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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Mud Island Money, Elvis Mystery and Beyond Barbecue -

It looks like the dry rub will be in order for Memphis in May's barbecue weekend with a shower or two keeping the dust down in Tom Lee Park Wednesday.

If you can see it through the smoke, Mud Island might strike a first-tme observer as a marked contrast to all of the activity in Tom Lee Park that goes right up to the bluff's edge.

2. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

3. Geater Claims Dunavant Honor for Job Without a Description -

Lisa Geater likens the job of the Memphis City Council’s staff to being wallpaper. After 27 years working in the council office at City Hall, including 20 as the administrator running the office, Geater said her advice for new staff members was simple.

4. Last Word: Pro Day, Hardwood Patios in C-Y and Memphis' Contested Convention -

It was a windy Pro Day Wednesday at the University of Memphis for Tigers quarterback Paxton Lynch. And if the wind wasn’t for you, you could watch Lynch work out for NFL teams and their representatives on the NFL network.
Don Wade was there to watch in person.

5. Last Word: The Curtain Falls in Nashville, Political Cuneiform and Ramsey Talks -

And in less than a half hour Wednesday, the de-annexation drama that should qualify as the political equivalent of a Netflix binge-watchable television series made just for Memphis was done.

6. Last Word: A Cleansing Breath, Urban Child Three Months In and Sugar In South Main -

Let’s all take a deep cleansing breath, away from the mounds of pollen that are amassing in the Memphis spring.
And resolve, however in vain it might be, that the word de-annexation will not be used in our presence at least until Monday – Tuesday if possible.

7. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

8. The Audible: Still Peyton Manning’s Best Weapon -

It was, of course, the closing of Peyton Manning’s recent retirement speech that provided the sound bite and made the headlines.

Quoting 2 Timothy 4:7, Manning said: “I have fought the good fight and I have finished the race. I have kept the faith.” He then added: “Well, I have fought the good fight. I’ve finished my football race and after 18 years, it’s time. God bless all of you and God bless football.”

9. Rare Wins for Democrats on Guns, Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats got a chance to beat their chests a little bit after a proposal to allow guns in the state Capitol and Legislative Plaza failed, and they hope to do the same with outsourcing.

10. Last Word: The Road To Memphis, Medical District Plans and A Greensward Update -

The Republican presidential field is coming this way in the gap between early voting, which ends Tuesday evening, and the March 1 election day
Donald Trump, John Kasich and Ben Carson are booked for this coming weekend.

11. Tigers Can Still Draw Fans Needed For Payoff, NCAA Bid Less Likely -

The University of Memphis didn’t have much trouble with UCF, as evidenced by the 73-56 final score.

The paid attendance didn’t have much trouble with the actual attendance (scanned tickets), as evidenced by the 12,492 to 6,374 final score.

12. Last Word: Secrets In A Small Town, Bullard Bounce and Beale & Mud Island -

Munford! A winning Powerball ticket for the largest jackpot ever was sold in Munford and that warrants a rare exclamation mark.
Possibly two when you consider that small towns are supposed to be places where it is nearly impossible to keep a secret – at least from the other folks in the town.
The fact that it was sold at Naifeh’s, a long-standing Tipton County business institution adds to the story.
The person who bought the ticket in Munford holds one of three winning tickets which comes out to about $582 million for that ticket.
That is roughly the size of the city of Memphis operating budget.
There was a similar mystery underway Thursday in Dyersburg where someone bought a Powerball ticket worth a paltry $2 million. Probably worth an exclamation mark if I wasn’t over the limit and already feeling the unspoken disdain of my reporting brethren who are judging me harshly as you read this.

13. Under Pressure -

The Urban Child Institute’s research produces data. That data provides guidance for making decisions about how to best help Memphis children age 3 and younger. And The Urban Child Institute’s assets, around $150 million in 2013, offer a means to that end.

14. The Truth, Whole Truth, Nothing But the Truth -

THE INS AND UNS OF OUR TRUTH. Truth is the truth. It isn’t inconvenient, inconsistent or incomplete. It isn’t uncomfortable or unpleasant and certainly not untrue.

But what we’ve made of the truth is all of those things.

