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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

2. Tennessee Passes Resolution to Sue Feds Over Refugees -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A resolution that would direct Tennessee to sue the federal government over its refugee resettlement program passed Tuesday in the state Legislature.

The measure was approved in the Senate after lawmakers agreed to a change that would allow a private law firm to file a lawsuit on behalf of Tennessee if the state attorney general refuses to sue. It stipulates that the use of the private firm could not cost taxpayers.

3. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

4. Moving Dirt -

The Memphis development community is looking inward and upward to increase density in the urban core. New construction is happening across all four commercial real estate sectors, with long-anticipated projects like Trader Joe’s and the redevelopment of Central Station finally coming to fruition. Construction and operating costs continue to be a challenge as new projects hit the top of their class to command higher rents.

5. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

6. Last Word: The Curtain Falls in Nashville, Political Cuneiform and Ramsey Talks -

And in less than a half hour Wednesday, the de-annexation drama that should qualify as the political equivalent of a Netflix binge-watchable television series made just for Memphis was done.

7. Can GOP Keep Grasp On Success Ramsey Built? -

As much as Tennessee Republicans want to put a happy face on the departure of Senate Speaker and Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey, holding it together in the wake of his departure will be an awesome task.

8. The Week Ahead: March 28-April 3 -

Alright, Memphis, are you sure you found all your Easter eggs? Before you make one more sweep of the yard, check out this week’s roundup of local happenings – from the sweet sounds of “Zelda” to what’s being dubbed a “Mini-MEMFix” in East Memphis…

9. Memphis Fights Back: Senate Poised To Do Real Damage via De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

10. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

11. ‘I’m the Steak’ Norris Carries Haslam’s Agenda, Except... -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris refers to himself as a “meat and potatoes” legislator. The four-term Republican senator from Collierville, a self-described policy wonk, is considering a run for governor in 2018. But if the race boils down to charisma, he says the media will have to determine if he has enough to win the top office.

12. Last Word: Mudslide, The Deannexation Storm and Kilzer at Calvary -

Lots of news on a very rainy day including the flooding from the constant rain that closed some schools and cancelled a lot of other events. And then there was a mudslide on Riverside Drive from the bluff overlooking Tom Lee Park and the Mississippi River. The rain has also pushed the Wolf River to the point that it is now over some parts of the greenway in Germantown.

13. Bill Would Open Door for Utilities to Expand Broadband -

Legislation to expand broadband access across Tennessee is evolving – by necessity.

State Rep. Kevin Brooks’ bill HB1303 to allow public utilities to provide Internet service outside their footprint is alive, he says, but it is being “argued vehemently.”

14. The Week Ahead: February 29, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? We know what you’ll be doing Tuesday (voting, of course!), but plenty of nonpolitical happenings grace this week’s calendar too – from a trio of Grizzlies games to a fundraiser supporting fair housing.

15. Making the Needle Move: Corporate Men Behind the Birth of the UNCF Telethon -

Editor’s note: Part two of a two-part series. What contributed to the success of the history-making UNCF Lou Rawls telethon? Leadership, collaboration, teamwork and a respect for the individual goals of participating partners.

16. Teachers Wary of Haslam’s Push For Increased Pay -

Pushing a budget with more than $100 million for K-12 teacher pay raises, Gov. Bill Haslam says Tennessee is taking education to new levels by raising standards, linking teacher evaluations to student performance and expanding education options.

17. Only So Much Durham Could Blame on Media -

It’s little wonder state Rep. Jeremy Durham had to take a two-week break from the General Assembly.

18. Minority Leader Harris Confident Even on Wrong Side of Supermajority -

Lee Harris says he ran for state Senate because he felt Memphis could do better on Capitol Hill, defeating Ophelia Ford in 2014.

19. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

20. Last Word: New Minority Business Numbers, The House Affair and The Heights -

The recently revived discussion on minority business in Memphis is about to go back on the front burner again. Fueling the intensity are new U.S. Census numbers. They show the percentage of business receipts in Memphis produced by black-owned businesses has dropped since the 2007 census numbers showed a 1.08 percent share of those receipts by black-owned businesses. That in a city whose population is 63 percent African-American.
The drop to below one percent is even though the overall receipts in 2012 were higher than they were in 2007.
Madeline Faber is the first to report the new numbers as part of a cover story in our weekly, The Memphis News, that will be on the streets and in the racks Saturday, on-line Friday afternoon.
The numbers are such a telling story and such an important indicator that we broke it out as its own story in advance of the cover story.

