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Editorial Results (free)

1. Open and Shut -

The office of the future hacks down cubicle walls in favor of modular furniture that encourages collaboration. As many business sectors, from banking to legal services, move to a tech-first approach, companies are turning away from traditional office configurations to attract the next generation of talent.

2. Last Word: After The Fire, Hard Changes at Fred's and Durham Doesn't Go Quietly -

The immediate questions have simple answers. It was a short in an air conditioner cord that caused the fire that killed 9 people – three adults and six children – before dawn Monday morning in South Memphis.

3. Trust Marketing Mantra: It Takes Villagers to Reach the People -

Even if you have not heard of Trust Marketing & Communications Inc., you’ve seen their work.

4. 2 More Universities Furl Confederate-Themed Mississippi Flag -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Two more Mississippi universities have stopped flying the state's flag, which prominently features the Confederate battle emblem.

Mississippi State University and the Mississippi University for Women confirmed Tuesday that they had taken down the state's flag from outdoor flagpoles over the summer. The universities' actions came after state lawmakers failed to act on changing the flag this year.

5. Last Word: Mike McLean's Campaign, Jimmy Carter and Beyond Disparity Studies -

Mike McLean is running one heckuva campaign for Clerk of the Courts. Some of you are thinking, “Why haven’t I heard of that position before?” “Who is the incumbent?”

6. Luttrell Has "Concern" About Charter Referendum On County Attorney -

Shelby County Commissioners have approved a ballot question for the Nov. 8 elections that would give them the final say if the county mayor moves to fire the county attorney.

But before the vote Monday, Aug. 29, by commissioners, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell indicated he might veto the referendum, saying he has a “concern” about what would be a limit on the power of mayors with the proposed amendment to the Shelby County charter.

7. Luttrell Has "Concern" About Charter Referendum On County Attorney -

Shelby County Commissioners have approved a ballot question for the Nov. 8 elections that would give them the final say if the county mayor moves to fire the county attorney.

But before the vote Monday, Aug. 29, by commissioners, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell indicated he might veto the referendum, saying he has a “concern” about what would be a limit on the power of mayors with the proposed amendment to the Shelby County charter.

8. What Would It Take for Trump to Lose Tennessee Voters? -

Murfreesboro Realtor Larry Sims almost closes his ears when Donald Trump speaks.

“He gets out of bounds. Of course, the press, they love it because they get to exploit his sayings and doings,” says Sims, who traveled to Cleveland, Ohio, as a Trump delegate for the Republican National Convention. 

9. Haslam Drops $150K Into PAC for Tennessee Legislative Races -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Haslam has opened his wallet for state legislative campaigns throughout the state.

According to the final campaign finance reports to be filed before the Aug. 4 primary, Haslam gave $150,000 to his political action committee, Jobs4TN. The committee then contributed all but $4,000 of that amount to the campaigns of 44 lawmakers.

10. Last Word: A Robust 2nd Quarter, Marshall and Union and the Code Crew -

Last Word is more like First Word because of a blink of the computer overnight at around 11 p.m. that left us able to create and report but not to post. But not to worry, we will resume our night owl habits Sunday into Monday after this brief reminder of the way things used to be when the deadline was when the presses stopped.

11. Last Word: Regrouping, Freedom Awards and The View From Another Bridge -

It will be a year come Sunday – a year since Darrius Stewart, a passenger in a car pulled over by Memphis Police in Hickory Hill was shot and killed by Officer Conner Schilling.

12. Last Word: Dallas, Baton Rouge and Minneapolis -

As I write this, I’m wondering if something else will happen once it goes up on our website that will render this irrelevant by the time you read it.

This time the datelines are Dallas, Baton Rouge and Minneapolis.

13. Death Sparks 'Autopilot' Car Probe; Man Had Speeding Tickets -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The first American death involving a car in self-driving mode presents a dilemma: How aggressively to embrace the potentially life-saving technology after a fatal crash. The driver's history of speeding complicates the question.

14. Chamber Names Simmons Director of Public Policy -

Haley Simmons has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as the director of public policy, a new position in the chamber’s community development department. In this role, Simmons will be focused on enhancing the chamber’s advocacy efforts to inform and engage its members on important policy issues, and he’ll also be responsible for growing the chamber’s role in education initiatives.

