» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Randy McNally' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:0
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:0
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. If Only Legislators Could Focus on Important Issues -

A year-old law enabling Tennessee colleges and universities to keep secret the “proprietary” fees they pay money managers for handling risky investments is likely to be reviewed this year.

2. Tennessee Governor: Sanctuary Bill to Become Law Sans Signature -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday he will allow legislation billed as a push against sanctuary cities to become law without his signature, saying it has stirred up irrational fear on both sides.

3. Tenn. Legislature Breaks TNReady Gridlock, Adjourns Session -

NASHVILLE – The House and Senate broke gridlock Wednesday night on problems stemming from the results of troubled TNReady testing by passing legislation saying no “adverse action” would be taken against teachers, students or schools for poor test scores.

4. Opioid Litigation, FedExForum NonCompete Top Local Law Developments -

Here are some of the legal issues making news in recent months.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery says lawsuits by local prosecutors over the opioid epidemic are complicating his efforts to reach a multistate settlement with drug companies. In response, the prosecutors, who represent about half of Tennessee's counties, say local communities lose out when lawsuits like theirs are rolled into one settlement.

5. Sex Week Seems Tame Compared to Session Antics -

Why should UT Knoxville be limited to its annual Sex Week when Tennessee legislators are celebrating year-round?

Based on the scurrilous reports published in these parts over the last couple of years, state legislators are doing more than collecting per diems in Nashville, and there’s plenty of evidence to prove it.

6. UT Board of Trustees Appointees Go Awry -

NASHVILLE – One of Gov. Bill Haslam’s main legislative pushes ran afoul of a Legislature angry about everything from Sex Week at the University of Tennessee to the handling of the football coach hiring at the Knoxville campus.

7. UT Board of Trustees Appointees Go Awry -

NASHVILLE – One of Gov. Bill Haslam’s main legislative pushes ran afoul of a Legislature angry about everything from Sex Week at the University of Tennessee to the handling of the football coach hiring at the Knoxville campus.

8. Lots of Noise, But Few Results in Legislature -

Just when you think the Tennessee Legislature is going off the deep end, someone will throw them a bungee cord. Maybe a rope made out of hemp would work better because a bungee cord leaves people bouncing, never quite reeling them in.

9. Tennessee Lawmaker Running Again Despite Allegations -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee state lawmaker has announced that he is running for re-election despite being mired in scandal after three of his former teenage basketball players accused him of sexual misconduct when he was their coach about three decades ago.

10. Tennessee Lawmaker Questions Motives of Female Accusers -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee lawmaker on Wednesday questioned the motives of three women who accused him of sexual misconduct as their high school basketball coach decades ago, but he didn't outright deny the accusations.

11. Last Word: Yoga's Return, Strickland on MLK50 and The Broad Water Tower Move -

The two parks where Confederate monuments were removed this past December will feature some new experiences now that spring is here both by the calendar and by all that flowers and clouds that are heavy with rain. Memphis Greenspace, the nonprofit that bought Health Sciences and Memphis Parks from the city at the end of 2017, will roll out its first programming for the two parks next week including a Truth Booth at Memphis Park along with the return of Downtown Yoga. It will be tai chi Tuesdays and yoga Thursdays at Health Sciences Park along with a lunchtime music series.

12. Leaders Want State Rep To Resign Over Charges -

The speaker of Tennessee’s Senate has joined the call for a lawmaker to resign after three women accused him of sexual misconduct as their high school basketball coach decades ago.

Speaker Randy McNally called for Republican Rep. David Byrd to step down Wednesday. House Speaker Beth Harwell has also asked for his resignation.

13. Questions for Feds Delay TennCare Work Requirement Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee lawmakers have temporarily hit pause on their push to make many able-bodied adults either work, volunteer, or take classes if they don't have children younger than 6, in order to keep their TennCare health coverage.

14. Dems Need Viable Candidates to Catch Blue Wave -

Republicans called it the “kickoff” to what they hope will be a great election season.

