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Editorial Results (free)

1. Leadership Holes in State Legislature -

With apologies to Robert Zimmerman, “the times they are a-changing.”

Unlike Bob Dylan’s 1964 song of rebellion, Capitol Hill isn’t turning into a bed of liberals, although someday the first could be last. In fact, it could turn more conservative this fall before things take a different direction. But leadership down the line in both parties is due for a big turnover.

2. If Only Legislators Could Focus on Important Issues -

A year-old law enabling Tennessee colleges and universities to keep secret the “proprietary” fees they pay money managers for handling risky investments is likely to be reviewed this year.

3. Consensus on Gun Legislation? Not on Your Life -

That burning smell emanating from the General Assembly isn’t coming from the flame of bipartisanship. More likely it’s the result of scorched-earth politics.

Even though a weapons measure called the “carry-like-a-cop” bill died recently in a House committee, the gap between Republicans and Democrats on gun legislation is, for the most part, about as wide as the range of a Barrett .50-caliber rifle, more than 2.5 miles.

4. Details Slow Plan to Shrink UT’s Board of Trustees -

Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure the University of Tennessee board of trustees appears to be a work in progress.

Timing is critical, too, with the 2018 session of the General Assembly moving at a snail’s pace and UT President Joe DiPietro’s contract set to run out in mid-2019.

5. Mistreated GOP Legislators Only Want to Be Heard -

Word has it extra tissue will be placed on the desks of some House members in the coming weeks so they can dry their tears of pain.

It seems a faction of the Republican supermajority just hasn’t gotten a fair hearing – from their own party – on opposition to Gov. Bill Haslam’s IMPROVE Act, which contains a dreaded gas and diesel tax increase to rebuild the state’s roads and bridges. It’s the gas tax versus the surplus, which is pretty big at $1 billion in one-time money and another billion in extra recurring money.

6. Trump: Next Old Hickory or Carnival Barker -

For those who ignore the news – fake or otherwise – Donald Trump won the presidency last November.

While he didn’t capture a majority of the vote, he did win the electoral vote, causing many detractors to call for the elimination of this outdated voting method.

7. New Year, New Resolutions for Legislators -

Some Tennesseans recall the days when the state Legislature met every other year and wonder if it should revert to that schedule. Considering the General Assembly pushes most of its work into 3 1/2 months, it might be worth a try.

8. Sports Notebook: Cardinals Fall in Opener, Tigers Hold First Football Scrimmage -

The next run the St. Louis Cardinals score in 2016 will be their first. Opening the season on Sunday, April 3, in Pittsburgh the Cardinals dropped a 4-0 decision to the Pirates and struck out 14 times.

9. SPORTS NOTEBOOK: Cardinals Fall in Opener; Tigers Hold First Football Scrimmage -

The next run the St. Louis Cardinals score in 2016 will be their first. Opening the season on Sunday, April 3, in Pittsburgh the Cardinals dropped a 4-0 decision to the Pirates and struck out 14 times.

10. Up-Tempo Offense Will Need ‘Nasty’ O-Line -

If all goes well, the attention probably will be on the quarterback – an open competition at the moment – and the receivers and the running backs. That’s just how football works.

But ultimately the success of the University of Memphis offense next season will be about much more than the fast guys and the guy who gets the ball to them. First-year head coach Mike Norvell was offensive coordinator at Arizona State and he has brought with him Chip Long, who will serve as Norvell’s offensive coordinator, and who worked with Norvell from 2012 through 2015.

11. Higher-Ed Shuffle Stokes Fears of UT-TSU Merger -

Anthony Joshua, who moved to Nashville from Madison, Wis., to attend Tennessee State University, says he’s worried his historically black institution could be in for serious change – for the worse.

12. Vols Take Plenty of Momentum Into Offseason -

KNOXVILLE – There’s nothing like going into the offseason on a high note. The Vols will be riding the momentum from the resounding 45-28 victory against Iowa in the Jan. 2 TaxSlayer Bowl through the end of recruiting season, winter workouts, spring practices and into the summer months.

13. Art Introduction -

The Art Factory in Cooper-Young is preparing to throw open its doors later this week for an open studio night that will introduce the public to the artists and artisans there hard at work on their craft – and also give a peek inside the creative process.

14. Ex-NFL Players Blame League for Brain Injuries -

ATLANTA (AP) – Jamal Lewis, Dorsey Levens and two other former NFL players have sued the league over brain injuries that they say left them struggling with medical problems years after their playing days ended.

15. Indie Spirit -

The Indie Memphis Film Festival opens for its 13th season this weekend, running Thursday through Sunday at the Playhouse on the Square, the Studio on the Square and the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art.

16. College Lite: Post-high school training programs – how do they rate? -

Jess Parrish used to say that when he started Shelby State Community College in 1970, he ran it out of the trunk of his car. His comment reflected the hard work it took to start a two-year college. Parrish also was acknowledging some of the perceptions about community colleges that exist to this day – eight years after SSCC merged with State Technical Institute to become Southwest Tennessee Community College, the largest community college in the state.

17. Gerard Appointed to Statewide Post -

Dr. Dava F. Gerard, a certified physician executive and administrator at the Methodist Healthcare Cancer Center, has been appointed West Tennessee Chair for the State of Tennessee Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan. Gerard also was appointed to Tennessee's Office of Cancer Surveillance.

18. Gerard Appointed to Statewide Post -

Dr. Dava F. Gerard, a certified physician executive and administrator at the Methodist Healthcare Cancer Center, has been appointed West Tennessee Chair for the State of Tennessee Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan. Gerard also was appointed to Tennessee's Office of Cancer Surveillance.