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Editorial Results (free)

1. Republicans Unveil Long-Shot Effort on Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senators on Wednesday rolled out competing plans for the nation's health care system, with a group of GOP senators making a last, long-shot effort to undo Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act and independent Sen. Bernie Sanders proposing universal government-run coverage.

2. REIT Set to Make Fifth Downtown Memphis Investment -

Alpha Residential Trust, a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania-based real estate investment trust, has entered into an agreement to purchase the 266 Lofts development at the corner of Front Street and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.

3. Breather for Vols Before Traveling to Florida -

Get ready for another thrill ride, Tennessee fans. Your football team is at it again, just like last year.

Tennessee needed a comeback and overtime to beat Appalachian State in its 2016 season opener. The Vols needed comebacks to beat Virginia Tech and Florida and got a Hail Mary touchdown pass as time ran out to beat Georgia.

4. Statue of Martin Luther King Jr. Unveiled in his Hometown -

ATLANTA (AP) – The daughter of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. stood beside her father's newly unveiled statue Monday, just a few blocks from where he grew up, handing out hugs and telling each well-wisher: "It's about time."

5. Comedian, Civil Rights Activist Dick Gregory Dies at 84 -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Dick Gregory, the comedian and activist and who broke racial barriers in the 1960s and used his humor to spread messages of social justice and nutritional health, has died. He was 84.

6. Downtown Lofts to Begin Second Phase -

In this week’s Real Estate Recap, 266 Lofts in Downtown Memphis begins its second phase, Peak Capital closes on a massive Cordova apartment complex, and a Chattanooga-based rock climbing gym purchases land in East Memphis.

7. Deadly Rally Accelerates Removal of Confederate Statues -

In Gainesville, Florida, workers hired by the Daughters of the Confederacy chipped away at a Confederate soldier's statue, loaded it quietly on a truck and drove away with little fanfare.

In Baltimore, Mayor Catherine Pugh said she's ready to tear down all of her city's Confederate statues, and the city council voted to have them destroyed. San Antonio lawmakers are looking ahead to removing a statue from a prominent downtown park.

8. Ken Hause Cooks Up Strategy To Enhance L’Ecole Culinaire -

L'Ecole Culinaire-Memphis has added Ken Hause its campus director. In his new role, Hause is responsible for overseeing operations of the Memphis campus, including ensuring a rich student experience that leads to employment in the culinary field, while enhancing the school’s reputation for educational excellence, compliance and operational performance.

9. Downtown Lofts to Begin Second Phase -

The area surrounding developer Vince Smith's project 266 Lofts, located at the corner of Front Street and Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, has already seen its share of changes since it broke ground last year, and it’s about to change even more.

10. The Week Ahead: Aug. 14-20 -

Hello, Memphis! School was the big opening last week, but this week it’s the majestic Crosstown Concourse, the 1.5 million-square-foot tower on Cleveland Street at North Parkway. It is hosting a six-hour extravaganza of tours, music, food and the arts. Check out the details, plus more Elvis Week events and other need-to-know happenings in The Week Ahead...

11. ‘I Am a Man’ Plaza Initial Design Unveiled -

The initial design of a public plaza south of FedExForum commemorating the 1968 sanitation workers strike calls for a central sculpture with the words “I Am a Man” in 15-foot-tall stainless steel letters, along with quotes from speeches by civil rights leaders on other parts of the built environment and on the letters of the sculpture.

12. 'I Am a Man' Plaza Initial Design Unveiled -

The initial design of a public plaza south of FedExForum commemorating the 1968 sanitation workers strike calls for a central sculpture with the words “I Am a Man” in 15-foot-tall stainless steel letters, along with quotes from speeches by civil rights leaders on other parts of the built environment and on the letters of the sculpture.

13. New Tiger Guard Kareem Brewton all about Slashing and Scoring -

Growing up, guard Kareem Brewton remembers watching the University of Memphis play via a small television in his kitchen. Well, actually, he doesn’t recall much about John Calipari’s team – that those Tigers could play lockdown defense was news to him – but he remembered how dazzled he was by Derrick Rose.

14. New Tiger Guard Kareem Brewton all about Slashing and Scoring -

Growing up, guard Kareem Brewton remembers watching the University of Memphis play via a small television in his kitchen. Well, actually, he doesn’t recall much about John Calipari’s team – that those Tigers could play lockdown defense was news to him – but he remembered how dazzled he was by Derrick Rose.

