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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Pinnacle's Drive-Through, Back to Work On Beale and Tea Time -

The Grizz lose 103-94 in Dallas Wednesday to the Mavericks. The Mavericks are here Thursday. And Thursday is also the day the two minority owners of the Grizz can begin a process to possibly buy the team from Robert Pera. ESPN outlines an unusual process that if it comes into play could take a while to sort out.

2. Democrats Hope Bredesen Run Will Reinvigorate Party -

Tennessee Democrats are canvassing the state to find candidates at every political level, but their next star is a well-known veteran who has people of all political stripes holding their breath.

Phil Bredesen, the former mayor of Nashville and a two-term governor, could alter the landscape of Tennessee politics if he enters the race for U.S. Senate to fill the void by departing Republican Sen. Bob Corker in 2018.

3. Last Word: Bonus For the Head Tiger, Brooks Downtown? and Harris Runs -

A $100,000 bonus from the University of Memphis board of trustees for U of M president David Rudd at Wednesday’s trustees meeting. The bonus is from private funds raised by the university foundation. The board also approved a paid parental leave policy – specifically the funding for that policy. And it reviewed scaled-back plans for the $30 million new rec center for students that will incorporate some of the existing rec center.

4. A Tasteful List: 2017 -

DIG IN, MEMPHIS. Presenting the Tasteful List 2017 – alphabetical local favorites in one decidedly local man’s opinion – all good if not good for you. Some are farm to table, some got waylaid by sugar, flour, corn meal and deep-frying along the way, but all are ours, bless their hearts. 

5. Last Word: The Monument Letter, Soulsville Gateway and Gas Tax Hike Regrets -

The Redbirds take Game 1 of the Pacific Coast League Championship series Wednesday evening with a 6-4 win over El Paso at AutoZone Park. Game 2 is noon Thursday at B.B. King and Union.

6. Opioid Committee on Right Track, Obstacles Remain -

Smyrna Police Chief Kevin Arnold can remember the first time his detectives brought a heroin case to him three or four years ago.

“Of course, my reaction immediately was, ‘I thought that went away in the late 70s.’ But we’re seeing it. In fact, we are averaging approximately five heroin overdoses a month just in the town of Smyrna,” adds Arnold, whose city about 10 miles southeast of Nashville has a population of nearly 48,600.

7. Cooper-Young Invitational For Artists Set for Sept. 14 -

The 2017 Cooper-Young Festival presented by Evolve Bank & Trust will be showcasing more than 25 local artisans at this year’s Art Invitational on Thursday, Sept. 14, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

8. Raising The Ceiling -

Here’s the thing about expectations: You either embrace them, turning them into some divine combination of daily bread and rocket fuel, or they crush you.

There is no middle ground. Not when the statistical mid-point – a .500 season – would be an undisputed failure.

9. Cooper-Young Art Invitational Scheduled for Sept. 14 -

The 2017 Cooper-Young Festival presented by Evolve Bank & Trust will be showcasing more than 25 local artisans at this year’s Art Invitational on Thursday, Sept. 14, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

10. State Panel Sheds New Light on Racial Atrocities -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner has seen what can happen when old wounds are never allowed to heal.

She’s seen it most recently in clashes between neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and white supremacists and those who resisted their hatred in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counter-protester was killed and 19 were injured when a car was intentionally driven into a group of counter protesters. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash that weekend.

11. Artist Cat Peña Named Director Of CBU’s Ross Gallery -

Cat Peña, a Memphis-based artist, arts administrator and independent public art consultant, has been named director of the Beverly & Sam Ross Gallery at Christian Brothers University. As an artist, Peña’s work in recent years has centered on public art installations, including “There’s More To Be Proud Of,” a canopy of metallic streamers on display in the Edge District through next February. In addition, she is the founder of Collabortory, a creative platform that expands public art practices through collaborative and social practices.

