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Editorial Results (free)

1. Wolf, Offense Look To Prove Predictions Wrong -

It’s championship or bust for Tennessee senior tight end Ethan Wolf.

Bowl victories are nice. So are nine-win seasons. But Wolf wants a lot more in his final season with the Vols.

“Our goal here at Tennessee every single year is to win a championship, and that’s going to remain the goal,” Wolf says. “Yeah, there may have been a little bit of excitement the first year, maybe the second year winning the bowl game. It’s always exciting, but that’s the bare minimum right now.”

2. Last Word: Primary Care, Weirich On Twitter and Tigers Offense -

Shelby County District Attorney General Amy Weirich has been responding by Twitter for the last two days to the New York Times Magazine article about the Noura Jackson case that went up online earlier this week. Using the hashtag “ProCrimeNYTimes,” Weirich @ShelbyCountyDA -- tweeted Wednesday that the long read is “a blatant effort to create sympathy for the defendant while demonizing prosecutors.”

3. HealthChoice Promotes Henning To Director of Population Health -

Sarah Henning has been promoted to director of population health programs at HealthChoice. Henning previously served as manager of the department. In her new role, Henning is responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness initiatives and programs for the HealthChoice network.
She also collaborates with stakeholders to promote and support these programs and to ensure they meet the needs of the affected populations and adapt with the changing health care environment.

4. Dean Touts ‘Middle Of the Road’ Focus For Democrats -

Former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean is making exactly the same observation in his bid for the Democratic nomination for Tennessee governor that Republicans are making on their side of the 2018 race.

5. Mississippi Man Takes Confederate Flag Fight to High Court -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A black Mississippi citizen is taking his case against the state's Confederate-themed flag to the U.S. Supreme Court.

In papers filed Wednesday, attorneys for Carlos Moore said lower courts were wrong to reject his argument that the flag is a symbol of white supremacy that harms him and his young daughter by violating the Constitution's guarantee of equal protection to all citizens.

6. As FESJC Turns 60, There's No Taking PGA Tour Event for Granted -

This year marks the FedEx St. Jude Classic’s 60th year in Memphis. For decades the annual PGA Tour stop has signaled the start of summer and the arrival of stars ranging from Lee Trevino and Jack Nicklaus to Greg Norman and Phil Mickelson.

7. Justices Make It Easier for Companies to Defend Patent Cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court is making it easier for companies to defend themselves against patent infringement lawsuits.

The justices ruled unanimously on Monday that such lawsuits can be filed only in states where defendants are incorporated. The issue is important to many companies that complained about patent owners choosing more favorable courts in other parts of the country to file lawsuits.

8. Supreme Court Order Unlikely to Deter Voting Restrictions -

By ANICK JESDANUN, AP Technology Writer– The Supreme Court's refusal to breathe new life into North Carolina's sweeping voter identification law might be just a temporary victory for civil rights groups.

9. Unfair Labor Practices Charged at Volkswagen's US Plant -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The National Labor Relations Board has filed another unfair labor practices complaint against Volkswagen for hiking health insurance premiums and changing working hours of employees who voted for union representation at the German automaker's only U.S. plant.

10. 'Fragile Fortress' -

When former U.S. Attorney General Michael Mukasey spoke at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law in April on the concept of judicial independence and the reality of judicial criticism, he came with some criticism of his own of the judiciary.

11. Arkansas' Multiple Execution Plan Appearing to Unravel -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Arkansas' already compromised plan to execute eight men by the end of the month appeared to unravel Friday, with a judge blocking the use of a lethal injection drug and the state's highest court granting a stay to one of the first inmates who had been scheduled to die.

12. Last Word: Spring Votes, Those Tax Bills and Tim McCarver on Baseball Changes -

Look for more details on the specifics of the “Gateway” project to start to emerge now that a crucial if overlooked piece of the geographic puzzle in the north Downtown area has come into public view. The city’s largest hotel, also the city’s original convention center hotel, is about to change hands and go back to flying the Marriott flag.

13. Bartlett Weighs $60M Overhaul, Expansion of Bartlett High School -

A four-word phrase that appeared on a Power Point presentation at Bartlett High School last week was when the audience of 500 people appeared to buy into a $60 million plan to reconfigure the high school campus over the next three to four years.

