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Editorial Results (free)

1. Pro Athletes Have Platform to Discuss Race -

After touring the National Civil Rights Museum Saturday, Jan. 14, before a forum on race and sports, journalist and commentator Marc Spears had an immediate thought as the panel discussed whether racism is becoming institutionalized in America.

2. State Targets Refugee Program; Lollar to Lead Delegation -

The state Legislature is likely to file a complaint before the end of January challenging the legality of the Refugee Resettlement Program in Tennessee, according to Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris.

3. Last Word: Charter Schools Views, Capitol Hill Round Up & Explaining The Cold War -

Double trouble Wednesday in Oklahoma. The Grizz lose to the Thunder 103-95 in OKC. They are on their way to Houston for a Friday game before returning home Sunday for the MLK game against the Chicago Bulls at the Forum. Meanwhile Tigers lose to Tulsa Wednesday, also in Oklahoma, 81-71. They are back at the Forum Saturday to play South Florida.

4. Last Word: Rallings at Rotary, The Weight of Cotton and Ugwueke's Path -

It’s becoming pretty obvious that this is going to be a big year for the issue of crime and violence in our city. It’s also becoming the year that Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings has found his voice in a job that may be the ultimate glass house for politicians.

5. Last Word: Opening Day in Nashville, Parking Pass or Parking Space and Ell Persons -

Lots of formalities Tuesday in Nashville where the 2017 session of the Tennessee Legislature begins. And that’s what this first week back will be about on the floors of the state House and the state Senate. Away from the floors, the real business of speculation and vote counting and drafting language is already well underway.

6. Last Word: The Elvis Tradition, Cordova Brewery and Parkside Path -

For about three decades now, there has been a cultural and political tradition around the birthday of Elvis Presley. It used to be a proclamation by the Shelby County Mayor and the Memphis Mayor on the steps of Graceland with a birthday cake.

7. Grizzlies’ MLK Game Changed, but Mission Remains the Same -

While the NBA moved the Grizzlies’ 15th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Game to Sunday night, Jan. 15, the game against the Chicago Bulls will be televised on ESPN and the team will use Monday to offer service to the community.

8. Crime Issue Shows Complexity After Record Homicide Tally -

When the subject is crime in Memphis, it never stays in one place for very long. Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton’s conclusion that the city’s problem with violent crime is a black problem drew criticism Tuesday, Jan. 3, from Memphis City Council member Janis Fullilove.

9. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

10. New Year, New Resolutions for Legislators -

Some Tennesseans recall the days when the state Legislature met every other year and wonder if it should revert to that schedule. Considering the General Assembly pushes most of its work into 3 1/2 months, it might be worth a try.

11. Tigers Football Signs JUCO Players -

Junior college defensive backs Marcus Green (Cedar Hill, Texas/Cedar Hill HS) and Tito Windham (Gulfport, Mississippi/Harrison Central) have signed national letters of intent with the University of Memphis, coach Mike Norvell has announced. Also, Sanchez Blake and Coye Fairman have joined the Memphis program as mid-year enrollees.

12. Last Word: The Return of Stubby Clapp, Poplar & Ridgeway for Pedestrians and Mice -

The death toll in the Sevier County-Gatlinburg wildfires is at seven. Authorities believe a fire at The Chimney Tops in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was what started the disaster and had consumed 15,563 acres as of Wednesday evening. At that point, the fire was 10 percent contained.

13. Gill Seeks $25 Million Permit For New MAA Headquarters -

6815 U.S. 72

Germantown, TN 38138

Permit Amount: $25 million

Future Tenant: MAA

14. Harwell Learning How to Dodge Challengers -

Beth Harwell has been called a lot of things over the last few years, “trailblazer” chief among them as Tennessee’s first female House speaker. 

Now she’s a “survivor” after eking out a Republican Caucus victory as speaker nominee to continue leading the lower chamber in the 110th General Assembly.

15. Last Word: Underperforming At the Polls, Tenoke Plans and Poverty in Cordova -

Still parsing election numbers, although 24 hours after the polls closed in Shelby County, the Election Commission was still counting absentee ballots.

Here is a statewide perspective from Associated Press.

16. Last Word: DOJ Reviews MPD, Big River Crossing Light Shows and Election Notes -

By the spring, we should have the first report from the U.S. Justice Department review of the Memphis Police Department. And we got a better idea Wednesday of what this study involves.

