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Editorial Results (free)

1. University of Memphis, UTHSC May Soon Face Outsourcing Decisions -

Forty-one state lawmakers signed a letter requesting the state put a hold on its outsourcing plans until the General Assembly can scrutinize its effect on state workers and services.

The state is set to sign a contract April 28 with Chicago-based JLL for facilities management work that could be used by universities and departments statewide. Even local government jobs could be doled out to the contractor.

2. Memphis Gets Nod for New Hotel Tax, Nashville Having Pipeline Problems -

The state Senate approved legislation enabling the Memphis City Council to consider an ordinance to create a new hotel/motel tax of no more than an aggregate of 5 percent to go toward the city-owned Memphis Cook Convention Center.

3. Memphis Gets Nod for New Hotel Tax, Nashville Having Pipeline Problems -

The state Senate has approved legislation enabling the Memphis City Council to consider an ordinance to create a new hotel/motel tax of no more than an aggregate of 5 percent to go toward the city-owned Memphis Cook Convention Center.

4. Harris: Syrian Air Strikes Should Change State’s Stance on Refugees -

State Sen. Lee Harris is calling on the Legislature to rethink its stance on refugees amid legal action taken against the federal government after President Donald Trump ordered an air strike against Syria.

5. Last Word: Busy Council Day, County Property Tax Cut Call and Gas Tax Vote Nears -

The Lawsons – K.J. and Dedric – are on their way to Kansas after leaving University of Memphis basketball they announced Monday. And Markell Crawford confirmed Monday that he will be transferring too. Crawford is the sixth Tiger player to head for the door since the season’s end. What will Tigers basketball look like by the next season?

6. Harris: Syrian Air Strikes Should Change State’s Stance on Refugees -

State Sen. Lee Harris is calling on the Legislature to rethink its stance on refugees amid legal action taken against the federal government after President Donald Trump ordered an air strike against Syria.

7. U of M Students, Faculty Do Social Work on the Hill -

The University of Memphis Department of Social Work recently participated in the annual Social Work Day on the Hill.

More than 50 students and six faculty members in bachelor’s and master’s programs traveled to Nashville to gain practical experience in speaking to legislators, building interdisciplinary professional relationships, and advocating for policies primarily related to mental health and child welfare.

8. Tennessee Senate OKs Gun Background Check Exemption Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Senate has passed a bill eliminating background check requirements when gun dealers occasionally sell from their personal firearm collections.

Senators voted 24-3 Thursday on the legislation by Republican Sen. Mae Beavers of Mt. Juliet. The House passed it Monday. Gov. Bill Haslam will decide to sign or veto the bill.

9. U of M Students, Faculty Do Social Work on the Hill -

The University of Memphis Department of Social Work recently participated in the annual Social Work Day on the Hill.

More than 50 students and six faculty members in bachelor’s and master’s programs traveled to Nashville to gain practical experience in speaking to legislators, building interdisciplinary professional relationships, and advocating for policies primarily related to mental health and child welfare.

10. Senate Campaign War Chests Could Swell -

NASHVILLE – Legislation enabling state lawmakers to raise campaign funds during even-year session recesses evolved into a markedly different bill this week – one allowing significant contribution increases for Senate candidates.

11. Senate Passes Less Speedy Rural Broadband Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Senate on Monday passed a bill that could make it easier for rural areas in Tennessee to get access to high-speed internet. However, a last-minute amendment tacked on to the bill would not require the internet to be so speedy.

12. Democrats Put Squeeze on Republicans To Defeat Outsourcing of State Assets -

Legislative Democrats are calling on Republicans to join them in passing a slate of bills to combat Gov. Bill Haslam’s outsourcing plans for everything from state parks to facilities management at universities.

13. Democrats Put Squeeze on Republicans to Defeat Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats are calling on Republicans to join them in passing a slate of bills to combat Gov. Bill Haslam’s outsourcing plans for everything from state parks to facilities management at universities.

14. Lawmakers Blast Haslam Administration for Process Toward JLL Contract -

The Tennessee Department of General Services is set to award a statewide contract for facility management services to Jones Lang LaSalle, a company that already handles 10 percent of state office space and estimates a 15.9 percent savings if all higher education institutes participate.