12. Last Word: Monuments Pace Quickens, Campaigning on Opioids and High Heels -

The financial services company that is a crucial tenant for the Bakery project between the Medical District and Downtown is Orion, which would move to the space in and around the old Wonder Break bakery building on Monroe from its Bartlett HQ.

13. Stronger Penalties Alone Won’t Solve State’s Opioid Crisis -

Rep. Bryan Terry deals with patients from every demographic caught up in the web of opiates.

Patients have an array of tolerance to opioids, as well, from those currently addicted to those who are recovering addicts. As a result, each patient requires an “individualized” anesthetic based on their background and the procedure or surgery they’re to have, says Terry, a Murfreesboro anesthesiologist.

14. The King's Castle: Graceland, Whitehaven open 40th anniversary Elvis Week -

It begins with a trivia contest and a sock hop. Those are the first two events Friday, Aug. 11, at the top of a crowded Elvis Week itinerary that marks 40 years since Elvis Presley died at Graceland.

15. Tensions of Density -

With hundreds of units already announced and all signs indicating there are more to come, the Midtown apartment market is primed to explode.

But when it comes to development, it’s no secret that Midtown residents can be fiercely protective.

16. Cordova Apartment Community Sells for $27.9M -

The Charleston, a 284-unit apartment community on the east side of Houston Levee Road just south of U.S. 64, has sold for $27.9 million, marking a new chapter for a property that was built just last year.

17. Last Word: St. Jude School, More Gannett Moves and Maida Pearson Smith -

For most, the school year starts next week. But classes are already underway at St. Jude’s new Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, an idea 15 years in the making, according to the physician who had that idea. The school is a big step in higher education in Memphis and its road to research center status.

18. Last Word: Repeal Votes, ServiceMaster Exit and Cooper-Young Apartments -

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee was among the seven Republican Senators who voted Wednesday against a bill that would have repealed the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act without an immediate replacement. U.S. Senator Bob Corker voted for the repeal. The bill failed.

19. The Week Ahead: July 10-16 -

Hello, Memphis! This week, a supercentenarian World War II veteran visits the Bluff City, a classic film flies into the Orpheum, and a piece of the Downtown skyline hits the auction block again. Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

20. Saturday Legal Aid Clinic To Celebrate 10 Years -

A ceremony and reception will be held Saturday, July 8, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the 2nd Saturday Legal Aid Clinic, or 2SLAC, serving the Memphis community.

The event will be from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave.

21. Last Word: The List Lawsuit, Charlie Morris on 1939 and New Rules for Democrats -

This looks like the end of Grit ‘n’ Grind as we wait for the other shoe to drop following Zach Randolph’s exit from the Grizzlies to Sacramento. There were a lot of rumors Wednesday, the day after Randolph’s $24 million free agency deal, including some about Marc Gasol and the Celtics. And then Tony Allen dropped a Grizz reference from his Twitter account causing even more speculation.

22. Micromanaging Nashville is Job 1 for Legislature -

Metro Nashville is used to getting hammered by the Legislature’s Republicans.

Nearly every time the Metro Council tries to come up with a solution to growing problems, conservatives in the General Assembly swoop in and save the rest of the state from Music City’s attempts to better handle its success.

23. Owners Invest $1.6 Million to Revive Memphis National Golf Club -

A golf club is not unlike a garden. It needs tending. Fairways, greens, bunkers – they all need attention. But so do the members, who have many choices throughout the Memphis area and want to feel like their presence matters no matter how low – or high – of a score they shoot.

24. Last Word: Cooper-Young's Controversy, Harris and Norris and Fulmer Returns -

Shelby County Commissioners have at least two hot topics to talk about Wednesday at committee sessions that could take up most if not all of the work day. By the agenda, these sessions go from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. But they have been known to stretch into the afternoon quite a bit.

