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Editorial Results (free)

1. Seeing the Light -

Four years ago, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell was in Knoxville for a college football game. But with several hours before kickoff, he took a side trip to view the green initiatives at the Knox County Jail.

2. Memphis, Nashville Mayors Praise Passage of Haslam’s Road Funding Bill -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland lauded the Tennessee Legislature for passing the IMPROVE Act, including a combination of fuel tax and fee increases designed to improve transportation funding.

3. View From the Hill: Tearful End for Non-Citizen Tuition Relief Bill -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari grew so emotional she couldn’t speak. On the verge of tears, the Memphis Democrat started to talk about a high school from her Shelby County district with a large number of undocumented immigrant students.

4. Harris: Syrian Air Strikes Should Change State’s Stance on Refugees -

State Sen. Lee Harris is calling on the Legislature to rethink its stance on refugees amid legal action taken against the federal government after President Donald Trump ordered an air strike against Syria.

5. Harris: Syrian Air Strikes Should Change State’s Stance on Refugees -

State Sen. Lee Harris is calling on the Legislature to rethink its stance on refugees amid legal action taken against the federal government after President Donald Trump ordered an air strike against Syria.

6. GOP Happy to ‘Wait and See’ on Medicaid -

Republicans say ho, Democrats say go. In the wake of Trumpcare’s congressional crash, states such as Kansas and North Carolina are joining the majority of the nation in expanding Medicaid rolls.

7. IMPROVE Act Moves Closer to Passage -

With hardly a peep of discontent from lawmakers, the governor’s IMPROVE Act containing fuel-tax increases and a host of tax cuts moved out of the House Local Government Committee today.

It heads next to a House Finance committee, where the bill’s sponsor, Rep. Barry Doss, predicts it won’t face a fight.

8. Norris Says Proposed School Voucher Legislation ‘Problematic’ -

NASHVILLE – Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris expressed reservations Wednesday, March 15, about legislation allowing tax dollars to be used to send low-income students in struggling public schools to private schools.

9. Last Word: Milhaus Sells, Voucher Debate Gets Heated and Boyd's Fly Around -

Highland Row isn’t fully open yet and it is already up for sale as part of a real estate portfolio. The owner, Milhaus, based in Indianapolis, is a development, construction and property management company that works in mixed use development. And the portfolio being on the market could turn into a recapitalization.

10. Tennessee Sues Federal Government Over Refugee Program -

NASHVILLE – The state of Tennessee, spearheaded by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris, filed suit against the federal government Monday, March 13, challenging the constitutionality of the Refugee Resettlement Program.

11. Tennessee Sues Federal Government Over Refugee Program -

NASHVILLE – The state of Tennessee, spearheaded by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris, filed suit against the federal government Monday, March 13, challenging the constitutionality of the Refugee Resettlement Program.

12. Local Democratic and Republican Partisans Already Looking To 2018 -

U.S. Rep. David Kustoff says former Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey was right in describing his 8th Congressional District as the most Republican of the state’s nine congressional districts.

13. Local Democrats and Republicans Prepare for 2018 Governor's Race -

At least five potential Republican candidates for Tennessee governor in 2018 were among the crowd of 400 people at the Saturday, Feb. 25, Lincoln Day Gala of the Shelby County Republican Party.

Meanwhile, Nashville Mayor Megan Barry told a group of 150 Democrats at an “Obama Day” event Saturday that they and other Democrats across the state can elect one of their own as governor in 2018.

14. View From the Hill: Outsourcing, Rates Worry Park Fans -

Dunlap resident Kathy Gilbert opposes privatization of Fall Creek Falls on a number of fronts.

If a vendor comes in to run the state park, as planned by Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration, she’s worried about the possible loss of jobs or pay and benefits by state employees, the funneling of revenue to private investors and the raising of rates at the state park’s lodge when it’s rebuilt, potentially making it less affordable for families to visit.

15. Norris Plans White House Trip To Discuss Refugee Resettlement -

NASHVILLE – State Sen. Mark Norris is planning a White House visit to discuss the direction of refugee resettlement despite a federal judge’s ruling blocking President Trump’s immigration and refugee moratorium.

