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Editorial Results (free)

1. Federal Regulators Close Memphis-Based Bank -

Trust Co. Bank of Memphis has failed, with state and federal regulators announcing Friday, April 29, they had closed all four branches of the West Tennessee financial institution and arranged a purchase agreement to protect depositors.

2. Memphis Tigers Golfer a Nicklaus Award Semifinalist -

University of Memphis golfer Lars van Meijel has been named one of 30 semifinalists for the Jack Nicklaus Award presented by Barbasol.

Division I finalists for the award will be named on May 25. Five Nicklaus Award recipients will be announced June 2 with the honor presented by Jack Nicklaus at a ceremony during the final round of the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide Insurance at Muirfield Village Golf Club.

3. The Week Ahead: May 2-8 -

So, you think this is the “off-week” of the Memphis In May International Festival – the gap between the Beale Street Music Festival and the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. But, while Tom Lee Park gets a breather, there are plenty of cultural experiences to soak up across Memphis. Here's our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about...

4. Women's Foundation Honors 3 Influential Memphians -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis is entering its 21st year as a nonprofit set on transforming the lives of underprivileged women and their families.

The Women’s Foundation hosted its annual Legends Awards Tribute Luncheon on April 29 to honor women in Memphis leadership. Honey Scheidt received the Philanthropy and Leadership Award. Beverly Robertson, the recently retired president of the National Civil Rights Museum, received the Catalyst Award, and Linn Sitler, commissioner with the Memphis-Shelby County Film & Television Commission, was recognized with the Innovation Award.

5. Farm-To-Table Restaurant For Shelby Farms -

415 E. Patriot Lake Road
Memphis, TN 38134

Permit Amount: $1 million

Owner: Shelby Farms Conservancy 

6. Women's Foundation to Honor 3 Influential Memphians -

The Women’s Foundation for a Greater Memphis is entering its 21st year as a nonprofit set on transforming the lives of underprivileged women and their families.

This week, the Women’s Foundation will host its annual Legends Awards event to honor women in Memphis leadership. At the Annual Tribute Luncheon on April 29, Honey Scheidt will receive the Philanthropy and Leadership Award. Beverly Robertson, the recently retired president of the National Civil Rights Museum, will receive the Catalyst Award and Linn Sitler, commissioner with the Memphis-Shelby County Film & Television Commission, will be recognized with the Innovation Award.

7. Ikea: 'Everything's on Track' for New Memphis Store -

A construction crew of nearly 500 is at work turning what is now a steel frame into Tennessee’s first Ikea store. This week, the crew began installing Ikea’s trademark cobalt-blue walls on the western edge of what will be a self-serve warehouse.

8. Memphis Jewish Home's Bobby Meadows Wins National Honor -

Bobby G. Meadows III, executive director of Memphis Jewish Home & Rehab, has been awarded the 2016 Young Executive Award by the Association of Jewish Aging Services. The award honors an executive younger than 45 who demonstrates significant potential in health care management by virtue of his or her cumulative achievements or innovative results in management or administration.
As executive director of MJHR, Meadows is responsible for day-to-day operations of the only glatt (strict) kosher, rehab long-term care facility in Tennessee and surrounding states. Operations include the oversight of more than 300 staff members, 160 patients, and a kosher deli.

9. Last Word: Memphis Gets Busy, Elections Future and Past and Dad Rock In C-Y -

While their folks are still getting settled over in the front office at The Commercial Appeal, Gannett announces Monday an $815 million offer to buy Tribune Publishing which would put The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune in the expanding USA Today family.

10. Regionalism Enhances Recruiting For Cities in Metros -

When Memphis hits a dirty dozen list – whether it’s for crime, or education attainment, or poverty – those ratings are based on Memphis Metropolitan Statistical Area data.

And while Memphis, as the largest city in the MSA, has the lion’s share of economic disparity, those problems don’t just effect the city’s 600,000 citizens.

11. The Week Ahead -

It’s a new week that ends with Music Fest, Memphis! Here’s a roundup of other local happenings you need to know about, from some important government meetings, to corporate earnings reports and a new exhibit set to open at the Memphis Zoo.