14. Last Word: Binghampton Gateway, Beale's Baggage and SoundStage Memphis -

You’ve seen stories here about how difficult it can be to assemble land and financing for a hotel project. Supermarkets have proven much more difficult to pull off at least in Memphis where food deserts are a problem in several parts of town.

15. Last Word: Little Chairs in Longview, Police Pay Raise and Tiger Football Schedule -

The toys are in their cubbyholes. No stray Legos yet. The little chairs tucked neatly under little tables. The tall trees with their bare branches are much in need of little eyes inspecting their twisted branches and the shadows they make on the winter ground.

16. Ex-Pilot Executive Wants to Throw Out Statement to Agents -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A former vice president of the truck stop chain owned by the family of Cleveland Browns owner Jimmy Haslam and Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam wants a judge to throw out statements he made to federal investigators.

17. Trump: Allow Those Into US Who 'Want to Love Our Country' -

MACDILL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. (AP) – President Donald Trump on Monday vowed to allow into the United States people who "want to love our country," defending his immigration and refugee restrictions as he made his first visit to the headquarters Monday for U.S. Central Command.

18. Last Word: Opening Day in Nashville, Parking Pass or Parking Space and Ell Persons -

Lots of formalities Tuesday in Nashville where the 2017 session of the Tennessee Legislature begins. And that’s what this first week back will be about on the floors of the state House and the state Senate. Away from the floors, the real business of speculation and vote counting and drafting language is already well underway.

19. Riding Momentum -

Around this time each year, everyone tends to start fetishizing the blank slate a bit, with its attendant allure of reinvention and that sweeping away of the old order to make way for what comes next.

20. Photographer Steber Captures Fading Legends on Blues Highway -

Bill Steber stood at the crossroads in the Mississippi Delta and made a deal with the devil that would allow him to not only master his photographic skills but become one of the most respected documentarians of Mississippi Delta blues. And kind of make a living (or at least fashion his life) while he’s at it.

21. Volkswagen Files Appeal of UAW Ruling at Tennessee Plant -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Volkswagen on Thursday challenged a National Labor Relations Board ruling allowing a small group of employees at the German automaker's lone U.S. plant to be represented by the United Auto Workers union.

22. Vols Offensive Line Rushing Into Much-Anticipated Season -

Jalen Hurd knows right where he stands among Tennessee’s running backs of the past and wants to be No. 1 in career rushing yards at the end of the 2016 season.

The junior from Hendersonville Beech High School needs 892 yards to surpass Travis Henry as UT’s career rushing leader.

23. Symbols of War Keep Dragging Us Down -

More than 150 years ago, we fought our nation’s most bloody war, a conflagration that claimed 620,000 lives, almost as many as were killed in all other American war efforts combined.

Despite the horror of it all, we just can’t seem to learn a lesson, possibly because of Southern hardheadedness, and a century and a half later, we seem doomed to an eternal task: pushing Sisyphus’ rock to the top of a hill only to have it chase us back to the bottom.

24. UAW Says Volkswagen Reneged on Deal to Recognize Union -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A signed agreement shows that Volkswagen officials reneged on a pledge to recognize the United Auto Workers without another vote at the German automaker's lone U.S. plant in Tennessee, a top union official said Tuesday.

25. Last Word: Orlando, Rain Delay At Southwind and Church Health Center's Move -

Many of us were watching the streets of our own city closely this weekend – the places where people gather for good times when the weather is warm and the sky is clear. Lately some of those places have been the settings for vivid and sudden reminders that all is not well in our city.

26. Land Use Board Turns Away Downtown Surfacing Parking Lot Proposal -

City leaders adhering to the mission of density in urban development made their point at a June 9 board meeting of the Land Use Control Board.

The applicant sought approval to construct a block-wide surface parking lot along Pontotoc Avenue between South Front and Wagner streets. The parking lot would be built on vacant land where a warehouse used by Machine Works once stood.

27. Archimania Leads 2016 Architecture Awards -

Memphis architecture firm archimania was the biggest winner Saturday night at the 2016 AIA Memphis Design Awards, an annual bash that honors the city’s top architecture firms.

Also singled out for honors by the four members of the design awards jury - which this year was comprised of nationally recognized, award-winning architects from Raleigh, N.C. - were the firms designshop, Haizlip Studio and Self+Tucker Architects as part of a joint venture with archimania. There were 11 winners in all, and the honors were presented during the event at Clark Tower’s Tower Center by the awards’ jury chair Erin Sterling Lewis of Raleigh’s in situ studio.