16. View From the Hill: Haslam Plan Tilts Broadband Playing Field -

State Reps. Pat Marsh and Art Swann emerged from a meeting underwhelmed by Gov. Bill Haslam’s legislation to spread broadband internet access across Tennessee.

“I thought there would be a lot more to it,” says Marsh, a Shelbyville Republican, calling the proposal “a drop in the bucket” financially but at least a starting point.

17. Last Word: Haslam To Talk Gas Tax, Rallings Talks Protesters and Beale Street -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam talks gas tax Wednesday in Nashville. Actually, he will be rolling out his full list of legislative priorities in the capitol. But much of the attention will be on what he proposes in the way of the state’s gas tax – something he’s talked about but not committed a specific position to for the last two years.

18. Editorial: Increase the State Gas Tax And Prevent Poaching -

Lamar Avenue to the Mississippi state line is arguably one of the most significant 5-mile stretches of road in the country.

That’s what state Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville said seven months ago as he and Tennessee transportation commissioner John Schroer gathered with local leaders by the side of the road to announce all were behind an application for $180 million in federal funding for Lamar.

19. McNally Voted Tennessee Senate Speaker -

Promising to maintain Tennessee’s strong fiscal standing, veteran legislator Randy McNally of Oak Ridge took the gavel Tuesday as Senate speaker, replacing Ron Ramsey, who over the last decade led a Republican majority to power in the Tennessee General Assembly.

20. Trump’s Turn -

If the election of Donald Trump was a mystery, there are even more questions about what will he do once he takes office Jan. 20. The clues may or may not be in the conduct of his campaign.

“Donald Trump campaigned without being tied to the traditional parameters of conservative-liberal dialogue that we’ve come to know over the past 20 or 30 years,” said Memphis attorney John Ryder, who is legal counsel to the Republican National Committee. “The hopeful part about that is that allows him to move past those divisions and enter new territory.”

21. Last Word: Booksellers Options, New Parking Spaces and The Memphis Open -

Somewhere in the back of our minds, I think most of us knew there were probably some circumstances under which Booksellers at Laurelwood might remain open. And as it turns out there are some terms the owner is talking about just past the post-New Year’s shock of work that the store will close in February.

22. New Year, New Resolutions for Legislators -

Some Tennesseans recall the days when the state Legislature met every other year and wonder if it should revert to that schedule. Considering the General Assembly pushes most of its work into 3 1/2 months, it might be worth a try.

23. Reid Inaugurated as President Of WestTNHBA Board -

James Reid, president of Memphis-based homebuilder Reid Homes Inc., has been inaugurated as board president of the West Tennessee Home Builders Association. Reid previously served as the 2016 vice president of the WestTNHBA executive committee and chairman of the 2016 VESTA Home Show.

24. Refugee Lawsuit Proceeds in Spite of Obstacles -

Tennessee is going “full speed ahead” in a challenge of the federal Refugee Resettlement Program despite threats by President-elect Donald Trump to dismantle it or, at the least, stop the flow of refugees from terrorist-linked countries.

25. This Week in Memphis History: Nov. 25-Dec. 1 -

2015: Republican presidential contender John Kasich is in Memphis for a fundraiser at the home of Brad Martin. It is one of two fundraisers that evening – the other is for state Senate Republican leader Mark Norris who is considering a bid for Tennessee governor in 2018.

26. Last Word: The Curses, Early Voting's Last Day and Midtown Kroger's First Day -

The goat, the curse, whatever you choose to call it – it’s over for the Cubs who are baseball’s world champions. And even in this basketball town, there is something about the tradition of baseball that commands attention. But alas October belongs to the political surprise in Presidential races exclusively as once again the World Series is decided in November.

27. BCBS Bombshell Leaves Insurance Seekers in Bind -

Nashville resident Jennifer Murray is caught in the snare of uncertainty looming over Tennessee health insurance coverage.

Self-employed as a health care consultant, the single 48-year-old bought individual coverage through BlueCross BlueShield Tennessee’s marketplace plans each year since the Affordable Care Act took effect in 2014. The company offered the widest range of physicians, and its insurance was accepted in most places.