15. The Sporting Life of David Climer -

I’m blaming Rudy Kalis. As the years passed in a long career as a sports writer, I always swore I’d never be the oldest guy at the press conference. As long as Rudy was in the house as sports anchor for WSMV-TV, I was safe. Then he got a morning gig at Channel 4.

16. Office, Industrial Real Estate Enjoy Strong Third Quarter -

Memphis’ industrial and office sectors are seeing healthy activity, and some areas are experiencing record fundamentals.

At the Crescent Center building in East Memphis, prices per square foot have reached $30.50, a level that hasn’t been seen before in the Memphis market.

17. Pastner, Always True to Self, Is Still Doing Things His Way -

Expectations. That’s the word that drives all sports narratives. Remember the record of Josh Pastner’s first University of Memphis team, the ragtag bunch that was left over after John Calipari exited for Kentucky?

18. Shifting Memphis Media Market, Like Every Other, In Flux -

Lauren Lee never picks up a newspaper. Which isn’t much of a surprise because she’s 33 years old, works in marketing, and has the technological savvy and finger dexterity to operate a smartphone.

19. Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? John Calipari! -

[UPDATE: University of Memphis president David Rudd issued a statement on Twitter late Thursday afternoon stating the university "will not be recognizing Coach Calipari." Read his statement here.]

20. Boner, Fate and the Summer of Shame -

Phil Bredesen knew what he was trying to do. He just didn’t know if he could accomplish it.

“I had this sense that Nashville was ready for change,” says the former Metro mayor and Tennessee governor, reflecting on his early motivation for taking on the system that had run Nashville for decades.

21. Senate, House Look to Update Bush-Era Education Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's something most Democrats and Republicans in Congress can agree on — an update to the Bush-era No Child Left Behind education law is much needed and long overdue.

22. All-Male Nanny Service Eyeing Middle Tennessee -

Mary Poppins he’s not. No flying umbrellas, no Oscar-winning musical numbers.

But as a caregiver, Jon Ericksen would rank himself right up there with any nanny in the business.

“Two nieces grew up in the house with me, I have worked with kids a lot in all my jobs, so I knew this was something that I would be very interested in,” says Ericksen, one of the men working for MyManny, a Tennessee-based, all-male nanny agency.

23. Supreme Court Upholds Use of Controversial Execution Drug -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Trading sharp words, a deeply divided Supreme Court upheld the use of a controversial drug in lethal-injection executions Monday, even as two dissenting justices said for the first time they think it's "highly likely" the death penalty itself is unconstitutional.

24. Supreme Court Extends Gay Marriage Nationwide -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court declared Friday that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States, a historic culmination of decades of litigation over gay marriage and gay rights generally.

25. Murphy, the Realist -

“Whatever can go wrong will go wrong.” That’s a common wording for the epigram that we call “Murphy’s Law.” Granted, others have said it somewhat differently.

In her 1953 book, “The Making of a Scientist,” Ann Roe (1904-1991) attributed “If anything can go wrong, it will” to an unnamed physicist whom she’d interviewed. In his 1952 book, “The Butcher – The Ascent of Yerupaja,” John Sack cited a saying among mountaineers: “Anything that can possibly go wrong, does.”

26. Keeping the Beat -

Jody Stephens may best be known as a rock 'n' roll timekeeper, the guy whose drum kit kept the beat and provided the rhythmic foundation for the pioneering power pop group Big Star.

27. Stones Rock Music City -

Pleased to meet you, hope you guessed our name. Well, hell, Mick, if it’s puzzling you, it’s Nashville. Music City USA.

We’re the national media’s flavor of the day – the “It city,” which has gone from being a secondary concert market – remember The Beatles played Memphis, not Nashville – to one of the country’s prime touring destinations.

28. Lipscomb-Area Jewelers Dazzle Both Sides of Granny White -

When the blonde left-fielder skidded across the outfield grass attempting in vain to catch a tricky hit, she likely didn’t know she was “visiting” – belly down – a well-fertilized, close-cropped living memorial to the man who spread love of Lipscomb from his jewelry store a couple hundred yards away.

