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Editorial Results (free)

1. View From the Hill: ‘Moral Mondays’ Draw Crowds, But Are Lawmakers Listening? -

Johnny and Julie Erwin don’t look like typical protesters, but the senior couple joined the “moral Mondays” ruckus recently at the State Capitol, Johnny wearing his Air Force cap and Julie holding a list of social legislation they oppose.

2. Attorney Harkavy Named To Wyatt’s Executive Committee -

Lee A. Harkavy is one of two attorneys from the Memphis office of Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs LLP to be named to the regional law firm’s executive committee. Harkavy is a commercial transactional attorney focused primarily on representing businesses in their external growth endeavors or exit strategies. In that capacity, he advises clients on mergers, acquisitions and dispositions, and capital-raising transactions.

3. Networking Helping Propel Women-Owned Businesses To New Heights -

When Memphis middle schoolers and sisters Madison Star and Mallory Iyana went on “Shark Tank” and secured $60,000 and partnerships with both Mark Cuban and Daymond John, they took their place among the ranks of female entrepreneurs who, in large numbers these days, are showing the business world that they are a force to be reckoned with.

4. State Lawmakers Confronted Over Anti-LGBT Bills -

NASHVILLE – The unveiling of legislation undercutting same-sex marriage and enforcing transgender bathroom rules turned into a short-circuited press conference and confrontation Wednesday, Feb. 15.

5. Ballet On Wheels Series Explores Contributions of Black Dancers -

The dancers at Memphis’s Ballet On Wheels Dance School are celebrating Black History Month in an innovative way this year. In conjunction with the Memphis Public Library, Ballet On Wheels has launched an interactive, monthlong series called “Groundbreakers: African-American Ballerina Stories of Triumph and Struggles,” that invites Memphians to consider the history and future of ballet in a new light.

6. The Week Ahead: February 13-19 -

Music is a common theme this week, which is nice to know, isn’t it, Memphis? And the sounds of other balls – not the dribbling kind – will take the stage again as the Memphis Open gets into swing and the University of Memphis throws its first real pitch of the 2017 season. Check out this week's list of need-to-know happenings...

7. Memphis Baseball Team Opens vs. UT and Ready for Rebound Season -

The extended forecast is promising, sunny with high temperatures in the 60s. University of Memphis baseball coach Daron Schoenrock not only is hoping the forecast for opening weekend at FedExPark vs. the University of Tennessee holds, but that clear skies and warming temps are signs of things to come this season.

8. Curb Market Closing Cooper-Young Location to Begin Crosstown Move -

Almost a year after it opened, The Curb Market is closing its Cooper-Young location Sunday, Feb. 12, as it begins its move to Crosstown Concourse.

The locally sourced food store, which is owned by Peter Schutt, president of The Daily News Publishing Co., opened last March in the former Easy Way at 596 S. Cooper St. The new 8,500-square-foot bay in Crosstown Concourse will be nearly four times the size of the Cooper-Young store.

9. Planned Parenthood Vote Draws On Political Divide -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Basar looked out at the audience in the commission’s chambers Monday, Feb. 6, and saw something the commission only sees once or twice a year – a standing room-only crowd with every seat taken and most there for a single issue.

10. What are the Odds? Blackburn is Still the Favorite -

Tennessee has its search firm and its search committee is in place to find the replacement for Dave Hart as the university’s athletic director.

Hart announced last August he would retire June 30, and with Tennessee undergoing a transition in its chancellor’s position, the search for Hart’s replacement was put on the back burner.

11. Last Word: The TVA Well Controversy, Fred Smith Redux and Norris On The Gas Tax -

The new Trader Joe’s in Germantown won’t be alone by the plans the supermarket chain got approved Tuesday night by the Germantown Design Review Commission. The conversion of the old Kroger store on Exeter includes seven other bays as Trader Joe’s goes for a smaller footprint than the size of the original building.

12. Ernest Strickland Takes On Workforce Role at Chamber -

The Greater Memphis Chamber has promoted Ernest Strickland to senior vice president of workforce development, a newly created role. Strickland, who has worked at the chamber since 2006, previously served as vice president of international and business partnerships.
In his new position, he is responsible for creating and implementing the chamber’s workforce development strategy. His department serves as a liaison, working directly with existing and prospective businesses to ensure they are able to attract and retain a qualified workforce today and in the future.

