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Editorial Results (free)

1. $21.6 Million in Construction Headed to Graceland -

1064 Craft Road

Memphis, TN 38116

Permit Amount: $18.1 million

Project Cost: $21.6 million

2. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

3. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

4. Last Word: Tubby Time, Haslam's Veto and Africa in April's 30th Year -

It was just four weeks ago that all of this talk about change at the top of the Tiger basketball chart was put to rest. Coach Josh Pastner’s performance was reviewed by the University of Memphis administration and he was staying at least for another season. Four weeks to the day of that announcement, Pastner is the new coach at Georgia Tech and we are in the first day of the Tubby Smith era at the U of M.

5. Last Word: Tubby Fever, School Closings and March Real Estate Numbers -

The Tigers basketball grapevine is nothing but Tubby Smith as of Wednesday when the speculation was joined by torrent of rumors about contact between the Texas Tech coach and the University of Memphis.
Smith has now acknowledged he’s talking with the U of M.
More background on Smith from The Sporting News and Mike DeCourcy, a former sports reporter at The Commercial Appeal, that came out before everything went Tubby here.

6. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

7. Moving Dirt -

The Memphis development community is looking inward and upward to increase density in the urban core. New construction is happening across all four commercial real estate sectors, with long-anticipated projects like Trader Joe’s and the redevelopment of Central Station finally coming to fruition. Construction and operating costs continue to be a challenge as new projects hit the top of their class to command higher rents.

8. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

9. Amended Senate De-annexation Bill Faces More Debate -

The de-annexation bill whose defeat became City Hall’s top priority in March is off the political frontburner.

But Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature who opposed the de-annexation by referendum measure expect that this isn’t the end of the concept or the move to make it law.

10. Last Word: Greensward Truce, Connor Schilling Retires and MEMFix Goes East -

You’ve heard of the mediation process surrounding the long-term use of the Overton Park Greensward by the Memphis Zoo for its overflow parking.
It appears there is now a less formal mediation process underway when it comes to the use of the greensward during the park’s spring peak season which is now underway.

11. Memphis Presence Helps Turn Tide on Controversial Legislation -

The Tennessee Legislature’s de-annexation debate is over for now. But the bill’s effect on the Memphis-Capitol Hill relationship has left a larger political imprint than the proposal.

That’s saying a lot considering the proposal dealt with the possibility of territory and citizens rearranging the city’s boundaries to put them and the taxes they pay outside the city limits.

12. Last Word: The Curtain Falls in Nashville, Political Cuneiform and Ramsey Talks -

And in less than a half hour Wednesday, the de-annexation drama that should qualify as the political equivalent of a Netflix binge-watchable television series made just for Memphis was done.

13. MATA Board Approves Significant Route Changes -

Sixteen bus route changes will take effect in May at the Memphis Area Transit Authority.

The changes, which were approved at the March 29 meeting of the MATA board of commissioners, mark the first significant batch of route changes since MATA CEO Ron Garrison took the position in 2014.

14. Amendments Cloud Issue of De-Annexation -

Tennessee state senators go back to work Tuesday, March 29, in Nashville on a modified de-annexation bill.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee will be reviewing a set of amendments to their version of the bill, which changed substantially from the House version in a committee session last week.

15. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

16. Memphis Fights Back: Senate Poised To Do Real Damage via De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

17. Opposers Fight De-Annexation Another Day -

When the state Senate’s State and Local Government Committee convenes at noon Wednesday, March 21, in Nashville, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and his administration will have been working Capital Hill for about a day and a half.

18. De-Annexation Bill Sent Back to Legislative Committee -

The de-annexation bill pending in the Tennessee Legislature was sent back to a Senate committee in Nashville Monday, March 21, after those favoring the bill raised numerous questions about amendments to it.

19. County Commission Questions City Figures on Deannexation -

Some Shelby County Commissioners are skeptical about City Hall’s estimate of how much city government would lose in revenue if a deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature becomes law.

The commission’s discussion at Wednesday, March 16, committee sessions came as Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was in Nashville to lobby against the bill in the state Senate.

20. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

21. Politics of Deannexation Proposal Grows More Complex -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is heading to Nashville Wednesday, March 16, to talk with legislators about what he considers City Hall’s highest priority in the 2016 session of the Tennessee Legislature – defeating a deannexation proposal.

22. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

23. Last Word: Redbirds Sold, Memphis Burning and When Old Dominick Was Young -

Grizzlies over the Cavaliers 106-103 Monday evening in Cleveland despite the pre-game injury story dominating up to tip-off.

24. Last Word: Timing and Numbers, Old Dominick Takes Shape and Zip Lines To Spring -

Political opportunity is defined by timing.
Witness a look at the early voting turnout numbers in advance of Tuesday’s election day.

More than half of the more than 43,000 Shelby County voters who cast early ballots voted Monday and Tuesday – the last two days of an early voting period that began Feb. 10 – way back there when Martin O’Malley was the third Democratic presidential contender and Jeb Bush was considered a force to be reckoned with in the Republican primaries.

25. Roland Passes on 8th Congressional District Run, Sticks With Mayor in 2018 -

Shelby County Commission chairman Terry Roland will not be running in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District in August.

26. Trust Fund Mentioned as Possible $1.1B Solution on School Benefits Liability -

A trust fund is one possibility that has surfaced early in the formal discussions of the Shelby County School system’s $1.1 billion benefits liability.

The first meeting of the ad hoc committee on the matter last week drew nine of the 13 Shelby County Commissioners, the administration of Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and two of nine Shelby County Schools board members.

27. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

28. Butch Jones Builds for Championship Run With Staff Tweaks -

Tennessee football coach Butch Jones got serious about taking the next step with his football program not long after his team’s 45-6 victory over Northwestern in the Jan. 1 Outback Bowl.

Jones fired defensive coordinator John Jancek on Jan. 6, and three days later hired his top candidate for the opening, Bob Shoop of Penn State.

29. Four Beale Street Proposals Feature Different Backgrounds -

Jeff Sanford fielded inquiries from 17 or 18 companies, local and out of town, expressing some level of interest in the contract to manage the Beale Street entertainment district.

30. 4 Applicants Up for Beale Street Gig -

A Fortune 500 corporation, the Memphis-based company behind the Delta Fair, a Memphis real estate management firm with office experience, and a newly formed group of Memphians with experience in real estate, entertainment and restaurants as well as commercial development and financing. Those are the four companies that have applied to manage the Beale Street entertainment district.

31. Last Word: Legislature's Return, Uber Pilot, Minivan Comeback and Bowie's Exit -

The gavel falls in Nashville.
The Tennessee legislature is back in session Tuesday. This is an election year session for the legislature. So it will be short – likely an early April adjournment. But that doesn’t mean the session is without expectations from outside Nashville.

32. County Commission Approves Hacks Cross Contract, New Health Director -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Jan. 11, a $223,600 contract for engineering and environmental work on the Hacks Cross Road widening.

The contract with Powers Hill Design LLC is to make Hacks Cross a seven-lane road from Shelby Drive south to Stateline Road, a span of 1.8 miles.

33. Memorable Events of 2015 will Spill Into 2016 -

When you really get down to it, history is a collection of moments, moments that, when they fall one after the other over the long arc of time, eventually form the tapestry representing who we are.

34. Stewart Incident Triggers Systemic Shift -

For six months this year the Black Lives Matter movement in Memphis grew in an ebb and a flow governed largely by the growing list of fatal police encounters in other cities.

There was also an equally volatile and varied set of reactions by civic leaders in those cities as well as protestors.

35. After a Year of Triumphs and Defeats, Haslam Looks Ahead -

Eight days into 2015, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam formally set a special session of the Tennessee legislature for February on his Insure Tennessee plan, a Medicaid expansion Haslam negotiated with the Obama administration.

36. DunAn to Open Manufacturing Facility in Memphis -

A Chinese company has selected Memphis to be its first manufacturing site in the U.S., bringing more than 100 jobs and $4.2 million in local taxes.

At a Wednesday, Nov. 18, meeting of the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine, the board approved an eight-year abatement in property taxes for DunAn Precision Inc. The tax break amounts to a total savings of $2.1 million.

37. Consolidation of Tennessee’s Newspapers Bad for Taxpayers -

The federal government isn’t likely to descend on Tennessee with trust-busting vengeance once three of the state’s four largest newspapers are owned by the same company.

Newspapers are too far down a virtual slippery slope of monopolism to retrieve from the hands of Gannett, which recently announced it plans to pay $280 million for Journal Media Group, the owner of The Commercial Appeal in Memphis and Knoxville News Sentinel.