21. Wal-Mart's Shutdown Creates New Food Deserts -

FAIRFIELD, Ala. (AP) — Wal-Mart's decision to shutter 154 stores across the country means that, starting Thursday, residents without cars in a neighborhood near a historically black college outside Birmingham, Alabama, will have to cross dangerous roadways on foot to get fresh produce and meat. Come Friday, folks in Coal Hill, Arkansas, will need to drive 15 miles to get to the nearest supermarket and pharmacy. Low-income neighbors of Wichita State University in Kansas, too, will be losing quick access to fresh groceries.

22. Tennessee Senate Votes to End Emissions Tests for New Cars -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The state Senate overwhelmingly passed a bill Thursday to end emissions testing in Tennessee for new cars, brushing aside concerns that relaxing standards might be a bad idea in light of the Volkswagen scandal.

23. The Persecution of Jeremy Durham -

Inhumane and unfair: That’s the only way to describe the “liberal media’s” treatment of state Rep. Jeremy Durham over the last month.

24. Sledge Joins Paragon Private Banking Team -

Julia Sledge has joined Paragon Bank as portfolio manager in private banking. Sledge has more than 30 years of experience in the banking industry, holding leadership positions at both Union Planters Bank and Cadence Bank. In her new role, she’ll provide service and support to Paragon’s private banking team.

25. Last Word: El Chapo and Memphis, First Filers for August and Origins in Graffiti -

The Mississippi River at Memphis crested and then it rained.
The weekend rain added about two-tenths of an inch by Saturday to Friday’s crest.
But by Sunday, the river had dropped to 39.12 feet, which is still more than five feet above flood stage.

26. Refugees, Regents, Privatization On Tap for New Session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

27. Corker Says Visa Waivers a Bigger Risk Than Refugees -

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker says he believes the nation needs to stop admitting Syrian refugees until security problems are solved, but the nation’s “bigger risk” in letting terrorists slip into the country lies with the nation’s Visa Waiver Program.

28. Knee-Jerk Outbreak -

A SAD STATE OF AFFAIRS. WASHINGTON, D.C. – The United States government has mobilized against a clear threat to the country.

Troops have been sent to identify and capture members of an ersatz government openly operating here in defiance of federal law. This group claims theirs as the only true religion, and that laws be based on it as prescribed in the tome of that religion. They believe no other laws to be valid in the eyes of God, and no rights assigned or any authority recognized if any are based on such godless laws. They seek to prohibit the teaching, or even mention, of any other religion in schools.

29. City Council to Vote on Idlewild Gate, Water Rate Hike -

A gate across Idlewild Street between two competing supermarket projects in Midtown tops the Memphis City Council’s next-to-last meeting of the year.

The council is to vote Tuesday, Dec. 1, on a resolution that would close Idlewild south of Union Avenue to vehicular traffic and install a gate. The reason, according to the resolution, is to prevent motorists coming from Union Avenue and the two developments from cutting through the residential area.

30. If Fear Is Goal, Terrorists Have Won in Tennessee -

The terrorists who struck Paris three weeks ago succeeded in more than killing and wounding hundreds of people. Their attack is pitting Americans against each other in how to respond, and Tennessee politicians are no exception.

31. LUCB Rejects Belz Application, Puts Midtown Mixed-Use Project in Jeopardy -

Balancing competing businesses, city engineering code and neighborhood input came to a head at a Thursday, Nov. 12, Office of Planning and Development meeting when the Land Use Control Board decided to reject a traffic-blocking gate across the south side of Idlewild Street in Midtown Memphis.

32. Tennessee’s Landlords Find Hidden Costs of Privatization -

Murfreesboro businessman Tom Hyde felt the sting of Tennessee’s privatization practices two years ago when a representative of Jones Lang Lasalle notified him he would have to pay the company a commission as part of his next lease agreement.

33. Raise Gas Tax or Borrow? How to Fund Road Projects -

Tennessee has an $8 billion backlog of transportation projects and not enough funds to pay for them, largely because the state gas tax, which funds those projects, hasn’t been increased in 26 years.

34. Ramsey Clear in Push to Politicize Supreme Court -

Republican Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey has a penchant for igniting flames of partisanship, and the retirement of Tennessee Supreme Court Justice Gary Wade is no exception.

35. 'En Fuego' -

When Southaven Mayor Darren Musselwhite took office in June 2013, one of the first tasks that landed on his desk was a long-planned regional outlet mall.

