of A Sales Team -

Is the next generation of salespeople heading toward extinction?

Former IBM president Thomas Watson was known for saying, “Nothing happens until a sale is made.” We saw that truth painfully realized during the 2007-09 recession. According to a report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as demand plummeted, approximately 1.6 million sales jobs were cut across multiple industries.

29. Vols Nearly Set on Offense as Season Approaches -

With Tennessee’s football team three weeks into fall camp, the offensive depth charts are set at some positions, while others remain open.

UT coach Butch Jones enters the 2015 season with no questions at quarterback or running back. His has plenty of receivers and all should get their share of playing time.

30. Poplar Tunes Recognized As Music Institution -

Several generations of Poplar Tunes employees gathered at the former site of the Danny Thomas Boulevard store last week for an interesting moment in the long but recently ended life of an obsolete institution – a music store.

31. Mississippi Health Officials: 3rd West Nile Virus Case of 2015 -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – The Mississippi State Department of Health says a Simpson County resident has the state's third confirmed case of West Nile virus this year.

Laboratories previously confirmed cases in Adams and Hinds counties.

32. Strickland's Memphis Mayoral Bid Heats Up -

Just hours after he dropped out of the race for Memphis Mayor, James Harvey endorsed mayoral contender Jim Strickland at the opening of Strickland’s Poplar Plaza campaign headquarters.

33. Memphis Mayoral Field Set at 10 -

Shelby County Election Commissioners have certified the Memphis election ballot for Oct. 8.

These are the names to appear on that ballot for the 15 elected offices.

The commission met hours after the noon Thursday, July 23, deadline for candidates to withdraw from the ballot if they wished.

34. Cardwell a Link to Metro’s Past, Present -

Metro Trustee Charlie Cardwell definitely is a member of the “good old boys” network that ran Nashville for decades.

35. Traci Peel Looks Back on Moment in Spotlight -

During the course of research for this package, I spent a couple of hours with Traci Peel, talking about her well-publicized, tabloid-grabbing romance with Mayor Bill Boner as well as where she is today and her views on other issues about Nashville.

36. Boner, Fate and the Summer of Shame -

Phil Bredesen knew what he was trying to do. He just didn’t know if he could accomplish it.

“I had this sense that Nashville was ready for change,” says the former Metro mayor and Tennessee governor, reflecting on his early motivation for taking on the system that had run Nashville for decades.

37. Strickland Files for Mayor One Week From Deadline -

A week before the filing deadline for candidates on Memphis’ October ballot, city councilman Jim Strickland filed his qualifying petition for mayor and said he has a campaign war chest of approximately $400,000.

38. City of Memphis Election Activity Picks Up -

There could be a familiar name in the open race for Memphis City Court Clerk on the October ballot.

Just weeks after incumbent clerk Thomas Long announced he would not run for another term, his son, Thomas Long II, pulled a qualifying petition for the race.

39. Younger Long Considering City Court Clerk's Race -

There could be a familiar name in the open race for Memphis City Court Clerk on the October ballot.

Just weeks after incumbent clerk Thomas Long announced he would not run for another term, his son, Thomas Long II, pulled a qualifying petition for the race.

40. Developer Arranging Financing for 100 North Main -

The owner of the skyscraper at 100 N. Main St. is closing in on a financing package to redevelop the building and will pay his utility bill as soon as the deal is complete, according to a review of public records.

41. Climate Change as Faith Issue a Tough Sell -

It’s been a tough few years for Tennessee Interfaith Power and Light. The state affiliate of a national network of faith communities, the organization offers its members a spiritual way to respond to climate change issues and challenges from political and other sources.

42. Building Green in a Red-Hot Market -

Counting cranes has become a Nashville pastime, and the perks of all that development are clear – a robust economy, vibrant real estate market and more jobs.

Naturally, there is concern among some residents that all of the construction and increased population could harm the area’s environment, water and air quality and green space.