13. Last Word: Charter Schools Views, Capitol Hill Round Up & Explaining The Cold War -

Double trouble Wednesday in Oklahoma. The Grizz lose to the Thunder 103-95 in OKC. They are on their way to Houston for a Friday game before returning home Sunday for the MLK game against the Chicago Bulls at the Forum. Meanwhile Tigers lose to Tulsa Wednesday, also in Oklahoma, 81-71. They are back at the Forum Saturday to play South Florida.

14. Task Force Prepared for Juvenile Justice Legislation -

A General Assembly-led panel is backing legislation to change juvenile sexting laws and adopt measures to stop teens from being held in detention for minor offenses as part of an effort to improve juvenile justice.

15. Exhibit Recalls Peter Bowman’s Inspiration -

Peter Bowman described himself as a “self-employed” artist on his application to teach at Memphis University School, the institution where he ended up serving as an art instructor from 1979 until 2008.

16. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

17. New Year, New Resolutions for Legislators -

Some Tennesseans recall the days when the state Legislature met every other year and wonder if it should revert to that schedule. Considering the General Assembly pushes most of its work into 3 1/2 months, it might be worth a try.

18. Awards Recognize Highest Ideals of Public Service -

Public service is a worthy legacy, and one that the Rotary Club of Memphis East wants to recognize and encourage in the next generation.

The annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards recognize one elected official and one non-elected public employee who have exemplified the virtues of former Probate Court Clerk Bobby Dunavant, for whom the award is named.

19. Winning With ‘Bad’ Mariota a Good Sign for Titans -

The Titans had been riding the gifted right arm of Marcus Mariota for about two months. The second-year quarterback had played so well during that period that he was named November AFC Offensive Player of the Month and was beginning to draw attention as one of the young QBs to keep an eye on as he began elevating his game toward superstardom.

20. Tigers’ Bowl Trip About Getting – and Keeping – That Winning Feeling -

The head coach who rebuilt the program, Justin Fuente, had left for Virginia Tech. The star quarterback, Paxton Lynch, was awful in his final game as a Tiger. And it rained … and rained.

21. Last Word: St. Jude Dollar Amounts, Fred's On The Move and The Treble Clef -

Grizz over the Trailblazers 88 – 86 Thursday evening at the Forum. At the end of the first half, Grizz coach David Fizdale had to be restrained by players on the way off the court after a technical was called on him. And welcome to Memphis, Toney Douglas. We love what you are doing with the fourth quarter.

22. Mayor’s Young Professionals Council Grows -

The Young Professional Council that advises Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has added 10 new members for 2017, a new crop that will join 15 current members in meeting regularly and working to connect, represent and support the interests of young professionals in the area.

23. Last Word: The Return of Stubby Clapp, Poplar & Ridgeway for Pedestrians and Mice -

The death toll in the Sevier County-Gatlinburg wildfires is at seven. Authorities believe a fire at The Chimney Tops in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was what started the disaster and had consumed 15,563 acres as of Wednesday evening. At that point, the fire was 10 percent contained.

24. Kirk-Ivy Named 2016 Mississippi Commercial Realtor -

Bambi K. Kirk-Ivy, a commercial Realtor and marketing director at Olive Branch-based Utley Properties, recently was recognized as the 2016 Mississippi Commercial Realtor of the Year at the annual Mississippi Realtors Convention and Expo.
As a landlord representative for all of Utley’s properties, most of Kirk-Ivy’s work has been in retail; however, she says the company is now focusing on light industrial-type flex spaces consisting of office, showroom and warehouse uses.
In 2017, she also will serve as the northern district director on the Mississippi Commercial Association of Realtors board of directors. 

25. Gill Seeks $25 Million Permit For New MAA Headquarters -

6815 U.S. 72

Germantown, TN 38138

Permit Amount: $25 million

Future Tenant: MAA

26. Harwell Learning How to Dodge Challengers -

Beth Harwell has been called a lot of things over the last few years, “trailblazer” chief among them as Tennessee’s first female House speaker. 