15. Insure Tennessee Advocates on the Road -

The state House’s task force on Insure Tennessee is nearing a June report to federal health regulators on its work. And a Tennessee Hospital Association advocacy group is ramping up its appeal for legislative passage of either the Medicaid expansion alternative or some similar program that might come out of the task force.

16. Last Word: As The Wheel Tax Turns, New Zoo Poll and Once Every Dozen Years -

When the school year ends, that’s not necessarily when leaders of school systems can take it easy.

That’s because the business of school systems is about looking months if not years ahead on your mental calendar.

17. 1917 Lynching Recalled, Marker Planned at Site -

In a year, a group of religious leaders hopes to draw at least 5,000 Memphians to an area off Summer Avenue by the Wolf River where 3,000 gathered nearly a century ago as a man was burned alive.

The Lynching Sites Project of Memphis gathered Sunday, May 22, in a field by a Wolf River oxbow, 99 years to the day that Ell Persons was lynched at an event that was covered by local newspapers in advance.

18. New Schools Giving Memphis Suburbs More Autonomy -

Some of the trees along East Shelby Drive on the 158 acres at Sycamore Road are in rows. It’s the unmistakable sign of a tree nursery. And before that it was considered a prime dove hunting location.

19. The Week Ahead: May 16-22 -

With a barbecue-filled weekend behind us, it’s time to get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the Memphis in May Triathlon (where you can work off that pork belly) to the city’s first Palestine Festival (where, yes, there will be even more food).

20. Wilson Urges Family Philanthropic Efforts at Dunavant Awards -

When most people think of the Kemmons Wilson family, there is an image that comes to mind. It’s a black and white photo from the 1950s of the five children – three boys and two girls – of the Holiday Inn founder cutting the ribbon on the very first Holiday Inn at 4925 Summer Ave.

21. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

22. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

23. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

24. Insure Tennessee: In Like A Lion, Out With A Committee -

What started with a roar is ending with a whimper.

On the first day of the 2016 legislative session, dozens of Insure Tennessee supporters rallied, shouted and sang songs outside the House chamber.

25. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

26. Hamilton & Holliman Bringing Mixed Upscale Housing to South Main -

What was once Downtown’s industrial and rail district is now one of the most densely populated residential neighborhoods in Memphis. Over 2,000 units are under development in the South End, and the current population is expected to double over the next two to three years, according to the Downtown Memphis Commission.

27. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

28. Redbirds Outfielder Tilson Reminds of Cardinals Past -

When Charlie Tilson speaks of the big-league players that have impacted him most, he does so with one eye trained on their past and one eye focused on his future.

“I grew up in Chicago and the guy I loved in 2005 with the White Sox was Scott Podsednik,” said Tilson, in his first year playing center field for the Memphis Redbirds, and a second-round draft pick (79th overall) by the St. Louis Cardinals back in 2011.

29. Shelby County Commission Releases Disparity Study -

In a unanimous vote, Shelby County commissioners waived their legal privilege Wednesday, April 6, and approved the public release of a disparity study that is expected to show minority businesses get a low percentage of county government contracts.

30. Last Word: Basketball Intervention, Medical Inventory and Memphis in the 1960s -

Five games left for the Grizzlies to win three and then get to play more in the NBA playoffs. And what seemed to be a foregone conclusion is now not such a sure thing based on the Grizz performance in Sunday’s 119-107 loss to the Orlando Magic in Orlando.

31. Amended Senate De-annexation Bill Faces More Debate -

The de-annexation bill whose defeat became City Hall’s top priority in March is off the political frontburner.

But Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature who opposed the de-annexation by referendum measure expect that this isn’t the end of the concept or the move to make it law.

32. Tied 4-4 After Scalia's Death, High Court Gives Unions A Win -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In the clearest sign yet of the impact of Justice Antonin Scalia's death, U.S. labor unions scored a major victory Tuesday with a tie vote in a high-profile Supreme Court case they had once seemed all but certain to lose.

33. Amendments Cloud Issue of De-Annexation -

Tennessee state senators go back to work Tuesday, March 29, in Nashville on a modified de-annexation bill.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee will be reviewing a set of amendments to their version of the bill, which changed substantially from the House version in a committee session last week.

34. Time On The Porch -

ON PORCHES. Whatever porches are about, the best ones are about time. Time for swings and rocking chairs and reflection. Time spent alone with your thoughts or time shared with others sharing space and experience. Time to be very quiet. Or very loud. Life in real time.