15. Memphis Music Initiative To Occupy Old Downtown Firehouse -

198 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Ave., Memphis, TN 38103

Tenant: Memphis Music Initiative

16. Last Word: Freeze Warning, Corker on Obamacare Repeal and The Disney Example -

What do you call it when you expect a lot of trouble coming from a specific direction – with a detailed roadmap -- and a completely different controversy comes in from a different direction, hits and leaves a crater. Whatever you call it, that is what happened to Ole Miss football coach Hugh Freeze Thursday evening. Or did it?

17. Last Word: Closing the Door, Midtown Rents and Red West's Many Roles -

It didn’t take the Shelby County Commission very long Wednesday to close the door on its budget season – about 20 minutes in the day’s special meeting to approve a county property tax rate of $4.11 on third and final reading. That’s not a quick up or down vote. And it took just a bit longer because there is still some discussion about whether this was a reduction in the tax rate or a tax cut in the sense that a homeowner in Shelby County would understand the term.

18. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

19. Heavy Rain, Winds, Tornado Warnings as Cindy Heads Inland -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — High tides in the wake of a weakening Tropical Depression Cindy prompted a voluntary evacuation in a coastal Louisiana town Thursday, and the storm's effects were being felt throughout the Southeast, with intermittent bands of heavy rain, blasts of high wind and periodic warnings of possible tornadoes in multiple states.

20. Phillip Fulmer Named Special Adviser to Tennessee President -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – University of Tennessee President Joe DiPietro has hired former Volunteers football coach Phillip Fulmer as his special adviser for community, athletics and university relations.

21. Power Pitching, Hitting Goal Of New UT Baseball Coach -

Tony Vitello wants to put a Power T in Tennessee baseball, and with it a yearly contender for SEC championships and NCAA tournament bids.

The new UT baseball coach was introduced last Friday at Tennessee’s Lindsey Nelson Stadium. He emphasized power pitching and power hitting as part of his rebuilding plan.

22. CCL-Korsini Opens $25M Collierville Plant -

One of the first things several Collierville civic leaders did when they toured CCL-Korsini LLC’s $25 million label-printing facility Wednesday, June 14, was look beyond the loading dock to the adjacent open land.

23. RedRover Adds Will Cook As Design Architect -

RedRover Sales & Marketing has added three new employees in recent months, including design architect Will Cook, who has more than 10 years of graphic design experience and comes to RedRover from The Commercial Appeal and Savant Learning Systems. In his new role, Cook primarily designs print and web collateral for RedRover’s clients while also assisting the sales and marketing teams in other ways, including participating in sales meetings and calls.

24. Not a Very Good Year for UT Athletics -

It hasn’t been the greatest of years for Tennessee sports. From football to basketball to baseball, and several sports in between, the Vols – for the most part – fell short in 2016-17.

25. Seay Leading Raleigh UPP In Parental Coaching Efforts -

The ACE Awareness Foundation’s fourth Universal Parenting Place recently opened at Christ Community Health Services in Raleigh, with Tara Seay serving as site director/parenting coach. Seay is a licensed professional counselor–mental health service provider.
In her new role at the Raleigh UPP, she’ll provide parents and caregivers with individual therapy and give clinical insight in group therapy programs. In addition, she will develop new programs over time to cater to the needs of the population that we serve in the Raleigh area.

26. Events -

The Memphis Greek Festival returns Friday and Saturday, May 12-13, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. at Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, 573 N. Highland St. Greek food, music, dancing, marketplace, kids’ activities, a food drive-thru and church tours are all part of the festivities. Call 901-327-8177 or visit memphisgreekfestival.com for details.

27. New AD Fires Shot Easily Heard at Nelson Stadium -

Tennessee coaches of all sports were alerted last Thursday when Sam Winterbotham was fired after 11 seasons as the Vols’ men’s tennis coach.

No doubt UT baseball coach Dave Serrano got the alert. He could be next in line.

28. Events -

Mothers of the Nile will hold its ninth annual banquet Thursday, May 11, at 5:30 p.m. at First Baptist Church Broad, 2835 Broad Ave. Those sharing their perspectives include state Rep. Raumesh Akbari, Hope Academy principal Michael Smith and essay contest participants from Hope Academy, whose students are in detention at Juvenile Court. Visit mothersofthenileinc.org for details.

29. House Takes First Step on ‘Almighty God’ Amendment -

The House of Representatives took the first legislative step Monday toward rewriting the state Constitution with a measure recognizing liberties come from Almighty God rather than governments.

In a 69-17 vote, the House passed the resolution by Rep. Micah Van Huss, an East Tennessee Republican, to amend the Constitution, a move requiring votes by consecutive General Assemblies and passage by the state’s voters.

