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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: TNReady Blinks Again, Gov. Debate Thoughts and Mud Island's Museum -

There was a point Thursday morning during the troubled TNReady testing at some Tennessee school districts when there was a “brief” slow down in the online testing, according to the Tennessee Education commissioner’s office. By noon that had been resolved and more than 250,000 completed tests had been submitted since testing began Monday. One can only imagine what some of the thoughts were in the office during the slow down and the gap between how long the slow down seemed and how long it actually was.

2. Last Word: 'Poking The Bear,' National Walk Out Day and McQueen on Capitol Hill -

The state House’s Tuesday action cutting $250k in funding for Memphis from Gov. Bill Haslam’s budget proposal is turning into a cause back here, starting with a GoFundMe page. Elsewhere on social media, you can see the unmistakable outline of a party or parties for the cause beginning to form. This is near the end of session for the Legislature when the budget is the last action before going back to the district to run for re-election. Different timing over here, with multiple crawfish outings leading into Memphis in May.

3. Lee, Boyd, Black Talk Confederate Monuments, Oppose Pre-K Expansion -

Three of the four major contenders for governor in the Aug. 2 Republican primary disagree with the removal of Confederate monuments from city parks but also disagree with the state legislature’s decision to cut $250,000 of city funding in retaliation.

4. Republican Contenders for Mayor Say City Paying for Monuments Misstep -

The three Republican contenders for Shelby County Mayor believe the city of Memphis acted improperly in removing Confederate monuments from city parks last year and is, in effect, paying the piper for challenging the Tennessee Legislature.

5. GoFundMe Page Seeks to Reimburse Memphis for State Money Withdrawal -

NASHVILLE – A GoFundMe page has been started on Facebook to raise funds to make up a $250,000 budget cut the Tennessee Legislature levied against the city of Memphis for removing Confederate monuments from two city parks late last year.

6. Last Word: Failed Test, Trolley Back Story and Violent Crime Down City and County -

The state’s third problem with online student achievement testing in three years is gathering political force in Nashville. And that force is aimed for the most part at testing in general and the role it plays in evaluating teachers and students.

7. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

8. Candidates for Governor Give Millions to Their Own Campaigns -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee candidates for governor are raising millions of dollars in contributions, but the big money is coming from the contenders themselves.

A state campaign finance disclosure report filed this week shows that Republicans Diane Black and Bill Lee had the most in contributions this quarter – each around $3.3 million.

9. Lots of Noise, But Few Results in Legislature -

Just when you think the Tennessee Legislature is going off the deep end, someone will throw them a bungee cord. Maybe a rope made out of hemp would work better because a bungee cord leaves people bouncing, never quite reeling them in.

10. Sunday Wine, Liquor Sales Passes in Tenn. Senate -

NASHVILLE – Buoyed by Bible verses and compromise giving liquor stores a head start on Sunday sales, legislation allowing grocery stores to sell wine on Sundays passed the Senate Wednesday on a 17-11 vote.

11. Three Incumbents Unopposed at August Primary Ballot Deadline -

Three incumbent Democratic state House members in the Shelby County delegation to the Tennessee Legislature were effectively re-elected Thursday, April 5, at the noon deadline for candidates in the Aug. 2 state and federal primaries to file their qualifying petitions.

12. Three Incumbents Unopposed at August Primary Ballot Filing Deadline -

Three incumbent Democratic state House members in the Shelby County delegation to the Tennessee Legislature were effectively re-elected Thursday, April 5, at the noon deadline for candidates in the Aug. 2 state and federal primaries to file their qualifying petitions.

13. MLK50 Observances Come With Appeals, Memories -

The way National Civil Rights Museum president Terri Lee Freeman described it as the MLK50 commemorations began this week, the church bells would cascade when they rang Wednesday, April 4, starting at 6:01 p.m. – the moment Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was shot 50 years ago.

