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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Change at the Top, Real Estate Action on Bellevue and Produce History -

Welcome back to the work week and however much this is a grind, you are probably having a better work week than David Fizdale who suddenly got the ax from the Grizz front office Monday afternoon. This was not altogether unexpected following a vocal post-game dissent from Marc Gasol after Big Spain came out of what wound up being a Sunday loss to Brooklyn in the fourth quarter – the latest in a string of losses after a strong start to the season by the Grizz.

2. Wiping Slate Clean: Now Less About Who Can Afford It -

The scales of justice in Tennessee are slowly tipping back toward the poor – and not so poor – helping them regain traction lost to often-minor transgressions.

Change is taking place in court battles and in the Republican-controlled Legislature, believe it or not.

3. The Next Four Years -

A week before candidates for the 2018 Shelby County elections could pull qualifying petitions to run, Shelby County Commissioner David Reaves was thinking out loud on Facebook.

“Next four years,” was how it began.

4. Arlington Election Decided, Other Political Milestones on Horizon -

With the Arlington vote count in and awaiting certification from the Shelby County Election Commission, it would seem a light election year in Shelby County is over.

The municipal elections were the only regularly scheduled elections in local politics this year.

5. Last Word: School Days, MLGW Moves Off Beale and Room For Peter Pan To Fly -

The K-12 school year begins Monday for most of Shelby County including the state’s largest public school system right here. Some schools have started earlier and some start later. So remember that in your daily travels going forward even if you don’t have school age children.

6. TCAT Students See the Future, Get Prepared -

Bryan Rippy, 38, chuckles when he says he’s in the prime of his life. But sharpening his skills is no laughing matter, and he understands the importance of raising his value in the job market.

7. Dean Touts ‘Middle Of the Road’ Focus For Democrats -

Former Nashville Mayor Karl Dean is making exactly the same observation in his bid for the Democratic nomination for Tennessee governor that Republicans are making on their side of the 2018 race.

8. Last Word: Rachel Heck, Beale Street's Cover and The Old Peabody -

The “fifth wave” of judicial appointments by President Donald Trump, as The White House termed them, are already causing some political ripples here primarily from state Senator Mark Norris’s appointment to the federal bench.

9. Last Word: Overton Gateway Talks, Norris of the Governor's Race and Coach O -

Shelby County Commissioners have quite the disagreement going in several ways as they try to put another budget season in the books and let the ink dry. As we’ve reported, the commission approved a $1.2 billion county government budget Monday and there is no taking that back – at least as a budget. That now becomes an important detail because in committee sessions Wednesday in advance of next week’s meeting of the full commission, there were five votes to change the proposed county property tax rate from $4.10 to $4.13.

10. Morris Recalls Brother’s Violent Death and Rage -

“Actually, the truth has never been told,” Charlie Morris said this week as he talked about the violent death of his brother 78 years ago in Arlington. Morris, now 96 years old, had family and friends gathered around him at the Memphis Branch NAACP headquarters Monday, July 3, as he marked the new state law that could reopen the investigation into the death of Jessie Lee Bond and other cold cases from the long arc of the civil rights movement.

11. Last Word: Cooper-Young's Controversy, Harris and Norris and Fulmer Returns -

Shelby County Commissioners have at least two hot topics to talk about Wednesday at committee sessions that could take up most if not all of the work day. By the agenda, these sessions go from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. But they have been known to stretch into the afternoon quite a bit.

12. Boyd Talks Gaps In Higher Ed During Whitehaven Stop -

Republican contender for governor Randy Boyd says there is a gap in the state’s Tennessee Promise plan and its reality.

13. Pardue, Benjamin Claim Seats at Arlington Filing Deadline -

One of the four races for alderman in Arlington this September was decided at the Thursday, June 15, noon deadline for candidates to file, as was one of the three school board races.

The two sets of races in Arlington are the only regularly scheduled elections of an otherwise off-election year in Shelby County that has come to include two special elections elsewhere in the county.

14. Pardue, Benjamin Claim Seats at Arlington Filing Deadline -

One of the four races for alderman in Arlington this September was decided at the Thursday, June 15, noon deadline for candidates to file, as was one of the three school board races.

The two sets of races in Arlington are the only regularly scheduled elections of an otherwise off-election year in Shelby County that has come to include two special elections elsewhere in the county.