38. Orgill to Build New World HQ in Collierville -

Orgill Inc. is going to build its new world headquarters in Collierville, bringing a $15 million investment and 115 new jobs.

Memphis-based Orgill is the world’s largest independently owned hardlines distributor, according to the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

39. Bona Fide -

When the Bona Fide Blues Festival takes a set of stages in Overton Square and the Cooper-Young neighborhood next month, it will mark a return that’s been a long time coming.

But it also will offer something new.

40. Hotel Developer Moves On Scimitar Building Conversion -

179 Madison Ave.
Memphis, TN 38103

Permit Cost: $5.2 million

Permit Date: Applied August 2015

41. Gov. Haslam Encounters Privatization Picket Line -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam encountered protesters Tuesday, Aug. 25, during a stop at Southwest Tennessee Community College.

Haslam’s visit to the campus on Macon Cove was to mark the start of the higher education academic year – the first school year of the Tennessee Promise program, which offers Tennessee high school graduates two years of free community college.

42. Gov. Haslam Encounters Privatization Picket Line -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam encountered protesters Tuesday, Aug. 25, during a stop at Southwest Tennessee Community College.

Haslam’s visit to the campus on Macon Cove was to mark the start of the higher education academic year – the first school year of the Tennessee Promise program, which offers Tennessee high school graduates two years of free community college.

43. Vanderbilt Received $10 Million in Grants for Fetal Tissue Research -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Vanderbilt University is one of nearly 100 research institutions to receive federal funding for fetal tissue research between 2011 and 2014 – a practice that has unleashed a furor on Capitol Hill after anti-abortion activists recently released undercover videos pertaining to such research.

44. Restoring Your Online Reputation is a Task for Experts -

As a property manager, Mark Hill is used to putting out fires. But when a disgruntled tenant took to the Internet to flame him and his business, Hill was the one calling for help.

45. Ramsey Clear in Push to Politicize Supreme Court -

Republican Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey has a penchant for igniting flames of partisanship, and the retirement of Tennessee Supreme Court Justice Gary Wade is no exception.

46. Piano-Playing Senator's Latest Tune: New Education Policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – How does a musician-senator fill the time during yet another partisan Senate stalemate?

In Sen. Lamar Alexander's case, he sits down at a borrowed piano in his Capitol Hill office and, with a grin, bangs out "The Memphis Blues."

47. Peabody Unveils Rest of Rooftop Party Lineup -

The Peabody hotel has announced the entertainment lineup for the second half of the 2015 Rooftop Party season.

The rest of the season lineup includes: The DMP Band (June 18), Transit (June 25), The 17th Floor (July 2), Star & Micey with Tyrannosaurus Chicken (July 9), The 5th Khind (July 16), Your Girlfriend (July 23), The Dantones (July 30), The M80s (Aug. 6) and Ingram Hill (Aug. 13).

48. Memphis Gets Greenlight to Relocate Police -

Now it’s all about closing the deal.

With no debate or discussion, the Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, May 19, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s proposal to buy the 13-story Donnelley J. Hill state office building at 170 N. Main St., just a stone’s throw from City Hall.

49. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

50. Memphis Moves Closer to Downtown Building Purchase -

The state of Tennessee may have moved out, but the city of Memphis could be moving in.

The city has a tentative deal to buy the Donnelley J. Hill state office building near City Hall for $1.5 million.

51. Tennessee House Bogs Down Over Making Bible Official Book -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A small-town Republican's proposal to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee ran into opposition from top members of his own party as the House delayed a scheduled vote on the measure Tuesday.

52. Battle of the Band(width) -

Joyce Coltrin’s business is wandering in Bradley County’s technological wilderness. And it’s likely to remain there – because of legal threats – until the General Assembly changes state law.

53. Brewery Developers Buy Site for New Apartment Building -

11 Butler Ave.
Memphis, TN 38103
Sale Amount: $1.25 million

Sale Date: Feb. 23, 2015
Buyer: 495 Tennessee LLC
Seller: BCH Investments LLC
Details: The team behind the development of the historic Tennessee Brewery has acquired a key piece of property adjacent to the long-vacant structure as plans for the new Tennessee Brewery: The Revival series of events there move forward.

54. Gestalt Renews Plans for Hickory Hill School -

A new Power Center Academy middle school in Hickory Hill near or on the footprint of the old Marina Cove Apartments moved a step closer to reality with Gestalt Community Schools applying for a $7 million building permit to build a 40,147-square-foot middle school at 5449 Winchester Road.