25. Last Word: Disaster Paperwork, The Whitehaven Plan and Juvenile Justice -

On its way to Washington is the paperwork for a federal disaster declaration sent Wednesday by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam. It includes Shelby County and 11 other Tennessee counties. This is essentially federal funding that will reimburse local government for money they spend up front for these kinds of disasters. The state’s request also includes a call for individual assistance to Shelby County homeowners and business owners whose property was damaged in the Memorial Day weekend storms.

26. Norris to Oversee Second Panel Reviewing Juvenile Justice -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris is set to oversee a comprehensive review of Tennessee’s juvenile justice system in an effort to reshape the lives of offenders.

27. 2,700 Vote Early, 3 Election Day Polls Move in House District 95 -

A total of 2,700 citizens cast early votes ahead Thursday’s special state House District 95 election in eastern Shelby County. And on election day, three of the 14 polling places – two in Collierville and one in Germantown – will move from their regular locations.

28. Not a Very Good Year for UT Athletics -

It hasn’t been the greatest of years for Tennessee sports. From football to basketball to baseball, and several sports in between, the Vols – for the most part – fell short in 2016-17.

29. Not Just 'Sgt. Pepper': Many 1967 Musical Firsts Echo Today -

NEW YORK (AP) – "Sgt. Pepper" was only the beginning. Half a century after the Beatles' psychedelic landmark, it stands as just one of many musical astonishments of 1967 that shaped what we listen to now.

30. Dream a Baseball Dream -

Memphis is Hoops City, a hotbed of premier basketball talent. That’s why University of Memphis basketball coach Tubby Smith is under pressure. The best of those hometown players on his team, Dedric Lawson, has transferred to the University of Kansas and everyone’s worried Smith won’t get the elite local talent going forward.

31. Last Word: Murphy's, Mount Arlington in Midtown and Surgery Open House -

Senses, the nightclub on the eastern side of the Poplar viaduct, is back. Apparently it’s been back for a little while but the top code enforcement official involved says it is news to him and may be a violation that puts this matter in Environmental Court.

32. Last Word: Game Day In San Antonio, Gas Tax Compromise and Democrats Talk -

Shelby County Commissioner Justin Ford is out on bond after being charged Monday with domestic violence assault and false imprisonment. And the Shelby County Commission does not appear to have a precedent for taking any kind of action until the charges are resolved one way or another although commission chairman Melvin Burgess is exploring that with attorneys.

33. Often-Arrested Lee Sisters Get Civil Rights Due on Capitol Hill -

During the civil rights era, the Lee sisters wouldn’t have been welcomed at the State Capitol. Half a century later, legislators honored the Memphis family on the House floor, recognizing their efforts in the 1960s when they participated in protests across the city and Southeast as high school and college students.

34. View From the Hill: Tearful End for Non-Citizen Tuition Relief Bill -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari grew so emotional she couldn’t speak. On the verge of tears, the Memphis Democrat started to talk about a high school from her Shelby County district with a large number of undocumented immigrant students.

35. Last Word: Derailed, The View From Pyramid Harbor and New History -

“Do Not Occupy” notices posted Thursday afternoon on most but not all of the newly-opened Railgarten complex on Central Avenue east of Cooper in Midtown. Local code officers acted after questions about whether the owners of the complex had approval for intermodal containers being used as part of the structure. The restaurant part of the structure in what was once an ice house remains open. There was already a lot of grumbling from neighbors about the music volume and late hours as well as parking for the development

36. Immigrant Student Tuition Bill Fails In House Education Committee -

Karla Meza dreams of enrolling in the University of Tennessee Law School after growing up in Knoxville and watching college students walk along Cumberland Avenue.

But that dream is on hold after a House Education committee refused Tuesday, April 11, to allow all students, including illegal immigrants, who graduate from Tennessee high schools to pay in-state tuition at state colleges.

37. Immigrant Student Bill Fails in House Education Committee -

Karla Meza dreams of enrolling in the University of Tennessee Law School after growing up in Knoxville and watching college students walk along Cumberland Avenue.