29. What Better Place for an NRA Convention? -

When the National Rifle Association announced that it would hold its 2015 convention in Nashville, the timing was propitious.

In 2010, gun sales and handgun permits were booming, and Tennessee had just enacted a controversial and contested new “guns in bars” law that allowed people with handgun permits to carry concealed firearms into bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

30. Obama, Wowed By Young Scientists, Announces New STEM Pledges -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The small Lego machine inside the White House whirred, and in a moment it was turning the pages of a story book. One page flipped, then another, ever faster as President Barack Obama marveled at its efficiency.

31. Love Song to a City -

As the story goes, Al Green wrote the lyrics to “Let’s Stay Together” in about five minutes. In 1972, the song – which spans just three minutes and 13 seconds – reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

32. Americans Striving to Find Their Place in a Global Sport -

He was supposed to be the next Andy Roddick, the next great American tennis player. That’s what they said about Ryan Harrison.

33. Justin Ford: ‘We’re On The Cusp Of Change’ -

Shelby County commission chairman Justin Ford is running for Memphis Mayor in 2015.

Ford announced his intention to challenge Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. Monday, Feb. 9, joining former county commissioner James Harvey, city council member Jim Strickland, and former University of Memphis basketball player Detric Golden in the growing field.

34. Honoring a Legacy -

The Grizzlies are in their 14th season in Memphis, and next Monday, Jan. 19, will mark the 13th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Day.

35. Nashvillians Offer Resolutions and Hopes for the New Year -

About 45 percent of Americans make New Year’s resolutions – or so says the Journal of Clinical Psychology. And one of the best ways to ensure they stick? Make them public.

So, we asked a few Nashvillians in various fields – some of whom we spoke with earlier in the year – to share their resolutions, goals or intentions for both their personal lives or businesses as well as hopes they have for the city.

36. Addressing the Post Office -

“Dear Judge Vic, I am writing about the U.S. Postal Service. My wife and me send several things each month to the same address in a major city in another state. To the home of our kids. A house we’ve stayed at. A place with a porch, where the mail guy leaves packages. A few weeks ago, we sent a box with some presents in it.

37. ‘Amazing Food’ Explosion -

John Minervini quickly turns giddy whenever he’s talking about the food scene in Memphis.

He’s such a fan of the scene, in fact, that this freelance writer and pro-Memphis foodie recently decided to start an online venture called “The Fork” he aims to make a one-stop shop where readers can read about chefs, learn about seasonal ingredients and find a new place to eat in their neighborhoods.

38. Handling the Stress of Thanksgiving Air Travel -

Do you plan on traveling over the Thanksgiving holiday? You’re not alone, as Airlines for America has projected 24.6 million passengers will travel globally on U.S. airlines during the 12-day Thanksgiving travel period.

39. Red Door Wealth Management Launches App -

Banks tend to be the ones most frequently jumping into the smartphone app game among financial services companies. But that doesn’t mean other such firms don’t see plenty to like about putting all those layers of functionality into their clients’ hands.

40. Developers Seek Permit for The Annex Lofts -

Developers are preparing to move forward with The Annex Lofts project Downtown.

Vince Smith Jr., who is teaming up with Robert Mallory, applied for a $1.6 million building permit through the city-county Office of Construction Code Enforcement to begin converting the 38,776-square-foot space at 345 S. Front St. into 23 apartments. The Annex Lofts will also include an interior courtyard and basement parking.

41. Developers Seek Permit for The Annex Lofts -

Developers are preparing to move forward with The Annex Lofts project Downtown.

Vince Smith Jr., who is teaming up with Robert Mallory, applied for a $1.6 million building permit through the city-county Office of Construction Code Enforcement to begin converting the 38,776-square-foot space at 345 S. Front St. into 23 apartments. The Annex Lofts will also include an interior courtyard and basement parking.

42. New Seat, Same Drive -

Dawn Distler was a bus driver for 10 years, but these days she does her work from the passenger seat.

Knoxville’s new director of transit, on the job since June 1, rides the Knoxville Area Transit buses often, making the most of her commute, traveling to work-related events or taking her staff on a friendly fact-finding mission.

