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Editorial Results (free)

1. The Ties That Bind -

When Big River Crossing was about to open a year ago, Doug Carpenter was asked often where the Tennessee-Arkansas state line is over the Mississippi River.

His marketing firm DCA has overseen publicity for the crossing from concept through construction, so he has learned much about the history of the Harahan Bridge and the mighty river below it. But the stateline wasn't marked

2. New Gannett Cuts Eliminate Two More Commercial Appeal Employees -

The effects of another companywide restructuring at newspaper publisher Gannett Co. Inc. – which owns USA Today as well as The Commercial Appeal – have touched the newsroom in Memphis, following an even deeper round of local cuts earlier this year.

3. Gannett Cost-Cutting Again Trims Commercial Appeal Headcount -

The effects of another companywide restructuring at newspaper publisher Gannett Co. Inc. – which owns USA Today as well as The Commercial Appeal – have touched the newsroom in Memphis, following an even deeper round of local cuts earlier this year.

4. Senate Confirms Dunavant As U.S. Attorney -

The U.S. Senate has confirmed Tipton County prosecutor Mike Dunavant as the new U.S. attorney for the Western District of Tennessee, based in Memphis with offices in Jackson, Tennessee.

5. Dunavant Confirmed As U.S. Attorney -

The U.S. Senate has confirmed Tipton County prosecutor Mike Dunavant as the new U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Tennessee, based in Memphis with offices in Jackson, Tennessee.

6. Last Word: The Amazon Competition, Millington Shelters and Grizz Ownership Drama -

With a social media post Thursday morning, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said the city is ready to compete in a very public competition for the $5-billion second North American headquarters Amazon.com announced earlier Thursday. Some context here. The $5 billion investment by Amazon in what it calls HQ2 compares to the $9 billion St. Jude is investing in its expansion including about $1 billion in capital costs and the rest research, technology and other development costs included in what is more than a physical expansion.

7. Last Word: Back From Jury Duty, ASD Changes and Southern Heritage Classic Is Here -

Back from a very short-lived jury duty on a short week for the courts – criminal and civil. Even a slow week at the Criminal Justice Center is a learning experience about not only our criminal justice system but also the Constitutional framework that puts those notices in the U.S. mail and results in several hundred citizens at a time showing up in a jury assembly room after the adventure of trying to find parking Downtown.

8. Raising The Ceiling -

Here’s the thing about expectations: You either embrace them, turning them into some divine combination of daily bread and rocket fuel, or they crush you.

There is no middle ground. Not when the statistical mid-point – a .500 season – would be an undisputed failure.

9. Looks Like Another 8-4 Season for Tennessee -

Oops. I goofed last year. So did lots of other people who thought Tennessee’s football team would win the SEC East Division and go to the league championship game for the first time since 2007.

10. The Latest: University Barricades Confederate Statue -

The Latest on efforts to remove Confederate monuments and the nationwide fallout from a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia (all times local):

___

2:30 p.m.

Workers in a Florida city have started taking down a memorial to Confederate soldiers at a city-owned cemetery.

11. Deadly Rally Accelerates Removal of Confederate Statues -

In Gainesville, Florida, workers hired by the Daughters of the Confederacy chipped away at a Confederate soldier's statue, loaded it quietly on a truck and drove away with little fanfare.

In Baltimore, Mayor Catherine Pugh said she's ready to tear down all of her city's Confederate statues, and the city council voted to have them destroyed. San Antonio lawmakers are looking ahead to removing a statue from a prominent downtown park.

12. ‘I Am a Man’ Plaza Initial Design Unveiled -

The initial design of a public plaza south of FedExForum commemorating the 1968 sanitation workers strike calls for a central sculpture with the words “I Am a Man” in 15-foot-tall stainless steel letters, along with quotes from speeches by civil rights leaders on other parts of the built environment and on the letters of the sculpture.

13. The King's Castle: Graceland, Whitehaven open 40th anniversary Elvis Week -

It begins with a trivia contest and a sock hop. Those are the first two events Friday, Aug. 11, at the top of a crowded Elvis Week itinerary that marks 40 years since Elvis Presley died at Graceland.