But that dream is on hold after a House Education committee refused Tuesday, April 11, to allow all students, including illegal immigrants, who graduate from Tennessee high schools to pay in-state tuition at state colleges.

38. Parkinson’s Pot Bill Falls Short by Handful of Votes -

Legislation by Rep. Antonio Parkinson designed to cut felony charges for possession of small amounts of marijuana didn’t exactly light up the House Monday evening. 

It fell 44-45-5 and was sent back to the Calendar and Rules Committee after some House members questioned the amount of marijuana the bill would allow people to carry – up to an ounce – without getting a harsher charge than a misdemeanor. The bill did not receive the 50 votes required for passage or the 50 in opposition to kill it and could be renewed with a two-thirds vote.

39. Last Word: Busy Council Day, County Property Tax Cut Call and Gas Tax Vote Nears -

The Lawsons – K.J. and Dedric – are on their way to Kansas after leaving University of Memphis basketball they announced Monday. And Markell Crawford confirmed Monday that he will be transferring too. Crawford is the sixth Tiger player to head for the door since the season’s end. What will Tigers basketball look like by the next season?

40. Last Word: The Catechism of 1968, Downtown Hotels and Earth Day on Auto Row -

What happened 49 years ago this week in our city began long before the first sanitation worker walked off the job or the first “I Am A Man” sign was made. Maybe it was that long arc that explains the timing of what happened here in late March into the first week of April of 1968. For just about half a century now we have thought and thought again about that chronology, reviewed the details. And what we have is a sort of catechism of moments that if they had happened differently, we can’t help thinking, might have produced a different result.

41. Last Word: Watching the Masthead, Dunavant Award Winners and Gin Blossoms -

Jones Lang LaSalle says it can save the University of Memphis and by extension the state 12.5 percent of the cost of running its facilities. That’s included in a statewide higher education facilities contract the Haslam administration appears poised to award in a fast-moving return to privatization proposals. But the administration is encountering resistance from legislators who cite a letter from the Tennessee Comptroller that calls into question the cost savings estimates.

42. View From the Hill: A Disjointed Stash of Marijuana Bills -

This year’s marijuana bills are a mixed bag.

Rep. Jeremy Faison is sending his medical marijuana legislation to a task force, as opposed to “summer study,” typically considered the trash heap for unwanted bills.

43. Last Word: Basketball Capitol, Gang Fight in Southwest Memphis and Moving Polk -

There is something to be said for hosting a round of the NCAA’s March Madness without having a team in the playoffs. Much to be said against it. But after a weekend of what I think most of us here will call the most compelling of the regionals featured prominently on national television, you really can find very little to complain about. It might even have rekindled the intensity of our civic love of basketball.

44. State House Votes to Block Memphis, Nashville Pot Ordinances -

Setting up a Senate debate on state pre-emption of Nashville and Memphis marijuana laws, the state House has approved legislation striking down local ordinances giving police discretion to hand out citations for small amounts of pot.

45. Another Quarterback Battle Brewing at Tennessee -

The time has come to write a new chapter of Tennessee Vols football. Which quarterback is going to write it? With spring practice unfolding, it looks like a two-man race between junior Quinten Dormady and redshirt freshman Jarrett Guarantano – not necessarily in that order.

46. Peabody Preparing For Rooftop Party Season -

It might not be readily apparent from the modern party vibe and the current local bands who entertain the crowds, but The Peabody hotel’s annual rooftop parties – which kick off again next month – go back decades to the era of supper clubs and big bands.

47. Trump: Next Old Hickory or Carnival Barker -

For those who ignore the news – fake or otherwise – Donald Trump won the presidency last November.

While he didn’t capture a majority of the vote, he did win the electoral vote, causing many detractors to call for the elimination of this outdated voting method.