Democrats are downplaying a lopsided loss in the 14th Senate District special election, saying it won’t represent results later this year in President Donald Trump’s midterm.

15. Judge Dismisses Tennessee Lawsuit Over Refugee Resettlement -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A judge has dismissed the state of Tennessee's lawsuit against the federal government over the refugee resettlement program.

The Republican-led Tennessee General Assembly filed the lawsuit in March 2017, arguing the refugee program is forcing the state to spend money on additional services, including health care and education.

16. Tennessee Declines to Cover Legislative California Trip -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee's Republican House and Senate leaders say the state isn't paying lawmakers or staffers to attend a California legislative summit.

In a letter Thursday, Senate Speaker Randy McNally and House Speaker Beth Harwell said the state won't cover the National Conference of State Legislatures conference trip in Los Angeles because of California's ban on state-paid trips to Tennessee.

17. Florida’s Epiphany On Guns Means Little in Tennessee -

Memphis resident Stevie Moore has been waging a war to take illegal guns off the streets since someone shot his son in the head with an AK-47 15 years ago.

“It’s my mission to fight these guns whatever way I can,” says Moore, who founded the organization Freedom From Unnecessary Negatives in an effort to steer youth away from violence.

18. Republican Reeves Wins Special Election to Tennessee Senate -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican Shane Reeves has won a special election to fill a vacant seat in the Tennessee Senate.

19. Civil War Re-Enactor Outflanked On Statues, Medicaid Expansion -

When state Rep. Steve McDaniel was a youngster he often read the historical marker at the intersection of Highway 22 and Wildersville Road detailing Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s first West Tennessee raid in the Battle of Parker’s Crossroads.

20. GOP Averts Ugly Battle with Corker Opting Out -

It’s not often Tennessee’s Republican legislative leaders have to endorse a congressional candidate against a vacillating opponent. But the General Assembly’s GOP must have been worried about losing to a Democrat as they consolidated forces behind U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn in an effort to maintain a hold on the U.S. Senate seat Bob Corker might be vacating.

21. Last Word: Corker & Blackburn, More Frost and Dale Watson's Move to The Haven -

It's possible around City Hall these days to get your RFQs mixed up with your RFPs. And there is a difference in requests for qualifications and requests for proposals. Usually RFQs come before RFPs – but there are exceptions – loopholes. The latest RFQ out of City Hall – album title or t-shirt slogan? – is for the adaptive reuse of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art.

22. State Senate Speaker, 18 Other Senators Endorse Blackburn -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee's Senate leader and 18 other Republican state senators have endorsed U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn in her U.S. Senate bid.

23. Consensus on Gun Legislation? Not on Your Life -

That burning smell emanating from the General Assembly isn’t coming from the flame of bipartisanship. More likely it’s the result of scorched-earth politics.

Even though a weapons measure called the “carry-like-a-cop” bill died recently in a House committee, the gap between Republicans and Democrats on gun legislation is, for the most part, about as wide as the range of a Barrett .50-caliber rifle, more than 2.5 miles.

24. Comptroller: City Obeyed Most Rules in Sale of Parks -

The state Comptroller’s Office has determined the city of Memphis’ Dec. 20, 2017, sale of Health Sciences Park and the easement to Memphis Park to Memphis Greenspace Inc. appropriately followed related laws with the exception of requiring Memphis Greenspace to submit an application so it could gauge the nonprofit’s financial stability.

25. Comptroller: City Obeyed Most Rules in Sale of Parks -

The state Comptroller’s Office has determined the city of Memphis’ Dec. 20, 2017, sale of Health Sciences Park and the easement to Memphis Park to Memphis Greenspace Inc. appropriately followed related laws with the exception of requiring Memphis Greenspace to submit an application so it could gauge the nonprofit’s financial stability.

26. Details Slow Plan to Shrink UT’s Board of Trustees -

Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure the University of Tennessee board of trustees appears to be a work in progress.

Timing is critical, too, with the 2018 session of the General Assembly moving at a snail’s pace and UT President Joe DiPietro’s contract set to run out in mid-2019.