14. 'I Am a Man' Plaza Initial Design Unveiled -

The initial design of a public plaza south of FedExForum commemorating the 1968 sanitation workers strike calls for a central sculpture with the words “I Am a Man” in 15-foot-tall stainless steel letters, along with quotes from speeches by civil rights leaders on other parts of the built environment and on the letters of the sculpture.

15. Last Word: The Old Auto Inspection Station, Beale Field Trip and Re-Democrating -

Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton has a different version of his 2016 plan to build two youth development centers for juvenile offenders to go to instead of detention at the Wilder Youth Development Center in Somerville. About a year ago, Herenton had tentative plans for two of the New Path centers in Shelby County that would be centers where the offenders could live.

16. ‘Fifth Wave’ of Federal Judicial Appointments Comes with Political Undercurrents -

The White House called it the “fifth wave” of federal judicial nominees. Among the 11 nominees announced by President Donald Trump Thursday, July 13, were two for the Memphis federal court bench. And the wave comes with a few political undercurrents.

17. Last Word: Fifth Wave, Hidden Gem in OB and the Freeze Filibuster -

There is one less contender in the crowded field of potential and declared candidates for the Republican nomination for Governor in 2018. State Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was nominated for federal court judge Thursday by President Donald Trump who also nominated Memphis attorney and former federal prosecutor Tommy Parker to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee as well. Both are part of what The White House described as a “fifth wave” of judicial nominees.

18. Legislature Losing Some Powerful, Familiar Members -

A shakeup in leadership is looming for the state Legislature, though it may portend more of a change in personalities than party strength.

In the House, longtime Rep. Craig Fitzhugh, the affable Democrat from Ripley in West Tennessee, is preparing for a 2018 gubernatorial run, a move that would knock him out of his House seat, at least temporarily, and the position as Democratic Caucus leader.

19. Ole Miss Buys Baptist Hospital in $22 Million Deal -

2301 S. Lamar Blvd.
Oxford, MS 38655

Sale Amount: $22 million

Sale Date: June 15, 2017

20. Last Word: Wahlburgers, CA For Sale and Council Day -

We really go for hot food brands around here – whether its restaurants or supermarkets. And it makes us suckers to some degree. I don’t mean that in a bad way. Memphis without being open to all possibilities and what others see as impossible is just not Memphis. But when it comes to the business of brands sometimes you start to wonder. We may be guilty of putting too much weight on a brand to solve problems that no brand anywhere can solve.

21. June 16-22, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

2008: The debut of The Memphis News, a weekly about “business, politics and the public interest” by The Daily News Publishing Co.

22. Last Word: Disaster Paperwork, The Whitehaven Plan and Juvenile Justice -

On its way to Washington is the paperwork for a federal disaster declaration sent Wednesday by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam. It includes Shelby County and 11 other Tennessee counties. This is essentially federal funding that will reimburse local government for money they spend up front for these kinds of disasters. The state’s request also includes a call for individual assistance to Shelby County homeowners and business owners whose property was damaged in the Memorial Day weekend storms.

23. Last Word: After the Last Hole, Cutting County Property Taxes and A Recycled Gown -

The story of how the Overton Park Conservancy raised $1 million in two months didn’t go according to the script. It wasn’t large donors, it was a lot of contributions of $250 or less it turns out, many from people who have never been to the park, the zoo or the greensward in particular whether it’s on foot or in a car. There were donations from Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia and every state, except South Dakota.

24. Last Word: The Mackin Letter, A County Property Tax Cut and UrbanArts Responds -

The Overton Gateway multi-family development on the eastern side of Overton Park looks to be the next development controversy heading for City Hall. The Land Use Control Board voted down the amended MRG plans Thursday that have drawn neighborhood opposition in both versions. The LUCB rejection doesn’t stop the project. It goes to the Memphis City Council at a date to be determined with a negative recommendation that certainly doesn’t do the project any favors.

25. Last Word: Foote Homes Falls, Kellogg Layoffs and The SCS Ask -

Once upon a time in South Memphis it could be difficult to tell where Foote Homes began and Cleaborn Homes ended or vice versa. The key to this was which side of Lauderdale you were looking at. The east side was Cleaborn and the west was Foote with Lauderdale as the dividing line.

26. Barbecue Restaurant Scene Heats Up in Memphis -

Memphis has enjoyed a bumper crop of barbecue restaurant news in recent weeks, from tweaks to some business’ existing locations and plans by others to expand. And that trend isn’t letting up anytime soon.