43. Self-Tucker Designs Green Center at T.O. Fuller -

T.O. Fuller State Park in Southwest Memphis was the first state park opened for African Americans east of the Mississippi River and just the second park of its type across the country.

The 1,138-acre park, originally built to house African Americans during the Great Depression, was designated Shelby County Negro Park in 1938. The name was changed to T.O. Fuller State Park in 1942 in honor of Dr. Thomas O. Fuller, a prominent African American educator who spent most of his life empowering and educating black Americans during the era of racial segregation by law.

44. Chism Political Picnic Offers Pre-Campaign Snapshot -

Memphis mayoral contender Jim Strickland saw a face he didn’t recognize Saturday, June 13, in the southwest Memphis crowd at former County Commissioner Sidney Chism’s annual political picnic.

45. City Court Clerk Thomas Long Won't Seek Re-Election -

Thomas Long lost several times before he finally won elected office in 1995 as City Court Clerk.

He’s considered running for Memphis mayor and for U.S. Congress.

But Long says he is done with politics completely and will not seek re-election as city court clerk in the October Memphis elections.

46. Farewell to the King -

There is a real temptation to sum up the passing of B.B. King by writing that his death marks the end of an era in entertainment.

But that would marginalize, if not belittle, both his talent, his gift and his enormous influence. The world that brought B.B. King to Memphis in the 1940s can’t be found on the road King called home.

47. Top 10 Recruiting Class Might Be Serrano’s Salvation -

Senior right-handed pitcher Will Neely, who opened the TSSAA Class AAA state tournament this week with a no-hitter and a 2-0 win against Bartlett, was the driving force behind Hardin Valley Academy’s run to its first-ever state tournament appearance.

48. At Long Last -

It’s taken the city of Memphis 10 years to reel in Bass Pro Shops at The Pyramid, and business owners in the nearby Pinch District hope it will be a catalytic force they’ve been waiting for.

49. High Court to Consider Lawsuits Over Personal Data -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court said Monday it will decide whether Web sites and other firms that collect personal data can be sued for publishing inaccurate information even if the mistakes don't cause any actual harm.

50. Memphis & The Law -

Over the long life of the city’s legal community, Court Square has been a place where attorneys and judges come together outside the courtroom and their law practices.

In many cases, it’s a chance encounter since no court has ever met in Court Square – despite its name and the intent of those who drew up the plan for Memphis nearly 200 years ago.

51. Wanda Halbert to Run For City Court Clerk -

Memphis City Council member Wanda Halbert will not seek re-election in this year’s city elections and will instead run for City Court Clerk.

Halbert pulled a petition for the challenge of incumbent clerk Thomas Long.

52. Wanda Halbert to Run for City Court Clerk -

Memphis City Council member Wanda Halbert will not seek re-election in this year’s city elections and will instead run for City Court Clerk.

Halbert planned to pull a petition Monday, April 20, for the challenge of incumbent clerk Thomas Long.

53. City Blight Efforts Evolve Beyond Demolition -

The Frayser Community Development Corp. knew the house it wanted on University Street. There were plenty to choose from with multiple abandoned houses on the block. But it wanted the worst one, at 3200 University St.

54. Halbert Passes on Council Re-election Bid To Go For City Court Clerk -

Memphis City Council member Wanda Halbert will not seek re-election in this year's city elections and will instead run for City Court Clerk.

Halbert plans to pull a petition Monday, April 20, for the challenge of incumbent clerk Thomas Long.

55. Heritage Trail Redevelopment Plan Resurfaces -

A long-delayed city plan to remake a large swath of Downtown’s southern end appears to be making a comeback.

Memphis Housing and Community Development director Robert Lipscomb said Tuesday that the city expects to receive good news on the Heritage Trail development plan sometime this year.

56. Full-Time Job -

For years, Judge Larry E. Potter has had to juggle a challenging court docket that included thousands of traffic citations and animal abuse cases along with the blight and neglect cases typically associated with the court.