14. MLK50 Events: A Roundup of Memphis Happenings -

Here's a selection of events in Memphis marking the 50th anniversary of the 1968 sanitation workers' strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. April 3 is the 50th anniversary of King’s last speech – the “Mountaintop” speech at Mason Temple, while April 4 is the 50th anniversary of his assassination on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

15. Davy Crockett’s Fine, But Let’s Not Get Carried Away -

The Tennessee General Assembly is making some monumental decisions these days – literally.

Not only is the Legislature prepared to put a statue of Tennessee folk hero Davy Crockett in front of the State Capitol, replacing obscure Nashville politician Edward Carmack, it’s also likely to erect a monument, or memorial, to unborn children in the ongoing battle against abortion.

16. August Ballot Starts to Fill Out Ahead of April 5 Filing Deadline -

With contenders in the May county primaries now appearing at various campaign forums, holding their own events and going door-to-door in search of votes, there are still a few gaps to be filled on the Aug. 2 state and federal primary ballot.

17. Children’s Central -

The first career choice a child has in mind isn’t always the right one. Stephanie Butler, who today is the new executive director of the Children’s Museum of Memphis, thought she wanted to be a doctor.

18. Dean: ‘It’s Kind of Our Turn’ in Governor’s Race -

Democratic contender for governor Karl Dean is pushing hard the idea that Democrats can win one of the two statewide races on the Tennessee ballot this year.

19. The Week Ahead: March 19-25, 2018 -

Good morning, Memphis! Spring fever’s in the air as the equinox officially arrives Tuesday morning. Tell winter to take a hike at the new Heels 4 Healing 5K for St. Jude this weekend, then let the kids dance the blues away at a pair of family ballet events. Here’s what else you should know about in The Week Ahead…

20. August State and Federal Primary Ballot Taking Shape -

With less than a month to file for the August state and federal primary elections, there are still a few decisions to be made by would-be candidates working in the shadows of those running in the May 1 county primary elections.

21. Bill Removing Sterilization From Sentencing Advances -

A proposal by state Sen. Brian Kelsey, R-Germantown, and Rep. Raumesh Akbari, D-Memphis, to prohibit Tennessee judges from offering defendants reduced jail time in exchange for sterilization passed the Senate on Thursday, March 1.

22. Digest -

Memphis Grizzlies Suffer 15th Consecutive Loss

The Grizzlies lost their 15th straight game, 119-110 at Chicago, on Wednesday, March 7.

The team has not won since defeating the Phoenix Suns at FedExForum on Jan. 29.

23. Tennessee Panel Won't Let Las Vegas Shooting Survivors Speak -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee legislative panel refused to let two Las Vegas concert shooting survivors testify Wednesday after Republicans delayed action on a Democratic bill to ban the device used by that gunman in October.

24. Trey Carter Honored Among Top 35 Millennial Influencers -

Patrick “Trey” Carter III has been named one of the Top 35 Millennial Influencers in the Country by the Next Big Thing Movement, a global network of more than 20,000 young professionals and creatives. Carter, president of Olympic Career Training Institute and an active community volunteer, is the only Tennessean to be included on the list. He will be honored Saturday, March 10, at NBTM’s Forward Conference in New York City alongside other influencers, including “The Daily Show” host Trevor Noah, Teen Vogue editor Elaine Welteroth and YouTube vlogger Tyler Oakley.

25. Last Word: Forrest and Slavery, The Tariff Blitz and Angus McEachran -

The report on poverty in Memphis over the last 50 years is on its way to a Greater Memphis Chamber breakfast meeting Thursday. And Terri Lee Freeman, the president of the National Civil Rights Museum and Elena Delavega, the University of Memphis lead researcher of the report, say their message is that as goes Memphis in this regard so goes the nation. And if employers start with lower pay at hiring with percentage raises across the board they feed the racial income gap and bonuses do as well.

26. Bill Removing Sterilization From Any Sentencing Advances -

A proposal by state Sen. Brian Kelsey, R-Germantown, and Rep. Raumesh Akbari, D-Memphis, to prohibit Tennessee judges from offering defendants reduced jail time in exchange for sterilization passed the Senate by a vote of 22-4 on Thursday, March 1.