27. Last Word: Council Day Issues, 'A Man Of Color' and East Memphis 'Novel' -

A busy day at City Hall Tuesday by the City Council agenda and by at least one completely unplanned moment during council budget committee sessions. It was so busy that at the start of Tuesday’s council session, chairman Berlin Boyd couldn’t find his gavel and technical glitches prompted him to ask for a can of WD-40. Throw in a visit to City Hall by civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson and you have our comprehensive same night rundown of how it went and for whom it went.

28. Commercial Appeal Changes Continue as Editor Signals Departure -

For a little over a month now, it’s seemed as though almost as soon as one significant change materializes at The Commercial Appeal, another follows close behind.

Just in recent days alone, the CA’s union has launched new actions against the paper – for a total of three actions now pending – related to its latest round of layoffs. Meanwhile, CA editor Louis Graham announced Wednesday, May 3, he’s stepping down to take a job as the executive director of enterprise content at ALSAC.

29. Last Word: DNA Unit Trouble, 100 Years After Ell Persons and Gas Tax Hike Redux -

The suspension of Ouita Knowlton, the Memphis Police detective overseeing the MPD's DNA Unit, appears to involve more than alleged violations of police policies. The unit oversees testing and processing of all current rape kits and those left unprocessed for decades that the city is currently working its way through five years after the admission. The District Attorney General’s office is part of the investigation of Knowlton, the office confirmed Monday. There are no specifics about what is involved here. But the police investigation will go to District Attorney General Amy Weirich who will then determine if criminal laws were violated and if there is a case to be made.

30. Governor’s Supplemental Budget Includes More Transportation Funding -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris calls the governor’s $125 million supplemental budget a “strong foundation” for completing work on the IMPROVE Act.

31. Riding New Wave -

In 2007, about a half-dozen Memphis companies came together to found the Urban Land Institute Memphis chapter. It was a fine start. Six years later, ULI Memphis was convening a group of mayors from the tri-state area and, at least initially, trying very hard to make it informal and non-threatening.

32. Last Word: The Day After, $21.9M More for SCS and First Tennessee Overdrafts -

Take That For Data, Indeed. The Grizz crack the century mark over the Spurs 105-94 in a motivated Game 3 of the playoff series before a loud and proud Forum. Game 4 is Saturday on Beale. Meanwhile, Markel Crawford chooses. He will be leaving the Tigers basketball program for Ole Miss.

33. Last Word: The Catechism of 1968, Downtown Hotels and Earth Day on Auto Row -

What happened 49 years ago this week in our city began long before the first sanitation worker walked off the job or the first “I Am A Man” sign was made. Maybe it was that long arc that explains the timing of what happened here in late March into the first week of April of 1968. For just about half a century now we have thought and thought again about that chronology, reviewed the details. And what we have is a sort of catechism of moments that if they had happened differently, we can’t help thinking, might have produced a different result.

34. Last Word: The CA Marks A Year, Bike Lanes and Nicole Miller for Fashion Week -

The city of Memphis is in a two-front legal fight in federal court over alleged surveillance of protesters that landed several dozen of them on the City Hall list – according to each of the two lawsuits filed this past month.

35. Last Word: The Overton Park Split, Democrats Help The Gas Tax Bill and LaVar Ball -

The city's tallest building, the fenced-off, derelict, 38-story 100 N. Main Building, cited in the past by fire officials for code violations including fire alarms that don't work -- had a small fire Wednesday 34 floors up.

36. Trump: Next Old Hickory or Carnival Barker -

For those who ignore the news – fake or otherwise – Donald Trump won the presidency last November.

While he didn’t capture a majority of the vote, he did win the electoral vote, causing many detractors to call for the elimination of this outdated voting method.

37. Last Word: James Cotton, A Quiet Jackson Day in Memphis and 'A Football School' -

When you think of the blues and harmonica – James Cotton probably comes to mind – Sonny Boy Williamson too, who taught Cotton how to play.

38. Tennessee Lawmakers Weigh In on Trump Visit -

NASHVILLE – While state lawmakers recognized the historical significance of President Donald Trump visiting the home of President Andrew Jackson in Hermitage Wednesday, March 15, the review is mixed on comparisons between the two as well as the Jackson legacy.