28. Only One School Board Seat Contested -

It’s usually filing too close to the deadline that ends up shedding potential candidates from local election ballots.

That is the case with two would-be challengers to a pair of Shelby County Schools board incumbents on the Aug. 4 ballot.

29. Two More August School Board Races Go Uncontested -

It’s usually filing too close to the deadline that ends up shedding potential candidates from local election ballots.

That is the case with two would-be challengers to a pair of Shelby County Schools board incumbents on the Aug. 4 ballot.

30. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

31. 8th Congressional District Primaries Draw 22 Contenders, 13 Republican -

The Republican primary race to fill the 8th District Congressional seat Republican incumbent Stephen Fincher is giving up drew a field of 13 contenders – seven from Shelby County and four from Jackson, Tennessee – at the Thursday, April 7, noon filing deadline for the Aug. 4 ballot.

32. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

33. Grizzlies Sign KD in Free Agency, Trade Mike Conley? No, Don’t Think So -

So there’s a national report out there saying the Memphis Grizzlies will make a strong play to sign free agent Kevin Durant after the season.

34. Lawsuit by Soldier's Widow Tests Tennessee's Malpractice Law -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A federal court case brought by a military widow whose husband committed suicide is testing Tennessee's medical malpractice statute after a judge said the state's laws led to "seemingly unfair results" for the soldier's family.

35. Last Word: Time and The Greensward, Crosstown High and Race and Sports -

Remember how the schools merger story of about five years ago would change by the hour at times? That story has met its equal in what is becoming the first major challenge of the new Strickland administration at City Hall – the Overton Park Greensward.
So much happened before noon Tuesday on the first day of the short work week that it required waiting for the dust to settle on several fronts.
Here is the latest on a very fluid and volatile situation that could very well change as you are reading this.
Luckily we report at a time when you can change stories on line to keep up with such changes.
Zoos and parks and protests featuring brass bands suggest to a casual observer that this is not very serious as controversies go.
And maybe that was the case about a year and a half ago when a group of high school students decided to block the gravel driveway from the zoo parking lot onto the greensward.
But consider this:
The Memphis Zoo is working toward a March 1 opening of its new exhibit, Zambezi River Hippo Camp, a $22-million attraction that from what we saw just a few months ago will likely draw big crowds to the zoo in the spring.
The zoo was preparing for that starting with the removal of 27 trees from the north end of the greensward.
The best Mayor Jim Strickland could get from both sides – the zoo and Overton Park Conservancy – at his meeting with them Tuesday was a commitment to take his proposal for mediation to their respective boards.
The zoo board has authorized its leaders to file a lawsuit in Chancery Court over the greensward and it’s very likely the zoo would go to court before the March 1 opening because of the crowds on their way.
If the work to come by the zoo in advance of the March 1 opening involves heavy machinery, the reaction is likely to draw a much bigger protest than the ones Memphis Police have so far watched from a distance without making arrests.
As in all pressing political dramas, this controversy has the accelerant of timing.

36. Haslam Dismissive of 'Cherry-Picked' UAW Victory -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — While the United Auto Workers is celebrating the end of its losing streak at foreign automakers in the South, Tennessee's Republican Gov. Bill Haslam was dismissive Monday of the significance of what he calls the union's "cherry-picked" win at the Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga.

37. Why Are Tennessee’s ACA Rate Hikes Among Nation’s Largest? -

Can you imagine your car payment going up by 44 percent next year? Or that the cost of your cable was going up another 36 percent per month?

That’s what it will feel like for hundreds of thousands of Tennesseans in 2016 as the nation gets ready for its third year of the Affordable Care Act, a.k.a. Obamacare, which provides health care insurance to more than 231,440 people in the state who couldn’t otherwise obtain insurance.

38. Food for Thought -

If you’re shopping at Kroger or Wal-Mart, you might see Chef Jenn. She won’t be hard to miss in her white chef’s jacket, and a blue scarf around her neck, smiling out at you from inside the freezer case on a package of her buffalo-style shrimp dip or on a shelf housing a box of her new cheese grits or “hushpuppies with a bark.”

39. Outbid on Your Dream House? Just Wait for Deal to Fall Through -

The real estate market remains frenzied with every passing week, with multiple-offer scenarios on numerous listings. As has been noted in this column, these spontaneous sales have often led to buyer’s remorse and, as a result, more terminated contracts than ever before.