28. Last Word: Z Bo and the Second Unit, Gannettized and the Electoral College -

Zach Randolph will not be starting for the Grizz this season as the post-Grit & Grind era enters the “Second Unit” chapter.

It will be interesting to see fan reaction Thursday at the Forum when the Grizz play Atlanta in another pre-season game. Randolph did not start Monday night’s pre-season opener against Orlando either.

29. Suburban Challengers Emerge at Filing Deadline For November Ballot -

Thirteen incumbents in the four suburban municipal elections on the Nov. 8 ballot were effectively re-elected to new terms at the Thursday, Aug. 18, filing deadline for the set of 30 races.

And Chris Denson claimed a seat on the Millington School Board with no opposition for the position incumbent Donald Holsinger is giving up to run for alderman in Millington.

30. Suburban Challengers Emerge at Filing Deadline For November Ballot -

Thirteen incumbents in the four sets of suburban municipal elections on the Nov. 8 ballot were effectively re-elected to new terms at the Thursday, Aug. 18, filing deadline for the set of 30 races.

31. Collierville, Millington Mayoral Races Top Suburban Ballots in November -

The mayors of Collierville and Millington are running for re-election on the November ballot and as the noon Thursday, Aug. 18, filing deadline approaches for the Bartlett, Germantown, Collierville and Millington municipal ballots the two mayors have challengers.

32. What Would It Take for Trump to Lose Tennessee Voters? -

Murfreesboro Realtor Larry Sims almost closes his ears when Donald Trump speaks.

“He gets out of bounds. Of course, the press, they love it because they get to exploit his sayings and doings,” says Sims, who traveled to Cleveland, Ohio, as a Trump delegate for the Republican National Convention. 

33. Lamar Avenue Grant Gets State’s Sole Focus -

The Lamar Avenue improvement project waiting for years to get started could be about to emerge from the planning stage to construction.

And if the state gets a $180 million federal grant in August, it could compress the timeline from a decade-long project to four or five years of construction. The state is currently acquiring rights of way.

34. State Applies for $180 Million Lamar Avenue Federal Grant -

The Lamar Avenue road project waiting for years to get started could be about to emerge from the planning stage to construction.

And if the state gets a $180 million federal grant in August, it could compress the timeline from a decade-long project to four or five years of construction. The state is currently acquiring rights of way.

35. Local, State Leaders to Make Lamar Avenue Announcement Tuesday -

The Lamar Avenue road project waiting for years to get started could be about to emerge from the planning stage to construction with a federal grant.

State and local leaders will gather in the heart of the busy freight corridor Tuesday, June 21, for a “major announcement.”

36. Haves, Have-Nots Get Varied Tax Relief -

Amid the rancor of bathroom and counseling bills, two major pieces of legislation slipped through the General Assembly this session with hardly a peep – elimination of the Hall tax and a partial revitalization of property tax relief for seniors and disabled veterans.

37. Geater Claims Dunavant Honor for Job Without a Description -

Lisa Geater likens the job of the Memphis City Council’s staff to being wallpaper. After 27 years working in the council office at City Hall, including 20 as the administrator running the office, Geater said her advice for new staff members was simple.

38. Norris Recounts Path to Majority Status, Dunavant Award -

Good government isn’t a bowl of cherries. There will be controversy even with the best of intentions and with everything done by the numbers. And that applies to those who win awards like state Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville.

39. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

40. 8th Congressional District Primaries Draw 22 Contenders, 13 Republican -

The Republican primary race to fill the 8th District Congressional seat Republican incumbent Stephen Fincher is giving up drew a field of 13 contenders – seven from Shelby County and four from Jackson, Tennessee – at the Thursday, April 7, noon filing deadline for the Aug. 4 ballot.

41. Can GOP Keep Grasp On Success Ramsey Built? -

As much as Tennessee Republicans want to put a happy face on the departure of Senate Speaker and Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey, holding it together in the wake of his departure will be an awesome task.

42. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

43. Higher-Ed Shuffle Stokes Fears of UT-TSU Merger -

Anthony Joshua, who moved to Nashville from Madison, Wis., to attend Tennessee State University, says he’s worried his historically black institution could be in for serious change – for the worse.