48. Last Word: No More Lottery Balls, The Voucher Bill Advances and UCLA -

Spring is in the air, which can only mean one thing – the Overton Park Greensward controversy is back on. Just this past weekend, I was in the park noting the metal barrier that separates Greensward pedestrians from Zoo parkers and that the barrier was not “decorated” with save the greensward paraphernalia as much as it has been the previous three springs.

49. Last Word: Lakeland Date Set, Silos in South Main and Trespassing in Apartments -

Here comes the Governor’s race with Randy Boyd doing the honors here in Memphis Wednesday at the top of the second day of his fly-around. Boyd’s opening sounds very much like he is running as the heir apparent to Gov. Bill Haslam – although there are no heirs in politics, at least not without an election. He talked a lot about hitting workforce development and job goals of the Haslam administration if he is elected Governor in 2018.

50. Singing Along With Tone-Deaf Legislators -

Often dull, but never boring. They might even make you break out into song.

Halfway through the 2017 session, the General Assembly could be accused of lacking sharpness or sensibility, but what it lacks in luster it makes up for with lots of political song and dance.

51. Akbari Calls for Task Force to Study Kindergarten Suspensions -

NASHVILLE – State Rep. Raumesh Akbari is altering her strategy on legislation to reduce suspension of kindergartners, seeking a task force study on the matter rather than an immediate and outright ban.

52. Heartbeat Bill Hits Hurdle -

NASHVILLE – State Rep. Micah Van Huss’ “heartbeat bill” ran into an unlikely opponent this week: Tennessee Right to Life. The legislation would prohibit abortions once a heartbeat is detected by ultrasound in a fetus, usually at six to eight weeks, a measure Van Huss is sponsoring to severely restrict abortions, except in cases when the mother’s life is in jeopardy.

53. View From the Hill: House Leaders Still Figuring Out Sexual Harassment Policy -

In a case of déjà vu all over again, Democratic state Rep. Bo Mitchell isn’t willing to give Republican House leaders a break on their handling of former Rep. Mark Lovell’s resignation for alleged sexual misconduct.

54. Last Word: Gas Tax Conflict, Redbirds Changes and Hidden Office Space -

The CEO of Memphis-based AutoZone, Bill Rhodes, among the corporate leaders meeting with President Donald Trump recently to urge him to abandon plans for a border tax. This is the tax on goods imported to the U.S. from other countries that U.S. Rep. David Kustoff says also has some opposition among Republicans in D.C.

55. Events -

Stax Music Academy will perform a Black History Month tribute to the 1967 Stax/Volt European Tour Friday, Feb. 24, at 7:30 p.m. at Minglewood Hall, 1555 Madison Ave. The concert will feature the music of Otis Redding, Sam & Dave, Booker T. & the MGs, Eddie Floyd, Carla Thomas, and Arthur Conley. Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door; call 901-946-2513, ext. 250, to buy advance tickets.

56. Binghampton Gateway Comes to Food Desert -

The groundbreaking of a shopping center doesn’t always attract a large crowd of city officials and TV cameras, but then again not every shopping center is an oasis in the middle of a food desert.

57. Binghampton Gateway Center Spells End for Inner City Food Desert -

The groundbreaking of a shopping center doesn’t always attract a large crowd of city officials and TV cameras, but then again not every shopping center is an oasis in the middle of a food desert.

58. View From the Hill: ‘Moral Mondays’ Draw Crowds, But Are Lawmakers Listening? -

Johnny and Julie Erwin don’t look like typical protesters, but the senior couple joined the “moral Mondays” ruckus recently at the State Capitol, Johnny wearing his Air Force cap and Julie holding a list of social legislation they oppose.

59. State Lawmakers Confronted Over Anti-LGBT Bills -

NASHVILLE – The unveiling of legislation undercutting same-sex marriage and enforcing transgender bathroom rules turned into a short-circuited press conference and confrontation Wednesday, Feb. 15.