The outlet mall, planned for a roughly 33-acre site at Church Road and Interstate 55 in the DeSoto County city, had been on the drawing board for some time, but the recession and its aftermath caused developers and Mississippi officials to put it on hold.

36. Events -

Dance Scholars Inc. will host Field Trip performances Thursday and Friday, July 30-31, at Trinity United Methodist Church’s education center, 1738 Galloway Ave. The junior camp performance is Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and the senior camp performance is Friday from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Cost is $2 per child and free for adults. RSVP required; call 901-301-3262.

37. Events -

Dance Scholars Inc. will host Field Trip performances Thursday and Friday, July 30-31, at Trinity United Methodist Church’s education center, 1738 Galloway Ave. The junior camp performance is Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and the senior camp performance is Friday from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Cost is $2 per child and free for adults. RSVP required; call 901-301-3262.

38. With No Real Rival, Tennessee Republicans Attack Their Own -

Republicans are sitting in Tennessee’s political catbird seat, but that doesn’t keep them from flying off in different directions.

Elected political leaders of the same stripe found themselves at odds this year over the Bible as a state book, Common Core education standards and Insure Tennessee, Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to catch 280,000 people in a medical coverage gap.

39. SEC is Better With Steve Spurrier in It -

HOOVER, Ala. – If you’re a Tennessee fan, you don’t like him. He was the one who said you can’t spell Citrus without “U-T.”

He started his record-setting 23rd appearance as a coach at the 2015 SEC Media Days by zinging the Vols for their 7-6 season, saying they were “celebrating big” while casting South Carolina’s 7-6 season as a disaster averted.

40. Tennessee’s ‘Fighting 26’ Democrats Work to Stay Relevant -

Sometimes Tennessee Democrats must feel like a tree that falls in the forest: Does anyone hear them?

When Democratic legislative leaders called for a special session this summer on Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam’s market-based plan to use federal dollars to catch 280,000 working people in a health care coverage gap, they found themselves alone.

41. Special Action on Same-Sex Nuptials a Waste of Time -

With Republican lawmakers scrambling for a response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay-marriage ruling, Tennesseans on both sides of the issue say they are seeking "equality."

Immediately after the court’s decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville said, "Love and equality won. I’m glad the Supreme Court ruled on the right side of history."

42. Southern Heritage Defined Differently Across Tennessee -

Tennessee’s loyalty was divided in the Civil War, and 150 years later, little is changed as the debate over Confederate symbols arises in the wake of the racist-fueled South Carolina church massacre.

43. State Gives Environmental Award to Agricenter’s Wilson -

Agricenter International president John Charles Wilson has received a lifetime achievement award from the state of Tennessee.

44. State Gives Environmental Award To Agricenter’s Wilson -

Agricenter International president John Charles Wilson has received a lifetime achievement award from the state of Tennessee.

45. This week in Memphis history: June 19-25 -

1985: The Center City Revenue Finance Corp. takes the first step toward financing a residential development to be called South of Beale, bounded by Fourth and Third streets and Lt. George W. Lee and Linden avenues – the block where FedExForum is now.

46. TruGreen Selects East Memphis for New Headquarters -

TruGreen is moving more than 300 Memphis-area employees and its corporate headquarters to a 65,000-square-foot space at the Forum II office building in East Memphis, the company announced Friday.

The new headquarters, which will eventually house up to 400 of TruGreen’s corporate associates, will be part of the three-building Forum Office Complex, situated at the intersection of Kirby Parkway and Poplar Avenue.

47. Ramsey: No Medicaid Expansion Until 2017 -

The Tennessee legislative session ended in late April, giving itself a little more than two and a-half months to handle the state’s business. That’s plenty of time, according to Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey.

48. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

49. Creative Class Boosting Downtown Memphis Office Market -

With the clock on its Downtown office sublease running, officials at Sullivan Branding began looking for a new home.

The Memphis-based marketing, advertising and public relations firm needed a dynamic environment, one that would appeal not just to clients but to existing and prospective employees.

50. Jewell Joins Orpheum's Development Foundation -

Ron Jewell is joining the staff of the Memphis Development Foundation, which operates the Orpheum Theatre, as vice president of operations at the forthcoming Centre for Performing Arts Education.

51. Jewell Joins Staff of Memphis Development Foundation -

Ron Jewell is joining the staff of the Memphis Development Foundation, which operates the Orpheum Theatre, as vice president of operations at the forthcoming Centre for Performing Arts Education.

52. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

53. Biblical Lessons Lost in Lack of Health Care Debate -

Tennessee’s legislators spent hours this session arguing over guns and whether to pass a law making the Bible the state book of Tennessee.

In fact, the Bible bill took two days of debate in the House, where it passed, and thorough discussion in the Senate, before it died – at least until next year.

54. Dr. Neil Bomar Joins Support Solutions -

Dr. Neil Bomar has joined Support Solutions as its first staff psychiatrist, a role in which he will help individuals with intellectual disabilities and those with a history of long-term mental illness who are currently supported by the organization. Bomar’s addition makes Support Solutions one of the only industry providers in the Mid-South to provide this level of support.

55. This Week in Memphis History: April 17-23 -

2014: The formal dedication of the Overton Park Bike Gate on the western edge of the Midtown landmark draws a crowd of several hundred people, dozens of whom come with their bicycles for a ride from the gate on East Parkway to Shelby Farms Park. The nearby Hampline connecting the park to the western end of the Greenline was still under construction at the time.

56. An ‘Epiphany’ for Legislators on In-State Tuition -

Tina Sharma grew up in Tennessee, graduated from Martin Luther King High School in Nashville and enrolled at Belmont University. She calls the Volunteer State home.

57. Pinnacle Awards Honor Commercial Real Estate Standouts -

The local commercial real estate community gathered at the Memphis Botanic Garden Thursday, April 9, for the 14th annual Pinnacle Awards. Every year, the Memphis Area Association of Realtors Commercial Council honors its members based on their transactional volume, merit and community activity.

58. Anti-Abortion Legislation Finds Little Resistance -

Buoyed by passage of Amendment 1 last fall, legislation restricting abortions is starting to roll – with relative ease – through the General Assembly.

Rep. Susan Lynn, R-Mt. Juliet, and Rep. Matthew Hill, R-Jonesborough, began the push recently with measures backed by Gov. Bill Haslam, House Speaker Beth Harwell, Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey and the Republican ranks. Their bills couldn’t even draw enough resistance to require a roll-call vote.

59. Events -

Memphis Area Master Gardeners will host its 2015 Spring Fling Garden Show and Plant Sale, themed “Growin’ Down the Garden Path,” Friday and Saturday, March 20-21, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Farmers Market Big Red Barn at Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove Road. The event will include more than 50 vendors, presentations and hands-on demonstrations, children’s activities and more. Admission and parking are free. Visit memphisareamastergardeners.org.

60. Grizzlies Turnaround Not As Easy as Flipping a Switch -

Consider just one headline from Yahoo Sports to demonstrate how fast a single word in a quote can blow up and get the media and fans alike into panic mode:

“Have the Memphis Grizzlies gone ‘soft’ since going Green?”

61. Battle of the Band(width) -

Joyce Coltrin’s business is wandering in Bradley County’s technological wilderness. And it’s likely to remain there – because of legal threats – until the General Assembly changes state law.

62. Events -

Memphis Music Commission will present the sixth annual Emissaries of Memphis Music gala Thursday, March 12, at 7 p.m. at the Kroc Center, 800 East Parkway S. The event will honor the musical contributions of seven Memphis women, ranging from musical artists to industry professionals. Tickets are $50. Visit memphismusic.org.

63. Space Race -

Businesses looking for office space in Nashville are learning a painful lesson that homebuyers already know – prices are high, and if you take time to shop around for a better deal, someone else is likely to snap up the property, leaving you out in the cold.

64. Events -

The 2015 Mid-South Home Expressions Show, presented by the West Tennessee Home Builders Association and Home Builders Association of North Mississippi, will be held Friday and Saturday, March 6-7, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, March 8, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Landers Center, 4560 Venture Drive in Southaven. The show will feature home improvement seminars and exhibitors showcasing home trends and products. Buy tickets at midsouthhomeexpressions.com.

65. Events -

Rhodes College will host physicist and author Brian Greene as part of its Communities in Conversation series Thursday, March 5, at 6 p.m. in the McCallum Ballroom, Bryan Campus Life Center at Rhodes, 2000 North Parkway. Greene will present “The Cosmos: From the Big Bang to the End of Time.” Cost is free. Visit rhodes.edu.

66. Eliminating Hall Income Tax Raises New Problems -

Republican lawmakers are lining up legislation to reduce or phase out Tennessee’s Hall income tax on investments, even though Gov. Bill Haslam is concerned about losing revenue amid the state’s economic ups and downs.