17. Federal Review of MPD to Take Two Years -

The U.S. Justice Department agency reviewing the Memphis Police Department will start meeting the public after Thanksgiving in the first two town hall meetings to hear from citizens.

The Nov. 29 and 30 sessions at Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church and Hickory Hill Community Center, respectively, are part of a two-year process.

18. Last Word: Z Bo and the Second Unit, Gannettized and the Electoral College -

Zach Randolph will not be starting for the Grizz this season as the post-Grit & Grind era enters the “Second Unit” chapter.

It will be interesting to see fan reaction Thursday at the Forum when the Grizz play Atlanta in another pre-season game. Randolph did not start Monday night’s pre-season opener against Orlando either.

19. Shelby Farms Park Formally Debuts $70 Million Improvements -

Opening a park that looks $70 million different isn’t a matter of lifting a curtain.

For two years, Shelby Farms Park has remained open to visitors with roads in the park changing dramatically as the landscape changed too. Tens of thousands of daily motorists traveling Walnut Grove Road on the park’s southern border have also seen the work in progress.

20. Last Word: Heart of the Park, Tigers Opener Preview and Memphis In May Numbers -

“Try to remember the kind of September when life was slow and oh, so mellow. Try to remember the kind of September when grass was green and grain was yellow.”

It would appear this is that kind of September you would otherwise be remembering.

21. Editorial: The Natives’ Guide To Memphis Tourism -

Mixing tourism with the everyday life of our city is always going to be a bit risky. And the mix is relatively new to a Memphis that has really only had a recognized tourism industry for about 35 years.

22. Ford to Invest $75M in Autonomous Vehicle Sensor Company -

DETROIT (AP) – Ford and the Chinese search engine company Baidu will each invest $75 million in Velodyne, a company that makes laser sensors that help guide self-driving cars.

Velodyne, based in Morgan Hill, California, says it will use the $150 million investment to expand design and production and reduce the cost of its sensors. The laser sensors are called Lidar, which stands for light, detection and ranging. They can also be used in conventional vehicles as part of driver assist systems such as automatic emergency braking.

23. Hotel Napoleon Joins Growing List of Unique Downtown Lodging -

A Downtown property’s ample windows, turn-of-the century architecture and an interesting backstory attracted hotel developer Suna Investments to the historic Winchester Building at 179 Madison Ave.

24. The Week Ahead: Aug. 15-21 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! If you’re looking for something to do this week, look no further. Here’s our weekly roundup of local events and other happenings you need to know about, from the Elvis Week candlelight vigil to a fun evening of craft beer and DIY art…

25. Kustoff Victory Caps TV, Outsider Heavy Congressional Campaign -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff claimed the Republican nomination for Tennessee’s 8th Congressional district Thursday, Aug. 4, in a 15-county contest in which the eastern parts of Shelby County played a decisive role.

26. Kustoff Claims 8th GOP Primary, Todd Upset by Lovell, Jenkins Over Newsom -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff claimed the Republican nomination for Tennessee’s 8th Congressional district Thursday, Aug. 4, in a 15-county contest in which the eastern parts of Shelby County played a decisive role.

27. Last Word: The One Before November, Defining The Outsider and Stock Exchange -

Election Day arrives in Shelby County.

And this election cycle, in the shadow of the November Presidential general election, has turned out to be pretty interesting.

28. Last Word: Curry Todd, Crosstown Brewing and Cursive Comeback -

A word at the top of Last Word about campaign signs and what happens to some of them during a campaign.

There are a couple of sayings – bits of political wisdom by the judgment of some – that are uttered numerous times during every election season.

29. Last Word: The Sound of Dominoes, Brexit Anxiety and Schilling Farms Backstory -

The Memphis Newspaper Guild makes it official – filing grievances against Gannett, the new owner of The Commercial Appeal, over the first significant changes in how the paper is put out. Those changes involve abolishing copy editing positions and making them part of the new job of digital producers.

30. Leadership Allowed Durham Sleaze To Fester for Too Long -

The Tennessee attorney general’s sexual harassment investigation of Republican Rep. Jeremy Durham dragged halfway through the summer. Now we know why.

31. Last Word: Regrouping, Freedom Awards and The View From Another Bridge -

It will be a year come Sunday – a year since Darrius Stewart, a passenger in a car pulled over by Memphis Police in Hickory Hill was shot and killed by Officer Conner Schilling.