12. Last Word: Prince, Violent Crime Numbers, and a Parkside Post Script -

Prince. It’s hard to think of a musician with a more complete knowledge of music as a social and cultural force and the ability to let that force inhabit his music and what he wanted to accomplish.
It is that knowledge and its use from obscurity to the pinnacle of fame and acclaim to his own journey for personal fulfillment that, to me, defines what has been lost.
Music mattered to Prince unlike it had ever mattered before. All of the influences analyzed and synthesized by someone born in rock and roll’s first wave pushed forward in a sound that combined rock and roll and rhythm and blues and funk with purpose and confidence.
It wasn’t a denial or downplaying of any of those music categories – all were present sonically and culturally. No juggling or quick changes.
That was his talent and it’s hard to think of anyone who has been as knowledgeable, intentional and successful -- commercially and artistically – in that combination.
Prince is remembered here for not only playing the city’s largest arenas but for his legendary after shows on Beale Street that brought an entertainment insider cachet the district has rarely seen since its early 1980s reopening.
His was an intensity and sense of purpose rarely seen and possessed in such a way in the 60 years since rock and roll started in this very city, kicked off by both Rocket 88 and That’s Alright Mama.
So why couldn’t the city’s rock radio stations do more than talk about Prince into commercial breaks after another Nickelback rock block and actually play some of his music to acknowledge such a huge genre crossing artist?
Not cool.

13. Hagler Launches Solo Practice as Real Estate Sector Picks Up -

Monice Moore Hagler grew up in a real estate family. Her father owned a real estate company and her brothers studied finance and real estate before going on to become brokers.

So of course it only made sense that she pursued a career in social work, where she worked with children on welfare and children who were placed for adoption. She worked closely with special needs adoptions, including older children who were more difficult to adopt.

14. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

15. Memphis’ Shrinking Population Cause for Concern -

Even as Memphis has grown larger through annexing surrounding communities, its population has steadily dwindled due to outmigration to the surrounding suburbs. Inner-city struggles will become more pronounced if this region’s wealthiest tax base continues that outward pattern, national experts say.

16. EDGE Considering Fast-Track Incentive Program, Diversity Spend Changes -

The Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine has started work on a new tax incentive program that would help Memphis compete with North Mississippi for industrial projects.

At its April 20 meeting, EDGE board chairman Al Bright appointed a committee to evaluate a proposed Fast Track PILOT and hammer out its policies and procedures.

17. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

18. $12.6M Building Permit For New Ballet Memphis HQ -

2144 Madison Ave.
Memphis, TN 38104
Permit Amount: $12.6 million

Owner: Ballet Memphis
Tenant: Ballet Memphis
Architect: Archimania
Contractor: Grinder, Taber & Grinder
Details: Ballet Memphis is setting the stage for its Overton Square headquarters as Grinder, Taber & Grinder recently applied for a $12.6 million building permit for new construction.

19. City Council Approves Parkside Development -

The Memphis City Council has approved the concept of Parkside at Shelby Farms Park, a $200 million mixed-use development on the northern border of Shelby Farms Park.

20. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

21. Parkside Development Gets Green Light -

Parkside at Shelby Farms Park, a $200 million mixed-use development on the northern border of Shelby Farms featuring three six-story apartment buildings, won the approval Tuesday, April 19, of the Memphis City Council.

22. Mid-South Mayors Don’t See Barriers In Regionalism -

It took the Mississippi River’s devastating flood in 2011 for Mid-South leaders to consider greater collaboration among the area’s 10 counties and three states.

Mid-South mayors came together to plot their way out of disaster, and that convening set the stage for a formal alliance, the Mid-South Mayors’ Council.

23. Last Word: When To Heal, Budget Day at City Hall and Cheese Steak Pondering -

After Sunday’s thrashing of the Grizzlies by the Spurs in their 2016 NBA playoff debut, there is a school of thought among Grizz watchers that the sooner this is over the better.
But there are others who would have a more content off season if the Grizz could win just one game in the series as they go down and then proceed back to the cave for some summer healing.
Either way, Game 2 is Tuesday in San Antonio and then FedExForum Friday for Game 3.

24. Strickland’s First Budget Includes Police Raise -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal Tuesday, April 19, to the Memphis City Council just four months after taking office as mayor.