27. Comptroller: City of Memphis Followed Most Rules in Sale of Parks -

The state Comptroller’s Office has determined the city of Memphis’ Dec. 20, 2017, sale of Health Sciences Park and the easement to Memphis Park to Memphis Greenspace Inc. appropriately followed related laws with the exception of requiring Memphis Greenspace to submit an application so it could gauge the nonprofit’s financial stability.

28. Customer-Focused Government Not Always a Pleaser -

Gov. Bill Haslam is fond of saying government should run more like a business, and during his eighth and final State of the State address he invoked the term “customer-focused” at least twice in a victory lap.

29. Last Word: 50 Years Ago, Skeleton Hotel in Court and New Moves on Forrest -

It was 50 years ago Thursday that the event that sparked the 1968 sanitation workers strike happened near Colonial and Sea Isle in East Memphis. City sanitation workers Robert Walker and Echol Cole were killed when the trash compactor on back of their city truck malfunctioned and crushed them.

30. Rotating Forrest Bust Out of Capitol Gains Momentum -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s days in the State Capitol could be numbered. Lt. Gov. Randy McNally, an Oak Ridge Republican, says he could support a move to rotate Forrest’s bust out of the Capitol and make sure Capitol displays are “more reflective of the entire history of Tennessee.”

31. Towns Sponsoring Gun Security Bills in a ‘Dangerous World’ -

NASHVILLE – State Rep. Joe Towns was like a lot of other legislators when he arrived at the renovated Cordell Hull Building for the start of the 2018 legislative session.

32. Report: 538 Public Records Exemptions in Tennessee Law -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A report has found that there are now 538 exemptions to Tennessee's public records law, about six times as many as there were three decades ago.

According to the state comptroller's office, the Tennessee Public Records Act only had two statutory exceptions when it was enacted in 1957. By 1988, a legislative committee reported there were 89 exceptions.

33. Reeves Wins GOP Special Election Primary in Tennessee Senate -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Small-business owner Shane Reeves has topped former state Rep. Joe Carr in the Republican primary of a Tennessee Senate special election.

34. Last Word: Eureka Education, Confederate Monuments in Court and Dillon Brooks -

Supermarkets are hard. That is the tag line in every discussion about getting a supermarket or grocery store for a given part of town that doesn’t have one. And once a new supermarket goes up somewhere else, there is inevitably word that a competitor or two is going to build nearby. The discussion always includes the mandatory recitation of the 3 to 4 percent profit margin stores operate on, which even knowledgeable critics of the decisions about where to locate and not to locate stores acknowledge is accurate.

35. Tennessee Governor Touts $30M Plan to Fight Opioid Epidemic -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam touted a $30 million plan Monday that focuses on prevention, treatment and law enforcement to attack an opioid epidemic that kills at least three people a day in Tennessee.

36. Haile Named Tennessee Senate Speaker Pro Tempore -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – State Sen. Ferrell Haile will take over duties as Tennessee Senate speaker pro tempore.

Republican Senate Speaker Randy McNally of Oak Ridge announced the appointment during a Thursday session.

37. Thompson Wants Session Suspended for MLK Events -

Democratic state Rep. Dwayne Thompson of Cordova wants legislative leaders to suspend the current session of the legislature April 4 and 5 so lawmakers can attend events in Memphis marking the 50th anniversary of the sanitation workers strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

38. Despite Need, Expanding Health Care Not in Cards -

Springfield resident Felicity Palma struggled mightily when she moved to Tennessee from Florida two years ago after suffering health problems and losing her job.

The 47-year-old former social worker became homeless for a period when she came here, and now she finds herself in a health insurance coverage gap as she tries to get treatment for ulcers, sciatica, fibroids and thyroid disease. Debt is piling up on her, too, for the care she does receive.

39. Thompson Asks for Suspension of Legislative Session for MLK Anniversary -

Democratic state Rep. Dwayne Thompson of Cordova wants legislative leaders to suspend the current session of the legislature April 4 and 5 so lawmakers can attend events in Memphis marking the 50th anniversary of the sanitation workers strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

40. Shot Fired From Memphis Ignites Civil War Rematch -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest died in 1877, but 140 years later some people just can’t let their hero or the Old South go away.