15. Last Word: Disaster Paperwork, The Whitehaven Plan and Juvenile Justice -

On its way to Washington is the paperwork for a federal disaster declaration sent Wednesday by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam. It includes Shelby County and 11 other Tennessee counties. This is essentially federal funding that will reimburse local government for money they spend up front for these kinds of disasters. The state’s request also includes a call for individual assistance to Shelby County homeowners and business owners whose property was damaged in the Memorial Day weekend storms.

16. Last Word: After the Last Hole, Cutting County Property Taxes and A Recycled Gown -

The story of how the Overton Park Conservancy raised $1 million in two months didn’t go according to the script. It wasn’t large donors, it was a lot of contributions of $250 or less it turns out, many from people who have never been to the park, the zoo or the greensward in particular whether it’s on foot or in a car. There were donations from Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia and every state, except South Dakota.

17. Lee Campaigns in Collierville After Nashville Fundraiser -

The night after he raised $1.3 million in Nashville at the first major fundraiser in his bid for Tennessee governor, Bill Lee was in Collierville for a local Republican Party gathering, along with a few hopefuls in countywide races on the ballot earlier in 2018.

18. A New Life Made Possible by a $170 Discount -

A harassment conviction lingered on the record of Memphis resident Brenda A. for 10 years, the high cost of expungement making it difficult to erase the past.

Like many people convicted of misdemeanors and felonies, she paid her court fees and fines, along with probation costs, years ago, but had trouble cobbling together the money to expunge her record, making it hard to land a good job and make a fresh start.

19. Last Word: Foote Homes Falls, Kellogg Layoffs and The SCS Ask -

Once upon a time in South Memphis it could be difficult to tell where Foote Homes began and Cleaborn Homes ended or vice versa. The key to this was which side of Lauderdale you were looking at. The east side was Cleaborn and the west was Foote with Lauderdale as the dividing line.

20. View From the Hill: GOP Points True North on State’s Moral Compass -

It was billed as the start of the 2018 governor’s race, but the GOP’s Reagan Day Dinner in Murfreesboro last week often sounded more like a tent revival.

Vote for one of these candidates and you’re guaranteed a place in heaven, ran the subtext of the evening, because, after all, everyone knows only Republicans know the road to salvation.

21. Unwilling Private Sector Gives Park Workers a Victory -

Two state parks are celebrating victories in an atmosphere of uncertainty created by the governor’s penchant for privatizing state functions.

Fall Creek Falls drew no bidders for a $20 million plan to hire a vendor who would tear down its inn, construct a new one and take over operations for 10 years. Henry Horton State Park, meanwhile, is set for $10 million in improvements this coming fiscal year, including upgrades to its hospitality facilities, plus a new visitors center, rather than a proposal to raze its inn and not rebuild.

22. Haslam Credits Republican Leadership for Budget, Economic Accomplishments -

With the legislative session finished, Gov. Bill Haslam is touting budget accomplishments and a strong economy as the result of Republican leadership.

In a Capitol Hill press conference shortly after the General Assembly adjourned for the year, the governor called passage of a $37 billion budget, the second consecutive one with no new debt, as the Legislature’s most important act.

23. Lamar Avenue, Austin Peay Highway Projects on Tap for Fiscal 2018 -

With a gas-tax increase approved as part of the governor’s IMPROVE Act, Shelby County will see several projects take off over the next three years, including the much-anticipated Lamar Avenue widening.

24. House Approves Education Fund Concept, But Senate Action Put on Hold -

House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh pushed his K-12 education fund to passage Tuesday, May 9, but the possibility of funding and Senate approval will have to wait until 2018.

Dubbed the “K-12 Block Grant Act,” the measure calls for setting aside $250 million in excess state revenue for interest-generating investment to provide grant money for school systems statewide. Each system could use the funds for state-approved programs such as reading coaches or dual enrollment, items not funded through Tennessee’s Basic Education Program.

25. Last Word: Council Day Issues, 'A Man Of Color' and East Memphis 'Novel' -

A busy day at City Hall Tuesday by the City Council agenda and by at least one completely unplanned moment during council budget committee sessions. It was so busy that at the start of Tuesday’s council session, chairman Berlin Boyd couldn’t find his gavel and technical glitches prompted him to ask for a can of WD-40. Throw in a visit to City Hall by civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson and you have our comprehensive same night rundown of how it went and for whom it went.