39. Last Word: Lakeland Date Set, Silos in South Main and Trespassing in Apartments -

Here comes the Governor’s race with Randy Boyd doing the honors here in Memphis Wednesday at the top of the second day of his fly-around. Boyd’s opening sounds very much like he is running as the heir apparent to Gov. Bill Haslam – although there are no heirs in politics, at least not without an election. He talked a lot about hitting workforce development and job goals of the Haslam administration if he is elected Governor in 2018.

40. Trump Announces Challenge to Obama-Era Fuel Standards -

YPSILANTI, Mich. (AP) – President Donald Trump announced Wednesday that his administration will re-examine federal requirements governing the fuel efficiency of cars and trucks, moving forcefully against Obama-era environmental regulations that Trump says are stifling economic growth.

41. Last Word: Milhaus Sells, Voucher Debate Gets Heated and Boyd's Fly Around -

Highland Row isn’t fully open yet and it is already up for sale as part of a real estate portfolio. The owner, Milhaus, based in Indianapolis, is a development, construction and property management company that works in mixed use development. And the portfolio being on the market could turn into a recapitalization.

42. Slain TBI Agent De'Greaun Frazier To Have Facility Named After Him -

NASHVILLE – Tennessee Bureau of Investigation Agent De’Greaun ReShun Frazier was only 35 when he was shot and killed in Jackson while working an undercover drug operation.

The Tennessee General Assembly, however, is set to make sure his service to the state lives in perpetuity by putting his name on the new TBI crime lab and consolidated regional headquarters to be built in Madison County.

43. Last Word: The List and Who Is On It, Lovell's Impact and Fountain Brook Recovers -

A list of 81 people who can’t come to City Hall without a police escort includes a lot of names from the last year of protests and marches in the city. And as the week begins, the list is under review by Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings at the request of Mayor Jim Strickland.

44. Last Word: Little Chairs in Longview, Police Pay Raise and Tiger Football Schedule -

The toys are in their cubbyholes. No stray Legos yet. The little chairs tucked neatly under little tables. The tall trees with their bare branches are much in need of little eyes inspecting their twisted branches and the shadows they make on the winter ground.

45. Last Word: The Business of Local Sports, Garrison Leaves MATA and Broadband -

Marc Gasol makes the NBA’s Western Conference All Star team as a reserve, the first player in the history of the Grizz to make the All-Star Game three times.

Grizz business operations president Jason Wexler asked about Memphis hosting an NBA All-Star Game one of these days at The Daily News Sports Seminar Thursday at the Brooks. Wexler saying the city doesn’t have enough hotel rooms – the same barrier to drawing bigger conventions and meetings to the city.

46. Last Word: Haslam To Talk Gas Tax, Rallings Talks Protesters and Beale Street -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam talks gas tax Wednesday in Nashville. Actually, he will be rolling out his full list of legislative priorities in the capitol. But much of the attention will be on what he proposes in the way of the state’s gas tax – something he’s talked about but not committed a specific position to for the last two years.

47. Last Word: The Elvis Tradition, Cordova Brewery and Parkside Path -

For about three decades now, there has been a cultural and political tradition around the birthday of Elvis Presley. It used to be a proclamation by the Shelby County Mayor and the Memphis Mayor on the steps of Graceland with a birthday cake.

48. Fitzhugh Touts Rural Credentials As He Mulls Governor's Bid -

JACKSON, Tenn. (AP) – State House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh is seriously considering joining the race to succeed term-limited Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam in 2018.

49. Last Word: The Bridge Revisited, The Election Year and Lamar Remains Lamar -

One of the biggest stories of 2016 wasn’t planned and the spontaneous nature of the July 10 demonstration that closed the Hernando DeSoto Bridge made it a very unusual story. It was spontaneous and it tapped long held feelings and frustrations. For that reason and others, it is its own story in our continuing review of the year’s biggest stories in Memphis.

50. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

51. What Lies Ahead for UT Athletics in 2017 -

Hey Vols fans, Happy New Year. May your 2017 year in Tennessee sports be better than your 2016 year in Tennessee sports. Perhaps, a fresh start is what we all need. Let’s face it. The Music City Bowl wasn’t where Tennessee wanted the 2016 football season to end. The Vols were picked to win the SEC East Division in preseason and floundered to an 8-4 record in the regular season, 4-4 in the SEC. Their football season was about the norm for most UT sports in 2016: average. Here are some dates to mark in hope of better things ahead in 2017...