In fact, the state Legislature is set to reignite the Civil War – to some degree – in 2018. We hope no gunshots are fired.

41. Tennessee Lawmakers Head Into Session With Elections Looming -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee lawmakers return Tuesday for a session colored by upcoming elections and Gov. Bill Haslam's final lap before he hits his term limits.

This year, the Republican-led General Assembly likely won't face a monthslong fight over one topic, like the roads-funding package with gas tax hikes and other tax breaks that Haslam ushered into law in 2017.

42. Democrats Look to Cooperate on Key Issues -

With the state’s budget projected to be tight and lawmakers lining up to run for re-election in 2018, the coming legislative session isn’t expected to yield many surprises.

But the 110th General Assembly still has a long row to hoe as the session starts Jan. 9 with new legislative offices and committee rooms in the renovated Cordell Hull Building in downtown Nashville.

43. Haslam Considering Changes to UT Board of Trustees -

Gov. Bill Haslam is considering reducing the number University of Tennessee Board of Trustees members and trimming the number of finalists presented for top leadership positions in the UT system, Lt. Gov. Randy McNally has confirmed.

44. Rep. Black Describes Enduring Sexual Misconduct as Lawmaker -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – U.S. Rep. Diane Black says she knows from personal experience, having endured sexual misconduct as a state lawmaker, why Congress needs to expose federal lawmakers who settled cases, force them to repay any tax dollars involved and ban such taxpayer-funded settlements going forward.

45. Last Word: Grizz Troubles Deepen, Germantown Kroger Enigma and The Strikers -

Tigers over Great Danes Tuesday at the Forum 67 – 58. The Grizz are in Washington Wednesday to play the Wizards and some of the attention around the Grizz is shifting away from what happens on the court. What would you call the place that the Grizz are at this mile marker past Grit & Grind? It is more than a losing streak, says Don Wade in his Press Box column.

46. Officials Break Ground on New Tennessee State Library -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – State officials have broken ground on a new state Library and Archives building slated to be complete in fall 2019.

According to a news release from the Tennessee secretary of state, Secretary of State Tre Hargett, Gov. Bill Haslam, Senate Speaker Randy McNally, House Speaker Beth Harwell and Tennessee State Librarian and Archivist Chuck Sherrill were on hand for the groundbreaking Monday afternoon at the future site of the Nashville facility.

47. Tennessee Senate Speaker Wants Comptroller Probe Into ACT -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The state Senate's leader wants an investigation into the ACT, which hasn't released scores from wrongly administered tests.

Speaker Randy McNally's letter last week asks Comptroller Justin Wilson's office to investigate.

48. Last Word: Grizz Ownership Moves, Confederate Deadline and Medical Family Tree -

As many of us were focused on Tigers football and the journey to Orlando last week, there was word that either both or one of the two minority owners of the Grizz had exercised a buy-sell provision in the NBA team’s unique ownership agreement. And what could be a fight for control of the team’s ownership is underway. The sports website The Athletic broke the story last Thursday. Here it is. It also talks about the timing of this coming with the controversial sacking of David Fizdale, an interim coach at the helm of a changing team and lead owner Robert Pera’s lack of visibility in all things Grizz around the city.

49. Black: State, Congress Should Release Sex Harassment Claims -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Congresswoman Diane Black wants Tennessee's General Assembly and Congress to disclose sexual harassment claims and settlements involving lawmakers and staffers.

50. Senate Speaker: UT to Accept Botched ACT Scores -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The state Senate's leader says the University of Tennessee will accept scores from ACT tests that weren't administered correctly last month, though ACT still won't release scores it deemed invalid.