32. Schism Among State Republicans Hits Critical Point With Resignation -

A rift within the Tennessee Republican Party, whether a tempest in a teapot or the early signs of implosion, isn’t likely to hit the big tent party hard at the polls this fall.

But make no mistake, there is some trouble in paradise.

33. Williams Hired for Memphis Blight-Fighting Fellowship -

The city of Memphis and University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law recently hired Brittany J. Williams as the city’s first Neighborhood Preservation Fellow. In that role, Williams will represent the city in Environmental Court lawsuits against property owners who have vacant, abandoned or dilapidated properties that violate city codes.

34. Chamber Names Simmons Director of Public Policy -

Haley Simmons has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as the director of public policy, a new position in the chamber’s community development department. In this role, Simmons will be focused on enhancing the chamber’s advocacy efforts to inform and engage its members on important policy issues, and he’ll also be responsible for growing the chamber’s role in education initiatives.

35. Last Word: Blight Fight Second Stage, Hickory Hill Schools and Brexit React -

If you had never seen blight and wanted to see it in order to define it, there are several places in Memphis that could give you the on sight definition you were seeking. At the top of that list would probably be Frayser.

36. Last Word: Brexit, Grizz Picks in the NBA Draft and the Race for the 8th -

Brexit – British Exit – it is. The end of the European Union in the United Kingdom in Thursday’s referendum there began to make its presence known in financial markets even before the very close vote count was well established.

37. Last Word: Verdell Smith and Lifeline, Strickland's First 5 Months and Tennessine -

Lots of blue lights in Cordova Thursday evening as the Memphis Police Department remembers Officer Verdell Smith, who died in Saturday’s Downtown rampage in the line of duty. His funeral is Friday.

38. Last Word: South Main and Main, More Wheel Tax Mileage and City Hall Shark Tank -

When we talk about South Main these days and all that is happening in that area, we aren’t talking about Main Street Memphis further south of that, even though it’s the same road.

39. $21.6 Million in Construction Headed to Graceland -

1064 Craft Road

Memphis, TN 38116

Permit Amount: $18.1 million

Project Cost: $21.6 million

40. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

41. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

42. Last Word: Tubby Time, Haslam's Veto and Africa in April's 30th Year -

It was just four weeks ago that all of this talk about change at the top of the Tiger basketball chart was put to rest. Coach Josh Pastner’s performance was reviewed by the University of Memphis administration and he was staying at least for another season. Four weeks to the day of that announcement, Pastner is the new coach at Georgia Tech and we are in the first day of the Tubby Smith era at the U of M.

43. Last Word: Tubby Fever, School Closings and March Real Estate Numbers -

The Tigers basketball grapevine is nothing but Tubby Smith as of Wednesday when the speculation was joined by torrent of rumors about contact between the Texas Tech coach and the University of Memphis.
Smith has now acknowledged he’s talking with the U of M.
More background on Smith from The Sporting News and Mike DeCourcy, a former sports reporter at The Commercial Appeal, that came out before everything went Tubby here.

44. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

45. Moving Dirt -

The Memphis development community is looking inward and upward to increase density in the urban core. New construction is happening across all four commercial real estate sectors, with long-anticipated projects like Trader Joe’s and the redevelopment of Central Station finally coming to fruition. Construction and operating costs continue to be a challenge as new projects hit the top of their class to command higher rents.

46. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

47. Amended Senate De-annexation Bill Faces More Debate -

The de-annexation bill whose defeat became City Hall’s top priority in March is off the political frontburner.

But Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature who opposed the de-annexation by referendum measure expect that this isn’t the end of the concept or the move to make it law.

48. Last Word: Greensward Truce, Connor Schilling Retires and MEMFix Goes East -

You’ve heard of the mediation process surrounding the long-term use of the Overton Park Greensward by the Memphis Zoo for its overflow parking.
It appears there is now a less formal mediation process underway when it comes to the use of the greensward during the park’s spring peak season which is now underway.

49. Memphis Presence Helps Turn Tide on Controversial Legislation -

The Tennessee Legislature’s de-annexation debate is over for now. But the bill’s effect on the Memphis-Capitol Hill relationship has left a larger political imprint than the proposal.

That’s saying a lot considering the proposal dealt with the possibility of territory and citizens rearranging the city’s boundaries to put them and the taxes they pay outside the city limits.

50. Last Word: The Curtain Falls in Nashville, Political Cuneiform and Ramsey Talks -

And in less than a half hour Wednesday, the de-annexation drama that should qualify as the political equivalent of a Netflix binge-watchable television series made just for Memphis was done.