26. Last Word: Two Science Marches, Bill Lee Kicks Off and Andrew Young on Ben Hooks -

Rainy Sunday in the city with ponchoed partisans of the Porter-Leath Ragin' Cajun gathering and Africa in April overlapping from the riverfront to Danny Thomas Boulevard. In Germantown, it was a soggy but colorful 5k for the Germantown Municipal School District with shades of blue, orange and of course pink, or was it red?, at different parts of the run.

27. Last Word: Data Night at the Forum, Passing Gas and Graceland's Las Vegas Exit -

It’s a $30,000 fine, about $5k more than expected by most. And Grizz players say they will chip in to pay the fine the NBA levied on coach David Fizdale for his epic rant on the officiating in Game 2 of the playoff series between the Grizz and the Spurs.

28. View From the Hill: Tearful End for Non-Citizen Tuition Relief Bill -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari grew so emotional she couldn’t speak. On the verge of tears, the Memphis Democrat started to talk about a high school from her Shelby County district with a large number of undocumented immigrant students.

29. Fuel-Tax Bill Short of Votes in the House -

NASHVILLE – Votes aren’t adding up in the House of Representatives for passage of the governor’s gas tax/tax cut legislation.

With floor debate scheduled Wednesday morning, not only is a Republican head count showing lack of support, Democrats aren’t exactly lining up behind the measure. The minority party says it wants concessions on other items from the governor before it can vote for the IMPROVE Act, and some Democrats say they won’t go for a combination of tax cuts for wealthy investors tied to a higher gas tax.

30. Norris, Proponents of Current IMPROVE Act Stand Firm as Alternative Bills Are Devised -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris gets revved up when he talks about the IMPROVE Act as a tax-cutting and bridge-safety measure. It’s a message he’s been sending for weeks, yet other lawmakers aren’t catching on.

31. IMPROVE Act Proponents Stand Firm as Alternative Bills Are Devised -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris gets revved up when he talks about the IMPROVE Act as a tax-cutting and bridge-safety measure. It’s a message he’s been sending for weeks, yet other lawmakers aren’t catching on.

32. Last Word: Lawsons Exit, LaRose Lessons and No Medicaid Expansion This Year -

The Lawson Brothers exit Tigers basketball seeking a release from the University of Memphis. The statement from Dedric and K.J. Lawson was all sweetness and light and apparently about as sincere as one of those interviews where players and coaches declare that if they will just play hard and put more points on the board than the other team then they should win.

33. Last Word: The CA Marks A Year, Bike Lanes and Nicole Miller for Fashion Week -

The city of Memphis is in a two-front legal fight in federal court over alleged surveillance of protesters that landed several dozen of them on the City Hall list – according to each of the two lawsuits filed this past month.

34. Corker To Keynote Dunavant Awards -

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker will be the keynote speaker at the Rotary Club of Memphis East’s annual Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

Co-sponsored by The Daily News, the awards luncheon is 11:30 a.m., April 18, at the Memphis Hilton, 939 Ridge Lake Blvd.

35. Last Word: James Cotton, A Quiet Jackson Day in Memphis and 'A Football School' -

When you think of the blues and harmonica – James Cotton probably comes to mind – Sonny Boy Williamson too, who taught Cotton how to play.

36. Norris Says Proposed School Voucher Legislation ‘Problematic’ -

NASHVILLE – Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris expressed reservations Wednesday, March 15, about legislation allowing tax dollars to be used to send low-income students in struggling public schools to private schools.

37. Boyd Opens Memphis Campaign for Governor -

Former Tennessee Economic and Community Development commissioner Randy Boyd brought his newly launched campaign for governor to Memphis Wednesday, March 15, with a pledge to continue the economic development policies of Gov. Bill Haslam – policies, particularly in workforce training, that Boyd played a key role in shaping.

38. Last Word: Milhaus Sells, Voucher Debate Gets Heated and Boyd's Fly Around -

Highland Row isn’t fully open yet and it is already up for sale as part of a real estate portfolio. The owner, Milhaus, based in Indianapolis, is a development, construction and property management company that works in mixed use development. And the portfolio being on the market could turn into a recapitalization.

39. Last Word: Gas Tax Resurrection, More Monitoring and Germantown's $200 M Plan -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam's gas tax bill emerged from the workshop effectively on Monday with a sharper cut in the state grocery tax making the complex set of gas tax hike and other tax rollbacks more than revenue neutral.