51. Last Word: Lake District Recycling, The New First and The AAC 'Glass Ceiling' -

The U.S. Senate vote on a tax reform plan is now set for 10 a.m. our time Friday morning following more debate in D.C. that began Thursday as the trigger provision to raise tax rates if economic growth from the proposed tax cuts doesn't materialize was ruled out of order by the Senate parliamentarian. This was the provision on which the support of U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee hinged. And Corker is leading a group of deficit hawks whose block of votes is considered crucial in what happens to a proposal that was being reshaped as midnight approached. Here's Politico with comments from Corker as of late Thursday

52. Flap Over Botched ACT Test Leads Tennessee to Consider SAT -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A disagreement over ACT scores withheld from students at a Tennessee high school could lead state officials to consider moving to a rival assessment test.

Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett and state Senate Speaker Randy McNally were among officials who met with ACT officials Tuesday in an unsuccessful attempt to persuade them to validate the scores of 409 Bearden High School students who took the test last month.

53. Is There Room for Common-Sense Gun Legislation? -

The Tennessee chapter of Moms Demand Action picks its battles judiciously. Once labeled as a bunch of anti-gun extremists, the group is anything but, spokeswoman Kat McRitchie says.

“We seek common ground. We work with legislators on both sides of the aisle. We’re nonpartisan,” McRitchie explains. “We’re simply looking for common-sense gun solutions, which the majority of Americans support.”

54. Grab a Gun, Go See Your State Representative -

When legislative leaders started to allow guns in the Legislative Plaza nearly two years ago, the Sierra Club’s Scott Banbury had his daughter take pictures of him wearing his holstered Ruger and lobbyist ID card to put on lawmakers’ desks with the question: “Is this what you want?”

55. Guns to be Allowed at New Tennessee Legislative Complex -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – People with state-issued handgun carry permits will be allowed to be armed within Tennessee's new legislative office complex.

Lawmakers and staff are beginning their move into the renovated Cordell Hull office building near the state Capitol this week. The facility is scheduled to open to the public this month.

56. Special Panel to Weigh Medical Marijuana in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Legislative leaders are setting up a special committee to examine whether medical marijuana should be legalized in Tennessee.

WKRN-TV reports that the panel appointed by House Speaker Beth Harwell of Nashville and Senate Speaker Randy McNally of Oak Ridge includes eight Republicans and two Democrats. The panel is co-chaired by Rep. Jeremy Faison of Cosby and Sen. Steve Dickerson of Nashville, two Republicans who this year sponsored unsuccessful medical marijuana legislation.

57. Legislature Losing Some Powerful, Familiar Members -

A shakeup in leadership is looming for the state Legislature, though it may portend more of a change in personalities than party strength.

In the House, longtime Rep. Craig Fitzhugh, the affable Democrat from Ripley in West Tennessee, is preparing for a 2018 gubernatorial run, a move that would knock him out of his House seat, at least temporarily, and the position as Democratic Caucus leader.

58. Celebrating Our Independence -

As we celebrate the declaration of our independence from the British Empire, it is important to remember the history behind the holiday. While much of the focus is on BBQ, ball games and fireworks, it is important to reflect on the real meaning of the day.

59. Norris to Oversee Second Panel Reviewing Juvenile Justice -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris is set to oversee a comprehensive review of Tennessee’s juvenile justice system in an effort to reshape the lives of offenders.

60. View From the Hill: Haslam Credits GOP ‘Experiment’ for Tennessee’s Success -

If you ask Gov. Bill Haslam, Republican government is the best thing since sliced bread.

Not only is GOP leadership responsible for a myriad of tax cuts leading to record surpluses and a $37 billion budget funding better K-12 and higher education, shoring up the rainy day and TennCare funds, shrinking state debt and building an economic environment for job creation, Haslam says. It’s even bringing us the cleanest air since before the industrial revolution.

61. Haslam Credits Republican Leadership for Budget, Economic Accomplishments -

With the legislative session finished, Gov. Bill Haslam is touting budget accomplishments and a strong economy as the result of Republican leadership.

In a Capitol Hill press conference shortly after the General Assembly adjourned for the year, the governor called passage of a $37 billion budget, the second consecutive one with no new debt, as the Legislature’s most important act.

