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Editorial Results (free)

1. Memphis College of Art Closing Doors -

Memphis College of Art, the 81-year-old Overton Park institution, will close by May of 2020 after years of financial struggles.

The college’s board described the pending process as an “orderly dissolution of MCA’s real estate and other assets to fund the College’s debt obligations and other liabilities, including providing sufficient funding to serve existing students who remain at MCA.”

2. Memphis College of Art Closing Its Doors -

The Memphis College of Art will close by May of 2020 in what the board of the 81-year old Overton Park institution is describing as an "orderly dissolution of MCA’s real estate and other assets to fund the College’s debt obligations and other liabilities, including providing sufficient funding to serve existing students who remain at MCA."

3. Corporations to Keep Tax Break Lost by Millions of Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Millions of Americans would lose a prized tax break under President Donald Trump's sweeping revamp of the tax code, but corporations would get to keep it.

The Republican proposal would eliminate the federal deduction for state and local taxes, a widely popular break used by some 44 million Americans, especially in high-tax, Democratic-leaning states like New York, New Jersey, California and Illinois. But corporations, which pay billions in local property levies and state income taxes, wouldn't be affected.

4. Pettit Joins Food Bank As Chief Development Officer -

Attorney Peter Pettit has joined Mid-South Food Bank as chief development officer following his recent retirement as a partner in the Memphis office of Bass, Berry & Sims PLC. In his new role, Pettit works closely with food bank leaders to develop strategies and relationships with major gift donors, and specifically is working to complete the $12.5 million “Hunger to Hope” capital campaign.

5. Outdoors Retailer REI Plans First Memphis Store -

In this week's Real Estate Recap, outdoors retailer REI eyes Ridgeway Trace for its first local store, Hilton Worldwide prepares to upgrade its Memphis campus, and several proposed Midtown projects seek financial incentives.

6. Outdoors Retailer REI Planning First Memphis Store -

5895 Poplar Ave.
Memphis, TN 38119

Permit Amount: $900,000

Owner: Weingarten Realty

Tenant: REI

Details: Seattle, Washington-based sporting and camping goods retailer REI has filed a $900,000 building permit application for tenant improvement in the former Sports Authority building at 5895 Poplar Ave. in the Ridgeway Trace shopping center.

7. CBRE Chosen To Lease Southwind Office Center -

Group RMC Corp., the new owners of Southwind Office Center, have tapped CBRE’s Ron Kastner and Patrick Reilly to handle leasing services for the recently acquired asset.

8. CBRE to Handle Leasing for Southwind Office Center -

Group RMC Corp., the new owners of Southwind Office Center, have tapped CBRE’s Ron Kastner and Patrick Reilly to handle leasing services for the recently acquired asset.

9. Events -

The Stax Music Academy will present Six Decades of Funk: Honoring the Bar-Kays Tuesday, Oct. 3, at 7 p.m. at the Stax Museum of American Soul Music, 926 E. McLemore Ave. The academy will perform several Bar-Kays hits to honor retiring lead singer Larry Dodson and original member James Alexander. Arrive early for a discussion with Dodson, Alexander and Stax Museum executive director Jeff Kollath. Cost is free. Visit staxmuseum.com.

10. Events -

Novel will host Otis Sanford for a discussion and signing of “From Boss Crump to King Willie: How Race Changed Memphis Politics” Monday, Oct. 2, at 6 p.m. at the bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended. Visit novelmemphis.com.

11. Congress at Crossroads After Another GOP Health Care Failure -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Congress is at a crossroads after Republicans' stinging failure to repeal Barack Obama's health care law. But what's next – more partisan conflict or a pragmatic shift toward cooperation?

12. Last Word: Pantographs & Catenaries, Grizz Uncertainty and Tuesdays Without Morrie -

After three years off the rails, the first significant indications that the trolleys are about to return. It was just a two-block ride that includes the Memphis Area Transit Authority trolley barn on North Main and one very new trolley. But it is a start through what is a very technical and bureaucratic process involving lots of safety vests, clipboards and video cameras.

13. Financial Services Firm Takes Floor in Clark Tower -

In this week’s Real Estate Recap, a financial services firm inks a full floor in Clark Tower and Crosstown High School files a $4.1 million permit to build-out space in the Crosstown Concourse for its charter school that is scheduled to open next fall. 