40. Last Word: Building a Bigger Police Force, Old Desk Calendars and Summer School -

Since the Memphis Mayor’s race of 2015 became about how best to build a larger Memphis Police Department, the discussion has always had an element of controversy to it on a larger scale than a head count of who has a badge.

41. Last Word: Bell at the Grammys, Old Dominick's Return and Luttrell & Strickland -

Memphis at the Grammys: William Bell was performer, presenter and winner at the Grammys Sunday evening. Gary Clark Jr. joined Bell to perform Bell’s calling card, “Born Under A Bad Sign” and the duo then presented a Grammy to Beyonce. In the non-televised Grammy awards, Bell won for Best Americana album for his Stax effort “This Is Where I Live.”

42. Last Word: Little Chairs in Longview, Police Pay Raise and Tiger Football Schedule -

The toys are in their cubbyholes. No stray Legos yet. The little chairs tucked neatly under little tables. The tall trees with their bare branches are much in need of little eyes inspecting their twisted branches and the shadows they make on the winter ground.

43. Last Word: Travel Ban Protest, Other Trump React and Sierra Club Goes To Court -

Grizz over the Nuggets in Denver Wednesday 119-99. The Tigers play USF in Tampa Thursday.

Another big crowd for a Memphis march, the second in less than two weeks including the Memphis Women’s March. The Wednesday march, focused on President Donald Trump’s immigration travel ban order, was smaller than that, but still sizeable and diverse.

44. View From the Hill: Haslam Plan Tilts Broadband Playing Field -

State Reps. Pat Marsh and Art Swann emerged from a meeting underwhelmed by Gov. Bill Haslam’s legislation to spread broadband internet access across Tennessee.

“I thought there would be a lot more to it,” says Marsh, a Shelbyville Republican, calling the proposal “a drop in the bucket” financially but at least a starting point.

45. Governor Proposes Rural Broadband Expansion for Tennessee -

NASHVILLE – State government will provide private companies with millions of dollars in grants and tax credits to extend broadband internet access while allowing electric co-ops to enter the retail broadband business under legislation Sen. Mark Norris is set to sponsor.

46. View From the Hill: Cooperatives Ready to Fill Broadband Void -

Rural broadband backers such as Misty O’Beirne in Rutherford County can take heart. Legislation to spread high-speed internet into cyberspace deserts is making the right connections.

47. Last Word: Rallings at Rotary, The Weight of Cotton and Ugwueke's Path -

It’s becoming pretty obvious that this is going to be a big year for the issue of crime and violence in our city. It’s also becoming the year that Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings has found his voice in a job that may be the ultimate glass house for politicians.

48. Task Force Prepared for Juvenile Justice Legislation -

A General Assembly-led panel is backing legislation to change juvenile sexting laws and adopt measures to stop teens from being held in detention for minor offenses as part of an effort to improve juvenile justice.

49. Last Word: Booksellers Options, New Parking Spaces and The Memphis Open -

Somewhere in the back of our minds, I think most of us knew there were probably some circumstances under which Booksellers at Laurelwood might remain open. And as it turns out there are some terms the owner is talking about just past the post-New Year’s shock of work that the store will close in February.

50. Last Word: A Rainbow's Tale, The Two Holiday Peaks and Crosstown High Plans -

I saw it all so clearly on a very cloudy and very rainy Monday in the city. A strong rainbow with bold colors across town from the setting sun on the river. Not some play rainbow that you create with a garden hose or some alleged double rainbow that depends on where you stand. As we were fond of saying in these parts in the 1980s and the 1990s – this was a “world class” rainbow.

51. Lawmakers Address Prosecutors, ASD -

The majority and minority leaders of the Tennessee Senate say there is political pressure to break the link in funding for prosecutors and public defenders.

“I think it takes both efforts,” state Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville said on ‘Behind The Headlines,’ the WKNO/Channel 10 program. “I think we need more prosecutors. I think we also need more public defenders.”

52. Awards Recognize Highest Ideals of Public Service -

Public service is a worthy legacy, and one that the Rotary Club of Memphis East wants to recognize and encourage in the next generation.

The annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards recognize one elected official and one non-elected public employee who have exemplified the virtues of former Probate Court Clerk Bobby Dunavant, for whom the award is named.