51. MATA Board Approves Significant Route Changes -

Sixteen bus route changes will take effect in May at the Memphis Area Transit Authority.

The changes, which were approved at the March 29 meeting of the MATA board of commissioners, mark the first significant batch of route changes since MATA CEO Ron Garrison took the position in 2014.

52. Amendments Cloud Issue of De-Annexation -

Tennessee state senators go back to work Tuesday, March 29, in Nashville on a modified de-annexation bill.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee will be reviewing a set of amendments to their version of the bill, which changed substantially from the House version in a committee session last week.

53. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

54. Memphis Fights Back: Senate Poised To Do Real Damage via De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland makes a persuasive argument against de-annexation legislation now being considered by the state Legislature, providing a long list of figures to show it would devastate the Bluff City.

55. Opposers Fight De-Annexation Another Day -

When the state Senate’s State and Local Government Committee convenes at noon Wednesday, March 21, in Nashville, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and his administration will have been working Capital Hill for about a day and a half.

56. De-Annexation Bill Sent Back to Legislative Committee -

The de-annexation bill pending in the Tennessee Legislature was sent back to a Senate committee in Nashville Monday, March 21, after those favoring the bill raised numerous questions about amendments to it.

57. County Commission Questions City Figures on Deannexation -

Some Shelby County Commissioners are skeptical about City Hall’s estimate of how much city government would lose in revenue if a deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature becomes law.

The commission’s discussion at Wednesday, March 16, committee sessions came as Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was in Nashville to lobby against the bill in the state Senate.

58. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

59. Politics of Deannexation Proposal Grows More Complex -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is heading to Nashville Wednesday, March 16, to talk with legislators about what he considers City Hall’s highest priority in the 2016 session of the Tennessee Legislature – defeating a deannexation proposal.

60. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

61. Last Word: Redbirds Sold, Memphis Burning and When Old Dominick Was Young -

Grizzlies over the Cavaliers 106-103 Monday evening in Cleveland despite the pre-game injury story dominating up to tip-off.

62. Last Word: Timing and Numbers, Old Dominick Takes Shape and Zip Lines To Spring -

Political opportunity is defined by timing.
Witness a look at the early voting turnout numbers in advance of Tuesday’s election day.

More than half of the more than 43,000 Shelby County voters who cast early ballots voted Monday and Tuesday – the last two days of an early voting period that began Feb. 10 – way back there when Martin O’Malley was the third Democratic presidential contender and Jeb Bush was considered a force to be reckoned with in the Republican primaries.

63. Roland Passes on 8th Congressional District Run, Sticks With Mayor in 2018 -

Shelby County Commission chairman Terry Roland will not be running in the Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District in August.

64. Trust Fund Mentioned as Possible $1.1B Solution on School Benefits Liability -

A trust fund is one possibility that has surfaced early in the formal discussions of the Shelby County School system’s $1.1 billion benefits liability.

The first meeting of the ad hoc committee on the matter last week drew nine of the 13 Shelby County Commissioners, the administration of Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and two of nine Shelby County Schools board members.

65. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

66. Butch Jones Builds for Championship Run With Staff Tweaks -

Tennessee football coach Butch Jones got serious about taking the next step with his football program not long after his team’s 45-6 victory over Northwestern in the Jan. 1 Outback Bowl.

Jones fired defensive coordinator John Jancek on Jan. 6, and three days later hired his top candidate for the opening, Bob Shoop of Penn State.

67. Four Beale Street Proposals Feature Different Backgrounds -

Jeff Sanford fielded inquiries from 17 or 18 companies, local and out of town, expressing some level of interest in the contract to manage the Beale Street entertainment district.

68. 4 Applicants Up for Beale Street Gig -

A Fortune 500 corporation, the Memphis-based company behind the Delta Fair, a Memphis real estate management firm with office experience, and a newly formed group of Memphians with experience in real estate, entertainment and restaurants as well as commercial development and financing. Those are the four companies that have applied to manage the Beale Street entertainment district.

69. Last Word: Legislature's Return, Uber Pilot, Minivan Comeback and Bowie's Exit -

The gavel falls in Nashville.
The Tennessee legislature is back in session Tuesday. This is an election year session for the legislature. So it will be short – likely an early April adjournment. But that doesn’t mean the session is without expectations from outside Nashville.