40. Top US Auto Safety Regulator Says Chrysler To Face Sanctions -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fiat Chrysler will be punished soon for failing to follow the law in 23 recalls involving more than 11 million vehicles, the nation's top auto safety regulator said Thursday.

41. Preserving East Tennessee's Endangered Buildings -

When preservation comes up in conversation, it brings to mind crumbling Victorian mansions or maybe an old Woolworth’s sitting idle downtown.

That’s definitely been the case in and around Knoxville, and it’s a mindset that Knox Heritage and the East Tennessee Preservation Alliance (ETPA) are working hard to break.

42. Gun Shops Targeted in Suicide Prevention Campaign in Tennessee -

The Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network is targeting gun shops as part of its public awareness campaign to try to prevent deaths.

An example is a poster on display in a Memphis gun store noting that suicides in Tennessee far outnumber homicides, and firearms are the leading method, The Commercial Appeal reported. The sign lists a crisis hotline.

43. Do We Have a Deal? Yes, Until We Don’t -

People are angry now. Angrier than ever. In the past, there may have been a slight skirmish or two, but now there are battles that often escalate into full-scale wars.

Buyers feel they have paid too much, and sellers feel they are being waterboarded during the inspection process.

44. Day to Day -

For years, she was a “social drinker.” She could have two glasses of wine or the clichéd “a couple of beers,” and stop. No problem.

But a few years ago Yaya, who asked that her full name not be used, noticed a change.

45. Labor Chief: Unions to Push on Wages in 2016 Campaign -

ATLANTA (AP) – Politicians of all ideologies have failed American workers in an era of rising corporate profits and declining wages, the nation's top labor leader said Monday, vowing to pressure candidates running for president in 2016 to address the issue.

46. Jones, Vols Make Honor Roll With Recruiting Class -

KNOXVILLE – Butch Jones has done it again.

Tennessee’s football coach has created a national buzz with his 2015 recruiting class.

UT finished with the No. 4 class in the nation as rated by 247Sports and ended up ranked No. 5 by Rivals when the Feb. 4 national signing day was over.

47. Tennessee’s Health Problem -

For years, the concept of “wellness” or “preventive health” measures has been the “eat your vegetables” mantra of a growing national discussion on health care that has focused primarily on the cost of such care and who should pay for it or try to control it.

48. Facing Health Law Hikes, Consumers Mull Options -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Consumers across most of America will see their health insurance premiums go up next year for popular plans under President Barack Obama's health care law.

But it will take time for families to figure out the best bang for their budgets – even as a bigger political battle brews over the program's future.

49. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

50. Skip Check-In; Latest Hotel Room Key is Your Phone -

NEW YORK (AP) – Hotels don't want guests to have to linger at the front desk – or even stop by at all.

New programs are helping speed up the check-in process for busy travelers, or in at least one case, letting them go straight to their rooms by using their smartphone to unlock doors.

51. Fuel Costs Ease, US Airline Profits Soar -

DALLAS (AP) — Profits are soaring at the biggest U.S. airlines as fuel prices drop — but don't expect fares to fall too.

Heading into the busy holiday-travel period, the airlines expect even cheaper fuel, thanks to the nosedive in crude oil prices. The price of jet fuel, an airline's biggest single expense, has dropped by about one-fifth since mid-June.

52. Recruiter’s Career Twist -

Ask Janet Miller about her remarkable career at the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce and she’ll likely attribute it to good timing or pass credit onto others.

53. Harpeth Hall: ‘Tenacious’ Curriculum, Dedication to Tradition -

Harpeth Hall’s new head of school is a fierce proponent of single-sex education who says that an all-girls school can nurture a female mind, especially one interested in going into a STEM fields – science, technology, engineering and math.

54. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

55. ‘People’s Mayor’ to Share Story at RISE Gala -

Every politician has a past, but not like this one.

Evelyn Wynn-Dixon was, at the low point, a homeless single mother so distraught she believed her four young children would be better off without her. She considered jumping from a bridge overlooking Interstate 75 in Atlanta.

56. Steffner Adds SIOR Role to Real Estate Resume -

Since Joe Steffner opened his own commercial real estate firm 10 years ago, the industry veteran has had a front row seat to some wild changes in the industry.