52. What 2017 May Mean for Your Personal Finances -

It's been a tumultuous 2016 – both financially and politically. The year may have left some people wondering, what's next? And, how will it affect me?

Lacking a crystal ball, we asked a few economic experts what they think 2017 may hold in store for Americans' personal finances. Here's their take on what to expect in the year ahead:

53. Wildfires Scorch Tourist Area in Tennessee; Thousands Flee -

GATLINBURG, Tenn. (AP) – Wildfires fueled by high winds roared through parts of the Great Smoky Mountains, burning the doorstep of the Dollywood theme park, destroying a resort and chasing thousands of people from their homes.

54. This Week in Memphis History: Nov. 25-Dec. 1 -

2015: Republican presidential contender John Kasich is in Memphis for a fundraiser at the home of Brad Martin. It is one of two fundraisers that evening – the other is for state Senate Republican leader Mark Norris who is considering a bid for Tennessee governor in 2018.

55. Big River -

Jim Jackson had it planned. At the third annual Arkansas Delta Flatlander bicycle ride, the 100-kilometer bike ride would become what it was intended to be – a ride across the Mississippi River from West Memphis to Memphis across the northern side of the Harahan Bridge.

56. Looks Like 10-2, SEC Title Game, Orange Bowl for UT -

Editor’s note: Nashville sports correspondent Dave Link has been accurate in predicting season outcomes for the Tennessee Vols in recent years. His 2016 season predictions, released just before press time, culminates with an SEC Championship appearance. Here’s his take on the season…

57. Last Word: Heart of the Park, Tigers Opener Preview and Memphis In May Numbers -

“Try to remember the kind of September when life was slow and oh, so mellow. Try to remember the kind of September when grass was green and grain was yellow.”

It would appear this is that kind of September you would otherwise be remembering.

58. 2 More Universities Furl Confederate-Themed Mississippi Flag -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Two more Mississippi universities have stopped flying the state's flag, which prominently features the Confederate battle emblem.

Mississippi State University and the Mississippi University for Women confirmed Tuesday that they had taken down the state's flag from outdoor flagpoles over the summer. The universities' actions came after state lawmakers failed to act on changing the flag this year.

59. Yellen, in Speech Friday, Could Send Signal About Next Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The job market is humming, and so are the U.S. financial markets, with major stock indexes near record highs.

All that would normally trigger a green light for the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates – especially when they're barely above all-time lows. Yet the Fed, still casting a wary eye on the economy, has yet to signal that it will resume raising rates soon.

60. Suburban Challengers Emerge at Filing Deadline For November Ballot -

Thirteen incumbents in the four suburban municipal elections on the Nov. 8 ballot were effectively re-elected to new terms at the Thursday, Aug. 18, filing deadline for the set of 30 races.

And Chris Denson claimed a seat on the Millington School Board with no opposition for the position incumbent Donald Holsinger is giving up to run for alderman in Millington.

61. Suburban Challengers Emerge at Filing Deadline For November Ballot -

Thirteen incumbents in the four sets of suburban municipal elections on the Nov. 8 ballot were effectively re-elected to new terms at the Thursday, Aug. 18, filing deadline for the set of 30 races.

62. Owens Corning Faces PILOT Reduction for Lack of Diversity Spending -

EDGE is showing its teeth. For the first time in the history of the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine and its predecessor, the Industrial Development Board, the entity is considering punitive measures for a company that failed to meet requirements about diversity contracting.

63. Collierville, Millington Mayoral Races Top Suburban Ballots in November -

The mayors of Collierville and Millington are running for re-election on the November ballot and as the noon Thursday, Aug. 18, filing deadline approaches for the Bartlett, Germantown, Collierville and Millington municipal ballots the two mayors have challengers.

64. Kustoff Victory Caps TV, Outsider Heavy Congressional Campaign -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff claimed the Republican nomination for Tennessee’s 8th Congressional district Thursday, Aug. 4, in a 15-county contest in which the eastern parts of Shelby County played a decisive role.