57. Live Nation Beale Alliance Touted As Concert Comeback -

On the sidewalk in front of the New Daisy Theater on Beale Street are two brass music notes, side by side. One honors the late Mid-South Concerts promoter Bob Kelley and the other honors Mike Glenn, the New Daisy’s long-time operator.

58. St. Jude Adds Chair of Radiation Oncology -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital has a new chair for its Department of Radiation Oncology, a key position at a time when the hospital has increasingly taken steps to bolster its radiation therapy programs.

59. Eurofix, Autofix Expand With Purchase of Middle Tennessee Midas Locations -

When you live in an “it” city, it’s important to have an “it” car, or at least that seems to be the thinking given the number of high-end imports seen around Middle Tennessee these days.

60. First Horizon to Host Shareholders -

Shareholders of First Tennessee Bank’s parent company will have an opportunity next month to share their input on the direction of the company when they gather for its annual meeting in Memphis.

61. Pera Elected Vice President of Tennessee Bar -

Lucian T. Pera, partner in the Memphis office of Adams and Reese LLP, has been elected vice president of the Tennessee Bar Association and will automatically become president of the organization in 2017-2018. Pera, who joined Adams and Reese in 2006, concentrates his practice in commercial litigation, media law, and legal ethics and professional responsibility.

62. US Labor Chief Urges Quick Deal in West Coast Port Dispute -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – The nation's top labor official is bringing a clear message to dockworkers and their employers amid a contract dispute that has crippled international trade through West Coast seaports: Reach a deal – and fast.

63. US Labor Official Attempts to Untangle Port Dispute -

West Coast seaports that were all but shut over the holiday weekend because of a contract dispute are reopening as the nation’s top labor official begins his efforts to solve a stalemate between dockworkers and their employers that already has disrupted billions of dollars in trade.

64. Planned Downtown Hotel Features Urban Design -

A new rendering of a proposed LaQuinta Inn & Suites hotel at Union Avenue and Danny Thomas Boulevard Downtown shows a more urban design than a previous stock rendering sent to city and county planners.

65. I Choose Memphis: Thomas Williams -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Thomas Williams

66. Nashville’s Most Romantic Restaurants -

Romance means something different for everyone, but most people can agree that if there is low lighting, soft music, a charming companion and something delicious to eat, you’ve already got the makings of one outstanding evening.

67. Lasting Legacies -

A FedEx commercial that never made it past the storyboard stage portrayed company founder, chairman and CEO Fred Smith as a child filling out an order form in the back of a comic book for a batch of Sea-Monkeys, sending it off and waiting for the delivery.

68. 100 North Main Seeks Historic Designation -

An effort to redevelop a Downtown skyscraper may have received a boost this week. A state board is recommending that the tower at 100 N. Main St. be listed on the National Register of Historic Places, a move that could allow the owner to seek tax credits and grants to redevelop the building.

69. 100 N. Main Recommended for Historic Register, Pinch Decision Delayed -

A state board is recommending that the skyscraper at 100 N. Main St. Downtown be listed on the National Register of Historic Places, a move that could allow the owner to seek tax credits and grants to redevelop the building.

70. Renting Out Homes for Super Bowl Can Bring Big Bucks -

PHOENIX (AP) – Hundreds of people gather every year to hobnob with A-list celebrities at a charity bash thrown in the Super Bowl's host city. But instead of heading to a trendy nightclub or swanky restaurant, organizers this year are throwing the party inside a private home.

71. Big Hit and Some Misses From Vols’ 2014 Early Enrollees -

KNOXVILLE – Recruiting is anything but an exact science. Experts are everywhere. Star ratings rise and fall. Player projections are widely varied.

One thing is certain: Only time will tell if coaches hit or miss on a recruit.

72. Plans Emerge for Universal Life Building -

In major Downtown news, the on-again, off-again redevelopment of the Universal Life Insurance Co. building Downtown appears to be on.