62. Tennessee Senate Approves $37B Budget -

The state Senate approved a $37 billion budget Monday complete with the governor’s IMPROVE Act package of fuel tax increases and tax reductions.

Senators passed the measure 28-2 and sent it to the governor despite opposition led by Democratic Sen. Lee Harris of Memphis, who argued the body would be breaking the Copeland cap, a law prohibiting the spending of revenue that exceeds the state economy’s growth rate.

63. Lawmakers Still Seek Answers as Outsourcing Contract Gets Underway -

A majority of Tennessee’s legislators, including several Shelby County lawmakers, are asking the state to hold up on a facilities management outsourcing contract with Jones Lang LaSalle.

Seventy-five of the General Assembly’s 132 members, 17 in the Senate and 58 in the House, have signed a letter to Terry Cowles, director of the Office of Customer Focused Government, asking the office to slow down on outsourcing so it can “study and understand the effect” on public services, the economy and state employees.

64. View From the Hill: IMPROVE Act an Insight Into Testy Election Ahead -

In case anyone’s keeping stats, Senate leadership soundly defeated House leadership this session in the gas tax/tax cut battle.

Whether this is a forerunner to a Republican gubernatorial primary remains to be seen as Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris and House Speaker Beth Harwell weigh decisions. It’s not as if they’d be facing off against each other, though, since businessman Bill Lee and former Economic and Community Development Commissioner Randy Boyd are definitely in the race and not hurting for money.

65. Governor’s Supplemental Budget Includes More Transportation Funding -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris calls the governor’s $125 million supplemental budget a “strong foundation” for completing work on the IMPROVE Act.

66. House Concurs on Gas Tax Senate Version, Sends to Haslam For Signature -

Wrapping up wide-ranging legislation that dominated the opening year of the 110th General Assembly, the House concurred Monday with the Senate’s IMPROVE Act, inserting a $7 million measure to increase property tax breaks for veterans.

67. House, Senate Approve IMPROVE Act -

The House and Senate are nearly ready to send the IMPROVE Act to Gov. Bill Haslam, passing it with relatively wide voting margins after months of debate.

Only one adjustment is needed in a measure providing property tax relief for veterans, the disabled and elderly before the measure can be sent to Haslam.

68. View From the Hill: Tearful End for Non-Citizen Tuition Relief Bill -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari grew so emotional she couldn’t speak. On the verge of tears, the Memphis Democrat started to talk about a high school from her Shelby County district with a large number of undocumented immigrant students.

69. Veterans Want Tax Relief Addressed Separately -

Members of the Legislature’s Veterans Caucus are renewing a call to increase property tax relief statewide for veterans and the elderly in a measure separate from the governor’s IMPROVE Act.

70. Fuel-Tax Bill Short of Votes in the House -

NASHVILLE – Votes aren’t adding up in the House of Representatives for passage of the governor’s gas tax/tax cut legislation.

With floor debate scheduled Wednesday morning, not only is a Republican head count showing lack of support, Democrats aren’t exactly lining up behind the measure. The minority party says it wants concessions on other items from the governor before it can vote for the IMPROVE Act, and some Democrats say they won’t go for a combination of tax cuts for wealthy investors tied to a higher gas tax.

71. Mistreated GOP Legislators Only Want to Be Heard -

Word has it extra tissue will be placed on the desks of some House members in the coming weeks so they can dry their tears of pain.

It seems a faction of the Republican supermajority just hasn’t gotten a fair hearing – from their own party – on opposition to Gov. Bill Haslam’s IMPROVE Act, which contains a dreaded gas and diesel tax increase to rebuild the state’s roads and bridges. It’s the gas tax versus the surplus, which is pretty big at $1 billion in one-time money and another billion in extra recurring money.

72. Norris, Proponents of Current IMPROVE Act Stand Firm as Alternative Bills Are Devised -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris gets revved up when he talks about the IMPROVE Act as a tax-cutting and bridge-safety measure. It’s a message he’s been sending for weeks, yet other lawmakers aren’t catching on.