Now she’s a “survivor” after eking out a Republican Caucus victory as speaker nominee to continue leading the lower chamber in the 110th General Assembly.

27. Norris, Others Take Next Step After Election -

State Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville ran for re-election this year the way just about any incumbent prefers to run – unopposed.

28. College Football Programs are Trending Toward Younger Hires -

When searching for a new head football coach, schools have been showing more willingness to hire an up-and-comer like Tom Herman or P.J. Fleck, rather than a veteran with a long track record of success such as Les Miles.

29. Last Word: Pants Suits On the River, Early Vote Numbers & Chandler Parsons' Debut -

A busy last weekend for the Presidential campaigns in Shelby County where we have seen neither Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump in the flesh since the primary campaign season and haven’t even seen their surrogates in the general election campaign.

30. Resetting the Bar -

David Fizdale is a first-time NBA head coach. Tubby Smith is a college coach with a Hall-of-Fame resume.

In Memphis, on the eve of the 2016-2017 NBA and college basketball seasons, they also share this in common: They are leaders that are worlds apart from their most immediate predecessors. Their mere presence, before the season even tips off, has changed the hopes, dreams and expectations for the city’s hoops fans.

31. I’ll Never Be President -

BIRTHDAY REFLECTIONS IN AN ELECTION YEAR. Let’s face it; I’ll never be president.

Another birthday just showed up and I didn’t blow out any candles. Maybe I don’t have the breath for it anymore. Maybe I don’t have the enthusiasm. While I’m grateful for another year, the count thereof gives me pause.

32. Big River -

Jim Jackson had it planned. At the third annual Arkansas Delta Flatlander bicycle ride, the 100-kilometer bike ride would become what it was intended to be – a ride across the Mississippi River from West Memphis to Memphis across the northern side of the Harahan Bridge.

33. The Press Box: Flawed Feathers, Grizz Preseason, and Dak’s Fame -

Wading in with a few thoughts as the baseball postseason nears, the Grizzlies get ready to play games that don’t count, and Dak Prescott’s new-found fame …

The St. Louis Cardinals, in all probability, will not make the playoffs. Oh, sure, as I write this they are mathematically alive for a wild card spot. They win out, they get help – the San Francisco Giants’ combustible bullpen being the most likely source – they could sneak in, even win the wildcard game, and find themselves facing the rival Chicago Cubs in the Division Series.

34. Oyler Named City of Memphis’ Bike/Ped Program Manager -

Nicholas Oyler has been named bikeway and pedestrian program manager for the city of Memphis, tasked with establishing walking and biking as safe, convenient and realistic forms of transportation in the city. The wide scope of the position includes tasks such as expanding Memphis’ network of bike lanes, implementing new pedestrian safety projects and educating individuals on the role of walking and biking.

35. No Quick Fix in State Health Insurance Issue -

State Rep. Ron Travis is perplexed.

On one hand, the Republican from Dayton is concerned with escalating premiums for Tennesseans participating in the insurance marketplace, worried costs are increasing to the point people simply can’t afford health insurance.

36. Enjoy The Hype, Vol Fans. It’s Been A Long Time -

The temptation here is to throw a couple of buckets of cold water on the great expectations for the Tennessee Vols this season.

But you know what? Enjoy the hype, UT fans. Any fan base that was subjected to three years of Derek Dooley deserves this moment.

37. Suburban Challengers Emerge at Filing Deadline For November Ballot -

Thirteen incumbents in the four suburban municipal elections on the Nov. 8 ballot were effectively re-elected to new terms at the Thursday, Aug. 18, filing deadline for the set of 30 races.

And Chris Denson claimed a seat on the Millington School Board with no opposition for the position incumbent Donald Holsinger is giving up to run for alderman in Millington.

38. Suburban Challengers Emerge at Filing Deadline For November Ballot -

Thirteen incumbents in the four sets of suburban municipal elections on the Nov. 8 ballot were effectively re-elected to new terms at the Thursday, Aug. 18, filing deadline for the set of 30 races.