15. Senate Douses Memphis and Nashville Pot Ordinances -

State senators are intent on striking down Memphis and Nashville marijuana laws giving police discretion to hand out citations for possessing small amounts of pot.

Despite opposition from Shelby County and Davidson County legislators, the Senate voted 26-5 Monday to clarify that state law overrides local government regulations involving drugs and similar substances.

16. Bill to Ban Outsourcing Sails Through Committee -

A Senate panel approved legislation Monday prohibiting the outsourcing of jobs at state parks less than a week after the State Building Commission renewed plans for rebuilding and privatizing the inn at Fall Creek Falls.

17. Last Word: Tri-State Inks Move to Midtown, Main and Gayoso and 'Wise Trek' -

The open land across Union Avenue from AutoZone Park remains just that as some of it has changed hands again. Vision Hospitality buying the land that had been the location of the Greyhound bus station at Union and Hernando. Vision Memphis LLC sold to Vision Hospitality of Knoxville for $4 million, according to a warrant deed we reviewed Monday.

18. Inn Construction, Private Management Plan Draw Ire of State Sen. Lee Harris -

State Sen. Lee Harris is criticizing Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision to renew an outsourcing plan for development and operations at Fall Creek Falls State Park, calling it a move to bolster profits for a private company.

19. Bill That Helps Nonviolent Offenders Passes in Legislature -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A bill that helps nonviolent offenders find employment has passed in the Legislature with bipartisan support.

The primary sponsors of the bill were Shelby County-area lawmakers.

20. Tennessee Senate Passes Bill to Punish Protesters Who Block Streets -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Senate has passed a bill that would punish protesters who block traffic and obstruct emergency vehicles from responding to an emergency.

Under the bill, protesters who block emergency responders would be charged with a misdemeanor and fined $200. The measure was sponsored by Sen. Mike Bell, a Republican from Riceville.

21. Chuck Berry's Influence on Rock ‘n’ Roll Was Incalculable -

Rock n' roll was more than a new kind of music, but a new story to tell, one for kids with transistor radios in their hands and money in their pockets, beginning to raise questions their parents never had the luxury to ask.

22. Last Word: Lakeland Date Set, Silos in South Main and Trespassing in Apartments -

Here comes the Governor’s race with Randy Boyd doing the honors here in Memphis Wednesday at the top of the second day of his fly-around. Boyd’s opening sounds very much like he is running as the heir apparent to Gov. Bill Haslam – although there are no heirs in politics, at least not without an election. He talked a lot about hitting workforce development and job goals of the Haslam administration if he is elected Governor in 2018.

23. Bill to Create Criminal Trespassing at Apartment Complexes Could Face Legal Challenges -

NASHVILLE – Two Memphis lawmakers are pushing legislation designed to clear apartment complexes of trespassers, in some cases to ensure that emergency personnel avoid intimidation and threats when they answer calls dealing with shootings.

24. View From the Hill: Outsourcing Win More About Turf Than Trends -

As Fall Creek Falls folks celebrate a state decision to postpone park privatization, the question is whether public opposition or failure to follow long-standing state protocol led to the plug-pulling.

25. View From the Hill: House Leaders Still Figuring Out Sexual Harassment Policy -

In a case of déjà vu all over again, Democratic state Rep. Bo Mitchell isn’t willing to give Republican House leaders a break on their handling of former Rep. Mark Lovell’s resignation for alleged sexual misconduct.

26. Fall Creek Falls Park Contract Postponed Indefinitely -

NASHVILLE – The state is putting an indefinite hold on a proposed contract for a private company to redevelop and operate Fall Creek Falls State Park.

The Department of General Services is postponing the request for proposals process from vendors for a contract to oversee construction of a new inn at the park and to run its hospitality services after the $22 million project is complete.

27. Harwell: Lovell Investigation Handled Correctly -

NASHVILLE – An investigation into now-former Rep. Mark Lovell started a day after he allegedly had inappropriate contact with a woman and lasted two to three days, House Speaker Beth Harwell says.