14. Financial Services Firm Takes Floor in Clark Tower -

In this week’s Real Estate Recap, a financial services firm inks a full floor in Clark Tower and Crosstown High School files a $4.1 million permit to build-out space in the Crosstown Concourse for its charter school that is scheduled to open next fall. 


15. Looks Like Another 8-4 Season for Tennessee -

Oops. I goofed last year. So did lots of other people who thought Tennessee’s football team would win the SEC East Division and go to the league championship game for the first time since 2007.

16. Last Word: Night in the Park, Hattiloo Goes Bigger & Cohen on the Republican Soul -

A gathering in Health Science Park a little before 11:30 Monday evening by a group of protesters who Facebooked that their intent was to take down the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest. Memphis Police showed up quickly and the police supervisor told those around the statue that the park is a private park and that no one can be in the park after 8 p.m. No arrests but the police did ask for identification from those in the park.

17. Barnes Tapped As New Tennessee Press Association President -

Eric Barnes, publisher and CEO of The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc., has become the next president of the Tennessee Press Association, the trade association for the state’s newspapers.

18. Fully Loaded -

It’s almost like the first half of 2017 was a decade in the making, at least when it comes to commercial real estate. Throughout all four major sectors of the Memphis-area commercial real estate market – industrial, office, retail and multifamily – figures are consistently reaching or exceeding pre-recession marks.

19. Juvenile Justice Summit Touts Sustained Contact Out of Court -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael says he should have more definitive plans for a Juvenile Assessment Center by the fall.

20. Governor Confident Immigrant Sentencing Law Constitutional -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam says his administration's legal team is very confident about the constitutionality of a new law that lets judges toughen sentences for defendants in the country illegally at the time of their crimes.

21. 2 Businesses Seek Inner City Loans From EDGE to Grow -

Two local businesses that are looking to grow their footprint in traditionally underserved areas of Memphis are seeking forgivable loans for building improvements from the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County.

22. Small Fitness Centers Fight Tax Exemption for Larger Competitors -

Jeff Rose and his wife Nancy sank their entire life savings, more than $500,000, into opening the Orangetheory Fitness center in Lakeland in 2015.

23. Clark Tower Wraps Up $8 Million Renovation -

Commercial real estate firm Colliers International has announced the owner of Clark Tower, In-Rel Properties, has finished an $8 million renovation of the iconic East Memphis office building. Details on that and other top deals in this week's Real Estate Recap...

24. Questions About Shelby County Schools Voucher Bill Postpone It for the Year -

NASHVILLE – Questions about student testing within a proposed pilot voucher bill affecting Shelby County Schools forced the bill’s sponsor to postpone it until next year.

Rep. Harry Brooks, R-Knoxville, sent the bill to the first calendar of the 2018 House Finance, Ways and Means Subcommittee Wednesday, April 26, telling lawmakers he needs more time to work out details in the legislation. One of those questions dealt with the effective date of the voucher program and the other with an amendment enabling private schools that would accept public students to opt out of state-required testing, the TNReady.

25. View From the Hill: IMPROVE Act an Insight Into Testy Election Ahead -

In case anyone’s keeping stats, Senate leadership soundly defeated House leadership this session in the gas tax/tax cut battle.

Whether this is a forerunner to a Republican gubernatorial primary remains to be seen as Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris and House Speaker Beth Harwell weigh decisions. It’s not as if they’d be facing off against each other, though, since businessman Bill Lee and former Economic and Community Development Commissioner Randy Boyd are definitely in the race and not hurting for money.

26. University of Memphis, UTHSC May Soon Face Outsourcing Decisions -

Forty-one state lawmakers signed a letter requesting the state put a hold on its outsourcing plans until the General Assembly can scrutinize its effect on state workers and services.

The state is set to sign a contract April 28 with Chicago-based JLL for facilities management work that could be used by universities and departments statewide. Even local government jobs could be doled out to the contractor.

27. Kelsey’s School Voucher Bill Faces Legislative Showdown -

NASHVILLE – A showdown is looming over a pilot voucher program targeting Shelby County Schools after the legislation moved out of Senate and House panels this week with unanimous votes.