25. Last Word: A Dog Named Elvis, Soulville's Change and Highlander Politics -

For those who stopped watching in the fourth quarter, The Grizzlies lost to the Spurs 106-74 in San Antonio Sunday to open the NBA's second season. If you put together the second and fourth quarters it would have been close. But oh the first and third quarters.

26. The Week Ahead: April 18-24 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the dreaded federal income tax filing day, to the scheduled end of the Tennessee Legislature for this session, to a couple of big round-ball games at FedExForum beginning Friday.

27. UPS Plans $6 Million Construction Project -

UPS Inc. has filed a $6 million building permit for its property at 3675 Swinnea Road near Memphis International Airport.

28. LEDIC Founder Buys Metro 67 Apartments -

The Metro 67 Apartments in Downtown Memphis has been sold by a Dallas equity firm to Scott Ledbetter, founder and chairman-emeritus of LEDIC Management Group in Memphis, and members of his family.

29. Last Word: Tubby Time, Haslam's Veto and Africa in April's 30th Year -

It was just four weeks ago that all of this talk about change at the top of the Tiger basketball chart was put to rest. Coach Josh Pastner’s performance was reviewed by the University of Memphis administration and he was staying at least for another season. Four weeks to the day of that announcement, Pastner is the new coach at Georgia Tech and we are in the first day of the Tubby Smith era at the U of M.

30. Lot Availability, Prices Putting Home Construction Behind Demand -

The recent uptick in the residential real estate market is devouring what’s left of lot development that lagged during the recession, and tight supply is raising home prices in the Memphis area.

31. This Week in Memphis History: April 15-21 -

2014: Memphis Police Director Toney Armstrong announces he will retire in 2017 and has enrolled in the city’s deferred retirement option plan. The retirement date depends on Memphis Mayor A C Wharton winning re-election in 2015 or Wharton’s successor keeping Armstrong on until retirement.
Wharton loses his re-election bid, and in November 2015, new mayor Jim Strickland names Armstrong interim police director while searching for a replacement. Armstrong left in February to become director of security for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

32. Murry-Drobot Brings Hope to Domestic Violence Survivors -

For the first seven years of her life, Olliette Murry-Drobot grew up in a home where her father physically abused her mother. It’s a harrowing experience she says she still grapples with.

“Growing up, my sense of the world was that it was a very scary place,” she remembers. “I saw that other kids had a sense of safety, but I was always looking over my shoulder.”

33. Omni Charter School Buys Permanent Home -

3385 Austin Peay Highway
Memphis, TN 38128

Sale Amount: $1.3 million

Sale Date: Feb. 26, 2016

34. Mortgage Market Up 3 Percent In March -

Shelby County’s mortgage market closed out the first quarter by posting March numbers that headed in the direction bankers and real estate professionals like to see.

Last month’s total purchase mortgage volume was a little more than $131 million, up by $3.4 million over March 2015’s total of almost $128 million, for a gain of about 3 percent. That’s according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, www.chandlerreports.com.

35. Metro 67 Apartments Bought by LEDIC Founder -

The Metro 67 Apartments in Downtown Memphis has been sold by a Dallas equity firm to Scott Ledbetter, founder and chairman-emeritus of LEDIC Management Group in Memphis, and members of his family.

36. Events -

Memphis Child Advocacy Center will host its annual children’s memorial flag-raising on Wednesday, April 13, at noon on Civic Center Plaza outside Memphis City Hall, 125 N. Main St. The ceremony remembers Shelby County kids who have died as a result of abuse or neglect. Visit memphiscac.org.

37. Donahoe Named VP at Avison Young -

Michael Donahoe has joined commercial real estate firm Avison Young as vice president of its Memphis branch. Donahoe’s main focus will be overseeing all of the firm’s landlord leasing projects in Memphis and the surrounding areas. Toronto-based Avison Young opened the Memphis office in December, marking its third location in Tennessee and its 50th nationally. 

38. Kustoff Opens Congressional Bid With 15 Stops -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff began his campaign for Congress Monday, April 11, with stops in Tipton County and Fayette County as well as East Memphis.

39. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

40. Events -

ArtsMemphis will hold a free workshop for organizations interested in Arts Build Communities grants on Tuesday, April 12, from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Hattiloo Theatre, 37 S. Cooper St. The grants are open to nonprofits and government entities seeking funding for artistic and cultural projects that benefit the community. Visit tn.gov for details.

41. Roland Starts 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

The 2018 Shelby County general elections are more than two years away. The 2016 county elections that decide races for General Sessions Court Clerk, five of the nine seats on the Shelby County Schools board and two judicial positions are still to come in August.

42. Young Cherishes Role of Rebuilding Memphis Neighborhoods -

“I don’t want to be viewed as the most powerful person in Memphis,” said Paul Young, a Memphis native who became director of Housing and Community Development for the city of Memphis in January.

43. State Halts City Board From Issuing Bonds -

The city of Memphis entity that sold $12 million in municipal bonds on behalf of Global Ministries Foundation has been told it can no longer conduct such business.

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency has temporarily de-authorized the Health, Educational & Housing Facility Board of the city of Memphis to sell bonds. The decision is related to the withdrawal of federal subsidies going to Global Ministries Foundation’s portfolio and a subsequent downgrading of those bonds as well as leadership changes at the Health & Ed Board.

44. Last Word: The Zoo's Proposal, Health and Ed In Limbo and Annexation's Effect -

A busy weekend on several fronts not the least of which was Overton Park and the Greensward controversy.
The Greensward itself was pretty subdued on a chilly Saturday.
The action was to be found in an email the zoo sent out Saturday making some proposals and offering some thoughts on the traffic and parking study the Overton Park Conservancy released last week.
Here is our summary
of what the zoo is offering in what may be a new effort in the public discussion.
Of course, the private discussion which is the mediation effort continues. But it sounds like some of the mediation discussions may be finding their way into the public discussion.
The public discussion has been sporadically active but very muted so far. For instance there has been talk before of zoo parking on the eastern side of the park in what until recently was a city maintenance yard.
The proposal by the zoo was shot down pretty quickly because it included running a tram through the Old Forest.
But there are some scenarios that wouldn’t take such a tram through the Old Forest.
The zoo email from Saturday isn’t specific on how the folks who would park at the maintenance yard would get from there to the zoo.
Presumably that is grounds for some type of discussion.

45. State Halts Memphis Health & Ed Board From Doing Business -

The city of Memphis entity that sold $12 million in municipal bonds on behalf of Global Ministries Foundation has been told it can no longer conduct such business.

The Tennessee Housing and Development Agency has temporarily de-authorized the Health, Educational and Housing Facility Board of the city of Memphis to sell bonds. The decision is related to the withdrawal of federal subsidies going to Global Ministries Foundation’s portfolio and a subsequent downgrading of those bonds as well as leadership changes at the Health & Ed Board.

46. Southwind Home Values Up 5 Percent in 2015 -

Southwind-Windyke B, one of the areas most recently annexed by the city of Memphis, figured prominently in the Tennessee Legislature’s recent consideration of a bill to allow de-annexation by referendum.

47. Events -

Hollywood Feed and the North Shore Animal League will host the Overton Bark Adoption Tour on Sunday, April 10, from noon to 3 p.m. in Overton Park’s Overton Bark Dog Park, 2080 Poplar Ave. Attendees can meet pets available for adoption, preview dog treats from Hollywood Feed’s soon-to-open Midtown bakery, and learn how to support Overton Bark through the “Give Your Dog a Bone” campaign. Visit overtonpark.org.

48. Moving Dirt -

The Memphis development community is looking inward and upward to increase density in the urban core. New construction is happening across all four commercial real estate sectors, with long-anticipated projects like Trader Joe’s and the redevelopment of Central Station finally coming to fruition. Construction and operating costs continue to be a challenge as new projects hit the top of their class to command higher rents.

49. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

50. United Housing Gets $1.1M Boost From Banks -

United Housing Inc. has gotten a boost from area financial institutions in recent days to the tune of $1.1 million.

51. Lake District Would Put Lakeland on the Map -

Before Lakeland became a city, it was the Lakeland Amusement Park. A California-based developer is bringing back that original flair with his proposal for The Lake District, a 165-acre mixed-use development.