65. Kustoff Claims 8th GOP Primary, Todd Upset by Lovell, Jenkins Over Newsom -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff claimed the Republican nomination for Tennessee’s 8th Congressional district Thursday, Aug. 4, in a 15-county contest in which the eastern parts of Shelby County played a decisive role.

66. Crowded Race in 8th District GOP Primary Tops Thursday's Ballot -

Two days before the Thursday, Aug. 4, election day, state Rep. Curry Todd was arrested by Shelby County Sheriff’s deputies for removing a rival’s campaign signs in Collierville.

The arrest Tuesday on a warrant sworn out against Todd for theft is an indication of just how hard fought some of the races are in what is considered a minor election cycle in the shadow of the November presidential general election.

67. Last Word: Curry Todd, Crosstown Brewing and Cursive Comeback -

A word at the top of Last Word about campaign signs and what happens to some of them during a campaign.

There are a couple of sayings – bits of political wisdom by the judgment of some – that are uttered numerous times during every election season.

68. Last Word: The Sound of Dominoes, Brexit Anxiety and Schilling Farms Backstory -

The Memphis Newspaper Guild makes it official – filing grievances against Gannett, the new owner of The Commercial Appeal, over the first significant changes in how the paper is put out. Those changes involve abolishing copy editing positions and making them part of the new job of digital producers.

69. Dark Money Ads Surface in 8th District Primary -

As Republicans were either at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland or watching it on TV last week, “dark money” entered the crowded Republican primary for Tennessee’s 8th Congressional district.

70. Chism Readying 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism wants to be the Democratic nominee for Shelby County mayor in 2018, and he plans to begin his campaign after the November presidential election.

71. Funds Rolling In for 8th Congressional District Race -

Five of the six major contenders in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District raised a total of $1.8 million from Jan. 1 to June 30 going into the critical last month of the campaign.

72. The Rest of the August Ballot -

If all goes according to plan on the Aug. 4 election day, Linda Phillips hopes the result is that you don’t see her in any of the reporting on election night.

73. Scramble in the 8th District -

You might call it the calm before the storm. The Aug. 4 election, for which early voting starts July 15, is calmer than usual for the election cycle before a November presidential general election – the only election that more than half of Shelby County voters regularly show up for.

74. 8th District Republican Contenders Highlight Differences -

Most of the 13 contenders in the August Republican primary in the 8th Congressional District agree on a lot. They think the country is going in the wrong direction. They believe the policies of a Democratic president are a factor in that, and they support Donald Trump as the Republican Party’s presidential nominee.

75. Joerger Lands in Sacramento; Grizzlies Casting for Replacement -

Future conversation in Sacramento between new coach Dave Joerger and franchise player DeMarcus “Boogie” Cousins:

Joerger: “DeMarcus, do you get what we’re doing here, do you know what you’re doing on this play?”

76. Joerger and Grizzlies Both had the Itch -

If Dave Joerger and the Memphis Grizzlies had been a married couple, they would have been those unsettled spouses forever undercutting each other in dinner party conversations, rolling their eyes, and smiling fake “we really do love each other smiles” while checking out all the other guests.

77. Reaction to the Death of Civil Rights Leader Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles -

Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles died Tuesday in Memphis after a long illness. Here's a roundup of reaction from local leaders, Kyles' associates and the National Civil Rights Museum...

78. Luttrell Wants to Bridge Urban-Rural Divide -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen knows the signs of someone making the transition to running for Congress.

So when he and Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell spoke at the March 31 opening of Moore Tech’s new welding school, Cohen watched closely as Luttrell began talking about the lack of workforce training and questioned the old Shelby County Schools slogan of “every child college bound.”

79. Kustoff Opens Congressional Bid With 15 Stops -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff began his campaign for Congress Monday, April 11, with stops in Tipton County and Fayette County as well as East Memphis.

80. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

81. 8th Congressional District Primaries Draw 22 Contenders, 13 Republican -

The Republican primary race to fill the 8th District Congressional seat Republican incumbent Stephen Fincher is giving up drew a field of 13 contenders – seven from Shelby County and four from Jackson, Tennessee – at the Thursday, April 7, noon filing deadline for the Aug. 4 ballot.