27. Governor Hopefuls Largely OK With TennCare Work Requirements -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee's candidates for governor said Tuesday that they are largely supportive of proposed TennCare work requirements, but some of them expressed concerns about possible costs and bureaucracy.

28. Trump Urges Lawmakers to Buck NRA Every Once in a While -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump declared he's willing to take on the National Rifle Association over gun legislation, but Republicans who control Congress aren't so sure. They prefer to consider only modest changes to firearms limits in response to the mass shooting at a Florida high school.

29. Local Political Partisans Begin Looking Beyond Trump -

The founder of one of the city’s Trump “resistance” groups is among those looking for something beyond the resistance.

“We don’t want to resist Trump forever,” Emily Fulmer, the founder of Indivisible Memphis, told a gathering of 50 Friday, Feb. 23, at the National Civil Rights Museum under the “Take Back Tennessee” banner. “The goal is not to be in a state of resistance forever.”

30. Governor Hopeful's Group to Manage Minor League Ballclub -

GREENEVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A company owned by Tennessee candidate for governor Randy Boyd will manage day-to-day operations of another minor league baseball team.

31. Corker Mum On Possible Senate Return Run -

When Shelby County Republican party leaders gathered Saturday, Feb. 26, for their annual Lincoln Day Gala, the local party’s largest fundraiser, much of the attention was on the elected official who delivered the shortest speech of the night.

32. Pre-K Expansion Faces Resistance in Push for Sunday Wine Sales -

NASHVILLE – Legislation sending revenue from Sunday wine sales to prekindergarten expansion faces a battle on several fronts when it reaches a committee in early March.

The bill sponsored by state Sen. Lee Harris is designed to take the state tax dollars from the sale of wine on Sundays, if that separate bill passes this session, and divert it to a fund designed to increase access for low-income children to prekindergarten classrooms in Tennessee. The bill is set to be heard March 6 in the Senate State and Local Government Committee.

33. Last Word: Plans and More Plans, Badu and Byrne and Gun Bills In Nashville -

Plans, plans, plans. I’ve seen so many overhead views and schematics in the last 24-hours that I had to go for a walk in the rain Wednesday to avoid vertigo. I saw a lot of green Save the Greensward t-shirts Wednesday evening at the Pink Palace that looked like they hadn’t been out of the bottom drawer in a while and even a couple of banners.

34. Consensus on Gun Legislation? Not on Your Life -

That burning smell emanating from the General Assembly isn’t coming from the flame of bipartisanship. More likely it’s the result of scorched-earth politics.

Even though a weapons measure called the “carry-like-a-cop” bill died recently in a House committee, the gap between Republicans and Democrats on gun legislation is, for the most part, about as wide as the range of a Barrett .50-caliber rifle, more than 2.5 miles.

35. Last Word: Patio Test, St. Jude's Edge and Bredesen Runs For the Center -

All across the city Monday afternoon into the evening, the city was tested just about a month away from spring by the calendar. And I am happy to report that the dry run for the patio season proved Memphis is vigilant and prepared. The test, in extreme temperatures that reached 77 degrees – breaking the record of 76 degrees set in 1986, prompted some of you to break out the running gear and give it a spin just before the early sunset. Others among you were spotted on patios pondering what ever became of Mr. Mister and Glass Tiger.

36. Harris Proposes Bill to Fund Pre-K with Sunday Wine Sales -

State tax revenue from the Sunday sale of wine in stores could be used to fund prekindergarten access for low-income families.

State Senate Democratic Leader Lee Harris of Memphis announced Monday, Feb. 19, that he is sponsoring the bill, which would figure prominently in the local push for more prekindergarten classrooms in the city of Memphis.

37. Harris Proposes Bill To Fund Pre-K with Sunday Wine Sales Revenue -

State tax revenue from allowing the Sunday sale of wine in grocery stores and supermarkets and other stores could be used to fund prekindergarten access for low income families.

State Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris of Memphis announced Monday, Feb. 19, that he is sponsoring the bill, which would figure prominently in the local push for more prekindergarten classrooms in the city of Memphis.

38. Harris Proposes Bill To Fund Pre-K with Sunday Wine Sales Revenue -

State tax revenue from allowing the Sunday sale of wine in grocery stores and supermarkets and other stores could be used to fund prekindergarten access for low income families.

State Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris of Memphis announced Monday, Feb. 19, that he is sponsoring the bill, which would figure prominently in the local push for more prekindergarten classrooms in the city of Memphis.

39. Last Word: Looking In The Lookout, Women in Business and The Race for Governor -

What would bring a Memphian on his own to The Lookout – the restaurant and bar at the top of the Pyramid? The view, of course. So after the obligatory walk outside to the views south along the riverfront and west across the river, I settled in Sunday for the view from within. I lined up with both of the tree stumps in the round fish tank in the center of the Pyramid’s apex, a steampunk frog watching from above.

40. Turner to Retire From State House -

Democratic State Rep. Johnnie Turner will not be seeking re-election to the House this election year, she announced Friday, Feb. 16.

41. Last Word: Corker & The Senate Poll, Memphis BBQ in Texas and Chandler Numbers -

The new owner of the city’s tallest building has bought two parcels next to the 100 North Main Building as the other part of the plan to bring the 37-story tall building back to life as a combo apartment-hotel building with the Loew’s hotel brand. The row of older buildings on the south side of 100 North Main all the way up to Jefferson would give way to a 34-story tall office tower.

42. The Metrics Mayor -

At times in the last two years, political supporters of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland have been worried. They agree with what got him elected, his “brilliant at the basics” philosophy that makes basic services and fundamental play-it-safe financial strategies the priority at City Hall.

43. Tennessee Bill Would Exempt Gun Safes From State Sales Tax -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Democratic and Republican lawmakers in Tennessee are pushing legislation to exempt gun safes from the state's sales tax.

At a news conference Monday, Republican Sen. Kerry Roberts of Springfield said the bill shows how the state Senate can find common ground and work in a bipartisan manner.

44. Governor’s Race Mixes Political Culture With Nuts-and-Bolts Policy -

As most of the other major contenders for Tennessee governor were on the same stage in Nashville last week, Republican Diane Black was in East Memphis meeting with a group of 15 local homebuilders. It was one in a set of meetings with small groups of potential supporters Black held in and around Memphis.

45. Last Word: Closing the Loophole, Skeleton Hotel Update and Jubilee Conversion -

The state legislator who sponsored the most recent version of the law making it much more difficult to remove Confederate monuments acknowledges that the city of Memphis found a legitimate loophole in the 2016 law he crafted. Republican Steve McDaniel, of Parkers Crossroads, tells our Nashville correspondent Sam Stockard that he has a bill in the House to close the loophole. But it won't undo what happened here. Although there is still a court fight over that taking shape.

46. McDaniel to Fashion Loophole Bill for State Monuments -

NASHVILLE – The House sponsor of the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act is preparing legislation to close a “loophole” Memphis used to spur removal of Confederate monuments from parks property it sold to a nonprofit group.

47. Tenn. Governor Candidates Talk Transparency, Medicaid and Megasite -

Five of the seven major contenders in the 2018 Tennessee governor’s race called for more transparency in government but said there are questions about when to disclose information about companies seeking to locate or expand in Tennessee.

48. 9:30 a.m.: Live-Stream the Tennessee Gubernatorial Forum -

The Tennessee Press Association holds a forum Thursday, Feb. 1, in Nashville featuring the announced candidates for Tennessee governor. The live stream – moderated by Eric Barnes, publisher of The Daily News and TPA president – starts at 8:30 a.m., and the forum is scheduled to begin at 9:30 a.m.

49. Immigrant Tuition Splits Tennessee Governor's Field in Forum -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Candidates for governor in Tennessee largely agreed on broad issues facing education during the race's first televised forum Tuesday, except for a partisan split on in-state tuition for immigrants whose parents brought or kept them in the country illegally.