52. Spence Wilson To Keynote Dunavant Awards May 11 -

Spence Wilson, chairman of the board of Kemmons Wilson Companies, is the keynote speaker for the annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards to be held May 11 at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis.

53. City Council Debates Idea of De-Annexation Compromises -

A proposal to form a joint city-county group to explore voluntary de-annexation and the city’s footprint goes to the Memphis City Council for a vote in two weeks.

But there is vocal sentiment on the council against the city giving up any of its turf, including the most recently annexed areas of south Cordova and Southwind-Windyke.

54. Southland Mall Sells In Foreclosure -

1215 E. Shelby Drive
Memphis, TN 38116
Sale Amount: $4.3 million

Sale Date: March 31, 2016
Buyer: 1215 East Shelby Drive Holdings LLC
Seller: Southland Mall Shopping Center LLC
Details: Southland Mall, Memphis’ first enclosed mall when it opened 50 years ago, has sold for $4.3 million in foreclosure.

55. Children’s Museum Plans New Carousel Building -

The historic Memphis Grand Carousel is headed to the next stage in its move from the Memphis Fairgrounds to the Children’s Museum of Memphis.

Plans recently posted by the Memphis-Shelby County Office of Planning and Development depict a 100,000-square-foot single-story building at the northwest corner of the CMOM campus.

56. Events -

Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development’s mobile Career Coach will be at Southwest Tennessee Community College’s Union Avenue campus on Wednesday, April 6, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 737 Union Ave. Career Coach staff will help people create resumes and register with jobs4tn.gov, where more than 90,000 jobs are available.

57. Lawsuit Seeks to Void City Decision on Greensward -

A lawsuit filed in Shelby County Chancery Court Tuesday, April 5, seeks to void the March 1 Memphis City Council vote that gave the Memphis Zoo undisputed control of most of the Overton Park Greensward.

58. Lawsuit Seeks to Void City Decision on Greensward -

A lawsuit filed in Shelby County Chancery Court Tuesday, April 5, seeks to void the March 1 Memphis City Council vote that gave the Memphis Zoo undisputed control of most of the Overton Park Greensward.

59. Conrad Call for De-Annexation Talks Draws Favorable Reviews -

Memphis City Council Chairman Kemp Conrad wants to open talks with county commissioners on possible voluntary de-annexations.

And County Commission Chairman Terry Roland said he is open to the idea.

60. City Council Sets Stage for Budget Season -

Two weeks before Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presents his first budget proposal to the Memphis City Council, the council and administration are setting the stage for the budget season to come.

61. The Week Ahead: April 4-10 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about in the coming days, from an observance of the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination to your first chance to visit Mud Island River Park this season.

62. City Ready to Develop Master Plan for Pinch District -

The Pinch District, one of Memphis’ oldest neighborhoods, is getting its time in the spotlight.

The Downtown Memphis Commission, the city of Memphis Division of Housing & Community Development and the city-county Division of Planning & Development are coming together to develop the Pinch’s first master plan in to bring the area up to date with mixed-use buildings and streetscape improvements.

63. Designing Materials for Future Needs -

In 2015 the Obama administration recognized the state’s manufacturing star power when it selected the University of Tennessee as the site for a major national manufacturing initiative – the Institute for Advanced Composites Manufacturing Innovation (IACMI).

64. Editorial: The Ponderosa Box -

Maybe we’ve got this all wrong. Some people have suggested bringing recalcitrant, Memphis-hating legislators from other parts of the state here to our city to show them what’s right about this place. Instead, maybe we should go to them.

65. Last Word: Greensward Truce, Connor Schilling Retires and MEMFix Goes East -

You’ve heard of the mediation process surrounding the long-term use of the Overton Park Greensward by the Memphis Zoo for its overflow parking.
It appears there is now a less formal mediation process underway when it comes to the use of the greensward during the park’s spring peak season which is now underway.

66. Last Word: Back to Nashville, Dentistry & Genomes and Living The Fable -

The Memphis traffic is again heavy on the Interstate to Nashville as the Senate state and local government committee meets Tuesday to pick up where it left off with the still-forming version the upper chamber is crafting of the de-annexation bill.