55. Gestalt Renews Plans for Hickory Hill School -

A new Power Center Academy middle school in Hickory Hill near or on the footprint of the old Marina Cove Apartments moved a step closer to reality with Gestalt Community Schools applying for a $7 million building permit to build a 40,147-square-foot middle school at 5449 Winchester Road.

56. Gestalt Renews Hickory Hill School Plans -

A new Power Center Academy middle school in Hickory Hill near or on the footprint of the old Marina Cove Apartments moved a step closer to reality with Gestalt Community Schools applying for a $7 million building permit to build a 40,147-square-foot middle school at 5449 Winchester Road.

57. New Woes for Healthcare.Gov: Wrong Tax Info Sent Out -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a new setback for the health care law and the people it's supposed to help, the government said Friday it made a tax-reporting error that's fouling up the filings of nearly a million Americans.

58. Jones, Vols Make Honor Roll With Recruiting Class -

KNOXVILLE – Butch Jones has done it again.

Tennessee’s football coach has created a national buzz with his 2015 recruiting class.

UT finished with the No. 4 class in the nation as rated by 247Sports and ended up ranked No. 5 by Rivals when the Feb. 4 national signing day was over.

59. Wharton Not Giving Up on Fairgrounds Plan -

Nashville is a more turbulent place than usual these days, especially Capitol Hill. So Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and his administration probably won’t tempt the turbulence there by taking their plan for a Tourism Development Zone to finance a Mid-South Fairgrounds renovation to the Tennessee Building Commission later this month.

60. Nashville’s Most Romantic Restaurants -

Romance means something different for everyone, but most people can agree that if there is low lighting, soft music, a charming companion and something delicious to eat, you’ve already got the makings of one outstanding evening.

61. Insure Tennessee: Failure by Politics and Procedure -

The momentum that killed the Insure Tennessee proposal and ended the special session of the Tennessee legislature Wednesday, Feb. 4, was fueled by ideological opposition to the Affordable Care Act and President Barack Obama.

62. Haslam's Insure Tennessee Health Plan Fails in Legislature -

Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans has failed during a special legislative session.

The Senate Health Committee defeated the Republican governor's Insure Tennessee plan Wednesday on a 7-4 vote.

63. Fourth-Quarter Bankruptcies Reflect Continued Drop -

Bankruptcies in Shelby County dropped below the 3,000 mark in the last quarter of 2014 after being just above it in the third quarter.

The 2,634 bankruptcies filed from Oct. 1 to Dec. 31 compare to 3,135 filings from July 10 to Sept. 30.

64. Hitting the Accelerator -

Five years after the Great Recession rocked the nation and nearly destroyed auto manufacturing in Tennessee, the Midstate’s industry is booming again.

Nissan’s growth is no small part of that, largely because of the company’s confidence in the state of Tennessee and Gov. Bill Haslam, according to José Muñoz, executive vice president of Nissan Motor Co. and chairman of Nissan North America, which is headquartered in Franklin.

65. Vols Take Plenty of Momentum Into Offseason -

KNOXVILLE – There’s nothing like going into the offseason on a high note. The Vols will be riding the momentum from the resounding 45-28 victory against Iowa in the Jan. 2 TaxSlayer Bowl through the end of recruiting season, winter workouts, spring practices and into the summer months.

66. The Preserve at Southwind Sells for $28 Million -

7991 Capilano Drive
Memphis, TN 38125
Sale Amount: $28 million

Sale Date: Dec. 22, 2014
Buyer: Southwind Apartments LP
Seller: G&I VII Preserve at Southwind Apartments LP
Loan Amount: $18 million
Loan Date: Dec. 18, 2014
Maturity Date: Oct. 31, 2020
Lender: Jackson National Life Insurance Co.
Details: A team that includes Memphis-based Foegelman Venture Partners has sold The Preserve at Southwind apartment community for $28 million.

67. Building the Base -

It was late September, and local officials were deeply engaged with retail giant Target as the company explored investing in an online fulfillment center in Memphis when the discussions turned toward a familiar subject.

68. Vol Players See TaxSlayer Win as a Big Step for Program -

KNOXVILLE – Christmas break has come and gone for the University of Tennessee’s football team. Now it’s back to business.

The Vols return to campus for practice Saturday and, after a Sunday practice, fly to Jacksonville for the Jan. 2 game against Iowa in the TaxSlayer Bowl, formerly the Gator Bowl.