60. Last Word: Impasse Flashback, Pot Alliances in Nashville and The Age of Etsy -

The late 1970s – bell bottoms, punk rock, disco, that perpetual haze floating over those lucky enough to get the most expensive concert seats for as much as $10 each on the floor of the Mid-South Coliseum… and yes, the impasse ordinance.

61. Last Word: The TVA Well Controversy, Fred Smith Redux and Norris On The Gas Tax -

The new Trader Joe’s in Germantown won’t be alone by the plans the supermarket chain got approved Tuesday night by the Germantown Design Review Commission. The conversion of the old Kroger store on Exeter includes seven other bays as Trader Joe’s goes for a smaller footprint than the size of the original building.

62. Tennessee Lawmakers Act on Balanced Budget Convention to Curb ‘Crippling’ National Debt -

Saying they can avoid a “runaway” convention for “crazy or radical ideas,” Republican state legislators are filing legislation calling for a convention of states in Nashville to adopt a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

63. Last Word: Charter Schools Views, Capitol Hill Round Up & Explaining The Cold War -

Double trouble Wednesday in Oklahoma. The Grizz lose to the Thunder 103-95 in OKC. They are on their way to Houston for a Friday game before returning home Sunday for the MLK game against the Chicago Bulls at the Forum. Meanwhile Tigers lose to Tulsa Wednesday, also in Oklahoma, 81-71. They are back at the Forum Saturday to play South Florida.

64. Justin Timberlake-Inspired Selfie Bill in Play in Tennessee Legislature -

Pop star Justin Timberlake won’t have to worry about getting into trouble for taking selfies at the voting booth if legislation by a Memphis lawmaker passes.

Democratic state Rep. G.A. Hardaway, a 10-year veteran of the Legislature, was set to file a bill Tuesday, Jan. 10, removing the prohibition on photos at Tennessee voting precincts.

65. Tennessee Acts on Balanced Budget Convention to Curb ‘Crippling’ National Debt -

Saying they can avoid a “runaway” convention for “crazy or radical ideas,” Republican state legislators are filing legislation calling for a convention of states in Nashville to adopt a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

66. Task Force Prepared for Juvenile Justice Legislation -

A General Assembly-led panel is backing legislation to change juvenile sexting laws and adopt measures to stop teens from being held in detention for minor offenses as part of an effort to improve juvenile justice.

67. Americans Have Good Shot to Ace Memphis Open -

This year’s Memphis Open field includes three Americans ranked in the top 35, two former past champions, and the certainty that Japan’s Kei Nishikori will not win a fifth straight title.

68. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

69. New Year, New Resolutions for Legislators -

Some Tennesseans recall the days when the state Legislature met every other year and wonder if it should revert to that schedule. Considering the General Assembly pushes most of its work into 3 1/2 months, it might be worth a try.

70. Faison’s Folly? Pushing Pot as a Conservative -

By just about any measure, state Rep. Jeremy Faison is a hardcore conservative. But when it comes to the cannabis plant, the East Tennessee legislator is ready to fire up the General Assembly with a move to liberalize the state’s pot law.

71. Last Word: The Return of Stubby Clapp, Poplar & Ridgeway for Pedestrians and Mice -

The death toll in the Sevier County-Gatlinburg wildfires is at seven. Authorities believe a fire at The Chimney Tops in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was what started the disaster and had consumed 15,563 acres as of Wednesday evening. At that point, the fire was 10 percent contained.

72. Harwell Learning How to Dodge Challengers -

Beth Harwell has been called a lot of things over the last few years, “trailblazer” chief among them as Tennessee’s first female House speaker. 

Now she’s a “survivor” after eking out a Republican Caucus victory as speaker nominee to continue leading the lower chamber in the 110th General Assembly.