67. Events -

Memphis Botanic Garden will kick off the 2016 Vine to Wine tasting series with “World of Wines” on Tuesday, March 29, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at MBG, 750 Cherry Road. Each event features eight wines, beers or cocktails and light hors d’oeuvres. Tickets are $30 for members and $45 for nonmembers. Visit memphisbotanicgarden.com..

68. Last Word: Saturday In The Park, Lipscomb's Successor and Fred's Looks Up -

Quite the Easter weekend on the Overton Park Greensward.
Greensward partisans planned a Saturday Easter Egg hunt, Memphis Zoo parking crews found the eggs and a crowd of several hundred people blocked overflow parking briefly that afternoon.

69. Two City Entities Thriving in MWBE Participation -

Recently released disparity studies say that minority- and women-owned businesses are only getting a sliver of contracts in the local business world.

Of all $128.6 billion in revenue flowing through Memphis in 2012, black-owned firms garnered 0.83 percent of those receipts. In Shelby County, 88.3 percent, or $168.2 million, of county contracts went to white-owned businesses between 2012 and 2014.

70. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

71. Events -

Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development’s mobile Career Coach will be in Memphis on Monday, March 28, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Cossitt Library, 33 S. Front St. Career Coach staff will help people create resumes and register with jobs4tn.gov, where more than 90,000 jobs are available.

72. Stephenson Leverages Capital for Community Change -

Why start a bank? It’s a question that would never occur to most people. But to Susan Stephenson, the answer is obvious: “It’s infinite variety. You get to participate in other people’s dreams. In the morning, I can be a first-time homeowner. In the afternoon, I’m a small business looking to open a new location.”

73. De-Annexation Bill Still Alive, Now In Two Versions -

At week’s end in Nashville, a bill to allow de-annexation by referendum was still on the tracks to passage. But there were significant differences in the Senate and House versions as the Tennessee Legislature heads for adjournment for the year in early April.

74. De-Annexation Bill Amended But Still on Path to Passage -

A state Senate committee considering amendments to the de-annexation bill pending in the Tennessee Legislature has amended it to allow for de-annexation by referendum anywhere in the state.

The committee got through two of 13 proposed amendments Wednesday, March 23, and will resume work on the amendments next week.

75. Memphis Fights Back: Senate Poised To Do Real Damage via De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

76. Over $20M in Construction Headed to Brewery District -

495 Tennessee St.
Memphis, TN 38103

Permit Amount: $18.8 million

Owner: 495 Tennessee LLC

Tenant: Brewery Master Tenant

77. Last Word: Confirming The Spike, Methodist Changes and The Honorary Miamian -

Lots of Memphians spending the week in Nashville in the name of bringing down the de-annexation proposal that’s already cleared the state House and is residing for now in a state Senate committee.

78. Events -

Tennessee Small Business Development Center will host a workshop on government contracting Thursday, March 24, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Renaissance Business Center, 555 Beale St. The University of Tennessee’s Procurement Technical Assistance Center will teach small-business owners how to successfully compete for government contracts. Cost is free; registration required. Visit tsbdc.org/training for details.

79. Events -

Rhodes College will host Tanisha C. Ford of the University of Massachusetts Amherst for a lecture titled “This Ain’t Yo Mama’s Civil Rights Movement: A New Perspective on the Style Politics of the 1960s” Tuesday, March 22, at 7 p.m. in Blount Auditorium of Buckman Hall on campus, 2000 North Parkway. Free and open to the public. Direct inquiries to Charles McKinney at mckinneyc@rhodes.edu or 901-843-3525.

80. Last Word: D-Day, Opera Festival Returns and Buying GMF After the Bond Default -

This is what you might call D-Day in Nashville. The “D’ in this case stands for deannexation.
The bill to permit deannexation by referendum has in the course of two weeks become the city’s dominant political issue.

81. Roadmap to Attacking Blight Awaits City and County Approval -

Blighted properties, overgrown lots and abandoned buildings are not unique to Memphis. But Memphis is the only city with a blight elimination charter that affirms cross-sector commitment to uproot the causes of blight and prevent further decline.