44. Complex path to higher-ed reform -

Only half a year after taking on the presidency of Motlow State Community College, Anthony Kinkel is trying to keep his eye on the pea.

The task of running one of the state’s fastest-growing community colleges is becoming increasingly complex, and it has nothing to do with thousands more students enrolling to take advantage of free tuition through the Tennessee Promise scholarship program.

45. Complex Path to Higher-Ed Reform -

Only half a year after taking on the presidency of Motlow State Community College, Anthony Kinkel is trying to keep his eye on the pea.

The task of running one of the state’s fastest-growing community colleges is becoming increasingly complex, and it has nothing to do with thousands more students enrolling to take advantage of free tuition through the Tennessee Promise scholarship program.

46. Measure Increasing Seat Belt Fines Among New Tennessee Laws -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Motorists in Tennessee who don't buckle up could face stiffer fines under one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect Friday.

The tougher seat belt law increases the fine for first-time offenders from $10 to $25 and from $20 to $50 for repeat offenders.

47. Refugees, Regents, Privatization On Tap for New Session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

48. Autonomy Comes With Risk for State’s Universities -

Tennessee officials are lauding Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure higher education in an effort to meet his goals for the Drive to 55.

The FOCUS Act proposed recently by the Republican governor to make sure 55 percent of Tennesseans hold a degree or postsecondary certificate by 2025 promises to launch a new era for the state’s colleges and universities.

49. Haslam Uses Lamar Backdrop To Make Road Funding Case -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam still thinks it’s too early to talk about how to pay for a $6.1 billion list of 181 state road projects in 62 counties across the state.

But after saying that Monday, Nov. 9, in Memphis, Haslam then made the case for a gas tax hike.

50. Haslam Uses Lamar Backdrop To Make Road Funding Case -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam still thinks it’s too early to talk about how to pay for a $6.1 billion list of 181 state road projects in 62 counties across the state.

But after saying that Monday, Nov. 9, in Memphis, Haslam then made the case for a gas tax hike.

51. Mathes Takes Helm at Community Legal Center -

Longtime attorney Anne Mathes has been named executive director of the nonprofit Community Legal Center, which has been providing civil legal services to lower-income Memphians for more than 20 years. In addition to civil cases and divorces, the CLC collaborates with other agencies to serve victims of domestic violence and elder abuse. They also take some immigration cases.

52. Is State’s Role to Provide a Service or Turn a Profit? -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam appears to be on the brink of privatizing state government. But he won’t be able to do it without a battle, especially from university unions and Democratic lawmakers.

53. Haslam Cites Mixed Signals on Gas Tax Hike For Roads -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam two weeks ago kicked off his statewide tour in Memphis, pushing for a better method of funding state road projects.

Some in the audience of business and civic leaders at the Greater Memphis Chamber had talked with Haslam and Tennessee transportation commissioner John Schroer before about the state’s fuel tax and had urged state officials to raise the tax. And some wanted to talk about it again Aug. 5 as Haslam emphasized the state’s $6 billion backlog of transportation projects.

54. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

55. Walter Awarded AAF Silver Medal -

Ronald A. Walter, president and general manager of WREG-TV, has been chosen to receive AAF Memphis’ 2015 Silver Medal, the highest form of individual recognition given by local chapters of the American Advertising Federation. The annual award, which honors an exceptional leader for a career of outstanding accomplishment and contribution in the industry, will be presented at AAF Memphis’ luncheon Jan. 29 at 11:30 a.m. at Memphis Botanic Garden.

56. Pitts-Murdock Leading Library’s Teen Services -

R. Janae Pitts-Murdock has been named coordinator of teen services for the Memphis Public Library and Information Center, a role in which she’s responsible for coordinating teen programs, partnerships and special initiatives across 18 locations.

57. Panel Hears Testimony on EPA Regulations -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee Republican senator has joined lawmakers in other states who have filed legislation that seeks to curtail federal regulation.

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville discussed the resolution on Tuesday during a special joint committee meeting on the effect of Environmental Protection Agency regulations in Tennessee.

58. Entrepreneur Day Spotlights Power of Innovation -

Already in recent weeks, Moziah “Mo” Bridges, the 12-year-old founder of the Memphis-based Mo’s Bows bow tie business, has appeared on the hit ABC show “Shark Tank.”