28. Last Word: MATA and the TBI, Fieldstone Gets Bigger and Wedge Bills -

Since Gannett bought The Commercial Appeal there has been a lot of speculation about what would remain of the Memphis operation in a newspaper chain known for consolidating not just in-house parts of the publishing process but the reporting side too. The biggest question in the air was the fate of the large printing presses at the CA. And Monday evening, there was an answer.

29. Israel Leader's White House Trip Clouded in Uncertainty -

JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel's prime minister heads to Washington this week for a high-profile meeting with President Donald Trump that suddenly is clouded in uncertainty.

After embracing Israel's hard-line nationalist right throughout his presidential campaign, Trump appears to have softened some of his positions on key issues since taking office.

30. TVA Drilling Controversy May Change Well Actions -

The controversy over Tennessee Valley Authority drilling water wells into the Memphis aquifer for the new TVA power plant in southwest Memphis is becoming a push for more public notice of such plans and better mapping of the water supply under the city.

31. Last Word: Bell at the Grammys, Old Dominick's Return and Luttrell & Strickland -

Memphis at the Grammys: William Bell was performer, presenter and winner at the Grammys Sunday evening. Gary Clark Jr. joined Bell to perform Bell’s calling card, “Born Under A Bad Sign” and the duo then presented a Grammy to Beyonce. In the non-televised Grammy awards, Bell won for Best Americana album for his Stax effort “This Is Where I Live.”

32. Last Word: Little Chairs in Longview, Police Pay Raise and Tiger Football Schedule -

The toys are in their cubbyholes. No stray Legos yet. The little chairs tucked neatly under little tables. The tall trees with their bare branches are much in need of little eyes inspecting their twisted branches and the shadows they make on the winter ground.

33. Last Word: Immigration Order React, State of State Preview and The Haven -

Lots of reaction from state and local leaders Sunday to President Trump’s Friday executive order on immigration that will likely dominate the action this week on Capitol Hill in Washington after a weekend of action and reaction.

34. View From the Hill: Cooperatives Ready to Fill Broadband Void -

Rural broadband backers such as Misty O’Beirne in Rutherford County can take heart. Legislation to spread high-speed internet into cyberspace deserts is making the right connections.

35. State Targets Refugee Program; Lollar to Lead Delegation -

The state Legislature is likely to file a complaint before the end of January challenging the legality of the Refugee Resettlement Program in Tennessee, according to Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris.

36. McNally Voted Tennessee Senate Speaker -

Promising to maintain Tennessee’s strong fiscal standing, veteran legislator Randy McNally of Oak Ridge took the gavel Tuesday as Senate speaker, replacing Ron Ramsey, who over the last decade led a Republican majority to power in the Tennessee General Assembly.

37. New Year, New Resolutions for Legislators -

Some Tennesseans recall the days when the state Legislature met every other year and wonder if it should revert to that schedule. Considering the General Assembly pushes most of its work into 3 1/2 months, it might be worth a try.

38. Nonprofits Raised Value In 2016 In Many Ways -

In any given year, charitable giving might rise or fall. But when the Chronical of Philanthropy analyzed the giving of the country’s 50 largest cities via Internal Revenue Service data, it captured a larger sample size: 2006 through 2012.

39. American Car Care Signs 9-Year Lease at Lenox Park -

American Car Care has signed a lease with Lenox Park C-F Owner LLC for 17,427 square feet in Lenox Park Building E, located at 6775 Lenox Center Court.

40. Village Shops of Forest Hill Sold for $37.1 Million -

9155 U.S. Highway 72

Germantown, TN 38138

Sale Amount: $37.1 million 

Sale Date: December 2016

41. Last Word: Turner Dairy Plans, Fred's HQ and Fred Smith's Remarks About Trump -

Lots of traffic at FedExForum this weekend with two graduation ceremonies for the University of Memphis – morning and afternoon shifts. Another double-header at the Forum Saturday. The Grizz beat the Warriors 110-89 and the Tigers beat UAB 62-55.

42. Ohio Lawmakers Pass Republican 20-Week Abortion Ban Proposal -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Abortions would be banned after 20 weeks under a bill Republican lawmakers passed Thursday, adding to legislation already on its way to Republican Gov. John Kasich that would prohibit abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected.