82. Shelby County Sees Slide in Unemployment Rate -

Shelby County’s unemployment rate in January was down a full 2 percentage points from a year ago at 5.5 percent, according to the latest data from the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

83. Events -

T.O. Fuller State Park will host its annual Spring Hike on the Discovery Trail Saturday, March 19, at 9:45 a.m. starting at the Visitors Center, 1500 W. Mitchell Road. The moderate, 4.5-mile hike will be followed by a birds of prey program. Cost is free; all ages welcome. For more information, call the park office at 901-543-7581.

84. Sweetening the Pot -

The role of the private and public sectors in growing minority wealth came to a head at the March 16 board meeting of the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine.

EDGE says that requiring companies that are receiving tax breaks to contract with minority- and women-owned companies makes for good public policy.

85. Last Word: Monday Vote, Beale's Search and Longview Heights -

Look for the state Senate to vote on the deannexation bill Monday in Nashville. At least that’s the date on the Senate calendar.

That could change as a member of the Shelby County legislative delegation has at last asked the Tennessee Attorney General for a legal opinion on the proposal. But it’s not a straight-up question about whether the proposal is constitutional. It’s a question about the specific characterization of past Memphis annexations as “egregious” – what has come to be the key legal term in this considerable political controversy.

86. Memphis Habitat Receives Statewide Grant Funds -

Memphis Habitat has received a $13,500 grant from the Tennessee Housing Development Agency through Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee to support the construction of a new home in Uptown.

The funds were part of a $500,000 grant Habitat for Humanity of Tennessee received from the THDA Housing Trust Fund to distribute among the 50 Habitat affiliates across Tennessee to aid in the construction of 20 homes statewide.

87. Evergreen Packaging, Hollywood Feed Make Big HQ Moves -

At its March 16 meeting, the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine Board approved tax incentives for two companies, creating 101 jobs and $8.1 million in local tax revenue.

A payment-in-lieu-of-taxes incentive went to Evergreen Packaging Inc., making Memphis the site of a global headquarters for a company with $5 billion in annual revenue.

88. Porter-Leath's Early Childhood Academy Highlights Collaboration -

The past six years have brought so many changes in kindergarten through 12th-grade education locally and statewide that it is easy to lose track of how different early childhood instruction is in its preparation of children for the next step in their journey.

89. City Council Approves Columbarium Permit -

The Memphis City Council approved a special permit Tuesday, March 15, for a memorial garden with mausoleums, crypts and a columbarium at the Serenity Columbarium and Memorial Garden at 1622 Sycamore View Road northwest of Shelby Oaks Drive.

90. Events -

Memphis Irish Society will host a family-friendly St. Patrick’s Day parade in Cooper-Young on Thursday, March 17, at 10 a.m. The route starts at First Congregational Church, 1000 S. Cooper St., and travels north to Memphis Made Brewing, 768 S. Cooper St. Visit memphisirish.com.

91. ‘I’m the Steak’ Norris Carries Haslam’s Agenda, Except... -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris refers to himself as a “meat and potatoes” legislator. The four-term Republican senator from Collierville, a self-described policy wonk, is considering a run for governor in 2018. But if the race boils down to charisma, he says the media will have to determine if he has enough to win the top office.

92. Cordova Apartments Sell for $31.1 Million -

555 Wood Arbor Parkway
Memphis, TN 38018
Sale Amount: $31.1 million

Sale Date: March 2, 2016
Buyer: CEAI Grove LLC
Seller: Trinity 464 LLC
Loan Amount: $4.2 million
Borrower: CEAI Grove LLC
Lender: CBRE Multifamily Capital Inc.
Details: The Grove at Trinity Point apartments have sold for $31.1 million.

93. Last Word: The Bloody Shirt of Deannexation, More Boats and The Rise of ioby -

“Waving the bloody shirt” – get ready to hear that phrase a lot as a deannexation bill continues to be debated in Nashville – the one that the state House approved Monday evening.
There was a palpable frustration at City Hall during Tuesday’s council day that featured a light agenda but lots of attention to several challenges – many of them financial and hidden until recently – that the new mayor and council are facing.
As we mentioned in our Monday evening coverage of this, the skirmish lines over the deannexation bill and the larger issue are very close in Shelby County. Our legislative delegation is split between Memphis Democrats vocal in their outrage over the bill and Republicans in the county outside Memphis who are just as vehement in their support of the bill, especially the parts that apply to Memphis.