28. Last Word: How Do You Get On The List, Sedgwick & Thornwood and Musicals -

Monday was Presidents Day and thus a holiday at City Hall. But for the occupant on City Hall’s top floor it was anything but a holiday. The list Memphis Police made for who has to have a uniformed police officer next to them to go anywhere in City Hall is turning into a controversy over possible surveillance of citizens participating in the last year or so of protests around the city.

29. Harris: House Leaders Took Right Action With Lovell Probe -

NASHVILLE – A Memphis legislator critical of the initial reaction to former Rep. Mark Lovell’s resignation is “somewhat satisfied” with the conclusion of a House investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct.

30. Lawmakers File Bills To Protect Memphis Aquifer -

State Sens. Brian Kelsey, R-Germantown, and Lee Harris, D-Memphis, have filed legislation in the Tennessee General Assembly that would set up a Memphis Sands Aquifer Regional Development Board to protect water supplies in West Tennessee.

31. Thompson Proposes State Certificate of Employability -

The first bill proposed in the Tennessee Legislature by Democratic state Rep. Dwayne Thompson of Cordova would create an alternative to the $450 expungement fee now required by state law to clear the record of those convicted of nonviolent felonies who have not been in trouble for five years after serving their sentences.

32. Thompson Proposes State Certificate of Employability -

The first bill proposed in the Tennessee Legislature by Democratic state Rep. Dwayne Thompson of Cordova would create an alternative to the $450 expungement fee now required by state law to clear the record of those convicted of nonviolent felonies who have not been in trouble for five years after serving their sentences.

33. Last Word: Lovell's Aftermath, West Memphis Tourism and Batter Up -

Political turbulence in the state capitol this week centered on one of the newest members of the Shelby County Delegation leaves the politically-minded among us with a lot to take in when you add the Beltway turbulence of the week in D.C.

34. View From the Hill: Outsourcing, Rates Worry Park Fans -

Dunlap resident Kathy Gilbert opposes privatization of Fall Creek Falls on a number of fronts.

If a vendor comes in to run the state park, as planned by Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration, she’s worried about the possible loss of jobs or pay and benefits by state employees, the funneling of revenue to private investors and the raising of rates at the state park’s lodge when it’s rebuilt, potentially making it less affordable for families to visit.

35. Democrats Want Investigation of Lovell’s Resignation -

NASHVILLE – A day after former Rep. Mark Lovell resigned abruptly, House Majority Chairman Ryan Williams says he asked Lovell to step down, but only if accusations of sexual misconduct against him were true.

36. Lawmakers File Bills To Protect Memphis Aquifer -

State Sens. Brian Kelsey, R-Germantown, and Lee Harris, D-Memphis, have filed legislation in the Tennessee General Assembly that would set up a Memphis Sands Aquifer Regional Development Board to protect water supplies in West Tennessee.

37. Flurry of Bills Affecting LGBT Community Filed in State Legislature Before Deadline -

NASHVILLE – Tennessee lawmakers met last Thursday’s legislation-filing deadline with a host of social measures one Memphis representative describes as “wedge bills” because they drive people apart.

38. Bills Affecting LGBT Community Filed Before Deadline -

NASHVILLE – Tennessee lawmakers met last Thursday’s legislation-filing deadline with a host of social measures one Memphis representative describes as “wedge bills” because they drive people apart.

39. TVA Drilling Controversy May Change Well Actions -

The controversy over Tennessee Valley Authority drilling water wells into the Memphis aquifer for the new TVA power plant in southwest Memphis is becoming a push for more public notice of such plans and better mapping of the water supply under the city.

40. Last Word: Little Chairs in Longview, Police Pay Raise and Tiger Football Schedule -

The toys are in their cubbyholes. No stray Legos yet. The little chairs tucked neatly under little tables. The tall trees with their bare branches are much in need of little eyes inspecting their twisted branches and the shadows they make on the winter ground.

41. View From the Hill: Legislators Feel Free to Work Against Haslam -

Democrats appear delighted about division within Republican ranks concerning Gov. Bill Haslam’s proposed fuel-tax increase, detecting a possible chink in the armor.

“How many times does the supermajority have to stab the governor in the back and undermine his core proposals before the people of the state of Tennessee wonder whether they need a different group up here?” asks Mike Stewart, House Minority Caucus chairman.