30. Spring Lessons: Here’s Who Vols Will Start -

Tennessee football coach Butch Jones isn’t big on naming starters and divulging depth charts. Not until he has to. So it comes as no surprise the Vols enter summer workouts and fall camp with junior Quinten Dormady and redshirt freshman Jarrett Guarantano still competing for the starting quarterback’s job.

31. Young Says Hooks Led in ’60s Without Pursuing Politics -

Just before he came to Memphis in April 1968 with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Andrew Young remembers a meeting in Atlanta with King and U.S. Rep. John Conyers, Harry Belafonte and Richard Hatcher, the newly elected African-American mayor of Gary, Indiana.

32. Who Will Grab the Spotlight in Vols' Spring Game? -

Tennessee completes its fifth spring practice under head coach Butch Jones on Saturday, April 22, at 4 p.m. with the DISH Orange & White Game at Neyland Stadium.

It’s merely the beginning as the Vols prepare for the 2017 season.

33. Civil Rights Activist Owens Calls Out Memphis Lawmaker -

Memphis civil rights activist Bill Owens, who campaigned for Republican Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential race, is criticizing a state legislator who refused to back his political efforts in a statement on the House floor.

34. As Memphis Tiger Fans Fret, Can Tubby Smith Fix This Mess? -

A few weeks ago, Tubby Smith stood in front of assembled media and admitted that the University of Memphis basketball job was a bit more than he had calculated.

“You’ve got a flavor here of expectations,” he said, the surprise evident in his voice and on his face.

35. Last Word: The Catechism of 1968, Downtown Hotels and Earth Day on Auto Row -

What happened 49 years ago this week in our city began long before the first sanitation worker walked off the job or the first “I Am A Man” sign was made. Maybe it was that long arc that explains the timing of what happened here in late March into the first week of April of 1968. For just about half a century now we have thought and thought again about that chronology, reviewed the details. And what we have is a sort of catechism of moments that if they had happened differently, we can’t help thinking, might have produced a different result.

36. Marker Commemorates King’s Final Flight to Memphis -

John Hope Bryant has come through Memphis International Airport many times on business. The founder of the financial literacy nonprofit “Operation HOPE” was always aware the airport was Martin Luther King’s last arrival point on the way to his assassination in 1968.

37. Historical Marker to Commemorate MLK’s Final Flight -

A historical marker commemorating the final flight of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. will be dedicat-ed at Memphis International Airport on Monday, April 3.

38. Lawmakers Blast Haslam Administration for Process Toward JLL Contract -

The Tennessee Department of General Services is set to award a statewide contract for facility management services to Jones Lang LaSalle, a company that already handles 10 percent of state office space and estimates a 15.9 percent savings if all higher education institutes participate.

39. Parkinson Rejects Owens’ Politics in Legislature -

NASHVILLE – Recognition for the Rev. Bill Owens turned into a rebuke on the House floor when a Memphis legislator discovered the activist pastor campaigned for President Donald Trump and urged black voters to leave the Democratic Party.

40. Parkinson Rejects Owens’ Politics After He is Honored -

NASHVILLE – Recognition for the Rev. Bill Owens turned into a rebuke on the House floor when a Memphis legislator discovered the activist pastor campaigned for President Donald Trump and urged black voters to leave the Democratic Party.

41. The Week Ahead: March 20-26 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! It’s the first day of spring, and a bounty of social gatherings, government meetings and business events are in bloom. Check out our top picks in The Week Ahead…

42. Vols Need a Good Spring With So Many No. 1 Players Gone -

Butch Jones is about to embark on his most crucial of five seasons as Tennessee’s football coach, and it begins with spring practices starting Tuesday, March 21.

Jones is coming off back-to-back 9-4 seasons capped by bowl wins, but has fallen short of the SEC East Division title both years. He was the preseason favorite to win the East in 2016, and the previous year had a team with potential to win the division.

43. March 10-16, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1835: A letter from Mayor Marcus Winchester reads in part: “We are involved in another lawsuit involving important interests in relation to the John Rice grant. You are aware that since 1828 a mud bar has been accumulating in front of this town. During last summer two warrants were located upon this bar, in the name of J.D. Martin, amounting together to 44 1/2 acres, for which a grant has actually been obtained from the state.”

44. The Press Box: Expectations Belong to Every Coach – Even Tubby -

He arrived as the future Hall-of-Fame coach with a national championship on his resume and a fresh Coach-of-the-Year Award from taking Texas Tech to the NCAA Tournament.

Tubby Smith was everything that Josh Pastner wasn’t: seasoned, the kind of guy that could “coach players up,” and wouldn’t be overmatched when making in-game decisions.