39. Vols Offensive Line Rushing Into Much-Anticipated Season -

Jalen Hurd knows right where he stands among Tennessee’s running backs of the past and wants to be No. 1 in career rushing yards at the end of the 2016 season.

The junior from Hendersonville Beech High School needs 892 yards to surpass Travis Henry as UT’s career rushing leader.

40. Can Alan Zucker Do for Titans’ Marcus Mariota What He’s Done for Mannings & Taylor Swift? -

As an NFL quarterback, Sunday is show time for Marcus Mariota. That’s when he suits up and does everything in his power to help the Tennessee Titans win football games.

But a recent Sunday morning was a different kind of show time. Mariota spent four hours on the opposite side of the Cumberland River from Nissan Stadium on a commercial shoot. A camera crew captured footage of him jogging in downtown Nashville and posing in front of various landmarks.

41. Collierville, Millington Mayoral Races Top Suburban Ballots in November -

The mayors of Collierville and Millington are running for re-election on the November ballot and as the noon Thursday, Aug. 18, filing deadline approaches for the Bartlett, Germantown, Collierville and Millington municipal ballots the two mayors have challengers.

42. What Would It Take for Trump to Lose Tennessee Voters? -

Murfreesboro Realtor Larry Sims almost closes his ears when Donald Trump speaks.

“He gets out of bounds. Of course, the press, they love it because they get to exploit his sayings and doings,” says Sims, who traveled to Cleveland, Ohio, as a Trump delegate for the Republican National Convention. 

43. Jordan Takes Leading Role At Child Advocacy Center -

Mark Jordan has joined the Memphis Child Advocacy Center as development director, responsible for connecting people in a meaningful way to the critical services MCAC provides to vulnerable children. In his new role, Jordan will create and administer a comprehensive development plan to both enhance connections and build new relationships with volunteers and the philanthropic community to grow fundraising, donor relations and public engagement. 

44. Chism Readying 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism wants to be the Democratic nominee for Shelby County mayor in 2018, and he plans to begin his campaign after the November presidential election.

45. Eventually, MSU’s Mullen May Take the Hit -

HOOVER, Ala. – After recent events, it’s good to remember that not everyone is a sell-out.

“I’ve always had a rule as a coach that, if you ever hit a girl, you’re finished,” Steve Spurrier said at SEC Media Days here last year when still a working head coach. “We’ve lost two at South Carolina.”

46. Williams Hired for Memphis Blight-Fighting Fellowship -

The city of Memphis and University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law recently hired Brittany J. Williams as the city’s first Neighborhood Preservation Fellow. In that role, Williams will represent the city in Environmental Court lawsuits against property owners who have vacant, abandoned or dilapidated properties that violate city codes.

47. 4 Children Fatally Stabbed in Memphis; Mother Charged -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Four young children were stabbed to death in a gated apartment complex in suburban Memphis on Friday, and the Shelby County Sheriff's Department has charged their mother, Shanynthia Gardner, with first degree murder as well as other charges.

48. Chamber Names Simmons Director of Public Policy -

Haley Simmons has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as the director of public policy, a new position in the chamber’s community development department. In this role, Simmons will be focused on enhancing the chamber’s advocacy efforts to inform and engage its members on important policy issues, and he’ll also be responsible for growing the chamber’s role in education initiatives.

49. Last Word: Orlando, Rain Delay At Southwind and Church Health Center's Move -

Many of us were watching the streets of our own city closely this weekend – the places where people gather for good times when the weather is warm and the sky is clear. Lately some of those places have been the settings for vivid and sudden reminders that all is not well in our city.

50. Local LGBT Community Stands in Solidarity After Orlando Massacre -

Flags across the state of Tennessee were at half staff Sunday, June 12, following the Sunday morning mass shooting at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida.

And a vigil for the victims of the Orlando shooting was scheduled Sunday at 8:30 p.m. at the Memphis Gay & Lesbian Community Center in Cooper-Young.

51. Last Word: Verdell Smith and Lifeline, Strickland's First 5 Months and Tennessine -

Lots of blue lights in Cordova Thursday evening as the Memphis Police Department remembers Officer Verdell Smith, who died in Saturday’s Downtown rampage in the line of duty. His funeral is Friday.