73. IMPROVE Act Proponents Stand Firm as Alternative Bills Are Devised -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris gets revved up when he talks about the IMPROVE Act as a tax-cutting and bridge-safety measure. It’s a message he’s been sending for weeks, yet other lawmakers aren’t catching on.

74. GOP Happy to ‘Wait and See’ on Medicaid -

Republicans say ho, Democrats say go. In the wake of Trumpcare’s congressional crash, states such as Kansas and North Carolina are joining the majority of the nation in expanding Medicaid rolls.

75. Senate Campaign War Chests Could Swell -

NASHVILLE – Legislation enabling state lawmakers to raise campaign funds during even-year session recesses evolved into a markedly different bill this week – one allowing significant contribution increases for Senate candidates.

76. Immigrant Tuition Break Gaining Support in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A push to offer in-state college tuition rates to students whose parents brought them into the country illegally is picking up unlikely momentum from some Republicans in Tennessee, a deeply conservative state that voted overwhelmingly for President Donald Trump and his tough stance on immigration.

77. Democrats Put Squeeze on Republicans To Defeat Outsourcing of State Assets -

Legislative Democrats are calling on Republicans to join them in passing a slate of bills to combat Gov. Bill Haslam’s outsourcing plans for everything from state parks to facilities management at universities.

78. Democrats Put Squeeze on Republicans to Defeat Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats are calling on Republicans to join them in passing a slate of bills to combat Gov. Bill Haslam’s outsourcing plans for everything from state parks to facilities management at universities.

79. View From the Hill: A Disjointed Stash of Marijuana Bills -

This year’s marijuana bills are a mixed bag.

Rep. Jeremy Faison is sending his medical marijuana legislation to a task force, as opposed to “summer study,” typically considered the trash heap for unwanted bills.

80. Two Memphis Democrats Help Move Amended Fuel-Tax Bill Along -

NASHVILLE – Two Memphis legislators helped move the governor’s IMPROVE Act and fuel-tax increases out of the House Transportation Committee Tuesday, March 21, saying they support a section allowing local governments to raise funds separately for mass transit.

81. Tennessee Legislative Leaders Pursue Open Records Law Review -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee legislative leaders are moving forward with a review of exemptions to the state's open records laws.

The Tennessean reports (http://tnne.ws/2n0EMFh) that Senate Speaker Randy McNally and House Speaker Beth Harwell sent a letter Monday to the Office of Open Records Counsel. They requested a thorough and comprehensive review of exemptions to the Tennessee Public Records Act.

82. Singing Along With Tone-Deaf Legislators -

Often dull, but never boring. They might even make you break out into song.

Halfway through the 2017 session, the General Assembly could be accused of lacking sharpness or sensibility, but what it lacks in luster it makes up for with lots of political song and dance.

83. Norris Presents Amended Fuel-Tax Bill With Larger Sales Tax Cut -

NASHVILLE – Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris pushed a revised fuel-tax bill through the Transportation Committee on Monday, March 13, making a sharper cut in the grocery tax to offset phased-in increases at the gas pump.

84. Norris Presents Amended Fuel-Tax Bill With Larger Sales Tax Cut -

NASHVILLE – Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris pushed a revised fuel-tax bill through the Transportation Committee on Monday, March 13, making a sharper cut in the grocery tax to offset phased-in increases at the gas pump.

85. Tennessee’s First Female State Architect ‘Blessed’ With Great Role Models -

The mother remembers her daughter drawing pictures almost from the time that she could walk. As the girl grew older, the art matured with her. Beautiful landscapes and portraits of people that proved she had more than just a little talent.

86. Tennessee Transgender Bathroom Bill Postponed -

NASHVILLE – Legislation requiring public school students to use restrooms based on their sex at birth is on hold.

State Rep. Mark Pody, saying he wants to bring “common sense” and “clarity” to the matter, took his bill off notice Tuesday in a House Education subcommittee, saying policies and court decisions are changing so quickly he needs more time to amend the measure.

87. View From the Hill: Outsourcing Win More About Turf Than Trends -

As Fall Creek Falls folks celebrate a state decision to postpone park privatization, the question is whether public opposition or failure to follow long-standing state protocol led to the plug-pulling.