42. Governor Defends Big Proposals for Statewide Infrastructure -

NASHVILLE – Protesters overshadowed Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s State of the State address Monday night, chanting in the Capitol in opposition to a spate of executive orders from President Donald Trump.

43. State Sens. Harris, Kelsey Critical of TVA Water Wells -

When Odell Johnson goes on business trips he looks forward to seeing water pumping plants in other cities that use surface water for drinking water.

Johnson is the manager for water and engineering operations at Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division. He made the comment Tuesday, Jan. 24, as his tour of the utility’s Sheahan Pumping Station served as a backdrop for the ongoing debate about the Tennessee Valley Authority’s change of plans to cool its new natural gas-fired power plant in southwest Memphis.

44. Last Word: The TVA Well Controversy, Fred Smith Redux and Norris On The Gas Tax -

The new Trader Joe’s in Germantown won’t be alone by the plans the supermarket chain got approved Tuesday night by the Germantown Design Review Commission. The conversion of the old Kroger store on Exeter includes seven other bays as Trader Joe’s goes for a smaller footprint than the size of the original building.

45. Last Word: The March & Crowd Estimates and Country Records in Memphis -

Twice now in the last six months, very different protests have drawn thousands of people to the streets in the largest demonstrations we’ve seen since the 1970s – and more importantly, demonstrations that are an entry point for a new generation to many of these issues.

46. Harris Visits With Park Employees on State Outsourcing Plan -

NASHVILLE – State Sen. Lee Harris, D-Memphis, and Rep. John Ray Clemmons, D-Nashville, met with Fall Creek Falls State Park employees Friday, Jan. 20, for a town hall discussion on the governor’s proposal to outsource state assets to private companies and potentially eliminate state jobs.

47. Haslam Tax Plan Would Secure Funds for Road, Infrastructure Projects -

NASHVILLE – Memphis legislators are weighing Gov. Bill Haslam’s proposal to raise fuel taxes and slightly cut the grocery tax, while assessing the impact on local governments of a Hall income tax reduction and a major business tax reduction that is proposed.

48. Memphis Lawmaker: Junk Food Bill Would Bully the Poor -

State Rep. Joe Towns Jr. of Memphis isn’t surprised that Rep. Sheila Butt dropped her bill limiting “junk food” for food stamp recipients.

“She should because she’s lost her damn mind,” Towns, a Memphis Democrat, said Tuesday. “How are you going to put out a bill to tell people what they can and can’t eat?”

49. Graves Named Director Of Downtown YMCA -

Angelic Graves has joined YMCA of Memphis & the Mid-South as executive director of the Louis T. Fogelman Downtown YMCA. Graves, a Chicago native, comes to Memphis from the YMCA of Metro Chicago, where she most recently served as executive director of the South Side YMCA.

50. McNally Voted Tennessee Senate Speaker -

Promising to maintain Tennessee’s strong fiscal standing, veteran legislator Randy McNally of Oak Ridge took the gavel Tuesday as Senate speaker, replacing Ron Ramsey, who over the last decade led a Republican majority to power in the Tennessee General Assembly.

51. Trump’s Turn -

If the election of Donald Trump was a mystery, there are even more questions about what will he do once he takes office Jan. 20. The clues may or may not be in the conduct of his campaign.

“Donald Trump campaigned without being tied to the traditional parameters of conservative-liberal dialogue that we’ve come to know over the past 20 or 30 years,” said Memphis attorney John Ryder, who is legal counsel to the Republican National Committee. “The hopeful part about that is that allows him to move past those divisions and enter new territory.”

52. Tennessee Lawmakers Could Raise, Lower Taxes This Session -

The 110th General Assembly is set to convene on Jan. 10 with unfinished business from previous sessions likely to dominate debate.

Here’s a look at some of the hottest topics expected to arise.

53. Last Word: A Rainbow's Tale, The Two Holiday Peaks and Crosstown High Plans -

I saw it all so clearly on a very cloudy and very rainy Monday in the city. A strong rainbow with bold colors across town from the setting sun on the river. Not some play rainbow that you create with a garden hose or some alleged double rainbow that depends on where you stand. As we were fond of saying in these parts in the 1980s and the 1990s – this was a “world class” rainbow.