43. Events -

The Booksellers at Laurelwood will host Ashton Lee, author of “Queen of the Cookbooks,” for a discussion and signing Wednesday, Dec. 7, at 6 p.m. at the bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended. Visit thebooksellersatlaurelwood.com.

44. Events -

Memphis 3.0 kickoff rallies continue through Saturday, Dec. 10, at locations around Memphis. The kickoff rallies will include a short overview of Memphis 3.0 followed by an extended opportunity for citizens to provide input on the future of their neighborhoods. Upcoming rallies include (start time is 5:30 unless otherwise noted): Tuesday, Dec. 6, at East High School; Wednesday, Dec. 7, in the Pipkin Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds; Thursday, Dec. 8, at McFarland Community Center; Friday, Dec. 9, at Bert Ferguson Community Center; and Saturday, Dec. 10, at 10 a.m. at the Cossitt Library and 2 p.m. at the McWherter Senior Center. Visit memphis3point0.com for details.

45. Diversity and Inclusion -

Nonprofits are ahead of the game when it comes to diversity. Is that true? We may tell ourselves that, but diversity – and most importantly inclusion – requires we take an honest look at our organizations. 

46. Events -

Memphis 3.0 kickoff rallies continue through Saturday, Dec. 10, at locations around Memphis. The rallies will include a short overview of the Memphis 3.0 planning process followed by an opportunity for citizens to provide input on the future of their neighborhoods. Upcoming rallies include (start time is 5:30 unless otherwise noted): Dec. 5 at Raleigh Community Center; Dec. 6 at East High School; Dec. 7 in the Pipkin Building at the Mid-South Fairgrounds; Dec. 8 at McFarland Community Center; Dec. 9 at Bert Ferguson Community Center; Dec. 10 (10 a.m.) at the Cossitt Library; and Dec. 10 (2 p.m.) at the McWherter Senior Center. Visit memphis3point0.com for details.

47. Refugee Lawsuit Proceeds in Spite of Obstacles -

Tennessee is going “full speed ahead” in a challenge of the federal Refugee Resettlement Program despite threats by President-elect Donald Trump to dismantle it or, at the least, stop the flow of refugees from terrorist-linked countries.

48. Harwell Learning How to Dodge Challengers -

Beth Harwell has been called a lot of things over the last few years, “trailblazer” chief among them as Tennessee’s first female House speaker. 

Now she’s a “survivor” after eking out a Republican Caucus victory as speaker nominee to continue leading the lower chamber in the 110th General Assembly.

49. Broke and Broken: Democrats Lose More Ground in State Legislature -

Tennessee House Democrats will have to start calling themselves the “Fighting 25,” down from the “Fighting 26,” after dropping a district in the battle to regain relevance statewide.

50. Norris, Others Take Next Step After Election -

State Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville ran for re-election this year the way just about any incumbent prefers to run – unopposed.

51. Last Word: Underperforming At the Polls, Tenoke Plans and Poverty in Cordova -

Still parsing election numbers, although 24 hours after the polls closed in Shelby County, the Election Commission was still counting absentee ballots.

Here is a statewide perspective from Associated Press.

52. Cubs’ World Series Victory The Start of a New Narrative -

You can buy into the goat, into the black cat that walked in front of Ron Santo in 1969, into infamous Steve Bartman and, well, into the whole notion that the Cubs were cursed for 108 years, if you wish. 

53. Real Estate Awakening -

The year’s biggest office deal didn’t affect Memphis’ office absorption at all, but everyone in real estate has felt its reverberations.

When ServiceMaster Global Holdings announced its move to the shuttered Peabody Place Mall from Ridge Lake office park, it promised new life for a 328,000-square-foot black hole in Downtown’s retail market.

54. Last Word: MATA Plans Bigger, Tiger Football Exits and Heartbreak Hotel Closes -

With a set of route and schedule changes about to hit the streets in December, the Memphis Area Transit Authority is embarking on a larger more comprehensive change in the city’s bus system. It is nothing less than a rebuilding of the city’s public transportation system that starts the planning process in November.