43. Redbirds Prepare for Playoffs Appearance -

First-year Memphis Redbirds general manager Craig Unger grew up a St. Louis Cardinals fan and he spent the last five years working in the team’s front office. He even wears a huge World Series ring from the team’s 2011 championship.

44. Is It Really Time to Relax Lending Standards? -

Just when you thought it was safe to believe in the wisdom of the system, they pull this.

Back in 2008, when the Great Recession made its way into Middle Tennessee and the area began to feel the pain that other regions had endured for several years, the financial world collapsed.

45. E-Books Cut Costs for Tennessee State Students -

Tennessee State University students face higher costs, tacked on by state government, but that downer could be offset by “e-books” that can save students $735 each semester.

TSU is set to offer the electronic books to freshmen and sophomores for general education courses in an effort to lower the cost of traditional books, according to the university.

46. Class is In -

For Collierville Schools superintendent John Aitken, the demerger of public schools in Shelby County didn’t become “real” until teachers reported the week before the Aug. 4 first day of classes.

47. Real Pastime: Forgiving Our Stars -

A story on baltimoreravens.com carried the following headline: “Ravens fans give Ray Rice a standing ovation.”

48. Mr. B’s Cross-Examination -

Several years ago, a Mr. B. testified as an expert witness in a plane crash case. The lawyer cross-examining him worked awfully hard. And provided some entertainment along the way. The issue was whether the pilot should have been warned of bad weather seen earlier by six FAA employees.

49. Sick Calls Drop, But Benefits Debate Still Volatile -

The Memphis Police Department returned to normal operations Sunday, July 13, for the first time in more than a week with fewer than 350 officers calling in sick.

And the number of sick calls among Memphis firefighters dropped to 60 Sunday, the lowest total for the department since sick calls among firefighters spiked Wednesday, July 9.

50. Supreme Court: Religious Rights Trump Birth Control Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sharply divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that some companies with religious objections can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, the first time the high court has declared that businesses can hold religious views under federal law.

51. IRS to Publicize 'Bill of Rights' for Taxpayers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Internal Revenue Service wants to read taxpayers their rights.

The agency is publicizing a "Bill of Rights" for taxpayers, including the right to quality service, the right to confidentiality and the right to a fair and just tax system, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen announced Tuesday.

52. Engineer's 'Switch From Hell' Began GM Recall Woes -

DETROIT (AP) – Inside General Motors, they called it "the switch from hell."

The ignition switch on the steering column of the Chevrolet Cobalt and other small cars was so poorly designed that it easily slipped out of the run position, causing engines to stall. Engineers knew it; as early as 2004, a Cobalt stalled on a GM test track when the driver's knee grazed the key fob. By GM's admission, the defective switches caused over 50 crashes and at least 13 deaths.

53. Joerger Claims ‘Shared Vision’ With Pera -

Dave Joerger said he and Grizzlies controlling owner Robert Pera had a “shared vision” for what the franchise can accomplish going forward and that in their recent “heart-to-heart” conversation they never discussed whether Pera was close to firing Joerger early into his first season as the team’s head coach.

54. More Departures From Haslam-Owned Truck-Stop Chain -

NASHVILLE (AP) – With a year-long federal fraud investigation looming over it, the huge truck-stop chain owned by the family of the Cleveland Browns owner and Tennessee's governor is doing some housecleaning at its highest levels.

55. ‘History Has Changed’ -

The headquarters for Freedom Summer is still being set up and nearby the stage is almost ready for the March on Washington.

The almost-finished exhibit on the black power movement includes an interactive media table that is as bold as the moments and cultural history it offers.

56. Actions Should Speaker Louder Than Words -

The Sports Morality Police have pinned on their badges and are cracking down on athlete-on-athlete crime.

You know, those vicious moments where one millionaire calls another millionaire a name across the line of scrimmage in what amount to little more than a grunt.

57. WhatsApp: A $19 Billion Bet for Facebook -

NEW YORK (AP) – Facebook is placing a $19 billion bet on reaching its next billion mobile users with the acquisition of WhatsApp, a popular messaging service that lets people send texts, photos and videos on their smartphones.