50. Medicaid Expansion Splits Tenn. Governor Hopefuls in Health Forum -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A health care forum Friday illustrated the partisan split in the Tennessee governor's race over Medicaid expansion, with Democrats ranking it their top priority and Republicans opposing it or espousing other priorities.

51. Roland Pulls Petition For Mayor, Running As ‘Uniter’ -

Shelby County commissioner Terry Roland has been campaigning for Shelby County mayor since last year.

When he pulled his qualifying petition Thursday, Jan. 11, to formally enter the May Republican primary for mayor, Roland did so with a slogan of bringing “positive change to Shelby County.”

52. Legislature Moving on Civil Rights Cold Cases -

Charlie Morris may be nearing 100 years of age, but he’s never given up on his quest for Tennessee to delve into decades-old civil rights crimes.

53. Younger Candidates Weighing New Political Moves -

George Monger listened to his critics and his backers late last year as he contemplated another run for office 11 years after his first try.

54. Last Word: Soccer Returns, Confederate Reprisals and Megasite Politics -

So much going on off the field and on parts of the field in Atlanta Monday evening as Alabama beat Georgia – a clothesline, a punch thrown on the field and an attempt to throw another punch on the sidelines at an Alabama coach and all of that from a single Alabama player. So a lot of speculation after the College Football Playoff National Championship about how that will be resolved. Alabama over Georgia 26-23 in overtime.

55. Akbari Pulls Petition To Run for State Senate -

Democratic state Rep. Raumesh Akbari has decided to run for the District 29 state Senate seat being vacated by Lee Harris in the Shelby County legislative delegation.

56. Last Word: Tax Reform Pay Raises, Minority Business Kinks and Elvis at 83 -

A busy but ultimately slow weekend on the Confederate monuments front as a total of fewer than 100 opponents of the removal of the city’s two most visible monuments actively protested Saturday either on the interstate loop or in the “protest area” by Health Sciences Park.

57. Candidates in August State and Federal Primaries Start Pulling Petitions Friday -

Contenders for the May Shelby County primaries are still coming out of the political woodwork. And starting Friday, Jan. 5, candidates in the August state and federal primaries can begin pulling qualifying petitions for the second of three elections in 2018.

58. Last Word: Liberty Bowl Sell-Out Prep, Beale's Year and Tubby Talks -

The AutoZone Liberty Bowl is a sell out as of Thursday. And while your thoughts may turn to the sight of a full stadium at the Fairgrounds, at least some of you who are going are thinking about what traffic will be like in the area. Here is the parking and shuttle game plan at the outset and a day in advance. The Liberty Bowl Parade on Beale is at 3 p.m. Friday followed by a pep rally in the entertainment district and all are welcome.

59. Black Steps Down as US House Budget Chair Amid Governor Bid -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – U.S. Rep. Diane Black announced Wednesday that she is stepping down as House Budget Committee chairwoman, but will remain in Congress as she runs for governor of Tennessee.

60. Last Word: Extradition Delay, Last Council Day of 2017 and The Skeleton Hotel -

When Sherra Wright made her first court appearance Monday in Riverside, California she was in a wheelchair. And her public defender there wants to delay an extradition hearing on the conspiracy, first degree murder and attempted first degree murder charges she faces in Memphis until a doctor can examine here. The hearing is reset for Wednesday.

61. Songwriter Drops Bid for Blackburn’s US House Seat -

Tennessee songwriter Lee Thomas Miller is dropping out of the race for the Republican nomination to succeed Rep. Marsha Blackburn in Congress.

62. Last Word: California Extradition, Corker's Vote on Tax Reform and Post Kirk & Crum -

The ex-wife of Tigers and Grizz basketball great Lorenzen Wright is due in a California courtroom Monday morning as extradition proceedings begin following Sherra Wright’s arrest there Friday evening on a Shelby County grand jury indictment here on charges of conspiracy, first degree murder and attempted murder.