35. Transgender Bathroom Bill Dies in Subcommittee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill that would require transgender students to use bathrooms that match their sex at birth has failed.

The bill died in a House Education Administration and Planning Committee meeting Tuesday that was packed with transgender youth who opposed the measure.

36. 1866 Massacre Author Says Riot Has Important Lessons -

When historian Stephen V. Ash went looking for source material on that most difficult of events to piece back together – three days of mob violence in a 19th century Southern city – he expected a challenge.

37. The Week Ahead: March 21-27 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first Great River Indoor Food Truck Festival to a celebration of late Memphis wrestler Sputnik Monroe.

38. Free Speech Bill Withdrawn After Islamic State Comments -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Republican lawmaker on Thursday defended his comments that free speech rights on Tennessee college campuses should apply to everyone – even recruiters for the Islamic State group.

39. Bill Would Require Students to Use Bathroom of Birth Sex -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill that would require transgender students to use bathrooms that match their sex at birth is gaining momentum in the Tennessee legislature after passing in a House subcommittee.

40. Politics of Deannexation Proposal Grows More Complex -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is heading to Nashville Wednesday, March 16, to talk with legislators about what he considers City Hall’s highest priority in the 2016 session of the Tennessee Legislature – defeating a deannexation proposal.

41. Strickland Makes Defeating Deannexation Bill Top Priority -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is downplaying but not ruling out a move toward local government consolidation as a response to a deannexation proposal in the Tennessee legislature.

42. Strickland Downplays Consolidation Response to Deannexation Bill -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is downplaying a move toward local government consolidation as a response to a deannexation proposal pending in the Tennessee legislature.

43. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

44. Health Law Fines Double for Many Uninsured at Tax Time -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Many people who went without health insurance last year are now seeing fines more than double under President Barack Obama's health care law, tax preparation company H&R Block said Tuesday.

45. Last Word: Presidential Distractions, Dude Perfect and The Kirby Farm House -

When it comes to political surprises, the presidential contenders may be the next group on the ballot locally. But they need to up their game if they are going to hold the attention of Memphis voters.
With three of the Republican contenders on their way to Shelby County this weekend and probably more making plans, the attention Tuesday shifted dramatically to the open 8th District Congressional seat that isn’t on the ballot until the August primaries.

46. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

47. Four Beale Street Proposals Feature Different Backgrounds -

Jeff Sanford fielded inquiries from 17 or 18 companies, local and out of town, expressing some level of interest in the contract to manage the Beale Street entertainment district.

48. Luttrell, Strickland Attend Obama’s State of the Union -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland both attended the Tuesday, Jan. 12, State of the Union address, the final State of the Union address by President Barack Obama

49. 4 Applicants Up for Beale Street Gig -

A Fortune 500 corporation, the Memphis-based company behind the Delta Fair, a Memphis real estate management firm with office experience, and a newly formed group of Memphians with experience in real estate, entertainment and restaurants as well as commercial development and financing. Those are the four companies that have applied to manage the Beale Street entertainment district.

50. Luttrell, Strickland To Attend Obama’s State of the Union -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will both be attending the Tuesday, Jan. 12, State of the Union address, the final State of the Union address by President Barack Obama

51. An Emotional Obama Unveils His Plan to Cut Gun Violence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama, at one point wiping tears from his cheek, unveiled his plan Tuesday to tighten control and enforcement of firearms in the U.S., using his presidential powers in the absence of legal changes he implored Congress to pass.

52. Measure Increasing Seat Belt Fines Among New Tennessee Laws -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Motorists in Tennessee who don't buckle up could face stiffer fines under one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect Friday.

The tougher seat belt law increases the fine for first-time offenders from $10 to $25 and from $20 to $50 for repeat offenders.

53. Greenprint Summit Shows Region’s Possibilities -

Trails and bike lanes aren’t the only path to regional success, but they’re playing a growing role in partnerships among communities that sometimes find themselves competing for jobs.

To date, 19 of those communities have adopted a 25-year, green-centric plan that was introduced earlier this year and has been endorsed by more than 50 organizations.