73. Center of Attention -

The Pinch District, one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods and commercial centers, will receive some much-needed tender loving care in advance of Bass Pro Shops opening its massive store at The Pyramid May 1.

74. Batts Joins HealthChoice as Complex Care Manager -

Kenneth Batts has joined HealthChoice’s new Population Health team as complex care manager. In his new role, Batts will reach out to patients identified with complex medical needs to schedule home visits, where he’ll provide customized intervention and condition education, including goal setting, care coordination, and long-term support with the goal to achieve improvements in their health.

75. Knoxville Area a Magnet for Retirees -

Retired air traffic controller Sterling King moved to Knoxville when his brother needed him. Five years later, he has fallen in love with the area and everything it has to offer.

Moderate weather, without the bone-chilling Northern winters or the searing heat of Florida summers, is a big draw, along with its location in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, says King, 58, who migrated from Dayton, Ohio, to Raleigh, North Carolina, and then to Knoxville.

76. Evolving Identity -

Some of the most telling views of Memphis are the ones many of us see for only seconds at a time as we drive on viaducts that take us and our cars just above the treetops and rooftops of older neighborhoods interrupted by the roadways.

77. Folk’s Folly Rebrands, Renames Butcher Shop -

Folk’s Folly has finished rebranding and renovating the restaurant’s adjacent butcher shop that opened in 1989, a spate of activity that also included renaming the shop in honor of restaurant founder Humphrey Folk.

78. Pension ‘Concept’ Flips Council Script -

For most of her seven years on the Memphis City Council, Wanda Halbert has been the most outspoken member when it comes to last-minute items added to the council’s agenda for a vote.

So, when Halbert rolled out a compromise plan on the city’s pension changes Tuesday, Dec. 2, she took some heat from other council members.

79. Telecom Controversy Emerges at City Hall -

During the recent repaving of Danny Thomas Boulevard Downtown, city public works crews discovered a leak in sewer lines, and the political timing lined up with a controversy at City Hall that’s been out of the public eye for the most part since the spring.

80. New Daisy Changes Hands at Critical Time for Beale -

Three decades is a long enough time on Beale Street for any institution to create its own remarkable life.

But when that 30 years is part of a longer life of nearly 80 years and it’s on a street with an even longer history and heritage, there can be a tendency to forget how much time has passed in the latest life.

81. Mississippi Hospitals, Clinic Receiving Updates on Ebola -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — State health officials say Mississippi hospitals will be capable of handling any Ebola cases that may arise.

State Epidemiologist Dr. Thomas Dobbs said some hospitals are updating procedures based on information provided by the state Department of Health and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

82. Ben Little's: Service Station Service in Self-Serve World -

The gentle soul who used to get his hair cut by an Everly Father a couple of doors down – and who pumped 100 percent pure gas to keep country immortal Ernest Tubb movin’ on – has enjoyed the last four-plus decades next to what used to be called Hailey’s Shopping Center.

83. University School of Nashville Kicks Off Centennial -

It was the summer of 1915, and a young Nashville educator had the audacity to suggest that a basement schoolroom on the grounds of the George Peabody College for Teachers might serve as a model for preparatory schools.

84. After Florida, How Do Vols Get Excited About UTC? -

Look around the University of Tennessee’s Neyland Stadium about mid-afternoon Saturday.

No more human orange-and-white checkerboard in the stands. Some empty seats, for sure. The most diehard of UT football fans will turn out to cheer for their beloved Vols against Tennessee-Chattanooga.

85. Olive Branch Business Park Closer to Development -

A Texas-based development firm could start turning dirt soon on a massive new business park in Olive Branch.

Hillwood Investment Properties is expected to close on a land purchase next week that will clear the way for Legacy Park, a 265-acre distribution and business park on the south side of Goodman Road, just east of Hacks Cross Road near Polk Lane.

86. Everyone Wants Locker to Succeed, But Can He? -

Perhaps the best thing that Jake Locker has going for him right now is Coach Ken Whisenhunt’s profession of faith.