63. Rep. Black Describes Enduring Sexual Misconduct as Lawmaker -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – U.S. Rep. Diane Black says she knows from personal experience, having endured sexual misconduct as a state lawmaker, why Congress needs to expose federal lawmakers who settled cases, force them to repay any tax dollars involved and ban such taxpayer-funded settlements going forward.

64. Poll: Tennessee Voters More Moderate Than Some Think -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennesseans are more moderate than their neighbors think they are, and their views of Congress and President Donald Trump have soured some in the past few months, according to a Vanderbilt University poll released Thursday.

65. Vice President Pence Gives $4K to Black's Gubernatorial Bid -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican gubernatorial candidate Diane Black can count Vice President Mike Pence among her supporters.

66. Haslam: Devising Different Incentives for Border Areas Like Memphis Difficult -

Changing the economic development strategy Tennessee cities use isn’t a new concept. But doing so is easier said than done when bordered by eight states – more than another other state in the union.

67. Conyers Resigns From Congress Amid Harassment Allegations -

DETROIT (AP) – Besieged by allegations of sexual harassment, Democratic Rep. John Conyers resigned from Congress on Tuesday, bringing an abrupt end to the civil rights leader's nearly 53-year career on Capitol Hill.

68. Trump Signs Proclamation to Scale Back 2 National Monuments -

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – President Donald Trump signed a proclamation Monday to scale back two sprawling national monuments in Utah, pledging to "reverse federal overreach and restore the rights of this land to your citizens."

69. 4 Governor Candidates Won’t Release Tax Returns -

Four of the seven major candidates for Tennessee governor are declining to release details of their federal income tax returns.

The Tennessean newspaper asked the five Republicans and two Democrats in the race for copies of their federal tax filings. U.S. Rep. Diane Black and fellow Republican state House Speaker Beth Harwell provided financial summaries, and Democrat Craig Fitzhugh released his 2016 tax return.

70. Is There Room for Common-Sense Gun Legislation? -

The Tennessee chapter of Moms Demand Action picks its battles judiciously. Once labeled as a bunch of anti-gun extremists, the group is anything but, spokeswoman Kat McRitchie says.

“We seek common ground. We work with legislators on both sides of the aisle. We’re nonpartisan,” McRitchie explains. “We’re simply looking for common-sense gun solutions, which the majority of Americans support.”

71. 4 Tennessee Governor Candidates Won't Release Tax Returns -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Four of the seven major candidates for Tennessee governor are declining to release details of their federal income tax returns.

The Tennessean newspaper asked the five Republicans and two Democrats in the race for copies of their federal tax filings. U.S. Rep. Diane Black and fellow Republican state House Speaker Beth Harwell provided financial summaries, and Democrat Craig Fitzhugh released his 2016 tax return.

72. Tigers' New Basketball Facility a Palatial Recruiting Tool -

When you donate $10 million toward the construction of new basketball practice facility that bears your name, you are entitled to make a joke. So former Tiger Bill Laurie, who played on the 1972-73 Memphis State team that was NCAA runner-up, went for the laugh at the recent ribbon cutting ceremony for the University of Memphis’ $21 million Laurie-Walton Family Basketball Center on south campus named after Laurie and his wife, Nancy Walton Laurie.

73. The Next Four Years -

A week before candidates for the 2018 Shelby County elections could pull qualifying petitions to run, Shelby County Commissioner David Reaves was thinking out loud on Facebook.

“Next four years,” was how it began.

74. Political Opening -

The Shelby County Election Commission is moving its Downtown office Friday, Nov. 17, the same day that candidates can begin pulling qualifying petitions there and at its Shelby Farms offices to run in the 2018 county primaries.

75. Despite Massive Turnover, GOP Owns Legislature -

2018 will be a year of change for the Tennessee General Assembly, and 2019 will bring even more, especially in leadership – much depending on the popularity of President Donald Trump.

Not only is the Legislature moving to the Cordell Hull Building, vacating the Legislative Plaza after 45 years or so, a number of legislative faces are changing, too, even before next year’s election.