54. Time for Tuition Equality in Tennessee -

Tennessee has a unique opportunity to help the state economy and support education. Passage of the “Tuition Equality” bill in the upcoming state legislative session will provide a critical chance to educate thousands of Tennessee youth and narrow the skills gap that exists for Tennessee employers.

55. Fred Davis Looks Back on Long Career -

Fred Davis can laugh about it now, but the founder of the Fred L. Davis Insurance Agency – which opened its doors back in 1967, the year before Davis was elected to the Memphis City Council – wasn’t always as sanguine about the color of his hair.

56. Early Voting Numbers Tell Still-Moving Story in Memphis Election -

Before the votes are counted Thursday, Oct. 8, there are some other numbers – which are already being counted – to tell the story of the 2015 Memphis elections.

Close to 15 percent of Memphis voters cast early ballots in advance of Thursday’s election day in the races for Memphis mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court clerk.

57. Early Voting Numbers Tell Still-Moving Story -

Before the votes are counted Thursday, Oct. 8, there are some other numbers – which are already being counted – to tell the story of the 2015 Memphis elections.

Close to 15 percent of Memphis voters cast early ballots in advance of Thursday’s election day in the races for Memphis mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court clerk.

58. Memphis Early Vote Turnout Higher Than 2011 and 2009 -

Nearly 15 percent of the voters in Memphis cast early ballots in advance of Thursday's election day in the races for Memphis Mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court Clerk.

Through the final day of the early voting period Saturday, Oct. 3, 51,848 citizens voted early, according to Shelby County Election Commission statistics.

59. Memphis Early Vote Turnout Higher Than 2011 and 2009 -

Nearly 15 percent of the voters in Memphis cast early ballots in advance of Thursday's election day in the races for Memphis Mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court Clerk.

Through the final day of the early voting period Saturday, Oct. 3, 51,848 citizens voted early, according to Shelby County Election Commission statistics.

60. Little Rock Officials Vote to Rename Confederate Boulevard -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Little Rock planning officials are recommending changing the name of a stretch of road called Confederate Boulevard.

The Little Rock Planning Commission voted Thursday to strip the name from the four-block section and make it an extension of Springer Boulevard. The recommendation came on the 58th anniversary of the day when federal troops arrived to escort nine black students into Central High School.

61. Memphis Early Voting Turnout Up 76 Percent So Far -

Early voting in the 2015 Memphis elections is running ahead of the pace from four years ago but behind the pace from 2007 and the special mayoral election of 2009.

The early voting period in advance of the Oct. 8 election day runs through Saturday, Oct. 3, at 16 locations across the city.

62. Little Rock Officials Weigh Renaming Confederate Boulevard -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Though only a short stretch of Little Rock's Confederate Boulevard remains, to some it is a glaring reminder of the city's checkered racial past.

City officials are expected to consider a petition Thursday to rename the boulevard's last few blocks after one of the area's first black property owners. Coincidentally, the planning commission's vote comes 58 years to the day that 1,200 troops arrived to escort nine black students to their first day of class during the integration of Central High School.

63. Bona Fide -

When the Bona Fide Blues Festival takes a set of stages in Overton Square and the Cooper-Young neighborhood next month, it will mark a return that’s been a long time coming.

But it also will offer something new.

64. Editorial: The Triumphant Return of Tigers Football -

Fifty years after the University of Memphis’ first season at the Liberty Bowl, and 52 years since the 1963 undefeated season, the annual return of Tigers football feels triumphant.

Maybe you don’t completely trust the tide from last year’s winning season – the first since 2007, the first conference championship since 1971 and the first bowl appearance since 2008. Your head tells you to assert your confidence in Tigers football. But in your heart, it feels like this may be at the expense of Tigers basketball.

65. Civil Rights Museum Names 2015 Freedom Awards Recipients -

Ava DuVernay, the director of the movie “Selma,” Freedom Rider Joan Trumpauer Mulholland and Ruby Bridges-Hall, who as a 6-year-old integrated schools in New Orleans, are the recipients of the 2015 National Civil Rights Museum Freedom Awards.

66. Welcome Back -

When Shelby County’s public schools open for the first day of the 2015-16 school year, it will mark the first time in three years that there will be no historic, structural changes to the systems themselves.

67. Ramsey Clear in Push to Politicize Supreme Court -

Republican Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey has a penchant for igniting flames of partisanship, and the retirement of Tennessee Supreme Court Justice Gary Wade is no exception.