If the exposure alone wasn’t enough, Bridges also impressed fashion mogul and “Shark Tank” panelist Daymond John into offering to mentor him.

59. Haslam Free Tuition Plan Garners Praise, Concern -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's signature proposal this year, a program that would cover a full ride at two-year colleges for any high school graduate, appears on track to pass as lawmakers enter the waning days of the legislative session. The details, however – including how to pay for this perk in the years to come – remain scattered.

60. Failed Education Bills to Return in New Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – Proponents of revamping education laws in Tennessee cite a recent report that ranked the state's students tops in the nation in academic improvement as proof that recent reforms are working and more should be considered.

61. Leadership Selections Next for Suburban School Boards -

For five of the six municipal schools boards that began taking office this week, their only formal involvement in the talks that led to agreements on school buildings and ending the federal lawsuit that threatened to hold up their start dates was to approve the agreements already negotiated.

62. Filing Deadline Nears for School Board Races -

It looks as if the prospective candidates in many of the suburban school board races on the Nov. 7 ballot had already decided the winners a day away from the noon, Thursday, Sept. 26, filing deadline for the six sets of races.

63. Economist Outlines US Freight Network at Intermodal Conference -

The Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute at the University of Memphis welcomed a distinguished list of guest speakers to its seventh annual Intermodal Freight Conference at the FedEx Institute of Technology Tuesday, Sept. 24.

64. Job Training Spurs Unilever Growth -

The Unilever USA plant in Covington should be the largest ice cream manufacturing plant in the world by 2016, following an $108.7 million expansion announced last week in Covington.

But when the global company began making ice cream in Covington in 2011 at what used to be a SlimFast plant, it was not a promising beginning.

65. Intermodal Conference to Tackle Freight Issues -

The Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute at the University of Memphis will host its seventh annual Intermodal Freight Conference at the FedEx Institute of Technology on the University of Memphis campus Tuesday, Sept. 24.

66. Moore Rejoins Girls Inc. as President/CEO -

Lisa Moore recently joined Girls Inc. of Memphis as president/CEO, returning to the organization where she began her career in the late 1980s. In her new role, Moore said, she will provide leadership and support to equip Girls Inc. of Memphis to effectively and efficiently fulfill its mission of equipping all girls to live strong, smart and bold.

67. Conference to Bridge Gap Between Employers, Training Programs -

Out of the near-crisis in hiring workers after the city’s set of economic development plums in the last three years came a workforce training formula that has worked.

But many of the city’s companies aren’t aware of that formula or the existing programs that grew out of what amounted to an emergency response by local leaders. That’s according to a recent survey of manufacturing company leaders by the Greater Memphis Chamber.

68. Advisory Board to Examine Community Health Needs -

Dr. David Stern, executive dean of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine, has launched a unique effort to address community health needs in Memphis.

“It’s my belief that a medical school has a very unique opportunity to interact with the community,” Stern said. “I consider our community to be a very important laboratory – it is an underserved, minority community that is in ill health. The biggest contribution we can make is to move the needle on overall community health and to develop new methods that we can apply to other communities like Memphis.”

69. Failed Education Bills on Radar for Next Session -

NASHVILLE (AP) – In the last few years, Tennessee hasn't shied away from contentious education initiatives as it seeks to remain at the forefront of education reform in the nation.

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan has even characterized the state's efforts as "courageous leadership."

70. Hopson Heads Both School Systems -

The city and county school systems have a single school superintendent less than five months from the start of the first school year of the consolidated school system in Shelby County.

Interim Memphis City Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson was appointed interim Shelby County Schools superintendent at the first countywide school board meeting since the board approved a buyout last week of county schools superintendent John Aitken.

71. Supermarket Wine Bill Advances by 1 Vote in Senate -

NASHVILLE (AP) – A proposal to allow wine to be sold in Tennessee supermarkets and convenience stores scored its first legislative victory on Tuesday after years of frustration.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee voted 5-4 to advance the bill that would allow cities and counties to hold referendums next year to decide whether to expand wine sales beyond the state's nearly 600 licensed liquor stores.