He experienced everything from the boom days of the early- and mid-2000s to the depths of the recession and its crushing aftermath as the decade ended.

57. Democratic Divide Widens in Election Results -

Democrats have retained their seven-vote majority on the new single-district Shelby County Commission that takes office Sept. 1.

That and the re-election victory of Democratic incumbent Cheyenne Johnson in the race for Shelby County Assessor of Property were the only bright spots for a divided local Democratic Party that lost every other countywide partisan elected position to Republicans in the Aug. 7 county general election, just as they lost every countywide position to Republicans four years earlier.

58. Alexander Looks to Fend Off Tennessee GOP Challengers -

LAWRENCEBURG, Tenn. (AP) – After losing his first bid for Tennessee governor 40 years ago, Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander shed his blue suit and buttoned-up appearance for a plaid shirt, hiking boots and a 1,000-mile walk around the state.

59. More Departures From Haslam-Owned Truck-Stop Chain -

NASHVILLE (AP) – With a year-long federal fraud investigation looming over it, the huge truck-stop chain owned by the family of the Cleveland Browns owner and Tennessee's governor is doing some housecleaning at its highest levels.

60. Harris Files Ford Challenge at Deadline -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris is challenging Democratic state Sen. Ophelia Ford in the August primary for District 29, the Senate seat held by a member of the Ford family since 1975.

61. Caught in the Middle -

Even before the Affordable Care Act came along, Deborah Casey was living between a logistical rock and an economic hard place. Casey, a 61-year-old widow, draws a monthly Social Security check based on her husband’s earnings. She works part-time for Shelby County (no benefits), and to continue receiving the same amount in that Social Security check, she has to keep tabs on how much she makes. This is exactly how someone who wants to provide for herself winds up on a “fixed income.”

62. Seminar Explores Complicated Details of Health Care Law -

The Affordable Care Act, more commonly known as Obamacare, became law in 2010.

But the law has grown and changed so much since then that its pages number more than 25,000, and if you stack them one on top of another they are more than 10 feet high, says Tim Finnell, founder and president of Group Benefits LLC.

63. Primaries Offer First Major Test of Voter ID Laws -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In elections that begin next week, voters in 10 states will be required to present photo identification before casting ballots – the first major test of voter ID laws after years of legal challenges arguing that the measures are designed to suppress voting.

64. New Housing Option Comes to Victorian Village -

Florence Hervery had been thinking about the next phase of her life for some time.

The 55-year-old Whitehaven resident had been mulling over a move Downtown, but she wanted a home, not a condominium or apartment, and was hesitant to move into the bustling Downtown core.

65. Amazon.com Sees Delivery Drones as Future -

NEW YORK (AP) – Amazon.com is working on a way to get packages to customers in 30 minutes or less – via self-guided drone.

Consider it the modern version of a pizza delivery boy, minus the boy.

66. Thieves Pose as Truckers to Steal Huge Cargo Loads -

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — To steal huge shipments of valuable cargo, thieves are turning to a deceptively simple tactic: They pose as truckers, load the freight onto their own tractor-trailers and drive away with it.

67. Brokers Simplify, Confuse Health Exchange Shopping -

This month's glitch-filled rollout of the health insurance marketplaces created by federal law is a business opportunity for brokers and agents, but regulators warn that it also opened the door for those who would seek to line their pockets by misleading consumers.

68. Chisley Named CEO of Methodist North Hospital -

Gyasi C. Chisley has joined Methodist North Hospital as CEO. In his new role, Chisley will lead thousands of associates and aligned and contracted medical staff. He says that as health care transitions from volume to value, his platform is to grow outpatient practices, physicians and services while creating a viable patient-centered environment.

69. Bunker: Taxes, Schools Governed Lakeland Election -

The new mayor of Lakeland wants more economic development in the heavily residential suburban community to boost its tax base to support its own school system.

Shelby County Commissioner Wyatt Bunker upset incumbent Lakeland Mayor Scott Carmichael last week in the unofficial results from the town’s municipal elections.

70. Cyber Crime Growing Priority for FBI -

Glankler Brown PLLC attorneys on Wednesday, Sept. 11, welcomed FBI Supervisory Special Agent Scott E. Augenbaum as the guest speaker for a cyber crime seminar for staff and clients at its East Memphis office.