76. Songwriter Joins GOP Race to Succeed Blackburn in Congress -

BRENTWOOD, Tenn. (AP) – Songwriter Lee Thomas Miller announced Tuesday that he is joining the race for the Republican nomination to succeed Rep. Marsha Blackburn in Congress.

77. Buyers Keep Coming -

October was another solid month for the local housing industry. The average home sales price rose to $168,272, a 13 percent increase from October a year ago, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com.

78. Last Word: The Run, 70 Million Gallons a Day and More Shipping Containers -

This will be another busy week on the political front with more candidates declaring their intentions in advance of Thanksgiving. Meanwhile, Republican contender for governor Randy Boyd ends his run across the state Tuesday morning on Mud Island – a variation on Lamar Alexander’s walk across the state in the 1978 Republican primary for Governor that remains a part of the state’s political folklore almost 40 years later.

79. Last Word: Changes Behind Highland Row, Lee Harris Opens and Ron Olson Moves -

Shelby County Commission chairwoman Heidi Shafer says the commission, through its attorneys, is in ‘the final stages of launching litigation” against big pharma over the opioid problem locally. And in a written statement Thursday she said she believes the litigation “will result in significant recovery for hundreds of millions of dollars that Shelby County has spent trying to heal, save, nurse and otherwise deal with the opioid crisis.” Shafer specifically announced the hiring on a contingency basis of a national law firm.

80. Black Launches Latest Broadside in Tennessee Governor's Race -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – U.S. Rep. Diane Black's gubernatorial campaign is taking aim at Republican rival Randy Boyd, launching a broadside Tuesday at the former member of Gov. Bill Haslam's Cabinet for everything from his running attire to what the congresswoman decries as his moderate record.

81. JFK Files: Thousands Released But Trump Holds Back Others -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has blocked the release of hundreds of records on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, bending to CIA and FBI appeals, while the National Archives came out Thursday night with a hefty cache of others.

82. Editorial: Finding Memphis In An Era of Big Changes -

Day by day it seems we see new evidence of change in a city that many of us believe doesn’t change much and even then changes very slowly and gradually.

The face of the change tends to be bricks and mortar like those underway in Overton Park’s institutions – the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art and the Memphis College of Art. Or the Gibson guitar plant planning to leave a key piece of real estate south of Beale Street.

83. Mickell Lowery Uses Lessons From Council Race in Commission Bid -

Two years to the month after he conceded defeat in his first political outing, Mickell Lowery is returning to the local political arena – albeit a different part of the arena.

Lowery is running in the May Democratic primary for Shelby County Commission District 8, the seat held by Democrat Walter Bailey, who is term-limited and cannot seek re-election in 2018.

84. Memphis College of Art Closing Doors -

Memphis College of Art, the 81-year-old Overton Park institution, will close by May of 2020 after years of financial struggles.

The college’s board described the pending process as an “orderly dissolution of MCA’s real estate and other assets to fund the College’s debt obligations and other liabilities, including providing sufficient funding to serve existing students who remain at MCA.”

85. Memphis College of Art Closing Its Doors -

The Memphis College of Art will close by May of 2020 in what the board of the 81-year old Overton Park institution is describing as an "orderly dissolution of MCA’s real estate and other assets to fund the College’s debt obligations and other liabilities, including providing sufficient funding to serve existing students who remain at MCA."

86. Early Differences Surface at Republican Governor’s Forum in Memphis Oct. 20 -

When the six declared contenders for the Republican nomination for governor met at this weekend’s Tennessee Federation of Republican Women convention in Memphis, there were some early differences certain to grow as the campaign intensifies.

87. Not Worried About Bama? Just Wait Until Kickoff -

Tennessee’s football team will make history Saturday against No. 1-ranked Alabama (7-0, 4-0 SEC), no matter what happens with the game.

The Vols (3-3, 0-3 SEC) were 34-point underdogs early in the week for the 3:30 EDT game (TV: CBS) in Tuscaloosa. The 34-point spread is the largest ever in the UT-Alabama series.