82. Statewide Demand Outstrips Supply of Qualified Workers -

Tennessee is surging as a major manufacturing state, bouncing back from the Great Recession by attracting billions of dollars in new investment and creating thousands of new – and often very high-paying – advanced manufacturing jobs.

83. Basar Out in 8th District Race, Luttrell Pulls Petition, Cohen Could Have Easy Ride -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Basar has called off his plan to run in the crowded Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District, but Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has pulled his petition to join the same crowded field.

84. Buckman Performing Arts Center Becomes Community Gem -

It was 25 years ago that singer-songwriter Marc Cohn released his debut album that included the song for which he’s most known, “Walking in Memphis.”

85. Sports Notebook: Lynch at Gruden’s QB Camp, Memphis Defense, Cards' Leadoff Hitter -

If you want to see the whole thing, Jon Gruden’s QB Camp with former University of Memphis quarterback Paxton Lynch will air at 11 a.m. on Saturday, April 16, on ESPN. The NFL Draft is April 28-30 in Chicago.

86. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

87. ‘I’m the Steak’ Norris Carries Haslam’s Agenda, Except... -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris refers to himself as a “meat and potatoes” legislator. The four-term Republican senator from Collierville, a self-described policy wonk, is considering a run for governor in 2018. But if the race boils down to charisma, he says the media will have to determine if he has enough to win the top office.

88. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

89. Luttrell Exit for Congress Likely Would Not Lead to County Special Election -

There probably won’t be a special election for Shelby County mayor if current mayor Mark Luttrell gets elected to Congress later this year.

90. Last Word: Election Day, Luttrell Makes It Six, And About "Executive Sessions" -

Can You Feel It? Tuesday is election day in Memphis and across the state in this presidential election year. And all indications are the turnout locally should be above the 24 percent mark we’ve been at in the last two presidential election years.

91. Luttrell Declares for Congressional Bid -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell announced Monday, Feb. 29, that he will be a candidate in the August Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District.

92. Pugh’s Cites Marketing In 40-Year Success -

Pugh’s Flowers co-owner Michael Pugh might have seemed out of place a few weeks ago when he stood in front of an audience of marketing professionals to address the Memphis Public Relations Society of America’s Memphis chapter.

93. Luttrell Weighing Congressional Bid -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell is considering a run for Congress and he expects to make his decision in the next week.

94. In the Game -

Way back in the 1990s, perhaps before the Grizzlies and FedExForum were even a twinkle in anyone’s eye, Chris Wallace came to Memphis and The Pyramid for a preseason NBA game featuring Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls.

95. Consolidation of Tennessee’s Newspapers Bad for Taxpayers -

The federal government isn’t likely to descend on Tennessee with trust-busting vengeance once three of the state’s four largest newspapers are owned by the same company.

Newspapers are too far down a virtual slippery slope of monopolism to retrieve from the hands of Gannett, which recently announced it plans to pay $280 million for Journal Media Group, the owner of The Commercial Appeal in Memphis and Knoxville News Sentinel.

96. Here’s How Vols Grade Going Into Second Half -

Order has been restored in Vol Nation, at least for now.

Tennessee’s football team restored it with a 38-31 victory over then-No. 19 Georgia last Saturday at Neyland Stadium.

UT’s rally from a 24-3 deficit has much of the fan base back on board with Vols coach Butch Jones and his staff after a precarious week leading up to the game.

97. Fair Trade: The Mid-South Fair’s transition to Southaven -

A FedEx jet turned for Memphis International Airport just north of Landers Center in Southaven, Miss., on Saturday, Sept. 26, the opening weekend of the Mid-South Fair.

Below it, a ride on the parking lot of the arena made a perpetual turn in the other direction under the same overcast skies.

98. As Fed Meets, Decision on Rate Hike Seems Like a Toss-Up -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Will they or won't they?

Nine years after they last raised their benchmark interest rate and after months of feverish speculation, Federal Reserve policymakers this week may finally raise that rate from a record low near zero.

99. Family Force -

Pugh’s Flowers came first. Landscaping as Pugh’s Earthworks and then Lickety Split Couriers followed. And now the latest venture – Rosie’s Pest Control – has become its own entity.

100. Council Explores Retirees Return To Police Ranks -

Memphis City Council members are exploring the idea of encouraging already-retired police officers to get back in uniform as reserve officers to keep the police force from slipping to less than 2,000 officers.