54. Lawmakers Address Prosecutors, ASD -

The majority and minority leaders of the Tennessee Senate say there is political pressure to break the link in funding for prosecutors and public defenders.

“I think it takes both efforts,” state Senate Republican Leader Mark Norris of Collierville said on ‘Behind The Headlines,’ the WKNO/Channel 10 program. “I think we need more prosecutors. I think we also need more public defenders.”

55. Last Word: The Bridge Revisited, The Election Year and Lamar Remains Lamar -

One of the biggest stories of 2016 wasn’t planned and the spontaneous nature of the July 10 demonstration that closed the Hernando DeSoto Bridge made it a very unusual story. It was spontaneous and it tapped long held feelings and frustrations. For that reason and others, it is its own story in our continuing review of the year’s biggest stories in Memphis.

56. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

57. New Year, New Resolutions for Legislators -

Some Tennesseans recall the days when the state Legislature met every other year and wonder if it should revert to that schedule. Considering the General Assembly pushes most of its work into 3 1/2 months, it might be worth a try.

58. Tennessee Dem Says GOP Governor's Cabinet Lacks Diversity -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Senate's top Democrat is criticizing Republican Gov. Bill Haslam for lacking diversity in his cabinet.

Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris says the resignation of Human Services Commissioner Raquel Hatter leaves only one commissioner who isn't white out of 29 members. None are African-American.

59. After The Vote -

If you stood in certain places during the last days of the 2016 campaign in Memphis you could see the 2018 elections even if you couldn’t see Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s national victory over Democratic contender Hillary Clinton.

60. Election Day Ends Contentious Presidential Contest -

In a contentious national campaign for president that has tested the boundaries of what is considered proper political discourse and what should be public, local Democratic and Republican partisans have mostly been spectators as the 2016 presidential campaign comes to an end Tuesday, Nov. 8.

61. Memphis Legislators Challenge Tennessee Law Banning Polling Place Selfies -

On the last day of early voting in Shelby County Thursday, Nov. 3, Democratic state Rep. G. A. Hardaway walked into the early voting site at Glenview Community Center in South Memphis.

Once he was at a voting machine, Hardaway took a selfie of himself with his smartphone, admittedly in violation of the state law prohibiting “the use of mobile electronic or communication devices at polling places.”

62. Memphis Legislators Call For Repeal of Polling Place Selfie Ban -

On the last day of early voting in Shelby County Thursday, Nov. 3, Democratic state Representative G. A. Hardaway walked into the early voting site at Glenview Community Center in South Memphis.

Once he was at a voting machine, Hardaway took a selfie of himself with his smartphone, admittedly in violation of the state law against “the use of mobile electronic or communication devices at polling places.”

63. Local Politicos Shift Focus to 2018 Given Expected Presidential Results -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism threw a masquerade party two nights before Halloween on an excursion boat.

64. State Rep. Feels Heat From Staffer’s Firing -

Like sands through the hour glass, these are the days of our Legislature’s lives.

When General Assembly candidates run for office, they talk of high ideals such as reforming education, creating jobs, saving tax dollars and stifling sexual offenders, even restricting abortion, adopting a state rifle or making the Holy Bible Tennessee’s state book.

65. U of M Journalism Alumni Name Annual Honorees -

The University of Memphis Journalism Alumni Club will host its Outstanding Alumni Awards. Thursday, Oct. 13, at the Holiday Inn U of M, 3700 Central Ave.

66. Editorial: Pot Ordinance Isn’t Perfect, But It Still Has Benefits -

The Memphis City Council is scheduled to vote this week on a much-discussed proposal that would decriminalize the possession of small amounts of marijuana. What’s at stake is about more than weed.

It’s really about beginning to level the playing field in the criminal justice system where too often, nonviolent crimes like possession of pot put a disproportionate number of young black males in a system that can taint opportunities for years, or even entire lives.

67. Pot Decriminalization Nears Final Vote -

One of the state’s two largest cities has decriminalized possession of less than a half ounce of marijuana. And the other city set the stage for a final vote on a similar measure next month.