88. How Should ‘Good People’ React to Racist Ideology? -

Southern nationalists planning to lead rallies in Murfreesboro and Shelbyville are banking on Republican ideas and protection to spread their views, a burr under the saddle for state lawmakers in the controlling party.

89. October 13-19, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1954: E.H. Crump dies after two days in a coma at his house on Peabody near McLean. The previous August, Crump had missed voting in the primary elections, reportedly the first time he had missed voting since he turned 21 years old, which was the legal voting age at the time.

90. Trump’s Bluster Cascades Through State Politics -

The chaos emanating from President Donald Trump’s administration is changing the landscape of Tennessee politics, setting the stage for upheaval within the dominant Republican Party.

“This is a really big moment for the Tennessee Republican Party,” with the Trump wing or far-right wing “firmly in control,” says Kent Syler, Middle Tennessee State University political science professor.

91. Last Word: Bonus For the Head Tiger, Brooks Downtown? and Harris Runs -

A $100,000 bonus from the University of Memphis board of trustees for U of M president David Rudd at Wednesday’s trustees meeting. The bonus is from private funds raised by the university foundation. The board also approved a paid parental leave policy – specifically the funding for that policy. And it reviewed scaled-back plans for the $30 million new rec center for students that will incorporate some of the existing rec center.

92. Week Ahead: Oct. 2-9 -

Hey, Memphis! Prepare to rock out this week as the Mempho Music Festival hits Shelby Farms Park and Wilco plays The Orpheum. Plus, Beale Street memorializes one of its own, Memphis legal pros discuss the Confederate monuments issue, and much more in The Week Ahead…

93. Events -

Novel will host Otis Sanford for a discussion and signing of “From Boss Crump to King Willie: How Race Changed Memphis Politics” Monday, Oct. 2, at 6 p.m. at the bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended. Visit novelmemphis.com.

94. Crosstown Crossroads -

For the past 90 years, Crosstown has seen its share of ups and downs. In the beginning, it was a shining beacon for the city’s eastward expansion; at its height, it anchored several vibrant and diverse neighborhoods; and at its lowest, Crosstown became the poster child for once-great inner-city areas of Memphis that had deteriorated.

95. GOP Donor Launches Super PAC to Support Corker Challenger -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A conservative Tennessee auto dealer is launching a super PAC to support Andy Ogles' bid for the U.S. Senate seat held by Republican Bob Corker.

Ogles is the former state director of Americans for Prosperity, the political arm of conservative billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch's network. He declared his candidacy last week, and his campaign on Tuesday announced the formation of the super PAC run by Lee Beaman, a Nashville Toyota dealer.

96. GOP Candidates for Tennessee Governor Uneasy About Gas Tax -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The ink may be dry on a new state law that boosts funding for road projects through Tennessee's first gas tax hike in 28 years, but that doesn't mean all Republicans running for governor are happy with it.

97. The Week Ahead: Sept. 11-18 -

Hey, Memphis! This week we’re gearing up for the Cooper Young Festival and a packed house at the Tigers vs. UCLA game. Plus, Uptown Funk heads Downtown and The Joker hits East Memphis. Here’s what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

98. ‘Divisive Symbols’: Mississippi Case Offers Hope for Forrest Bust Removal -

State Sen. Lee Harris is encouraged by the U.S. Supreme Court’s request for the state of Mississippi to respond to a lawsuit seeking to remove the Confederate battle flag from its state flag.

99. Outsourcing by Any Other Name Still Not So Sweet -

Outsourcing is starting to become a four-letter word in state government.

Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration told lawmakers during a summer study session it’s giving up on privatization of state parks, including a plan to hire a company to raze the inn at Fall Creek Falls and build a new one, at a cost of more than $22 million, then take over the keys and the profits.

100. State Panel Sheds New Light on Racial Atrocities -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner has seen what can happen when old wounds are never allowed to heal.

She’s seen it most recently in clashes between neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and white supremacists and those who resisted their hatred in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counter-protester was killed and 19 were injured when a car was intentionally driven into a group of counter protesters. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash that weekend.