67. Standing Tall -

Lucille O’Neal is 6-foot-2 and the mother of former NBA All-Star Shaquille O’Neal. But that’s not why she stands tall.

“When we make mistakes,” she said, “we have to live with the mistakes. But if we don’t look up, we can’t get up. When we go through trials and tribulations, everything starts with us. It’s never too late for a new beginning.”

68. This week in Memphis history: February 27-March 5 -

1985: The Center City Commission declared 1984 a “record year” for Downtown, with seven residential projects totaling 500 units underway, bringing the total number of Downtown apartments and condominiums to 1,113 with almost 2,000 people living Downtown. In office development, 13 projects were underway in 1984, adding 1.3 million square feet of office space. The projects included the renovations of Brinkley Plaza and the Falls Building as well as construction of Morgan Keegan Tower and One Memphis Place.

69. Shaq’s Mother to Speak at HopeWorks Event -

Memphis-based HopeWorks Inc. will host its seventh annual Morning of Hope breakfast and fundraising event Saturday, March 28 from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Woodland Hills Event Center in Cordova. Lucille O’Neal, motivational speaker and mother of former NBA star Shaquille O’Neal, will be the keynote speaker.

70. Haslam Wary of Gas Tax Hike -

Despite low gas prices, a backlog on road projects and prevailing winds for fuel-tax reform, Gov. Bill Haslam is pulling back from a gas-tax increase this session.

After floating the possibility of raising the tax in December, the Republican governor appears to be changing course, in part because of his loss in a Senate committee on Insure Tennessee, the Medicaid expansion alternative that failed to make debate in the full House or Senate.

71. Shaq’s Mother to Speak at HopeWorks Fundraiser -

Memphis-based HopeWorks Inc. will host its seventh annual Morning of Hope breakfast and fundraising event Saturday, March 28 from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Woodland Hills Event Center in Cordova. Lucille O’Neal, motivational speaker and mother of former NBA star Shaquille O’Neal, will be the keynote speaker.

72. Insure Tennessee Fails to Win Sound Bite Test -

Fresh off a resounding November re-election victory, Gov. Bill Haslam ran smack dab into the reality of Tennessee politics: The Republican Party abhors anything connected to President Barack Obama.

73. Both Sides Dig In for Insure Tennessee Special Session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 280,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

74. Both Sides Dig In For Insure Tennessee Special Session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 200,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

75. Raymond James Tower Fetches $20 Million -

How much is a 21-story skyscraper overlooking the Mississippi River worth? About $1 million a floor.

New York-based investor Jacob Sofer will pay Parkway Properties around $20 million for the Raymond James Tower at 50 N. Front St. Downtown, according to several people with knowledge of the transaction. The Shelby County Assessor of Property’s 2014 appraisal for the 340,000-square-foot building is $24 million.

76. Plans Emerge for Universal Life Building -

In major Downtown news, the on-again, off-again redevelopment of the Universal Life Insurance Co. building Downtown appears to be on.

77. Morris: Public Transit Tops Downtown Goals -

A stronger and more vital public transportation presence in Downtown and a plan for development of land south of Central Station are two priorities of the Downtown Memphis Commission for the coming year.

78. Tennessee’s Health Problem -

For years, the concept of “wellness” or “preventive health” measures has been the “eat your vegetables” mantra of a growing national discussion on health care that has focused primarily on the cost of such care and who should pay for it or try to control it.

79. Dobbs the Latest in Line of Dual-Threat UT Quarterbacks -

If the University of Tennessee’s football team gains bowl eligibility with a victory Saturday at Vanderbilt, it can look back to a quarterback change Oct. 25 against Alabama as a pivotal point in the season.

80. More at Moore -

The large old trees on its campus and the large paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

81. Moore Tech Awakens -

The large old trees on its campus and the paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

82. Hillwood to Launch Two Spec Buildings in DeSoto County -

A Texas-based development firm will start turning dirt soon on a massive new business park in DeSoto County.

Hillwood Investment Properties is expected to begin site work in around 30 days on Legacy Park, a 266-acre distribution and business park on the south side of Goodman Road, just east of Hacks Cross Road near Polk Lane.

83. Real Estate Rally -

Commercial real estate can offer insight into the strength of the local economy. Through the office, retail, industrial and apartment developments that mark the region the economy at work in the real world can be seen.

84. Events -

The South Main Art Trolley Tour will be held Friday, Oct. 31, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in the South Main Historic Arts District. Email info@southmainmemphis.net.