The final vote Tuesday, Sept. 20, by the Metro Nashville Council could be one of several factors influencing the final vote Oct. 4 by the Memphis City Council.

68. Study Leads to Broader Call for Business Ties -

Rodney Strong, CEO of the Atlanta law and public policy firm Griffin and Strong that authored city government’s latest disparity study on minority contracting, didn’t come to talk about the study last week when he spoke to a room of 40 African-American civic and business leaders.

69. Last Word: One Beale Delay, Memphis Banks and The Other Anniversary -

Changing the city’s skyline comes with some challenges. That’s a reflection of ever-changing economic conditions and the terrain by the Mississippi River on which the city’s skyline is built.

70. Scramble in the 8th District -

You might call it the calm before the storm. The Aug. 4 election, for which early voting starts July 15, is calmer than usual for the election cycle before a November presidential general election – the only election that more than half of Shelby County voters regularly show up for.

71. Symbols of War Keep Dragging Us Down -

More than 150 years ago, we fought our nation’s most bloody war, a conflagration that claimed 620,000 lives, almost as many as were killed in all other American war efforts combined.

Despite the horror of it all, we just can’t seem to learn a lesson, possibly because of Southern hardheadedness, and a century and a half later, we seem doomed to an eternal task: pushing Sisyphus’ rock to the top of a hill only to have it chase us back to the bottom.

72. Harris' White House Trip Rejected by State GOP Officials -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Over the last two years, Tennessee state senators have been reimbursed for out-of-state travel for meetings from Florida to Alaska, and on topics ranging from school vouchers to the dangers of radical Islam.

73. Outsourcing Savings Estimates Strain ‘Credulity’ -

Terry Cowles flashes a photo of ceiling lamp fixtures on the screen and tells state legislators a vendor’s state Capitol team used its electrical training to remove, repair and reinstall fixtures, saving taxpayers $15,500.

74. Legislature Votes to Strip Funding From UT Diversity Office -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — State lawmakers voted to send a message that they don't agree with the sexually open and progressive views of the Office for Diversity and Inclusion on the University of Tennessee campus. So the Legislature on Thursday passed a bill stripping it of state funds — a total of nearly $337,000. The money will be used to fund minority scholarships instead.

75. The Opportunity of a Learning Lifetime -

The opportunity of a tuition-free community college education for every Tennessee high school graduate who wants it is one of our state’s boldest initiatives. That’s what the Tennessee Promise program represents.

76. Last Word: Pastner's Georgia Tech Post-Season, Who Filed and Greensward Invitations -

Not so fast with the off-season. There is a Memphis post-season after all.

And the Grizz found it Thursday like a light at the end of a long-tunnel where a lot of people slipped and fell and can’t get up.
The light was Houston flaming out at home to Phoenix without the Grizzlies having to make a basket.
It’s all about the math. Stay in school, young people.

77. Conrad Call for De-Annexation Talks Draws Favorable Reviews -

Memphis City Council Chairman Kemp Conrad wants to open talks with county commissioners on possible voluntary de-annexations.

And County Commission Chairman Terry Roland said he is open to the idea.

78. Amended Senate De-annexation Bill Faces More Debate -

The de-annexation bill whose defeat became City Hall’s top priority in March is off the political frontburner.

But Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature who opposed the de-annexation by referendum measure expect that this isn’t the end of the concept or the move to make it law.

79. Memphis Leaders Pleased With 'Reprieve' on De-Annexation Bill -

The de-annexation by referendum legislation pending in the Tennessee Legislature was sent to a summer study committee Wednesday, March 30, in the state Senate, effectively killing the proposal for the legislative session.

80. Last Word: Back to Nashville, Dentistry & Genomes and Living The Fable -

The Memphis traffic is again heavy on the Interstate to Nashville as the Senate state and local government committee meets Tuesday to pick up where it left off with the still-forming version the upper chamber is crafting of the de-annexation bill.

81. Amendments Cloud Issue of De-Annexation -

Tennessee state senators go back to work Tuesday, March 29, in Nashville on a modified de-annexation bill.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee will be reviewing a set of amendments to their version of the bill, which changed substantially from the House version in a committee session last week.