71. Who You Calling ‘Hillbilly’? -

In a Huffington Post article with the dateline of Venice, Italy, actor Scott Haze says he spent three months living in the Tennessee mountains to prepare for a role in a film. Losing 45 pounds, eating a piece of fish and an apple each day, and sleeping in caves, Haze hardened himself to the role of a deranged killer for “Child of God,” which is about to premiere at the Venice Film Festival.

72. Taste of Australia -

When asked where good wine is made, even the teetotaler will come up with an answer of France, Italy or California.

But not many, even with years of sniffing corks, tend to think of Australia.

73. Judge Likely to Approve AMR Bankruptcy Exit -

NEW YORK (AP) – A federal judge signaled Thursday that he is leaning toward approving American Airlines' emergence from bankruptcy protection but wanted more time to reflect.

"I'm finding the arguments in favor of confirmation fairly persuasive," Judge Sean H. Lane said from the bench. He could sign off on American's restructuring plan at the next hearing on Sept. 12 or in a written decision prior.

74. Government, States Try to Block Proposed Airline Merger -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal government is trying to block the proposed merger of American Airlines and US Airways, saying it would cause "substantial harm" to consumers by leading to higher fares and fees.

75. Pfizer to Pay $491 Million to Resolve Drug Marketing Case -

The U.S. Justice Department said Tuesday that drugmaker Pfizer Inc. will pay almost $491 million to resolve an investigation into illegal marketing of the organ transplant drug Rapamune by a company Pfizer later acquired.

76. Rising Home, Stock Prices Boost US Confidence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans are more confident in the U.S. economy than at any point in the past five years, thanks to surging home values, a brighter job market and record-setting stock prices.

77. Justice Department to Investigate IRS Targeting of Tea Party -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Justice Department is opening a criminal investigation into the Internal Revenue Service's targeting of tea party groups for extra scrutiny over whether they qualified for tax exempt status, Attorney General Eric Holder announced Tuesday.

78. Brighter View on Jobs and Pay Lifts US Confidence -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans are more optimistic the job market is healing and will deliver higher pay later this year. That brighter outlook, along with rising home prices, cheaper gasoline and a surging stock market, could offset some of the drag from the recent tax increases and government spending cuts.

79. Judge Indicates Support for American-US Airways Deal -

NEW YORK (AP) – A federal bankruptcy judge signaled his support for the $11 billion merger of American Airlines and US Airways.

But Judge Sean H. Lane deferred giving his official blessing until he could further consider the timing of a severance package for outgoing American CEO Tom Horton.

80. ‘Teacher Town’ -

There was a time not too long ago when teacher residency programs in Memphis were exercises in isolation. The new teaching recruits in and out of those programs often talked of being overwhelmed in their new school and career environments. But in the larger maelstrom of changes to the face of local public education, the residency programs are growing across all the different types of public schools emerging in advance of the August merger of city and county schools.

81. Unemployed Complain They Need a Job to Find a Job -

NEW YORK (AP) – Help wanted. Qualifications: Must already have a job.

It's a frustrating catch for those out of work in an era of high unemployment: looking for a job, only to find that some employers don't want anyone who doesn't already have one.

82. Startup Ground Zero -

For three days over the past week, Memphis was effectively ground zero for technologists, startup founders, investors and entrepreneurs from near and far.

For that, the city can thank the organizers of the Everywhere Else startup conference who, with help from a collection of sponsors and supporters, took what was initially going to be called “Pitchmas,” happening last December, and refashioned it in a matter of months.

83. Conference Turns Memphis Into Startup Hotspot -

The Everywhere Else startup conference that kicked off at the Memphis Cook Convention Center earlier this week has turned the city into ground zero for technologists, startup founders, investors and entrepreneurs.

84. Startup Conference Billed as ‘Must Attend’ -

Scott Case, the founding chief technology officer of Priceline.com and Startup America CEO, had some words of praise for Memphis and Tennessee while on a panel at November’s Ernst & Young Strategic Growth Forum in Palm Springs, Calif.

85. Growth Capital Wasteland -

Capital makes the world go round – or at least it used to before the recession and our new economic reality took hold. Enacting growth strategies is difficult without capital to invest. This is certainly true for early stage companies that need enough runway to get the business off the ground and then gain momentum to cash flow the business.

86. Former Harrah’s Headquarters Sells for $4.1 Million -

The previous owner of the East Memphis office complex at 1023 Cherry Road has reinvested in the asset for $4.1 million.