58. Aging in Style -

A few weeks ago, Jill Stepherson fell in a Walgreens parking lot. Given that she is 90 years old, one or more broken bones could have been an unfortunate, but hardly unusual, outcome.

But Stepherson walked away with only bruises.

59. Farm Bill Deal Would Cut Food Stamps by 1 Percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Farm-state lawmakers are lobbying colleagues member by member, vote by vote as they push for House passage of a massive, five year farm bill that would make cuts to food stamps and continue generous subsidies for farmers.

60. Can ‘Cardinal Way’ Improve Park Attendance? -

To put it in the game’s terms, the Memphis Redbirds/AutoZone Park/St. Louis Cardinals defeated political skepticism and doubt by a score of 8-4 and saved baseball at Third and Union for many summers to come.

61. Makino Named Music Director at Opera Memphis -

Ben Makino has joined Opera Memphis as the company’s music director. The conductor and pianist, who most recently worked with the Long Beach Opera in Long Beach, Calif., previously served as the music director of Opera Memphis’ inaugural 30 Days of Opera in 2012.

62. Abundance of Diet Soda Starts Stats Revolution -

One man, one room, one micro-fridge stocked with diet soda.

In his Lawrence, Kan., home, this is where Bill James would hunker down and create his yearly “Baseball Abstract.” It was an obsessive, solitary labor of love that started a statistical revolution in baseball. It’s just that it took another generation and Brad Pitt starring in a movie inspired by a book, “Moneyball,” for much of the world to notice numbers in a new way.

63. NBA Uses More Ways to Prove ‘Numbers Don’t Lie’ -

Walk up to an ATM, and you’re on camera. Walk into a convenience store, and you’re on camera. Walk onto an NBA court during game time, and you’re not only on camera but every movement you make – or don’t make – will be tracked, sifted, analyzed.

64. Appeals Court Upholds Dismissal of 'Soul Man' Suit -

Sam Moore may be "The Legendary Soul Man," but a federal appeals court says he doesn't have sole use of the title.

65. Appeals Court Upholds Dismissal of 'Soul Man' Suit -

Sam Moore may be "The Legendary Soul Man," but a federal appeals court says he doesn't have sole use of the title.

66. Williams Honored by Tennessee Urban Forestry Council -

Laurie Williams, adult education coordinator at Memphis Botanic Garden, was recently awarded the Tennessee Urban Forestry Council’s President’s Award for her contribution to establishing and maintaining viable community forests in Tennessee. Williams was one of seven individuals the urban forestry council honored this year.

67. State Lags for Women in Corporate Positions -

Tennessee’s corporate boards are showing slow growth in gender diversity levels, although rankings are still among the lowest in the nation, according to the latest findings of an annual study.

Expert opinions vary on how strongly the statistics reflect corporate vitality in Tennessee on a broader scale.

68. Events -

National Hispanic Professional Organization-Memphis will meet Thursday, Oct. 17, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Hilton Memphis, 939 Ridge Lake Blvd. Barbara Prescott, executive director of PeopleFirst, will speak. Cost is $20 for nonmembers. RSVP to info@nhpomemphis.us or 466-6476.

69. GOP House: Keep Government Open, Hit 'Obamacare' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Charting a collision course with the White House, the Republican-controlled House approved legislation Friday to wipe out the three-year-old health care law that President Barack Obama has vowed to preserve – and simultaneously prevent a partial government shutdown that neither party claims to want.

70. Bigger Joins TriMetis as Business Development Specialist -

Lauren Bigger has joined preclinical services company TriMetis, a subsidiary of Memphis Bioworks Foundation, as a business development specialist. In her new role, Bigger will work with the operations and scientific teams to drive new projects for the TriMetis specialized laboratory and manage the sales and protocol review processes.

71. Rhodes Program Spotlights Community Service -

Rhodes College’s efforts to make community involvement an important part of student life was recently on display with its second annual REACH (Research, Engagement, and Community History) Symposium held in the Blount Auditorium of Buckman Hall.

72. Industry Finalizing New Mobile App Guidelines -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Industry groups and privacy advocates on Thursday were near agreement on voluntary guidelines for mobile apps that should make it easier for consumers to know what personal information is getting sucked from their smartphone or tablet and passed along to marketers.