82. Opposers Fight De-Annexation Another Day -

When the state Senate’s State and Local Government Committee convenes at noon Wednesday, March 21, in Nashville, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and his administration will have been working Capital Hill for about a day and a half.

83. Harris, Towns Hope to Delay Monday De-Annexation Vote -

Memphis Democrats in the Tennessee Legislature are hoping to delay a scheduled Monday, March 21, state Senate floor vote on a deannexation bill that cleared the state House a week ago.

“This train is moving very fast,” Democratic Sen. Lee Harris said Friday, March 18. “The city of Memphis has never made a significant presentation about the city of Memphis’ finances to the relevant committees or to the Senate members,” he added. “Minimally, we need to send this back to committee so that we can have some airing out of what the facts are and what the known consequences are. … Minimally, if you are going to devastate a city, you should know exactly what that means and what you are doing.”

84. Harris Seeks Legal Opinion on Deannexation Bill, Senate Vote Set For Monday -

State Sen. Lee Harris of Memphis has requested a legal opinion from the Tennessee Attorney General’s office on the deannexation bill the Senate could vote on Monday, March 21.

85. Bipartisan Skeptics Doubt Haslam’s Outsourcing Plan -

Poor timing and questionable numbers: That’s how legislators are viewing a business justification plan for outsourcing facilities management across Tennessee.

The Office of Customer Focused Government tells state senators, if all departments opt in, the state could save $35.8 million by the second year of a contract under study for building operations and services – without laying off state workers or cutting pay and benefits.

86. Cordova Apartments Sell for $31.1 Million -

555 Wood Arbor Parkway
Memphis, TN 38018
Sale Amount: $31.1 million

Sale Date: March 2, 2016
Buyer: CEAI Grove LLC
Seller: Trinity 464 LLC
Loan Amount: $4.2 million
Borrower: CEAI Grove LLC
Lender: CBRE Multifamily Capital Inc.
Details: The Grove at Trinity Point apartments have sold for $31.1 million.

87. Cordova Apartments Sell for $31.1 Million -

The Grove at Trinity Point apartments have sold for for $31.1 million.

In a March 2 warranty deed, Trinity 464 LLC sold the Cordova property to CEAI Grove LLC. In conjunction with the sale, CEIA Grove signed a certificate of joint venture with Fundrise Real Estate Investment Trust.

88. Rare Wins for Democrats on Guns, Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats got a chance to beat their chests a little bit after a proposal to allow guns in the state Capitol and Legislative Plaza failed, and they hope to do the same with outsourcing.

89. AP Sources: Clippers Trade Stephenson to Memphis for Green -

The Memphis Grizzlies traded forward Jeff Green to the Los Angeles Clippers on Thursday in exchange for guard Lance Stephenson and a future protected first-round draft pick.

The deal confirmed by the Clippers hours after the NBA trade deadline passed reunites Green with Doc Rivers, who coached him in Boston from 2011-13.

90. AP Source: Grizzlies Sending Lee to Charlotte in 3-Team Deal -

The Charlotte Hornets have acquired veteran swingman Courtney Lee from the Memphis Grizzlies in a three-team trade that will help bolster the team's perimeter shooting and defense after losing Michael Kidd-Gilchrist to a shoulder injury.

91. Teachers Wary of Haslam’s Push For Increased Pay -

Pushing a budget with more than $100 million for K-12 teacher pay raises, Gov. Bill Haslam says Tennessee is taking education to new levels by raising standards, linking teacher evaluations to student performance and expanding education options.