72. Merger Again Intersects With Nashville -

For a third consecutive year in Nashville, the Shelby County schools merger and the suburban reaction to it are on the calendar of the Tennessee legislature.

As the General Assembly finished its legislative week Thursday, Feb. 14, state Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville introduced several bills, some of them captions to be added to as needed that would make suburban municipal school districts possible.

73. Kyle Wants GOP Senate Caucus Meetings Open -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The top Democrat in the state Senate is calling on Republicans to make the upper chamber of the General Assembly subject to open government laws, saying he wants to see more transparency in government.

74. Obama Carries Shelby, Cohen Over Flinn and Two Tax Hikes Defeated -

President Barack Obama carried Shelby County in unofficial Nov. 6 election returns as his Republican challenger Mitt Romney took the state’s 11 electoral votes.

Voter turnout in the most popular election cycle among Shelby County voters was 61.9 percent, about the same percentage as four years ago. But the 371,256 voters is fewer than 2008 when more than 400,000 Shelby County voters cast ballots. The percentage is about the same because there are fewer registered voters in Shelby County than there were four years ago after a purge by election officials.

75. Events -

Cannon Wright Blount will present “Getting Started With QuickBooks: Learn From the Experts” Wednesday, Oct. 10, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at its office 756 Ridge Lake Blvd., suite 100. Cost is $75. Visit cannonwrightblount.com or email quickbooks@cannonwrightblount.com.

76. Suburban School Board Races Almost Set -

Races on the Nov. 6 ballot for six sets of suburban school boards took shape Thursday, Aug. 16, at the noon filing deadline for candidate qualifying petitions.

The candidates that made the deadline have another week to withdraw from the races if they wish.

77. Congestion Woes -

Tennessee Transportation Commissioner John Schroer told the Regional Logistics Council Thursday, Aug. 2, that his office has the “right priority list” of road projects for the Memphis area.

78. Lost Crosswords: Part 2 -

This is Part 2 of a series. Don’t miss Part 1, next week. (I know what order series normally go in! Get over it already!)

Maggie the Cheagle and I decided to watch “Lost” again. Last year, we watched for the first time, with Susan along for the ride. We went through all six seasons in about two months.

79. School Board Moves Toward Superintendent Pick -

At the start of another five-hour countywide school board meeting Tuesday, June 26, Jim Boyd of the schools consolidation planning commission set the stage for a busy night on several fronts.

80. County Commission Files Motion to Stop Muni Schools Votes -

The Shelby County Commission is asking Memphis Federal Court Judge Hardy Mays to call off the Aug. 2 referendums in all six Shelby County suburbs on forming municipal school districts.

And the commission, in a motion to file a third party complaint, wants Mays to declare unconstitutional the state laws permitting a move to municipal school districts before the consolidation of Shelby County’s two public school systems in August 2013.

81. Countywide School Board To Discuss Future Supt. -

When countywide school board members resume a still-preliminary discussion Tuesday, June 19, about who should be superintendent of the merged public school system to come, they will have another opinion to consider.

82. Jackson Lewis Adds Attorneys, Plans More -

The Memphis office of workplace law firm Jackson Lewis LLP is on a tear. The firm has brought four new attorneys, for example, on board since December. That brings the current total to nine – up from three when the firm opened its doors here in 2008.

83. Cohen-Hart in Congressional Race at Filing Deadline -

The chairman of the countywide school board, Billy Orgel, was effectively elected to his District 7 school board seat without opposition at the Thursday, April 5, filing deadline for candidates on the Aug. 2 primary and general election ballot in Shelby County.

84. Municipal Schools Bill Amendment Surfaces -

As the Tennessee House education subcommittee was meeting in Nashville Wednesday, March 29, it was where most of those involved in the local schools reformation saga were focusing their attention.

And the center of their attention was a bill lifting the statewide ban on the creation of municipal school districts.

85. Deadline Looms for Complex Aug. Elections -

The August elections were already going to be more complex than usual. There are the changes from this year’s drawing of new district lines for the Tennessee Legislature and the U.S. House of Representatives.

86. Muni School District Votes on Hold -

At week’s end, the move to municipal school districts had slowed for a possible pit stop in Shelby County Chancery Court.