85. US to Track Everyone Coming From Ebola Nations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stepping up their vigilance against Ebola, federal authorities said Wednesday that everyone traveling into the U.S. from Ebola-stricken nations will be monitored for symptoms for 21 days. That includes returning American aid workers, federal health employees and journalists, as well as West African travelers.

86. Olive Branch Business Park Closer to Development -

A Texas-based development firm could start turning dirt soon on a massive new business park in Olive Branch.

Hillwood Investment Properties is expected to close on a land purchase next week that will clear the way for Legacy Park, a 265-acre distribution and business park on the south side of Goodman Road, just east of Hacks Cross Road near Polk Lane.

87. Coverage Gap Leaves Rural Tennessee Hospitals on Life Support -

Four rural hospitals have closed and dozens are at risk of shuttering: That’s the fallout, some say, from Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision not to join the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and tap into millions in promised federal funds for Tennessee’s financially-strapped health care institutions.

88. Al Green Among Kennedy Center Honorees -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's a rare honor for an artist to receive accolades from the president, let alone have him sing one of your tunes.

Now Al Green can claim both, knowing that President Barack Obama is a fan. Green is among five artists receiving this year's Kennedy Center Honors, the national awards for influencing American culture through the arts, the center announced Thursday.

89. Election Commission Certifies August Vote -

The Shelby County Election Commission certified the August election results Monday, Aug. 25, at the beginning of a week that includes an early oath of office for those elected to county offices on the ballot.

90. Source: Horizon Under Contract To Be Purchased -

The Horizon, an uncompleted 16-story residential tower overlooking the Mississippi River on the southern end of Downtown, could change hands soon.

A yet-to-be-identified buyer is under contract to purchase the tower, according to sources familiar with the effort.

91. The Q Party -

CRISIS AVERTED. It’s all a matter of perspective.

At the height of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis, a friend’s father was in Corinth, Miss., on business. He was outside the courthouse having a cigarette and waiting for an appointment when he overheard a conversation between two old men on a bench.

92. Deadline to Clear Up Health Law Eligibility Near -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Hundreds of thousands of people who signed up under the new health care law risk losing their taxpayer-subsidized insurance unless they act quickly to resolve questions about their citizenship or immigration status. The government warned on Tuesday that they have just over three weeks to show that they're eligible.

93. Ask a Lawyer -

JUDGED BY LAWYERS. Q: What do you when you have a lawyer buried up to the neck in sand?

A: Not enough sand.

Lawyers can’t catch a break.

Q: What the difference between a lawyer and a catfish?

94. Dohmen Life Science Adds Space in SE Memphis -

Dohmen Life Science Services is expanding its footprint in Southeast Memphis.

The operator of the pharmaceutical logistics company DDN recently inked lease renewals and an expansion that pushed its occupancy to 628,000 square feet.

95. From Despair to Belief -

A July weekday afternoon, about 2:45. It’s the perfect time for just about anyone to be nodding off in class.

But in the basement of Midtown Church of Christ, where HopeWorks Inc. is housed, class is in session and a dozen men and their teacher are having a lively discussion.

96. ‘Significant Headwinds’ -

When Gov. Bill Haslam joined local economic development and civic officials at FedExForum in January to announce that Conduit Global would open a call center in Shelby County that would employ 1,000 people over the next three to five years, it provided a much-needed boost to the local office real estate sector.

97. Departing PDS Head Says Education Needs ‘Disruption’ -

The departing headmaster of Presbyterian Day School says American education needs more of a revolution than evolution.

Lee Burns is leaving the East Memphis private school to become head of school at the McCallie School in Chattanooga, Tenn., after 14 years in Memphis. He was the keynote speaker Wednesday, June 11, for the second day of the Martin Institute for Teaching Excellence’s two-day summer conference on the PDS campus.

98. Medical Makeover -

After suffering from years of benign neglect, a new, more invigorated Memphis Medical Center is finally beginning to take shape.

A drive or walk around the area these days shows the hallmarks of a changing landscape – bulldozers, backhoes, cranes and construction crews working feverishly to forge the new urban environment.

99. Some Expect Costly, Divisive Justice Campaign -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Tennessee could be facing the costliest state Supreme Court election in its history now that conservatives have targeted three sitting justices on the state's highest court.

100. FedEx Consolidates Office Space -

For months, commercial real estate brokers have been watching closely for any signs that might hint at what FedEx Corp. and its subsidiaries will do with the hundreds of thousands of square feet of commercial space the Memphis-based company leases across the area.