70. County Commission Approves Hacks Cross Contract, New Health Director -

Shelby County Commissioners approved Monday, Jan. 11, a $223,600 contract for engineering and environmental work on the Hacks Cross Road widening.

The contract with Powers Hill Design LLC is to make Hacks Cross a seven-lane road from Shelby Drive south to Stateline Road, a span of 1.8 miles.

71. Memorable Events of 2015 will Spill Into 2016 -

When you really get down to it, history is a collection of moments, moments that, when they fall one after the other over the long arc of time, eventually form the tapestry representing who we are.

72. Stewart Incident Triggers Systemic Shift -

For six months this year the Black Lives Matter movement in Memphis grew in an ebb and a flow governed largely by the growing list of fatal police encounters in other cities.

There was also an equally volatile and varied set of reactions by civic leaders in those cities as well as protestors.

73. After a Year of Triumphs and Defeats, Haslam Looks Ahead -

Eight days into 2015, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam formally set a special session of the Tennessee legislature for February on his Insure Tennessee plan, a Medicaid expansion Haslam negotiated with the Obama administration.

74. DunAn to Open Manufacturing Facility in Memphis -

A Chinese company has selected Memphis to be its first manufacturing site in the U.S., bringing more than 100 jobs and $4.2 million in local taxes.

At a Wednesday, Nov. 18, meeting of the Memphis-Shelby County Economic Development Growth Engine, the board approved an eight-year abatement in property taxes for DunAn Precision Inc. The tax break amounts to a total savings of $2.1 million.

75. Consolidation of Tennessee’s Newspapers Bad for Taxpayers -

The federal government isn’t likely to descend on Tennessee with trust-busting vengeance once three of the state’s four largest newspapers are owned by the same company.

Newspapers are too far down a virtual slippery slope of monopolism to retrieve from the hands of Gannett, which recently announced it plans to pay $280 million for Journal Media Group, the owner of The Commercial Appeal in Memphis and Knoxville News Sentinel.

76. Orgill to Build New World HQ in Collierville -

Orgill Inc. is going to build its new world headquarters in Collierville, bringing a $15 million investment and 115 new jobs.

Memphis-based Orgill is the world’s largest independently owned hardlines distributor, according to the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

77. Bona Fide -

When the Bona Fide Blues Festival takes a set of stages in Overton Square and the Cooper-Young neighborhood next month, it will mark a return that’s been a long time coming.

But it also will offer something new.

78. Hotel Developer Moves On Scimitar Building Conversion -

179 Madison Ave.
Memphis, TN 38103

Permit Cost: $5.2 million

Permit Date: Applied August 2015

79. Gov. Haslam Encounters Privatization Picket Line -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam encountered protesters Tuesday, Aug. 25, during a stop at Southwest Tennessee Community College.

Haslam’s visit to the campus on Macon Cove was to mark the start of the higher education academic year – the first school year of the Tennessee Promise program, which offers Tennessee high school graduates two years of free community college.

80. Gov. Haslam Encounters Privatization Picket Line -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam encountered protesters Tuesday, Aug. 25, during a stop at Southwest Tennessee Community College.

Haslam’s visit to the campus on Macon Cove was to mark the start of the higher education academic year – the first school year of the Tennessee Promise program, which offers Tennessee high school graduates two years of free community college.

81. Vanderbilt Received $10 Million in Grants for Fetal Tissue Research -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Vanderbilt University is one of nearly 100 research institutions to receive federal funding for fetal tissue research between 2011 and 2014 – a practice that has unleashed a furor on Capitol Hill after anti-abortion activists recently released undercover videos pertaining to such research.

82. Restoring Your Online Reputation is a Task for Experts -

As a property manager, Mark Hill is used to putting out fires. But when a disgruntled tenant took to the Internet to flame him and his business, Hill was the one calling for help.

83. Ramsey Clear in Push to Politicize Supreme Court -

Republican Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey has a penchant for igniting flames of partisanship, and the retirement of Tennessee Supreme Court Justice Gary Wade is no exception.

84. Piano-Playing Senator's Latest Tune: New Education Policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – How does a musician-senator fill the time during yet another partisan Senate stalemate?

In Sen. Lamar Alexander's case, he sits down at a borrowed piano in his Capitol Hill office and, with a grin, bangs out "The Memphis Blues."

85. Peabody Unveils Rest of Rooftop Party Lineup -

The Peabody hotel has announced the entertainment lineup for the second half of the 2015 Rooftop Party season.