73. Supreme Court Halts Use of Key Part of Voting Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A deeply divided Supreme Court threw out the most powerful part of the landmark Voting Rights Act on Tuesday, a decision deplored by the White House but cheered by mostly Southern states now free from nearly 50 years of intense federal oversight of their elections.

74. Supreme Court Makes it Harder to Sue Businesses -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sharply divided Supreme Court on Monday decided to make it harder for Americans to sue businesses for retaliation and discrimination, leading a justice to call for Congress to overturn the court's actions.

75. Former IRS Chief: Can't Say How Targeting Happened -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The man who led the Internal Revenue Service when it was giving extra scrutiny to tea party and other conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status told Congress on Tuesday that he knew little about what was happening while he was still commissioner.

76. Chamber Prepares to Celebrate 175 Years -

Despite arriving this year at the ripe old age of 175, the Greater Memphis Chamber still has a spring in its step.

When the chamber blows out the candles, so to speak, during its milestone bash Friday, April 12, at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, the event will underscore the organization’s storied history, which predates the Civil War. This year also sees the continuation of the chamber’s push to be more of a civic force in the community, helping to bring together government and private businesses.

77. Restored Video Shows James Earl Ray in Memphis -

MEMPHIS (AP) – Newly-restored videotapes showing James Earl Ray's return to Memphis to face trial for the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. have been released on the 45th anniversary of the civil rights leader's death.

78. Events -

The University of Memphis School of Public Health will host Dr. John Dreyzehner, Tennessee Commissioner of Health, for “Public Health is Everybody’s Business” Tuesday, Jan. 15, from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the FedEx Institute of Technology fishbowl room 203, 365 Innovation Drive. Visit memphis.edu/sph for details.

79. Debt Drama -

One of the common refrains among money managers and economists in Memphis is that the nation’s political leaders spend too much time wrestling with crises and not enough actually solving problems.

Case in point: in a few weeks, the federal government will have reached the limit of its authorized borrowing capacity, the so-called “debt ceiling.” In truth, that moment already has come, but the U.S. Treasury Department has some procedural room to maneuver to keep things going for a few more weeks.

80. Events -

The Memphis Chapter International Association of Administrative Professionals will meet Monday, Jan. 14, at 6 p.m. at Memphis Marriott East, 5795 Poplar Ave. Pamela D. Pitts, financial adviser with Waddell & Reed Inc., will discuss financial planning and investments. Cost is $22. R.S.V.P. to Sharon Gardner at sharon.gardner@asentinel.com or 752-6213.

81. McLain Joins Counterpart in Copywriting Role -

Rebekah McLain has joined Counterpart Communication Design as copywriter. In her new role, McLain will write copy for print and websites, with areas of expertise including higher education, security and disability law, neuropsychology and hospitality.

82. School Board Divisions Resurface -

Countywide school board members already had a lot on their agenda Tuesday, Dec. 18, when they were surprised by an internal ethics investigation.

Near the beginning of this week’s meeting, school board member Martavius Jones offered a resolution calling on board member David Pickler to resign over money put aside by school districts under the Tennessee School Boards Association to cover the liability of other post-employment benefits (OPEB).

83. Local Students Give Back With Literacy Program -

A lot of people have good ideas that could change the world, or at a little piece of it. But often those ideas never quite turn into action.

Two Memphis University School seniors – basketball player Jonathan Wilfong and football player and wrestler Andrew Renshaw – had just such a good idea. Inspired by “Caddy for a Cure,” in which an individual makes a donation to a charity and in turn gets to caddy for a PGA golfer, they created “Coaching for Literacy – The Assistant Coach Program for Promoting Literacy.”

84. Michigan House Approves Right-to-Work Limiting Unions -

LANSING, Mich. (AP) – The Michigan House approved the first of two right-to-work bills Tuesday that would weaken union power in the historical labor stronghold as hundreds of protesters rallied at the Capitol.

85. Things That Matter -

This morning I read in the news that John Gagliardi, the somewhat maverick coach of the St. John’s “Johnnies” Division III football team, is retiring after 64 years of coaching. In addition to holding the record for coaching longevity, there is one more little thing about Gagliardi that is worth noting. Let’s talk a little about football history.