88. Rep. Mark Pody Pushes ‘Common Sense’ Transgender Bill Some Say Isn’t Needed -

Despite a reversal of federal guidelines for public school restroom use, state Rep. Mark Pody is prepared to present legislation Tuesday, March 7, restricting bathroom use to a student’s sex at birth.

89. Last Word: Who Needs To Be Watched, Hopdoddy and Fresh Fed Numbers -

Three Memphis City Council members on Behind The Headlines had quite a bit to say about protesters and lists and police surveillance. Council chairman Berlin Boyd and council members Kemp Conrad and Worth Morgan all say the surveillance question, which is the central issue now that the City Hall list has been pared significantly, is complex because of public postings and protests in public places.

90. Pody Pushes ‘Common Sense’ Transgender Bill Some Say Isn’t Needed -

Despite a reversal of federal guidelines for public school restroom use, state Rep. Mark Pody is prepared to present legislation Tuesday, March 7, restricting bathroom use to a student’s sex at birth.

91. Tennessee Leaders Weigh In on Death of Longtime Lawmaker -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Former Sen. Douglas Henry, a lawmaker with the longest tenure in the history of the Tennessee General Assembly, died at 90 years old on Sunday.

92. Former Sen. Douglas Henry, Longest-Serving Lawmaker, Dies -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Former Sen. Douglas Henry, a larger-than-life former state lawmaker with the longest tenure in the history of the Tennessee General Assembly, has died. He was 90.

93. Bills Aimed at Raising Permanent Funding For Road Projects Collide Again This Week -

NASHVILLE – The chairwoman of the House Transportation Subcommittee is defiant in her handling of legislation that could have derailed Gov. Bill Haslam’s fuel-tax plan, a high-profile measure on the panel’s calendar again Wednesday, March 1.

94. Last Word: Gas Tax Conflict, Redbirds Changes and Hidden Office Space -

The CEO of Memphis-based AutoZone, Bill Rhodes, among the corporate leaders meeting with President Donald Trump recently to urge him to abandon plans for a border tax. This is the tax on goods imported to the U.S. from other countries that U.S. Rep. David Kustoff says also has some opposition among Republicans in D.C.

95. Bills Aimed at Raising Road Project Funding Collide Again This Week -

NASHVILLE – The chairwoman of the House Transportation Subcommittee is defiant in her handling of legislation that could have derailed Gov. Bill Haslam’s fuel-tax plan, a high-profile measure on the panel’s calendar again Wednesday, March 1.

96. View From the Hill: ‘Moral Mondays’ Draw Crowds, But Are Lawmakers Listening? -

Johnny and Julie Erwin don’t look like typical protesters, but the senior couple joined the “moral Mondays” ruckus recently at the State Capitol, Johnny wearing his Air Force cap and Julie holding a list of social legislation they oppose.

97. Beavers Shuts Down Office As Protesters Gather Outside -

NASHVILLE – The sponsor of two bills aimed at the LGBT community left the Legislative Plaza in a huff Tuesday, Feb. 21, as protesters gathered around her office to object to her “retaliation” in the wake of a short-circuited press conference.

98. Tennessee Capitol Protests Lead to Call for Tighter Security -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – After recent protests around the state Capitol in Nashville, some Republicans want a crackdown on demonstrators and tougher security requirements for entering the legislative office complex.

99. Tennessee GOP Mulls Capitol Complex Security Clamp-Down -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Republican legislative leaders are suggesting stricter security to enter the Capitol complex after a few dozen protesters interrupted a news conference about transgender bathroom access.

100. View From the Hill: Outsourcing, Rates Worry Park Fans -

Dunlap resident Kathy Gilbert opposes privatization of Fall Creek Falls on a number of fronts.

If a vendor comes in to run the state park, as planned by Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration, she’s worried about the possible loss of jobs or pay and benefits by state employees, the funneling of revenue to private investors and the raising of rates at the state park’s lodge when it’s rebuilt, potentially making it less affordable for families to visit.