55. MATA Ready to Develop Strategic Plan -

The Memphis Area Transit Authority in November will begin developing a new strategic plan to rebuild Memphis’ transit system, according to MATA chief executive officer Ron Garrison.

56. October 14-20, 2016: This week in Memphis history -

2015: The University of Memphis Tigers football team beats Ole Miss 37-24 at a sold-out Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium in a game televised on ABC. It’s a big day in the city. Some tailgaters showed up the night before, anticipating a colossal traffic back-up around the fairgrounds. The evening of the game, a smaller, sold-out crowd gathers at the Cannon Center for the Performing Arts for the induction of the latest class to the Memphis Music Hall of Fame. Among those in attendance is late-night TV talk show host Jimmy Fallon, who is inducting Justin Timberlake. Keith Richards is present to induct Scotty Moore.

57. Last Word: Stewart Case Conclusion, River Re-View and Rhodes Hacks -

81.4 million of you watched Monday’s Trump-Clinton debate which aired on 11 networks altogether, according to the preliminary numbers from Nielsen, the television rating business.

The day after the debate here in Memphis was a reminder of the urgent issues that will likely remain once all of the votes – popular and electoral -- are counted and estimated on Nov. 8.

58. Open and Shut -

The office of the future hacks down cubicle walls in favor of modular furniture that encourages collaboration. As many business sectors, from banking to legal services, move to a tech-first approach, companies are turning away from traditional office configurations to attract the next generation of talent.

59. No Quick Fix in State Health Insurance Issue -

State Rep. Ron Travis is perplexed.

On one hand, the Republican from Dayton is concerned with escalating premiums for Tennesseans participating in the insurance marketplace, worried costs are increasing to the point people simply can’t afford health insurance.

60. Giving Ideas Of Memphis ‘Rock Stars’ Bigger Stage -

Eighteen people working in Memphis will bring their innovations to a global audience at the upcoming TEDxMemphis conference.

TEDx is an independent spin-off of the popular TEDTalks series, where thought leaders in the technology, entertainment and design sectors share their work and vision with a live audience.

61. The Week Ahead: Aug. 15-21 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! If you’re looking for something to do this week, look no further. Here’s our weekly roundup of local events and other happenings you need to know about, from the Elvis Week candlelight vigil to a fun evening of craft beer and DIY art…

62. August 12-18, 2016: This week in Memphis history -

2011: On the front page of The Daily News, city leaders vow that construction work is about to begin on The Pyramid’s long-delayed conversion from an arena to a Bass Pro Shops store with added attractions. The first stirrings of action on the dormant project include a $75 million city buyout of county government’s interest in the Memphis Cook Convention Center as part of the deal for the city to get exclusive ownership of The Pyramid.

63. What Would It Take for Trump to Lose Tennessee Voters? -

Murfreesboro Realtor Larry Sims almost closes his ears when Donald Trump speaks.

“He gets out of bounds. Of course, the press, they love it because they get to exploit his sayings and doings,” says Sims, who traveled to Cleveland, Ohio, as a Trump delegate for the Republican National Convention. 

64. Haslam Drops $150K Into PAC for Tennessee Legislative Races -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Haslam has opened his wallet for state legislative campaigns throughout the state.

According to the final campaign finance reports to be filed before the Aug. 4 primary, Haslam gave $150,000 to his political action committee, Jobs4TN. The committee then contributed all but $4,000 of that amount to the campaigns of 44 lawmakers.

65. Red State, Blue Mayors -

Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, a Democrat in Tennessee’s sea of red, finds herself adapting to the control Republicans hold over the state Legislature.

66. Pinnacle Financial Anchor Tenant in Boyle's New Office Building -

Pinnacle Financial Partners will be an anchor tenant in Boyle Investment Co.’s long-awaited office building in Ridgeway Center.

67. Leadership Allowed Durham Sleaze To Fester for Too Long -

The Tennessee attorney general’s sexual harassment investigation of Republican Rep. Jeremy Durham dragged halfway through the summer. Now we know why.

68. Too Big To Ignore: The SEC and Its Ever-Growing Football Media Days -

HOOVER, Ala. – The SEC football preseason always has been loud. More than 30 years ago, the noise came via the Skywriters Tour and the rattle and roar of a DC-3 propeller plane carrying rumpled, hardworking – and often hard-drinking – sports writers to the 10 Southeastern Conference campuses for essentially unfettered access to the league’s coaches and players.