69. Watching Kobe’s Empty-the-Clip Tour -

For those first few minutes, Kobe Bryant was toying with us. He passed the ball and he passed up shots – open and otherwise.

The crowd last Tuesday night at FedExForum seemed unnerved by this. Let’s face it, whether you come wearing a white No. 50 Zach Randolph jersey or a purple and gold No. 24 Lakers jersey, you come to see Kobe be true to his DNA.

70. Voters Approve Wine, Amendments -

Shelby County citizens voted 2-to-1 Tuesday, Nov. 4, against a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that gives the Tennessee Legislature the power to regulate abortion, including in cases of rape or incest.

71. Voters Approve Wine, Constitutional Amendments -

Shelby County citizens voted 2-to-1 Tuesday, Nov. 4, against a proposed amendment to the Tennessee Constitution that gives the Tennessee Legislature the power to regulate abortion, including in cases of rape or incest.

72. Shelby Early Vote Shows "No" Carry On Abortion Amendment -

Shelby County’s early vote totals show a defeat for the amendment to the Tennessee Constitution involving abortion and passage of the other three amendments.

The vote count for Shelby County only during the early voting period in advance of the Tuesday, Nov. 4, election day show:

73. Real Estate Rally -

Commercial real estate can offer insight into the strength of the local economy. Through the office, retail, industrial and apartment developments that mark the region the economy at work in the real world can be seen.

74. Schools, Development Dominate Germantown Races -

Germantown will have a new mayor once all of the votes are counted Nov. 4 in the city’s municipal elections on the ballot.

But the race between former Germantown Community Services director George Brogdon and alderman Mike Palazzolo likely won’t completely settle the community’s discussion and debate about development and the future of the Germantown Municipal Schools district.

75. First Tennessee Grows Beyond Home State -

This year may mark its 150th anniversary, but 2014 has proven to be a significant period for First Tennessee Bank for reasons beyond the celebration of a milestone birthday.

76. Competition Calls -

Economic development and the quality of jobs coming to Shelby County are the dominant issues as county elected leaders begin a new four-year term of office this month.

And there are plenty of indications the local strategy is about to change, or at least shift, in response to the resurgence in manufacturing and distribution in North Mississippi.

77. McDonald Re-Elected at Filing Deadline -

Bartlett Mayor Keith McDonald was re-elected to another four-year term of office at the noon Thursday, Aug. 21, filing deadline for candidates in four sets of suburban municipal elections on the Nov. 4 ballot.

78. Class is In -

For Collierville Schools superintendent John Aitken, the demerger of public schools in Shelby County didn’t become “real” until teachers reported the week before the Aug. 4 first day of classes.

79. SEC’s New Quarterbacks Ready to Prove Themselves -

They are the SEC quarterbacks left behind. The quarterbacking gods, with names like Manziel, McCarron, Mettenberger and Murray – what is it about M’s? – have ascended to a higher place: playing on Sundays in the NFL.

80. Bartlett Mayor McDonald Re-Elected at Filing Deadline -

Bartlett Mayor Keith McDonald was re-elected to another four-year term of office at the noon Thursday, Aug. 21, filing deadline for candidates in four sets of suburban municipal elections on the Nov. 4 ballot.

81. Calm Amidst the ‘Storm’ -

The S&P 500 continues to inch ever so closer to the 2,000 mark, while volatility measures remain historically low. Furthermore, there have been 43 consecutive days where the S&P 500 has registered a daily return mark within the -1 percent to +1 percent band.

82. Chism Picnic Reflects Summer Campaign Tone -

From the stage at County Commissioner Sidney Chism’s annual political picnic Saturday, June 21, you could almost see the Aug. 7 election day.

83. Parking Wars -

It’s been a hot, humid and restless spring at Overton Park.

The park has been crowded, but not as crowded as expected given the political tempest over parking on Overton’s greensward.

84. County Commission to Weigh New Disparity Study -

Shelby County Commissioners consider a start Monday, June 16, toward a new disparity study as a way to changing the county’s efforts in increasing minority business participation in government contracts.

85. Take Back Your Health on Memphis Kidney Action Day -

“What you don’t know won’t hurt you” is a popular saying today. While that may be true in some cases, when it comes to your health, the opposite is true. Speaking from personal experience, I can tell you that when it comes to kidney disease, what you don’t know can actually put your health in grave danger.