52. Legislators Sweating the Small Stuff -

My late father kept a paper weight on his desk at home that read: “Don’t sweat the small stuff.”

Well, we’re sweating the small stuff – from the federal government down to the states – with this harangue over transgender bathrooms.

53. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

54. Herenton Pitches Two New Schools For Juvenile Offenders -

Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton began Wednesday, May 4, with an appeal that got the attention of Shelby County Commissioners. “We don’t want your money,” he told 11 of the 13 commissioners in committee sessions as he pitched two new residential campuses for children in juvenile detention.

55. Elway Has Faith in Lynch, and That’s Good Enough -

Todd McShay, NFL Draft expert and college football analyst, was a backup quarterback for the mighty University of Richmond Spiders.

John Elway, general manager for the Denver Broncos, won two Super Bowls for the team, was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and was the first pick of the 1983 NFL Draft.

56. Elway Has Faith in Lynch And That’s Good Enough -

Todd McShay, NFL Draft expert and college football analyst, was a backup quarterback for the mighty University of Richmond Spiders.

John Elway, general manager for the Denver Broncos, won two Super Bowls for the team, was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, and was the first pick of the 1983 NFL Draft.

57. Regionalism Enhances Recruiting For Cities in Metros -

When Memphis hits a dirty dozen list – whether it’s for crime, or education attainment, or poverty – those ratings are based on Memphis Metropolitan Statistical Area data.

And while Memphis, as the largest city in the MSA, has the lion’s share of economic disparity, those problems don’t just effect the city’s 600,000 citizens.

58. The Week Ahead -

It’s a new week that ends with Music Fest, Memphis! Here’s a roundup of other local happenings you need to know about, from some important government meetings, to corporate earnings reports and a new exhibit set to open at the Memphis Zoo.

59. Robots Are Taking Tennessee’s Jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

60. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

61. Hamilton & Holliman Bringing Mixed Upscale Housing to South Main -

What was once Downtown’s industrial and rail district is now one of the most densely populated residential neighborhoods in Memphis. Over 2,000 units are under development in the South End, and the current population is expected to double over the next two to three years, according to the Downtown Memphis Commission.

62. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

63. Redbirds Outfielder Tilson Reminds of Cardinals Past -

When Charlie Tilson speaks of the big-league players that have impacted him most, he does so with one eye trained on their past and one eye focused on his future.

“I grew up in Chicago and the guy I loved in 2005 with the White Sox was Scott Podsednik,” said Tilson, in his first year playing center field for the Memphis Redbirds, and a second-round draft pick (79th overall) by the St. Louis Cardinals back in 2011.

64. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

65. 8th Congressional District Primaries Draw 22 Contenders, 13 Republican -

The Republican primary race to fill the 8th District Congressional seat Republican incumbent Stephen Fincher is giving up drew a field of 13 contenders – seven from Shelby County and four from Jackson, Tennessee – at the Thursday, April 7, noon filing deadline for the Aug. 4 ballot.

66. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

67. Memphis Baseball Trusting Young Pitchers -

University of Memphis baseball coach Daron Schoenrock looks at his freshmen pitchers and sees talent and promise, even if at times this season “the moments have been a little big for them.”

68. Open to Progress -

WE CANNOT REMAIN STILL. When the news of the assassination broke on April 4, 1968, I ran to the dorm phone to call home to find out what in my world was going on, if my city was on fire, my family safe. All the lines to Memphis were busy, the answers would have to wait.

69. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

70. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

71. Rudd + Bowen + Pastner = PR Nightmare at Memphis -

You keep thinking the story can’t get worse, and then it does. What we have here is an ongoing public relations disaster that is the University of Memphis athletic department as it pertains to all matters regarding the men’s basketball program.

72. Shipmon Joins Lending Team at Paragon -

Thomas “Tee” Shipmon has joined Paragon Bank as senior vice president, specialty lending. In this role, Shipmon is responsible for developing products for Paragon that solve customers’ challenges and that are profitable to the bank. Currently, specialty lending is providing short-term commercial construction loans to companies, often franchisees, that are expanding operations.