53. Reid Inaugurated as President Of WestTNHBA Board -

James Reid, president of Memphis-based homebuilder Reid Homes Inc., has been inaugurated as board president of the West Tennessee Home Builders Association. Reid previously served as the 2016 vice president of the WestTNHBA executive committee and chairman of the 2016 VESTA Home Show.

54. Last Word: Football Comes Back, Snuff on Front Street and Pot Is Short of Seven -

I have a question that some of you may not care for? Is football making a comeback in this basketball town for a more prominent place in the conflicted and diverse hothouse that is Memphis culture?

55. Last Word: The Return of Stubby Clapp, Poplar & Ridgeway for Pedestrians and Mice -

The death toll in the Sevier County-Gatlinburg wildfires is at seven. Authorities believe a fire at The Chimney Tops in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was what started the disaster and had consumed 15,563 acres as of Wednesday evening. At that point, the fire was 10 percent contained.

56. Kustoff, Cohen Win Seats in Congress And the Rest of Shelby County's Ballot -

Shelby County voters re-elected all but six incumbents seeking re-election on the Nov. 8 election ballot.

And the biggest upset on the local ballot gave Democrats a gain of one seat in the state House delegation from Shelby County.

57. Election Day Ends Contentious Presidential Contest -

In a contentious national campaign for president that has tested the boundaries of what is considered proper political discourse and what should be public, local Democratic and Republican partisans have mostly been spectators as the 2016 presidential campaign comes to an end Tuesday, Nov. 8.

58. Last Word: Z Bo and the Second Unit, Gannettized and the Electoral College -

Zach Randolph will not be starting for the Grizz this season as the post-Grit & Grind era enters the “Second Unit” chapter.

It will be interesting to see fan reaction Thursday at the Forum when the Grizz play Atlanta in another pre-season game. Randolph did not start Monday night’s pre-season opener against Orlando either.

59. Suburban Challengers Emerge at Filing Deadline For November Ballot -

Thirteen incumbents in the four suburban municipal elections on the Nov. 8 ballot were effectively re-elected to new terms at the Thursday, Aug. 18, filing deadline for the set of 30 races.

And Chris Denson claimed a seat on the Millington School Board with no opposition for the position incumbent Donald Holsinger is giving up to run for alderman in Millington.

60. Suburban Challengers Emerge at Filing Deadline For November Ballot -

Thirteen incumbents in the four sets of suburban municipal elections on the Nov. 8 ballot were effectively re-elected to new terms at the Thursday, Aug. 18, filing deadline for the set of 30 races.

61. Collierville, Millington Mayoral Races Top Suburban Ballots in November -

The mayors of Collierville and Millington are running for re-election on the November ballot and as the noon Thursday, Aug. 18, filing deadline approaches for the Bartlett, Germantown, Collierville and Millington municipal ballots the two mayors have challengers.

62. Chamber Names Simmons Director of Public Policy -

Haley Simmons has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as the director of public policy, a new position in the chamber’s community development department. In this role, Simmons will be focused on enhancing the chamber’s advocacy efforts to inform and engage its members on important policy issues, and he’ll also be responsible for growing the chamber’s role in education initiatives.

63. University of Memphis Moves Toward Own Board in a Year -

For decades, University of Memphis alumni and supporters have run hot and lukewarm on two topics – an on-campus arena and a board for the university independent of the Tennessee Board of Regents.

64. Legislators Sweating the Small Stuff -

My late father kept a paper weight on his desk at home that read: “Don’t sweat the small stuff.”

Well, we’re sweating the small stuff – from the federal government down to the states – with this harangue over transgender bathrooms.

65. Wilson Urges Family Philanthropic Efforts at Dunavant Awards -

When most people think of the Kemmons Wilson family, there is an image that comes to mind. It’s a black and white photo from the 1950s of the five children – three boys and two girls – of the Holiday Inn founder cutting the ribbon on the very first Holiday Inn at 4925 Summer Ave.

66. Wilson Urges Family Philanthropy at Dunavant Awards -

Families can have an impact on public service, the chairman of Kemmons Wilson Inc. said Wednesday, May 11, at the 13th annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

67. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

68. Last Word: Council Return on Overton, No Frayser Truck Stop and Historian-apolooza -

June 30 is fast approaching. It’s coming up so fast that the City Council is moving to seal in any agreement that might come from the Overton Park Greensward mediation process before the ink dries.