73. Last Word: Pants Suits On the River, Early Vote Numbers & Chandler Parsons' Debut -

A busy last weekend for the Presidential campaigns in Shelby County where we have seen neither Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump in the flesh since the primary campaign season and haven’t even seen their surrogates in the general election campaign.

74. Last Word: Mud Island Round 3, Newsmakers Notes and North Midtown -

Cue the organ. You know, the one from those old soap operas or radio dramas. And prepare for the latest episode of Island of Mud. When last we looked in on Mud Island River Park, the city had two finalists to redevelop all or a part of the southern half of the island that is really a peninsula.

75. State Rep. Feels Heat From Staffer’s Firing -

Like sands through the hour glass, these are the days of our Legislature’s lives.

When General Assembly candidates run for office, they talk of high ideals such as reforming education, creating jobs, saving tax dollars and stifling sexual offenders, even restricting abortion, adopting a state rifle or making the Holy Bible Tennessee’s state book.

76. Legislator: Marijuana Law Has Problems -

State Rep. William Lamberth balks at the notion Memphis and Nashville are softening the punishment for simple pot possession.

77. The Crooked Path to Durham’s Ouster -

State Rep. Kevin Brooks set the tone for Jeremy Durham’s ouster in prayer, of all places. Quoting from Luke, the Cleveland Republican opened the recent extraordinary session of the General Assembly saying, “Heavenly Father, you’re very clear in your word when you say that every valley will be filled, every mountain and hill brought low and the crooked places made straight and the rough places made smooth.

78. A Tasteful List 2016 -

MEMPHIS BY THE BITE. Presenting the sixth serving of the Tasteful List, updated for 2016 – alphabetical local favorites in one decidedly local man’s opinion – the only things easy to swallow in an election year.

79. Last Word: Rallings on Protests, New Home Sales Numbers and Special Session Over -

$10 million goes a long way toward establishing a new school.

But Crosstown High School was not among the new high schools that garnered grants Wednesday from the XQ Super School Project.

80. No Quick Fix in State Health Insurance Issue -

State Rep. Ron Travis is perplexed.

On one hand, the Republican from Dayton is concerned with escalating premiums for Tennesseans participating in the insurance marketplace, worried costs are increasing to the point people simply can’t afford health insurance.

81. What Would It Take for Trump to Lose Tennessee Voters? -

Murfreesboro Realtor Larry Sims almost closes his ears when Donald Trump speaks.

“He gets out of bounds. Of course, the press, they love it because they get to exploit his sayings and doings,” says Sims, who traveled to Cleveland, Ohio, as a Trump delegate for the Republican National Convention. 

82. Outnumbered Democrats Hope To Ride Anti-Trumpmentum -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari identified herself with the “Fighting 26,” also known as the Tennessee House Democratic Caucus, when she took the podium to support Hillary Clinton at Philadelphia’s Democratic National Convention.

83. Scotty Moore, Elvis Presley's First Guitarist, Dies At 84 -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Scotty Moore, the pioneering rock guitarist whose sharp, graceful style helped Elvis Presley shape his revolutionary sound and inspired a generation of musicians that included Keith Richards, Jimmy Page and Bruce Springsteen, died Tuesday. He was 84.

84. Symbols of War Keep Dragging Us Down -

More than 150 years ago, we fought our nation’s most bloody war, a conflagration that claimed 620,000 lives, almost as many as were killed in all other American war efforts combined.

Despite the horror of it all, we just can’t seem to learn a lesson, possibly because of Southern hardheadedness, and a century and a half later, we seem doomed to an eternal task: pushing Sisyphus’ rock to the top of a hill only to have it chase us back to the bottom.

85. Brush With Death Recalled, Part 1 -

I was 50 when I died. April 21, 2002. I can’t forget the date.

A few weeks earlier, I saw an old friend, Cotton, at a memorial service for a mutual friend. In the early 1980s, Cotton and I were in the same golf group. After the service, we reminisced about a golf outing that no one involved could forget.