And efforts in the Tennessee Legislature to check a possible legal challenge of the state law that allows the suburban school districts specifically in Shelby County encountered some vocal non-Memphis resistance in the House Education Subcommittee.

87. Cohen Concerned Over Redistricting -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Memphis, got a closer look over the weekend at the proposed set of new district lines for his congressional district.

88. Cohen Expresses Concern Over Redistricting -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, D-Memphis, got a closer look over the weekend at the proposed set of new district lines for his congressional district.

89. First Schools Meeting Addresses Blueprint -

The two groups that will do much of the political and organizational heavy lifting in the consolidation of Shelby County’s two public school systems first will do a lot of listening in the weeks to come.

90. Schools Consolidation Saga Turns Corner -

Where does a 23-member countywide school board meet? “FedExForum is open,” replied Shelby County Schools board chairman David Pickler last week to the question from fellow board member David Reaves.

91. Allie Prescott to Head U of M Alumni Association -

Allie Prescott has been elected president of the University of Memphis Alumni Association national executive board of directors.

Prescott holds his bachelor’s and law degrees from the U of M, and he is a life member of the University of Memphis Alumni Association. As a former adviser to the executive director and former vice president for membership, Prescott is serving his fifth year on the national board.

92. Deadline Looms for School Board Plans -

Attorneys on several sides of the schools consolidation lawsuit have until the end of Friday, Aug. 12, to submit their plans to Federal Judge Hardy Mays for a redrawn countywide school board that includes proportional representation for Memphians.

93. Decision Leaves Board Question Unanswered -

Attorneys for all of the sides in the schools consolidation court case have a Friday, Aug. 12, deadline that will set the stage for the next crucial part of the landmark court case.

What does a new countywide school board look like and when is there a transition to that school board?

94. Shelby County School Board Meets Wed. On Schools Case -

Shelby County school board members meet Wed., Aug. 10 at 3 p.m. in special session to weigh their next move now that a federal judge has ruled in the schools consolidation lawsuit.

The meeting comes two days before all sides in the lawsuit are to submit their proposals for a new countywide school board that would play a pivotal role in a transition to consolidating Shelby County's two public school systems by Aug. 2013.

95. Consolidation Case Deadline Arrives -

It’s been briefed several times over, unsuccessfully mediated three times and adorned with a fresh supply of depositions.

And Thursday, June 30, is the deadline for all of the material all of the sides in the schools consolidation case want U.S. District Court Judge Hardy Mays to consider in making a decision.

96. Barnes & Noble Q4 Loss Larger Than Expected -

NEW YORK (AP) – Barnes & Noble reported a larger fourth-quarter loss than analysts expected Tuesday as the bookseller continues to invest in its e-book reader Nook and as liquidation sales by rival Borders hurt its revenue.

97. Malone's Barnes & Noble Bid a Bet on the Nook -

NEW YORK (AP) – Why buy a bookstore?

John Malone, who made a fortune in cable television, is offering $1 billion for Barnes & Noble – trying to jump into a business so sick that its No. 2 competitor, Borders Group Inc., is on life support.

98. Mays Hears First Arguments in Schools Consolidation Case -

Federal Judge Hardy Mays heard arguments and testimony Thursday from all sides in the schools consolidation lawsuit.

Shelby County schools superintendent John Aitken and Shelby County Commissioners Walter Bailey and Mike Carpenter testified as part of tracing the chronology of what has and hasn’t happened in terms of moves toward schools consolidation in recent months. They also testified about the intentions behind their actions. Bailey and Carpenter were grilled about the reasoning behind the commission’s decision to appoint a 25-member countywide school board.

99. Cash Says New Contract Solidifies Reform Decision -

For Memphis City Schools superintendent Dr. Kriner Cash, his two-year contract extension – approved Monday night – is an endorsement of his reform agenda and more time to work on that agenda in a shifting political environment.

100. Cash Gets Contract Extension From MCS Board -

Memphis City Schools superintendent Dr. Kriner Cash’s contract has been extended by the MCS board up to the Aug. 2013 transition date for schools consolidation.

The MCS board voted 7-0 for the contract extension which follows a similar decision by the Shelby County school board to extend the contract of county schools superintendent John Aitken.