69. Norris Recounts Path to Majority Status, Dunavant Award -

Good government isn’t a bowl of cherries. There will be controversy even with the best of intentions and with everything done by the numbers. And that applies to those who win awards like state Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville.

70. Last Word: BSMF Looks Up, Overton Park Respite and Slow Economic Growth -

The Beale Street Music Festival box office numbers won’t be in for a bit yet. But it looks like the three-day event that ended Sunday evening with Beck and Paul Simon weathered the weather very well, maybe better than usual.

71. Did ‘People Back Home’ Really Sway No Votes on Bible? -

I thought about skipping church Sunday and playing golf. After listening to the House of Representatives’ debate on the Bible bill, I could probably skip church for a month and still be in good standing.

72. Robots Are Taking Tennessee’s Jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

73. City Council Approves Parkside Development -

The Memphis City Council has approved the concept of Parkside at Shelby Farms Park, a $200 million mixed-use development on the northern border of Shelby Farms Park.

74. Parkside Development Gets Green Light -

Parkside at Shelby Farms Park, a $200 million mixed-use development on the northern border of Shelby Farms featuring three six-story apartment buildings, won the approval Tuesday, April 19, of the Memphis City Council.

75. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

76. 8th Congressional District Primaries Draw 22 Contenders, 13 Republican -

The Republican primary race to fill the 8th District Congressional seat Republican incumbent Stephen Fincher is giving up drew a field of 13 contenders – seven from Shelby County and four from Jackson, Tennessee – at the Thursday, April 7, noon filing deadline for the Aug. 4 ballot.

77. Bill to Make Bible Tennessee's State Book Heads to Governor -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Derided by critics as everything from unconstitutional to sacrilegious, Tennessee lawmakers nevertheless plowed ahead with designating the Holy Bible as the state's official book.

78. Last Word: A Trip to Committee, Minority Business Moves and the Issue With Reissues -

So those who support the general concept of de-annexation in the Tennessee state Senate were the most vocal Monday in sending the proposal back to committee for a more intense examination.

There were plenty of Memphians in the Senate chambers Monday despite the rumors that this was on its way back to committee.
Staying put until the deal is done has been a lesson won through bitter experience for some Memphis leaders.
Despite hearing from legislators in other parts of the state who are uneasy about this, the opposition remains a Memphis thing in Nashville.
But the Senate sponsor, Bo Watson, stumped his toe badly on this when he shut down an amendment Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville wanted to allow the voluntarily de-annexation of an area Millington recently took into its city limits.
So when the state and local government committee meets at noon Wednesday, it will be round – frankly, I forget which round it is. Just ring the bell and let’s see what happens.

79. Tenn. Approves Incentives for TV Series Production in Memphis -

The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development has approved a grant of up to $4.3 million to support production of a TV series that will be shot in Memphis this spring.

The series will be an eight-episode, Memphis-themed scripted drama that Viacom’s CMT network is adapting from the Tony Award-winning musical “Million Dollar Quartet.”

80. Complex path to higher-ed reform -

Only half a year after taking on the presidency of Motlow State Community College, Anthony Kinkel is trying to keep his eye on the pea.

The task of running one of the state’s fastest-growing community colleges is becoming increasingly complex, and it has nothing to do with thousands more students enrolling to take advantage of free tuition through the Tennessee Promise scholarship program.

81. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

82. Complex Path to Higher-Ed Reform -

Only half a year after taking on the presidency of Motlow State Community College, Anthony Kinkel is trying to keep his eye on the pea.

The task of running one of the state’s fastest-growing community colleges is becoming increasingly complex, and it has nothing to do with thousands more students enrolling to take advantage of free tuition through the Tennessee Promise scholarship program.

83. Tennessee Legislature Opens 2016 Session on Capitol Hill -

The Tennessee General Assembly's 2016 session will be a short one, likely done by early April. The gavels fall in the House and Senate chambers in Nashville at noon Tuesday, Jan. 12, opening the election year session.

84. Candidates Already Gearing Up For August Elections -

The ballot for the March 1 Tennessee presidential primaries and county primaries for General Sessions Court Clerk was set while many voters were focused on the holidays and preparations for the new city leaders taking office in January.

85. Last Word: Council Round-Up, One Beale's Third Tower and the Battle Over the ASD -

On a clear day, the song goes, you can see forever.
In Memphis though, it seems that no two politicians will see exactly the same thing or have precisely the same opinion.
On a somewhat sunny but not necessarily clear Tuesday in our fair city there was a lot to see.