The rest of the season lineup includes: The DMP Band (June 18), Transit (June 25), The 17th Floor (July 2), Star & Micey with Tyrannosaurus Chicken (July 9), The 5th Khind (July 16), Your Girlfriend (July 23), The Dantones (July 30), The M80s (Aug. 6) and Ingram Hill (Aug. 13).

86. Memphis Gets Greenlight to Relocate Police -

Now it’s all about closing the deal.

With no debate or discussion, the Memphis City Council approved Tuesday, May 19, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s proposal to buy the 13-story Donnelley J. Hill state office building at 170 N. Main St., just a stone’s throw from City Hall.

87. Will Tennessee Republicans Ever Be Truly Happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier?

With the GOP so dominate in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

88. Memphis Moves Closer to Downtown Building Purchase -

The state of Tennessee may have moved out, but the city of Memphis could be moving in.

The city has a tentative deal to buy the Donnelley J. Hill state office building near City Hall for $1.5 million.

89. Tennessee House Bogs Down Over Making Bible Official Book -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A small-town Republican's proposal to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee ran into opposition from top members of his own party as the House delayed a scheduled vote on the measure Tuesday.

90. Battle of the Band(width) -

Joyce Coltrin’s business is wandering in Bradley County’s technological wilderness. And it’s likely to remain there – because of legal threats – until the General Assembly changes state law.

91. Brewery Developers Buy Site for New Apartment Building -

11 Butler Ave.
Memphis, TN 38103
Sale Amount: $1.25 million

Sale Date: Feb. 23, 2015
Buyer: 495 Tennessee LLC
Seller: BCH Investments LLC
Details: The team behind the development of the historic Tennessee Brewery has acquired a key piece of property adjacent to the long-vacant structure as plans for the new Tennessee Brewery: The Revival series of events there move forward.

92. Gestalt Renews Plans for Hickory Hill School -

A new Power Center Academy middle school in Hickory Hill near or on the footprint of the old Marina Cove Apartments moved a step closer to reality with Gestalt Community Schools applying for a $7 million building permit to build a 40,147-square-foot middle school at 5449 Winchester Road.

93. Gestalt Renews Plans for Hickory Hill School -

A new Power Center Academy middle school in Hickory Hill near or on the footprint of the old Marina Cove Apartments moved a step closer to reality with Gestalt Community Schools applying for a $7 million building permit to build a 40,147-square-foot middle school at 5449 Winchester Road.

94. Gestalt Renews Hickory Hill School Plans -

A new Power Center Academy middle school in Hickory Hill near or on the footprint of the old Marina Cove Apartments moved a step closer to reality with Gestalt Community Schools applying for a $7 million building permit to build a 40,147-square-foot middle school at 5449 Winchester Road.

95. New Woes for Healthcare.Gov: Wrong Tax Info Sent Out -

WASHINGTON (AP) – In a new setback for the health care law and the people it's supposed to help, the government said Friday it made a tax-reporting error that's fouling up the filings of nearly a million Americans.

96. Jones, Vols Make Honor Roll With Recruiting Class -

KNOXVILLE – Butch Jones has done it again.

Tennessee’s football coach has created a national buzz with his 2015 recruiting class.

UT finished with the No. 4 class in the nation as rated by 247Sports and ended up ranked No. 5 by Rivals when the Feb. 4 national signing day was over.

97. Wharton Not Giving Up on Fairgrounds Plan -

Nashville is a more turbulent place than usual these days, especially Capitol Hill. So Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and his administration probably won’t tempt the turbulence there by taking their plan for a Tourism Development Zone to finance a Mid-South Fairgrounds renovation to the Tennessee Building Commission later this month.

98. Nashville’s Most Romantic Restaurants -

Romance means something different for everyone, but most people can agree that if there is low lighting, soft music, a charming companion and something delicious to eat, you’ve already got the makings of one outstanding evening.

99. Insure Tennessee: Failure by Politics and Procedure -

The momentum that killed the Insure Tennessee proposal and ended the special session of the Tennessee legislature Wednesday, Feb. 4, was fueled by ideological opposition to the Affordable Care Act and President Barack Obama.

100. Haslam's Insure Tennessee Health Plan Fails in Legislature -

Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans has failed during a special legislative session.

The Senate Health Committee defeated the Republican governor's Insure Tennessee plan Wednesday on a 7-4 vote.