68. Tax Filing Problems Could Jeopardize Health Law Aid for 1.8 Million -

WASHINGTON (AP) – About 1.8 million households that got financial help for health insurance under President Barack Obama's law now have issues with their tax returns that could jeopardize their subsidies next year. Administration officials say those taxpayers will have to act quickly.

69. Improving Access -

With Hispanics expected to make up 31 percent of the nation’s population by 2060, Christian Brothers University is investing in its growing community by pledging $12.5 million to go toward scholarships for immigrant students whose legal residency status may be in question.

70. Clinton to Propose Increasing Capital Gains Taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton plans later this week to propose raising capital gains taxes for some investors, part of a larger campaign effort to encourage greater focus on longer-term economic growth rather than more immediate gains for investors.

71. Mark Mosteller Joins Evolve Bank & Trust -

Mark E. Mosteller Sr. recently joined Evolve Bank & Trust as executive vice president, accounting and finance.
The new role includes a variety of responsibilities, including management of the accounting and finance department team, accounting internal controls, internal and external financial reporting, budgeting and forecasting, taxes and treasury management. Mosteller also works with senior and executive management and the board on accounting, finance and operational issues.

72. White House: Action Needed Now to Slow Climate Change -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Failure to act on climate change could cause an estimated 57,000 deaths in the United States from poor air quality by 2100, the Obama administration argued in a new report Monday that warns of dire effects of global warming.

73. Harris Pushes For Insure Tennessee Comeback -

State Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris of Memphis will be on the campaign trail this summer.

Harris and other Democratic leaders in the majority Republican Tennessee legislature will campaign across the state this summer for the comeback of the Insure Tennessee proposal in the 2016 legislative session.

74. Students Not Giving Up on Tuition Equality -

Tennessee students without citizenship say they’ll continue the battle for in-state tuition in 2016 after a measure to help them overcome the financial hurdle of out-of-state tuition barely failed on the House floor.

75. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

76. Rieger Begins Work at Memphis Chamber -

Tom Rieger recently joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as senior vice president of member development, a role in which he will oversee major fundraising activities, conduct membership drive campaigns and implement revenue enhancement opportunities.

77. Tennessee Tuition Equality Bill Likely Dead This Session -

A proposal that would allow students lawfully in the United States to be eligible for in-state tuition is likely dead this session after failing in the House.

The proposal sponsored by Republican Rep. Mark White of Memphis failed 49-47 on Wednesday when it didn’t get the 50 votes needed for passage. The Senate approved the measure 21-12 last week.

78. An ‘Epiphany’ for Legislators on In-State Tuition -

Tina Sharma grew up in Tennessee, graduated from Martin Luther King High School in Nashville and enrolled at Belmont University. She calls the Volunteer State home.

79. County Commission Looks for Schools Budget -

Shelby County Commissioners have plenty of work to begin on the $1.18 billion budget proposal submitted to the body this week by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

80. Memphis Officials Target High-Cost Markets for Office Jobs -

On a recent trip to New York City to meet with site selection consultants, national headhunters and corporate executives, Greater Memphis Chamber officials and prominent Memphis business operators wined and dined the assembled crowd and touted the benefits of locating office operations in the Memphis area, a city and region in dire need of white-collar jobs.

81. Memphis Part of Federal TechHire Job Training Effort -

Memphis is one of 21 cities involved in a commitment to improve training for workers in the technology sector, and the city will compete for $100 million in federal grant money for tech job training programs.

82. Dr. Phil Delivers Hockey Therapy to the Masses -

Dr. Phil toys with me as he allows me to work my center and left wing to get the puck tantalizingly close to his net.

Then that big smile erupts on the face of a man who hands out “Live With Happiness” dog-tags – like the one dangling beneath his Hawaiian shirt – as he passes through life. With a couple of cagey quick twists of his wrists, Dr. Phil clears his end of the rink and fires a slap shot past my befuddled defensemen and goalie.…

83. Jones, Vols Make Honor Roll With Recruiting Class -

KNOXVILLE – Butch Jones has done it again.

Tennessee’s football coach has created a national buzz with his 2015 recruiting class.

UT finished with the No. 4 class in the nation as rated by 247Sports and ended up ranked No. 5 by Rivals when the Feb. 4 national signing day was over.