94. Council Tallies Damage in 'Day of Bad News' -

Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd summed up City Hall’s attitude Tuesday, March 15, during the council’s executive session. “Today is the day of bad news,” he said after a briefing from Mayor Jim Strickland on the deannexation bill approved the night before by the Tennessee House.
That was followed by more details on the estimated $60 million it will cost to replace the entire radio system for local first responders from the radios to the towers used to transmit their signals.

95. MWBE Taskforce Searching for Concrete Plan -

The Memphis City Council is the latest group to address the disparity of business secured by women- and minority-owned businesses in the city and county.

On March 14, the MWBE Taskforce held its inaugural meeting. Organized by council member Janis Fullilove, it will propose realistic and and sustainable approaches that the city could take to increase the participation of MWBEs.

96. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will present Broadway musical “The Book of Mormon” Tuesday, March 15, through March 20 at the theater, 203 S. Main St. Buy tickets at orpheum-memphis.com.

AARP Cordova Chapter will meet Wednesday, March 16, at 11:30 a.m. at the Cordova branch library, 8457 Trinity Road. The topic is colon cancer awareness. Email fmyers912@yahoo.com for details.

97. Blight Fight Touts New Pathway, Partnerships -

The local effort to fight blight has been in recent years a machete-like action to cut through bureaucratic red tape and get possession of the most blighted properties.

So there have been a lot of press conferences where bulldozers are featured prominently to demolish the targeted property.

98. Finances Will Be in Focus at City Council -

The list of financial surprises that Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland presented to Memphis City Council members two weeks ago tops council discussions Tuesday, March 15.

99. Last Word: Tiger Drumbeat, Eye on Drones and Shelby County Biggest Home Sale -

Let the coaching drumbeat resume after the Tigers Sunday post-season collapse one game past Tulsa.
A confession here – I am so sports challenged that I thought UConn was a team from Alaska until I saw it spelled out.
In my defense, who associates Huskies with Connecticut?
My point is what happens next isn’t just about basketball. It’s about a change with a good track record of being emotional in the worst way.
It’s linked to how we want to be known for treating people and what they think of us as a result of that.
In those two areas, it’s never just business. It’s always personal.
Josh Pastner’s four predecessors were each very different case studies in this regard.
It could have been any stop in any city with a basketball court and a one-and-done star he could find and recruit to John Calipari. But he still had to hide under a blanket in the back seat of a car on the way to the airport and lie about it long after everyone knew.
Knew about the Kentucky job that is. The mess he left at the university would surface shortly thereafter.
Tic Price was two fast seasons and the proof that the Memphis job isn’t just about what happens on the court and the attendance at games.
Price was clearly excited about coming to Memphis. He clearly understood the importance and heritage of Tigers basketball and valued it. And he wasted no time at all getting lost in the Memphis that is not a part of that all encompassing world.
It was the only job Larry Finch wanted and ultimately the job he couldn’t continue to have. That after ignoring conventional wisdom as a player and coming from Melrose High to Memphis State, bringing a beloved team with him and then picking Memphis again in the ABA over the Lakers in the NBA.
None of that was considered in pushing him out the door and then naming a building after him.
Dana Kirk
wanted to be the hustler John Calipari was. He was certainly impersonal enough about it and he took the team to an era where a post-season NCAA bid was expected and is still expected to this day.
But his impersonality exacted a high cost and he paid most of that cost. Although you could argue the experience for his team that produced some legendary players also made some of them legendary casualties of his emotional distance. It didn’t allow him to go elsewhere because he never figured out that he was being underestimated just as much as the team whose needs he ignored was in the national view of college basketball.
While Calipari dodged big trouble twice, Kirk wasn’t even in Calipari’s league when it came to ducking and timing.
We are past our inferiority complex. That’s what the last NFL drive of the 1990s did for us.
But it’s not necessarily a bad thing that we see the people chosen to occupy these very public positions as a reflection to the world of who we are.

100. Politics of Deannexation Proposal Grows More Complex -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is heading to Nashville Wednesday, March 16, to talk with legislators about what he considers City Hall’s highest priority in the 2016 session of the Tennessee Legislature – defeating a deannexation proposal.