86. Past, Present, Future -

The weekend before the formal reopening of the National Civil Rights Museum, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s voice could be heard in the museum plaza.

87. This week in Memphis history: February 28-March 3 -

2013: A group of 61 Ku Klux Klan members along with neo-Nazis and Aryan Nations members rallied at the Shelby County Courthouse to protest the plan by the City Council to rename three Confederate-themed parks. The massive police response included 400 law enforcement officers in riot gear, a chain link fence around the Klan protestors and another chain link fence two blocks away around a group of 1,200 counter protestors and curious onlookers. One counter protestor was arrested.

88. Yellen Debuts as Fed Chair -

For the first time since 2006, someone not named Ben Bernanke testified before the House Financial Services Committee as Chair of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. Dr. Janet Yellen officially assumed the post on Feb. 3.

89. Destination: Memphis -

On a slow Sunday afternoon Downtown with the Broncos and Chargers NFL playoff game on a bar TV screen, a trio of 20-somethings – two men and one woman – watched the game, speculated about whether the Grizzlies were playing a few blocks away and quizzed one another about their plans for the future.

90. Events -

Literacy is Key: A Book and Author Affair, sponsored by the Memphis Alumnae Association of Kappa Kappa Gamma, will be held Thursday, Jan. 30, at 11 a.m. at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. The program will feature W. Bruce Cameron, Joshilyn Jackson and Molly Crosby. Tickets start at $45; proceeds benefit First Book Mid-South. Visit memphiskkg.org.

91. Obama Tightens Reins on Surveillance Programs -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Tightening the reins on the nation's sweeping surveillance operations, President Barack Obama on Friday ordered new limits on the way intelligence officials access phone records from hundreds of millions of Americans – and moved toward eventually stripping the massive data collection from the government's hands.

92. Gold Strike Promotes Slade to PR Manager -

Elizabeth Slade has been promoted to public relations manager at Gold Strike Casino Resort. In her new role at the MGM Resorts International property, Slade will lead in developing and executing integrated marketing communication plans with components such as media relations, social media strategy, community partnerships and brand management.

93. Oakhaven Warehouse Sells for $1.2 Million -

4300 Air Trans Road
Memphis, TN 38118
Sale Amount: $1.2 million

Sale Date: Dec. 17, 2013
Buyer: Chob Realty LLC
Seller: Tenn Trans LLC
Loan Amount: $950,000
Loan Date: Dec. 19, 2013
Maturity Date: N/A
Lender: BankPlus
Details: The 109,626-square-foot warehouse at 4300 Air Trans Road in Oakhaven has traded hands for $1.2 million.

94. Stonebrook Apartments Owner Files $4.6 Million Loan -

The owner of the 244-unit Stonebrook Apartments at 6371 Winchester Road in Hickory Hill North has filed a $4.6 million loan on the property.

95. Meadows Appointed to State Dentistry Board -

Dr. Dan T. Meadows has been appointed to the Tennessee Board of Dentistry by Gov. Bill Haslam. Meadows, who has a private practice on Walnut Grove Road, will serve as the Rotating Dentist member through June 2016.

96. Editorial: Time to Give Thanks for Each Other -

The first Thanksgiving wasn’t called Thanksgiving and it was probably in October, according to “Mayflower,” Nathanial Philbrick’s recent chronicle of the founding of the first English colony in America.

97. Commercial Real Estate Market Reawakens -

After suffering through a prolonged slump, the Memphis commercial real estate market this year began to shake off the rust that gathered during the “Great Recession,” and brighter days could be ahead for the prime markets in the apartment, retail, office and industrial sectors, according to local experts.

98. Social Security Benefits to Go Up by 1.5 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Social Security benefits will rise 1.5 percent in January, giving millions of retired and disabled workers an average raise of $19 a month to keep up with the cost of living.

99. Rapid Return -

Downtown to Whitehaven on a city bus in a half hour is quite an achievement in a city with limited experience with modern bus express service.

The concept is called “bus rapid transit” and the Memphis Area Transit Authority’s first try at the concept with a Poplar Express lasted less than a year before MATA’s board pulled the plug for lack of ridership.

100. Take a Deep Breath -

Last Monday, as Congress was debating the 97th version of the Continuing Resolution (CR), I decided to watch some of the floor remarks made from Capitol Hill. After about four minutes of viewing, the alarmist nature of the comments about the pending shutdown proved to be three minutes too much for me.