73. Clark Butcher is Pedaling to Glory -

It’s 6 a.m. on a rainy Wednesday morning. Outside, the sun has not yet risen. But inside Victory Bicycle Studio, they’re already playing Rihanna. “We’re gonna start with some two-minute openers,” shouts Clark Butcher, over the thump of the music. “I want you at 70 percent of your max. Let’s go!”

74. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

75. Higher-Ed Shuffle Stokes Fears of UT-TSU Merger -

Anthony Joshua, who moved to Nashville from Madison, Wis., to attend Tennessee State University, says he’s worried his historically black institution could be in for serious change – for the worse.

76. Graceland West Up Next as Guest House Tops Out -

As construction crews working on the 450-room Guest House at Graceland resort hotel marked the topping out of that Whitehaven project this week, work is about to begin on the other side of Elvis Presley Boulevard on the Graceland West project.

77. Post-Gasol: Grizz Doing What They Have To Do, How They Have To Do It -

Marc Gasol has said it. Zach Randolph has said it. Tony Allen has said it ad nauseam.

“We hang our hats on the defensive end.”

78. Last Word: Timing and Numbers, Old Dominick Takes Shape and Zip Lines To Spring -

Political opportunity is defined by timing.
Witness a look at the early voting turnout numbers in advance of Tuesday’s election day.

More than half of the more than 43,000 Shelby County voters who cast early ballots voted Monday and Tuesday – the last two days of an early voting period that began Feb. 10 – way back there when Martin O’Malley was the third Democratic presidential contender and Jeb Bush was considered a force to be reckoned with in the Republican primaries.

79. Roland Passes on 8th Congressional District Run, Sticks With Mayor in 2018 -

Shelby County Commission chairman Terry Roland will not be running in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District in August.

80. Last Word: Leaving Warren and Tulane, New Police Brass and Losing Housing -

Post Super Bowl edition of Last Word: Broncos 24 – Panthers 10 – Lady Gaga’s National Anthem kudos – Coldplay/Bruno Mars/Beyonce ambitious halftime extravaganza got lost in spots by bad sound.

81. Bourbon, Tennessee Whiskey Producers Toast More Strong Sales -

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Producers of Kentucky bourbon and Tennessee whiskey are toasting another year of strong sales and revenue growth, led by consumers increasingly ordering high-priced, super-premium brands.

82. Tenn. Approves Incentives for TV Series Production in Memphis -

The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development has approved a grant of up to $4.3 million to support production of a TV series that will be shot in Memphis this spring.

The series will be an eight-episode, Memphis-themed scripted drama that Viacom’s CMT network is adapting from the Tony Award-winning musical “Million Dollar Quartet.”

83. Memphis Sports Leaders to Speak on Local Impact -

You will find Memphis sports fans everywhere – including in the Redbirds dugout at AutoZone Park.

“Our players like having the NBA here and FedExForum nearby,” said Memphis Redbirds general manager Craig Unger.

84. In the Game -

Way back in the 1990s, perhaps before the Grizzlies and FedExForum were even a twinkle in anyone’s eye, Chris Wallace came to Memphis and The Pyramid for a preseason NBA game featuring Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls.

85. Last Word: Legislature's Return, Uber Pilot, Minivan Comeback and Bowie's Exit -

The gavel falls in Nashville.
The Tennessee legislature is back in session Tuesday. This is an election year session for the legislature. So it will be short – likely an early April adjournment. But that doesn’t mean the session is without expectations from outside Nashville.

86. County Commission Approves Hacks Cross Contract, New Health Director -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Jan. 11, a $223,600 contract for engineering and environmental work on the Hacks Cross Road widening.

The contract with Powers Hill Design LLC is to make Hacks Cross a seven-lane road from Shelby Drive south to Stateline Road, a span of 1.8 miles.

87. Measure Increasing Seat Belt Fines Among New Tennessee Laws -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Motorists in Tennessee who don't buckle up could face stiffer fines under one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect Friday.