69. Last Word: Conley Makes It Official, No "Figure Heads" and Early Voting Opens -

Mike Conley signed on the dotted line about an hour before the press conference confirming that he and the Grizz front office have closed on the deal that makes him the highest paid player in NBA history… for now.

70. Show Time -

For the first time in years, the Peabody Place mall was packed. On June 3, hundreds of ServiceMaster employees and a handful of business and government leaders ushered in One ServiceMaster Center, a multimillion-dollar headquarters for Memphis’ fourth-largest public company.

71. May 27-June 2: This week in Memphis history -

1990: On the front page of The Daily News, the large cavitation channel being built on Presidents Island is nearing completion. Its formal name is the David Taylor Research Center. The chamber, 240 feet long by 65 feet high, is to hold 1.5 million gallons of water to test water flow effects, or cavitation characteristics, for ships and submarines.

72. Available Class-A Office Space Scarce in Memphis -

ServiceMaster is looking to relocate its headquarters into a Class A office building, and Memphis just doesn’t have room.

“For the past two years, we’ve been using those phrases,” said Ron Kastner, senior vice president with CBRE.

73. Legislators Sweating the Small Stuff -

My late father kept a paper weight on his desk at home that read: “Don’t sweat the small stuff.”

Well, we’re sweating the small stuff – from the federal government down to the states – with this harangue over transgender bathrooms.

74. Sports Notebook: If He’s Available, Should Grizzlies Take Labissiere In First Round? -

While it’s difficult to imagine the NBA matching the NFL for draft night drama this year – hopefully there are no Twitter bong photos seconds before tipoff – the mock drafts don’t seem to agree a lot beyond LSU forward Ben Simmons going to Philadelphia first overall and Duke forward Brandon Ingram going second overall to the Los Angeles Lakers.

75. Legislative Losers: All Who Disagree With Legislators -

The 109th General Assembly is done – almost – for the year. Here’s a look at the winners and losers.

Winner: State budget

Buoyed by $400 million in surplus revenue from fiscal 2015 and $450 million in projected surpluses for the coming fiscal year, Gov. Bill Haslam spread the wealth in a $34.9 billion budget. 

76. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

77. Tennessee Passes Resolution to Sue Feds Over Refugees -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A resolution that would direct Tennessee to sue the federal government over its refugee resettlement program passed Tuesday in the state Legislature.

The measure was approved in the Senate after lawmakers agreed to a change that would allow a private law firm to file a lawsuit on behalf of Tennessee if the state attorney general refuses to sue. It stipulates that the use of the private firm could not cost taxpayers.

78. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

79. Moving Dirt -

The Memphis development community is looking inward and upward to increase density in the urban core. New construction is happening across all four commercial real estate sectors, with long-anticipated projects like Trader Joe’s and the redevelopment of Central Station finally coming to fruition. Construction and operating costs continue to be a challenge as new projects hit the top of their class to command higher rents.

80. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

81. Last Word: The Curtain Falls in Nashville, Political Cuneiform and Ramsey Talks -

And in less than a half hour Wednesday, the de-annexation drama that should qualify as the political equivalent of a Netflix binge-watchable television series made just for Memphis was done.

82. Can GOP Keep Grasp On Success Ramsey Built? -

As much as Tennessee Republicans want to put a happy face on the departure of Senate Speaker and Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey, holding it together in the wake of his departure will be an awesome task.

83. The Week Ahead: March 28-April 3 -

Alright, Memphis, are you sure you found all your Easter eggs? Before you make one more sweep of the yard, check out this week’s roundup of local happenings – from the sweet sounds of “Zelda” to what’s being dubbed a “Mini-MEMFix” in East Memphis…

84. Memphis Fights Back: Senate Poised To Do Real Damage via De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

85. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

86. ‘I’m the Steak’ Norris Carries Haslam’s Agenda, Except... -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris refers to himself as a “meat and potatoes” legislator. The four-term Republican senator from Collierville, a self-described policy wonk, is considering a run for governor in 2018. But if the race boils down to charisma, he says the media will have to determine if he has enough to win the top office.