86. Legislators Sweating the Small Stuff -

My late father kept a paper weight on his desk at home that read: “Don’t sweat the small stuff.”

Well, we’re sweating the small stuff – from the federal government down to the states – with this harangue over transgender bathrooms.

87. Opera Memphis: If You Sing – Anywhere – They Will Listen -

For everything else opera might be, Ned Canty has made it his business to see opera as opportunity.

The general director for Opera Memphis, when Canty came to town five years ago the company was in decline.

88. Akbari Proving to be Worthy Successor to Iconic DeBerry -

Those who wondered how Raumesh Akbari would do in following legendary Memphis legislator Lois DeBerry now have a much clearer picture.

89. Robots Are Taking Tennessee’s Jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

90. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

91. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

92. Last Word: Pro Day, Hardwood Patios in C-Y and Memphis' Contested Convention -

It was a windy Pro Day Wednesday at the University of Memphis for Tigers quarterback Paxton Lynch. And if the wind wasn’t for you, you could watch Lynch work out for NFL teams and their representatives on the NFL network.
Don Wade was there to watch in person.

93. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

94. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

95. Higher-Ed Shuffle Stokes Fears of UT-TSU Merger -

Anthony Joshua, who moved to Nashville from Madison, Wis., to attend Tennessee State University, says he’s worried his historically black institution could be in for serious change – for the worse.

96. Last Word: Timing and Numbers, Old Dominick Takes Shape and Zip Lines To Spring -

Political opportunity is defined by timing.
Witness a look at the early voting turnout numbers in advance of Tuesday’s election day.

More than half of the more than 43,000 Shelby County voters who cast early ballots voted Monday and Tuesday – the last two days of an early voting period that began Feb. 10 – way back there when Martin O’Malley was the third Democratic presidential contender and Jeb Bush was considered a force to be reckoned with in the Republican primaries.

97. Last Word: The First Surrogate, Parkside at Shelby Farms and Manilow Memories -

Here they come, fresh from Iowa and New Hampshire – first the surrogates and in the next two weeks the Presidential contenders themselves.

The nation’s “first surrogate” – former President Bill Clinton is at Whitehaven High School Thursday evening to rally early voters in the heart of a large reliably Democratic middle class community.
And it is that voter base that was integral to Barack Obama carrying Shelby County in the 2008 Democratic Presidential primary even as Hillary Clinton carried the state that year.
As mentioned here Tuesday, the local Bernie Sanders campaign opens its Memphis HQ over the weekend.
Hillary Clinton headquarters in Memphis and Nashville are on the way soon with the Nashville HQ opening Thursday as the former President is in Whitehaven and the candidate is preparing for another television debate Thursday in Milwaukee with Sanders.
And early voting opened Downtown Wednesday.
The first day's turnout Wednesday was 177 early and absentee voters. Combined with another 645 absentee votes cast before the early voting period, that makes 822 early or absentee votes.
Another Republican contender on the ballot in Tennessee is out of the race. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie dropped out the day after his dismal finish in New Hampshire. He did not have a slate of delegates on the ballot here.

98. Teachers Wary of Haslam’s Push For Increased Pay -

Pushing a budget with more than $100 million for K-12 teacher pay raises, Gov. Bill Haslam says Tennessee is taking education to new levels by raising standards, linking teacher evaluations to student performance and expanding education options.

99. Midtown Memphis Ready for Apartment Building Boom -

It’s been more than a decade since new apartments were built in Midtown, and that’s poised to change in a big way with a wave of new multifamily construction stretching from Binghampton to Crosstown.

100. Tenn. Approves Incentives for TV Series Production in Memphis -

The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development has approved a grant of up to $4.3 million to support production of a TV series that will be shot in Memphis this spring.

The series will be an eight-episode, Memphis-themed scripted drama that Viacom’s CMT network is adapting from the Tony Award-winning musical “Million Dollar Quartet.”