86. Measure Increasing Seat Belt Fines Among New Tennessee Laws -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Motorists in Tennessee who don't buckle up could face stiffer fines under one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect Friday.

The tougher seat belt law increases the fine for first-time offenders from $10 to $25 and from $20 to $50 for repeat offenders.

87. Refugees, Regents, Privatization On Tap for New Session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

88. After a Year of Triumphs and Defeats, Haslam Looks Ahead -

Eight days into 2015, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam formally set a special session of the Tennessee legislature for February on his Insure Tennessee plan, a Medicaid expansion Haslam negotiated with the Obama administration.

89. Last Word: Recovery in North Mississippi, Opera in 2016 and Uptown North of Chelsea -

It’s been a holiday season of challenged hopes and muted emotions in our corner of the world.
The beginning of the series of storms and tornadoes they spawned killed eight people in North Mississippi where recovery is still a fact of life in this last week of 2015.
This will be a week of funerals and damage assessments for federal disaster aid throughout our region.
And you will hear more stories of escapes and new beginnings after losing everything of any material value.
But even in our spared city, our thoughts will return instinctively to the young lives taken so suddenly and so close to the family gatherings in which our youngest give so much more in the way of hope than they will realize at this tender age.

90. Delavega Joins Hooks Institute Leadership Team -

Dr. Elena Delavega, assistant professor in the University of Memphis’ Department of Social Work, has been named associate director of the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the U of M. A former policy fellow at the institute, Delavega specializes in the study of poverty and economic development.

91. Last Word: More Medical Expansions, Norris & Harris and Christmas In Hell's Kitchen -

Last Word is a new daily online column that offers an overview of what’s happened at the end of shift, so to speak. Picture a dimly lit newsroom in the Downtown night and the last person in the place leaving a memo for the morning shift and you have a pretty good idea of what we are aiming for.

92. Norris: Gas Tax Proposal Not Happening in 2016 -

Don’t look for a gas tax hike in the 2016 session of the Tennessee legislature, says the state Senate majority leader.

“We’re not going to do a gas tax in 2016,” Rep. Mark Norris of Collierville said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind The Headlines.” “We are going to have to address it soon enough and these conversations are very important.”

93. Autonomy Comes With Risk for State’s Universities -

Tennessee officials are lauding Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure higher education in an effort to meet his goals for the Drive to 55.

The FOCUS Act proposed recently by the Republican governor to make sure 55 percent of Tennesseans hold a degree or postsecondary certificate by 2025 promises to launch a new era for the state’s colleges and universities.

94. US Cold Storage Latest Growth For Tipton County -

Phil Coles remembers one job interview in particular as he was hiring for the new United States Cold Storage plant in Covington, Tenn.

The job applicant, who was from Covington, had questions for Coles, the plant’s general manager. Was the plant paid for? Or was U.S. Cold renting? The bottom line was job stability in a town and county that has had a rough recession.

95. Mathes Takes Helm at Community Legal Center -

Longtime attorney Anne Mathes has been named executive director of the nonprofit Community Legal Center, which has been providing civil legal services to lower-income Memphians for more than 20 years. In addition to civil cases and divorces, the CLC collaborates with other agencies to serve victims of domestic violence and elder abuse. They also take some immigration cases.

96. Insure Tennessee Path Still Facing Many Turns -

There’s a move in Nashville for a special session of the Tennessee General Assembly, but it would have nothing to do with the February special session on Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal.

97. McGehee Animal Clinic Focuses on Close Family Connections -

Dr. Norris McGehee always knew that he wanted to be a veterinarian. His father was an architect and his brothers went on to be engineers, but McGehee was attracted to a different family practice.

98. Clarksville Star Can’t Wait to Be Part of Lady Vols -

Haley Bearden will watch every pitch this weekend as the University of Tennessee softball team pursues its ultimate goal in the NCAA Women’s College World Series.

The 2015 Clarksville High School graduate and UT softball recruit has been a fan since she was young, hardly ever missing a televised game, and dreamed of playing for the Lady Vols one day.

99. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

100. Harris Pushes For Insure Tennessee Comeback -

State Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris of Memphis will be on the campaign trail this summer.

Harris and other Democratic leaders in the majority Republican Tennessee legislature will campaign across the state this summer for the comeback of the Insure Tennessee proposal in the 2016 legislative session.