There is no question that virtually everyone at St. Thomas Sports Park is pulling for Locker to make good in his final chance to be the Titans long-term answer at quarterback.

87. University of Tennessee Students Help Design Nashville’s Future -

Nashville may be a city on the rise, attracting new residents by the droves. But it’s also a laboratory for students at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville’s College of Architecture and Design, where they are designing the communities of the future in partnership with the Nashville Civic Design Center.

88. Medtronic Advances Spinal Fracture Treatment -

Without treatment, people suffering vertebral compression fractures probably can expect chronic pain, decreased mobility and the potential for neurological complications.

“It’s a downward spiral,” said Matt Thomas, vice president of interventional therapies at Medtronic. “So it’s important to treat the patient early in the process.”

89. Airport Officials Recommend RedRover for Branding Contract -

Memphis International Airport officials are recommending that RedRover Co. LLC be engaged to help develop an image and marketing campaign for the airport, which is reinventing itself as an origin-and-destination facility.

90. Unintended Consequences: ER Visits Increase -

Hospital officials have been pushing for the state to expand Medicaid health care coverage for thousands of Tennessee’s poorest citizens, despite two significant and related concerns:

Expansion will lead to increased visits to the most expensive place in America for routine health care, the emergency room.

91. Safe House -

She talks about the bad old days easily now. That’s what years of steady sobriety will do. For the last three-plus years, Amy Phillips, 54, has worked as a program coordinator at Grace House of Memphis, a recovery program for women with alcohol and/or drug problems and, in many cases, co-occurring mental health disorders.

92. High-Flying Vols Can’t Overlook Arkansas State -

KNOXVILLE – You had to be hiding under a rock not to hear the buzz this week about the University of Tennessee’s football team.

One person not reveling in the Vols’ 38-7 season opening victory over Utah State on Sunday night was UT coach Butch Jones.

93. Vols Among NCAA’s Youngest Headed Into Sunday Opener -

KNOXVILLE – For better or worse, University of Tennessee football coach Butch Jones won’t need to wait long to see the talent level of his highly touted freshman class.

Jones will find out Sunday night at 7 when the Vols play host to Utah State at Neyland Stadium. The Aggies will be an underdog – probably by a touchdown or so – and a trendy pick for some as an upset special.

94. Hit Factory -

The massive trees and the shade they make are the only thing left on the northwest corner of Danny Thomas Boulevard and Chelsea Avenue from the days when American Studios turned out 120 hit records from 1965 to 1972.

95. Judge: Davis Can’t Use Public Bond for Appeal -

A judge won’t let former Southaven Mayor Greg Davis use his $100,000 public official bond to cover his appeal in a case with the state auditor’s office.

96. Dueling Rulings: Courts Split on Health Law Clash -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama's health care law is snarled in another big legal battle, with two federal appeals courts issuing contradictory rulings on a key financing issue within hours of each other Tuesday.

97. Judge: Davis Can’t Use Public Bond for Appeal -

A judge won't let former Southaven Mayor Greg Davis use his $100,000 public official bond to cover his appeal in a case with the state auditor's office.

98. Locally Grown Foods Look to Bigger Business -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) – Once a niche business, locally grown foods aren't just for farmers markets anymore.

A growing network of companies and organizations is delivering food directly from local farms to major institutions like Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in downtown Philadelphia, eliminating scores of middlemen from farm to fork. Along the way, they're increasing profits and recognition for smaller farms and bringing consumers healthier, fresher foods.

99. Blue Flu Tops 550 Cops Out -

As Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong has watched the number of police officers on sick leave grow and top 550, so has much of the city.

Armstrong and the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. have gone public in not just talking about the impact but putting numbers to it.

100. Economic Development Growth Engine Looks to Make PILOTs More Effective -

For years, the payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive used to recruit or retain jobs in Memphis and Shelby County has been a lightning rod for criticism, particularly from municipal labor unions who view the incentives as corporate welfare that erodes the tax base.