92. Last Word: History As Geology, Beyond the Greensward and City Hall's HR Director -

History can be like geology once you get it in something that isn’t in the form of a book.
There are layers on top of layers that you may not ever see or miss until a site is wiped clean for the next present that used to be the future and will eventually become the past.
That’s the case with the city’s historic Medical Center where much has come and gone several times over as our city’s considerable investment in medicine and health approaches the end of its second century.
Health Sciences Park used to be the site of a hospital. You would think something as massive as the tower of Baptist Memorial Hospital’s central campus on Union Avenue would be missed. Yet even those of us who grew up with its presence drive past it every day without a thought of what was once there.
The same with the site of Russwood Park on the north side of Madison Avenue and the old bus barns where Beale used to run further east than it does now.
In recent years, new facilities have arisen as the medical center makes itself over in a kind of economic regeneration without a comprehensive plan.
There is now an effort to come up with a comprehensive plan for the area that is more than different ventures buying or leasing land and making plans for their needs.
Eight of the institutions in the area have hired a consulting firm to develop a master plan that includes not just facilities but residential and retail areas.
It’s a significant step for an area that remains intriguing for those of us trying to remember what was where and how long some of the survivors have been holding out in much different streetscapes than were there when they arrived.
The Masonic lodge at the dead end of Dunlap into Union Avenue is a survivor. It’s where the funerals were held for some of those killed in the 1925 river disaster in which Tom Lee rescued so many others.
The lodge at one time had an earth-shaking pipe organ that I had the rare privilege of hearing at a concert following its restoration in the 1980s – the ancient 1980s.
And I still wonder about the tiny medical textbook storefront and how it endures at a time when students rent books and others use digital versions.
There are still remnants of the porous border between the medical center and the Union Avenue auto row that used to exist and arose around the old Ford plant.

93. Minority Leader Harris Confident Even on Wrong Side of Supermajority -

Lee Harris says he ran for state Senate because he felt Memphis could do better on Capitol Hill, defeating Ophelia Ford in 2014.

94. Last Word: New Minority Business Numbers, The House Affair and The Heights -

The recently revived discussion on minority business in Memphis is about to go back on the front burner again. Fueling the intensity are new U.S. Census numbers. They show the percentage of business receipts in Memphis produced by black-owned businesses has dropped since the 2007 census numbers showed a 1.08 percent share of those receipts by black-owned businesses. That in a city whose population is 63 percent African-American.
The drop to below one percent is even though the overall receipts in 2012 were higher than they were in 2007.
Madeline Faber is the first to report the new numbers as part of a cover story in our weekly, The Memphis News, that will be on the streets and in the racks Saturday, on-line Friday afternoon.
The numbers are such a telling story and such an important indicator that we broke it out as its own story in advance of the cover story.

95. Harris Passes On Challenging Cohen For House Seat -

A surprise January dalliance by Tennessee Sen. Lee Harris of Memphis with a challenge of U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen in the August primaries didn’t make it quite to the end of the month.

96. Last Word: Kroger Disses Clarence Saunders, Mud Island Plans and The Australians -

What is old has become new again. And judging by your reaction to Andy Meek’s story on the Kroger plans for online ordering of groceries, what is old has gone viral as well.
Here are the basics:
You order from a list of items and Kroger fills the order and has it waiting for you to pick up.
When you think about the idea of supermarkets, which originated here in Memphis with Piggly Wiggly, it’s enough to make the Piggly Wiggly founder himself, Clarence Saunders, spin in his grave.
Before he came up with the idea of taking store shelves from behind the counter and putting them out there for you to get your own stuff from them, you would tell your grocer what you wanted and he would write it down on a paper bag and get it for you, wrap it up and present it to you.
Saunders changed all of that as you know if you’ve seen the Pink Palace’s child-sized replica of a Piggly Wiggly store from the start of the 20th century.
A century later, no paper bags and you can still walk among the shelves if you wish.
Perhaps this isn’t that extreme. Maybe this is simply a swing of the pendulum, back toward the middle ground.
Saunders tried to push it even further with his Keedoozle stores that followed Piggly Wiggly. In those stores, the items were lined up in what amounted to vending machines with shoppers releasing an item from the vertical row with a key.
Here Saunders went too far. He mashed the bread.

97. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

98. Cohen, Ford Pull Petitions For August Primaries -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen has pulled a qualifying petition to run for another term in Congress starting with the Aug. 4 Democratic primary.

99. Tennessee Legislature Opens 2016 Session on Capitol Hill -

The Tennessee General Assembly's 2016 session will be a short one, likely done by early April. The gavels fall in the House and Senate chambers in Nashville at noon Tuesday, Jan. 12, opening the election year session.

100. Candidates Already Gearing Up For August Elections -

The ballot for the March 1 Tennessee presidential primaries and county primaries for General Sessions Court Clerk was set while many voters were focused on the holidays and preparations for the new city leaders taking office in January.