87. Former Harrah’s Headquarters Sells for $4.1 Million -

The previous owner of the East Memphis office complex at 1023 Cherry Road has reinvested in the asset for $4.1 million.

88. Blue CRUSH Cuts Point to Larger Divide -

Crime numbers may be the most politically volatile set of statistics elected officials can debate or rely on.

The statistics mean little to someone who has been a crime victim. But they are a way of validating whether public money is being spent effectively. On the other hand, how crimes are counted always will be debated.

89. TVA Board Votes to Delegate Authority to CEO -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Tennessee Valley Authority's board voted Monday to delegate certain authority to the utility's new chief executive in case five of its vacancies aren't filled before Congress adjourns this month.

90. This Den of Grizzlies Players Doesn’t Bluff -

They were three words that were perfect for summing up Zach Randolph. Three words that were perfect for describing the Memphis Grizzlies seven games into this NBA season.

“I don’t bluff,” Randolph told reporters when asked about his exchange of unpleasantries with the Thunder’s Kendrick Perkins after the Grizzlies’ 107-97 victory on Wednesday, Nov. 14, at Oklahoma City, and on national television no less.

91. This Den of Grizzlies Players Doesn’t Bluff -

They were three words that were perfect for summing up Zach Randolph. Three words that were perfect for describing the Memphis Grizzlies seven games into this NBA season.

“I don’t bluff,” Randolph told reporters when asked about his exchange of unpleasantries with the Thunder’s Kendrick Perkins after the Grizzlies’ 107-97 victory on Wednesday, Nov. 14, at Oklahoma City, and on national television no less.

92. Filings Represent Numerous Possibilities for Schools Case -

All six population maps for Carroll and Gibson counties are on file. And Memphis federal court Judge Samuel “Hardy” Mays has all of the material he needs to make a critical ruling on the future of municipal school districts in Shelby County.

93. Local Mortgage Market Up 22 Percent -

It’s been an old story for several quarters – for a few years now, in fact: Rates are low, and homebuyers keep tiptoeing back into the market.

That’s especially liable to be the case going forward, in light of the Federal Reserve’s steps last week to keep interest rates low for an indefinite period of time. Indeed, the local mortgage market continues to feel the effects of those low rates.

94. Mays Opens Hearings On Municipal Schools With Testimony -

The first of two days of testimony in the federal court case over the state laws setting up municipal school districts ended with a lot of reading material for U.S. District Court Judge Hardy Mays.

95. Kickstarter Projects Generate Millions of Dollars -

NEW YORK (AP) – A funny thing happens on Kickstarter, the website where people ask for money to finance their projects. Sometimes, they get more money than they ask for.

Sometimes, they get millions more.

96. American CEO Bashes US Airways; Calls it Desperate -

BOSTON (AP) – American Airlines CEO Tom Horton wants to set the record straight: It was he who approached US Airways CEO Doug Parker about the possibility of combining the two airlines, not the other way around.

97. Wal-Mart's Proxy Vote Shows Dissent Against Execs -

NEW YORK (AP) – Wal-Mart's final shareholder vote for its board of directors showed unprecedented dissent against key executives and board members, including CEO Mike Duke, in the wake of allegations of bribery in Mexico.

98. City Moves Forward With 25-Square Blight Strategy -

The city started a pilot program last year to clean up blight by utilizing a 25-square-block strategy.

Due to the program’s success, the 25-square strategy is being implemented as the strategy for neighborhood improvement going forward. The program entails crews working in predetermined “target zones” to mitigate grass and weed overgrowth, abandoned and dilapidated houses, litter and debris, impassable sidewalks, congested alleys, potholes and vacant lots.

99. American Makes its Case Against Union Contracts -

NEW YORK (AP) – American Airlines argued before a federal bankruptcy judge Monday that its union contracts need to be changed to make the company financially stable.

The airline lost more than $10 billion in the decade leading up to its declaration of bankruptcy in November. During that same period most of its major rivals used the bankruptcy process to cut wages and benefits, which American says has left it saddled with higher labor costs.

100. US Airways Makes Deals With 3 AMR Unions -

DALLAS (AP) – US Airways has struck deals with unions at American Airlines to win their support for a possible merger of the two airlines.

The unions are angry that American is trying to cut jobs and labor costs while under bankruptcy protection. They represent 55,000 pilots, flight attendants and ground workers at American, the nation's third-largest airline