84. Nashville’s Most Romantic Restaurants -

Romance means something different for everyone, but most people can agree that if there is low lighting, soft music, a charming companion and something delicious to eat, you’ve already got the makings of one outstanding evening.

85. Haslam on Statewide Tour to Tout Insure Tennessee -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he isn’t counting votes in the Tennessee legislature just yet for his Insure Tennessee Medicaid expansion proposal.

At least he’s not counting hard votes for the upcoming Feb. 2 special legislative session as he holds a series of nine public forums across the state.

86. Key Decisions on Drones Likely From Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Obama administration is on the verge of proposing long-awaited rules for commercial drone operations in U.S. skies, but key decisions on how much access to grant drones are likely to come from Congress next year.

87. Pitts-Murdock Leading Library’s Teen Services -

R. Janae Pitts-Murdock has been named coordinator of teen services for the Memphis Public Library and Information Center, a role in which she’s responsible for coordinating teen programs, partnerships and special initiatives across 18 locations.

88. Tech Summit Addresses Industry's Lack of Diversity -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Civil rights leader Jesse Jackson spent most of this year pressuring the technology industry into facing up to the glaring scarcity of women, blacks and Latinos at companies renowned as great places to work.

89. White House Focuses on Computer Science in Schools -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Smartphones and laptops have become essential tools for today's teenagers. But learning how these devices work has often taken a backseat to other priorities in U.S. schools.

90. EDGE Approves Graceland Taxing District -

A special taxing district to help pay for a massive redevelopment of the sprawling Graceland campus is one step closer to reality.

The board of the city-county Economic Development Growth Engine approved Tuesday, Nov. 25, the creation of a Tax Increment Financing, or TIF, district around Graceland, one of the city's most visited attractions and powerful economic engines.

91. Spillyards Leads Community Advisors Launch -

Greg Spillyards has joined the brokerage team at Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors to launch the firm’s Community Advisors service line.

Community Advisors is focused on the Memphis city core, with a goal to provide real estate advisory services to assist in the revitalization of the city’s underserved areas with passion, creativity and entrepreneurship, and with service to those already living and leading in their neighborhoods.

92. More at Moore -

The large old trees on its campus and the large paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

93. Moore Tech Awakens -

The large old trees on its campus and the paned windows of its brick buildings indicate the William R. Moore College of Technology has been around for a while.

It was the idea of William R. Moore, a dry goods wholesaler, who left a $500,000 endowment to fund the institution following his death in 1909.

94. Watching Kobe’s Empty-the-Clip Tour -

For those first few minutes, Kobe Bryant was toying with us. He passed the ball and he passed up shots – open and otherwise.

The crowd last Tuesday night at FedExForum seemed unnerved by this. Let’s face it, whether you come wearing a white No. 50 Zach Randolph jersey or a purple and gold No. 24 Lakers jersey, you come to see Kobe be true to his DNA.

95. New Lawmakers Trace Likely Abortion Legislation -

The two newest state legislators from Shelby County say they hope to find ways to work across party lines and even with the Shelby County Commission and the Memphis City Council.

“We may not be in the majority, but there is a lot we can do,” said incoming state Sen. Sara Kyle, who will be one of five Democrats in the 33-member Senate when next year’s legislative session in Nashville begins.

96. Real Estate Rally -

Commercial real estate can offer insight into the strength of the local economy. Through the office, retail, industrial and apartment developments that mark the region the economy at work in the real world can be seen.

97. Early Vote Turnout Lags Behind 2010 -

Early voting turnout in advance of the Nov. 4 Election Day was running about 17,000 voters behind the early vote turnout four years ago for the same election cycle through the second and final weekend in the early voting period.

98. 'I Voted' Stickers Feature GOP Name in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – No matter how Tennessee voters cast their ballots, they'll be offered "I Voted" stickers featuring the name of a key Republican who's not running for office – yet.

99. Health Law Waivers: Too Complicated to Claim? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions of Americans may qualify for waivers from the most unpopular part of President Barack Obama's health care overhaul. But getting that exemption could be an ordeal.

100. Community Advocates Seek Crime Solutions -

In mid-August, Memphis Police brass realized they had a crime problem in different parts of the city.

“We realized we had a spike in crime,” is how Deputy Police Chief Clete Knight put it Wednesday, Sept. 17, to a neighborhood group in East Memphis.