The tougher seat belt law increases the fine for first-time offenders from $10 to $25 and from $20 to $50 for repeat offenders.

88. The Good and Bad of Memphis’ Fortune 500 -

During a breakfast meet-and-greet with young professionals earlier this fall at International Paper’s newly opened building on its Poplar Avenue campus, IP chairman and CEO Mark Sutton recalled attending an investor day event during his first month on the job.

89. McKinney Appointed as Shelby County Lobbyist -

Assistant County Attorney David E. McKinney is Shelby County government’s new director of legislative affairs.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell announced McKinney’s appointment Tuesday, Dec. 29, to take effect Jan. 1.

90. 3-Time Champ Nishikori Headlines Memphis Open -

Defending champion Kei Nishikori heads the competitors’ list for The Memphis Open presented by ServiceMaster, to be held at the Racquet Club of Memphis on Feb. 6-14.

Nishikori, 26, is the highest-ranked player competing in the 2016 Memphis Open, holding the ATP No. 8 ranking. Kevin Anderson follows Nishikori with an ATP No. 12 ranking. Nishikori and Anderson met in the finals last year.

91. McKinney Appointed as New County Government Lobbyist -

Assistant County Attorney David E. McKinney is Shelby County government’s new director of legislative affairs.

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell announced McKinney’s appointment Tuesday, Dec. 29, to take effect Jan. 1.

92. Three-Time Champ Nishikori Headlines Memphis Open -

Defending champion Kei Nishikori heads the competitors’ list for The Memphis Open presented by ServiceMaster, to be held at the Racquet Club of Memphis on Feb. 6-14.

Nishikori, 26, is the highest-ranked player competing in the 2016 Memphis Open, holding the ATP No. 8 ranking. Kevin Anderson follows Nishikori with an ATP No. 12 ranking. Nishikori and Anderson met in the finals last year.

93. Last Word: Watching The River, The Clerk's Inner Circle and Universal Bankers -

The Mississippi River is on the rise here and elsewhere which means for many of us the New Year will include a look at the river and memories of 2011 when the river at Memphis was the highest it had been since the record 1937 flooding.

94. Last Word: Recovery in North Mississippi, Opera in 2016 and Uptown North of Chelsea -

It’s been a holiday season of challenged hopes and muted emotions in our corner of the world.
The beginning of the series of storms and tornadoes they spawned killed eight people in North Mississippi where recovery is still a fact of life in this last week of 2015.
This will be a week of funerals and damage assessments for federal disaster aid throughout our region.
And you will hear more stories of escapes and new beginnings after losing everything of any material value.
But even in our spared city, our thoughts will return instinctively to the young lives taken so suddenly and so close to the family gatherings in which our youngest give so much more in the way of hope than they will realize at this tender age.

95. Delavega Joins Hooks Institute Leadership Team -

Dr. Elena Delavega, assistant professor in the University of Memphis’ Department of Social Work, has been named associate director of the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the U of M. A former policy fellow at the institute, Delavega specializes in the study of poverty and economic development.

96. Young Named City HCD Director By Strickland -

Memphis Mayor-elect Jim Strickland has named Paul Young as the director of the city’s division of Housing and Community Development.

97. A List of Mayor-Elect Jim Strickland’s Appointments So Far -

Memphis Mayor elect Jim Strickland still has some appointments to make, but he is methodically filling key positions in his administration ahead of taking office Jan. 1.

98. College Football’s Coaching Carousel Is Still Spinning -

In an ideal world, a kid climbs aboard a carousel and it’s all fun and good times. But the reality is, sometimes the experience is dizzying – even nauseating.

And so it goes with the current college football coaching carousel.

99. Turbett Joins First Horizon as CRA Officer -

Keith D. Turbett has joined First Horizon National Corp., parent company of First Tennessee Bank, as corporate Community Reinvestment Act officer and community development manager. In that role, Turbett ensures First Tennessee is making credit and financial products available in all parts of the community, consistent with safe and sound banking practices.

100. The Week Ahead: Nov. 23, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from The Peabody’s 36-foot dessert table to your potential (fingers-crossed, maybe not) last chance to see Paxton Lynch at the Liberty Bowl…