86. Serving Memphis -

The hospitality industry is the nation’s largest private sector employer, yet many in its workforce do not have access to affordable and consistent health care, education opportunities or financial mentoring.

87. IP Looks to Future Following Temple-Inland Acquisition -

When International Paper Co. moved its headquarters to Memphis in 1987 it was an economic development milestone for Shelby County.

88. Cherry Back to Roots at Dunavant Enterprises -

Russel Cherry, longtime general counsel at Dunavant Enterprises Inc., grew up in a family that raised sporting dogs and had originally planned to be a veterinarian.

89. Back to the Gridiron -

It was the last day before fall practice would begin. First-year University of Memphis football coach Justin Fuente couldn’t wait to get started.

“This is the longest day of the year,” he said.

90. Literacy Mid-South’s Dean Appointed to State Coalition -

Kevin Dean, executive director of Literacy Mid-South, has been appointed to the Tennessee Literacy Coalition’s board of directors. The board unanimously approved Dean’s nomination, and he will serve as a representative from West Tennessee for three years.

91. High Court Rejects Part of Arizona Immigration Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court threw out key provisions of Arizona's crackdown on illegal immigrants Monday but said a much-debated portion could go forward – that police must check the status of people stopped for various reasons who might appear to be in the U.S. illegally.

92. Nothing Wrong With Occasional Flip-Flopping -

So, I heard today that John Kerry is going to play the role of Mitt Romney in President Barack Obama’s debate preparation sessions. Hearing this made me think of an article I read years ago titled “The Dog Handler” published in Time Magazine.

93. Trial, Error Led Local Writer to Gray Man Series -

In the modern American thriller, the good guys don’t come much tougher than Court Gentry.

He is an ex-CIA super spy forced to elude waves of hit teams, survive a shoot-on-sight sanction from the CIA and tussle with crime bosses, drug lords and plenty of other baddies thanks to the hyper-kinetic imagination of Memphis writer Mark Greaney.

94. Hunter Brings Unique Teaching Methods To The Martin Institute Conference -

John Hunter teaches only two days a week. That’s because the fourth-grade teacher from Charlottesville, Va., is now on the road a lot. He and his World Peace Game that teaches critical thinking skills and collaboration are the subject of a 2010 movie documentary that has garnered a lot of attention.

95. 150 Years Later: City’s Role Remembered -

The 150th anniversary of the Civil War arrived in Memphis this week with plans to return cannons to Confederate Park and lots of contemporary views about the battle of Memphis in which no cannons were fired from land.

96. Executive Coach Burtch Earns Int’l Designation -

Bill Burtch, founder and president of full-service management consultancy firm Harmony Coaching & Consulting, has received the Professional Certified Coach designation from the International Coach Federation, becoming the second PCC in Memphis. Burtch, who also holds the Senior Professional in Human Resources designation, focuses his consulting work in executive/team coaching, professional development training and human resources consulting.

97. Semmes-Murphey Turns 100, Looks to Next Century of Care -

Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute this year celebrates a century of improving the quality of care for patients with neurological and spine disorders.

The Memphis-based institute, which today employs about 275 people – including about 40 doctors – was founded in 1912 by Dr. Eustace Semmes and Dr. Francis Murphey.

98. McFarland Named VP At Visible Music College -

Christy McFarland has been named the vice president of business at Visible Music College. Previously the director of marketing, McFarland will now oversee VMC’s marketing/public relations, business and operational functions.

99. Harris Named Payroll Specialist At New Patrick Payroll Div. -

Tammy Harris has been named the payroll specialist at Patrick Payroll, a newly branded division of the certified public accounting firm Patrick Accounting and Tax Services PLLC. Patrick Payroll is housed in Patrick Accounting’s office in Germantown.

100. Garrett to Head Adult Programs At Literacy Mid-South -

Alfred Garrett has been promoted to director of adult programs at Literacy Mid-South. Previously the adult programs manager, Garrett’s new role will include establishing and maintaining program delivery policies, evaluating effectiveness and measuring outcomes for the nonprofit organization’s adult programs.