87. Last Word: Mudslide, The Deannexation Storm and Kilzer at Calvary -

Lots of news on a very rainy day including the flooding from the constant rain that closed some schools and cancelled a lot of other events. And then there was a mudslide on Riverside Drive from the bluff overlooking Tom Lee Park and the Mississippi River. The rain has also pushed the Wolf River to the point that it is now over some parts of the greenway in Germantown.

88. Bill Would Open Door for Utilities to Expand Broadband -

Legislation to expand broadband access across Tennessee is evolving – by necessity.

State Rep. Kevin Brooks’ bill HB1303 to allow public utilities to provide Internet service outside their footprint is alive, he says, but it is being “argued vehemently.”

89. The Week Ahead: February 29, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? We know what you’ll be doing Tuesday (voting, of course!), but plenty of nonpolitical happenings grace this week’s calendar too – from a trio of Grizzlies games to a fundraiser supporting fair housing.

90. Making the Needle Move: Corporate Men Behind the Birth of the UNCF Telethon -

Editor’s note: Part two of a two-part series. What contributed to the success of the history-making UNCF Lou Rawls telethon? Leadership, collaboration, teamwork and a respect for the individual goals of participating partners.

91. Teachers Wary of Haslam’s Push For Increased Pay -

Pushing a budget with more than $100 million for K-12 teacher pay raises, Gov. Bill Haslam says Tennessee is taking education to new levels by raising standards, linking teacher evaluations to student performance and expanding education options.

92. Only So Much Durham Could Blame on Media -

It’s little wonder state Rep. Jeremy Durham had to take a two-week break from the General Assembly.

93. Minority Leader Harris Confident Even on Wrong Side of Supermajority -

Lee Harris says he ran for state Senate because he felt Memphis could do better on Capitol Hill, defeating Ophelia Ford in 2014.

94. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

95. Last Word: New Minority Business Numbers, The House Affair and The Heights -

The recently revived discussion on minority business in Memphis is about to go back on the front burner again. Fueling the intensity are new U.S. Census numbers. They show the percentage of business receipts in Memphis produced by black-owned businesses has dropped since the 2007 census numbers showed a 1.08 percent share of those receipts by black-owned businesses. That in a city whose population is 63 percent African-American.
The drop to below one percent is even though the overall receipts in 2012 were higher than they were in 2007.
Madeline Faber is the first to report the new numbers as part of a cover story in our weekly, The Memphis News, that will be on the streets and in the racks Saturday, on-line Friday afternoon.
The numbers are such a telling story and such an important indicator that we broke it out as its own story in advance of the cover story.

96. Wal-Mart's Shutdown Creates New Food Deserts -

FAIRFIELD, Ala. (AP) — Wal-Mart's decision to shutter 154 stores across the country means that, starting Thursday, residents without cars in a neighborhood near a historically black college outside Birmingham, Alabama, will have to cross dangerous roadways on foot to get fresh produce and meat. Come Friday, folks in Coal Hill, Arkansas, will need to drive 15 miles to get to the nearest supermarket and pharmacy. Low-income neighbors of Wichita State University in Kansas, too, will be losing quick access to fresh groceries.

97. Tennessee Senate Votes to End Emissions Tests for New Cars -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The state Senate overwhelmingly passed a bill Thursday to end emissions testing in Tennessee for new cars, brushing aside concerns that relaxing standards might be a bad idea in light of the Volkswagen scandal.

98. The Persecution of Jeremy Durham -

Inhumane and unfair: That’s the only way to describe the “liberal media’s” treatment of state Rep. Jeremy Durham over the last month.

99. Sledge Joins Paragon Private Banking Team -

Julia Sledge has joined Paragon Bank as portfolio manager in private banking. Sledge has more than 30 years of experience in the banking industry, holding leadership positions at both Union Planters Bank and Cadence Bank. In her new role, she’ll provide service and support to Paragon’s private banking team.

100. Last Word: El Chapo and Memphis, First Filers for August and Origins in Graffiti -

The Mississippi River at Memphis crested and then it rained.
The weekend rain added about two-tenths of an inch by Saturday to Friday’s crest.
But by Sunday, the river had dropped to 39.12 feet, which is still more than five feet above flood stage.