45. What a Strange Twist of Events in Hiring of Currie -

John Currie is the new athletics director at the University of Tennessee. Has it sunk in yet? Currie, previously the athletic director at Kansas State, was introduced last week by new UT chancellor Beverly Davenport during a ceremony featuring fans, boosters, coaches and, of course, former Tennessee and NFL quarterback Peyton Manning.

46. New AD Bad News for Struggling Vol Coaches -

The hiring of John Currie as the University of Tennessee’s athletics director conveys a number of messages. One of them: Butch Jones is officially on the clock.

Based on Currie’s history at UT, as well as his eight-year track record as Kansas State’s athletics director, it’s safe to say he isn’t afraid to pull the trigger when it comes to coaches – for better or worse.

47. 'Heartbeat Bill' Put Off a Year -

NASHVILLE – Legislation outlawing abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected is being postponed until 2018, but a House panel voted Wednesday to restrict abortions after the 20th week, a shift from the 24-week period defining “viability.”

48. New Vols AD Currie Says His Tennessee Experience Should Help -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – New Tennessee athletic director John Currie has some shopping to do.

49. Busiest Season for Sports Hits Big Orange Country -

It’s the busiest time of the year for Tennessee athletics. There’s even some football to whet your gridiron appetite.

The Vols begin spring football practices March 21, and the DISH Orange & White Game is April 22 at Neyland Stadium. By then, much will have happened in Big Orange Nation.

50. Getting To Know Dallas -

Once upon a time, I called Dallas home. But as many Memphians can attest when admitting to never visiting Graceland, as a Dallasite I didn’t hit many of the tourist attractions.

I’ve returned to Dallas off and on since moving away in 2000, mainly to attend sporting events. But in October we visited for a longer stretch, enough time to hit some of the city’s highlights. We simplified things and used a CityPASS ticket to lead our decisions.

51. The Week Ahead: February 28-March 6 -

It's Monday, Memphis – time to peek at this week's (very busy) dance card, from the opening of Graceland's $45 million entertainment complex to a showcase of the latest high-tech ag innovations to a celebration of some local "hidden figures." Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...  

52. You Gotta Have Heart: UT’s 2017 Recruiting Class -

Butch Jones did it again. The Tennessee football coach gave opponents press conference fodder with another one-liner while putting his spin on the Vols’ 2017 signing class.

It happened a day after the Feb. 1 National Signing Day when UT’s class was rated No. 17 nationally in the 247Sports composite rankings.

53. New Book Spurs Call for Fresh Probe of Emmett Till Lynching -

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) – The horrific 1955 Mississippi slaying of Emmett Till, which helped trigger the modern civil rights movement, should be re-investigated now that a key witness is quoted as saying she lied about what the black teen said and did before he was lynched, Till's relatives say.

54. View From the Hill: Haslam Plan Tilts Broadband Playing Field -

State Reps. Pat Marsh and Art Swann emerged from a meeting underwhelmed by Gov. Bill Haslam’s legislation to spread broadband internet access across Tennessee.

“I thought there would be a lot more to it,” says Marsh, a Shelbyville Republican, calling the proposal “a drop in the bucket” financially but at least a starting point.

55. Connecting People at Heart of Plans For $12M Friendship Park -

Heartsong Church and the Memphis Islamic Center, neighbors in Cordova, are shattering notions of hatred and divisiveness seen elsewhere in the world with plans to develop a $12 million Friendship Park connecting their two properties.

56. Grizzlies to Own, Operate D-League Team in Southaven -

The Memphis Grizzlies next season will have an expansion NBA Development League team it will own and operate that will play its home games at the Landers Center in Southaven.

The Grizzlies broke the news on their website after reports of the Minnesota Timberwolves purchasing the majority ownership of the D-League’s Iowa Energy; the Grizzlies and Minnesota have been operating the Energy together, but that agreement will end at the conclusion of this season.

57. Freshman Bone Gives Vols Hope for Quicker Rebuild -

Tennessee coach Rick Barnes isn’t ready to proclaim Jordan Bone a rising star in SEC basketball, but he sure saw promising signs from his freshman point guard last Saturday night in Nashville.

58. Frayser Charter Seeks to Take Over Humes Prep Academy -

Bobby White admits Humes Preparatory Academy is a “challenging situation.”

“But it’s a situation that is manageable,” he told a group of 40 people in the auditorium of the North Memphis school Wednesday, Jan. 11.

59. View From the Hill: Taxing Online Sales Not Such an Easy Fix -

Cumberland Transit owner Allen Doty isn’t sure if a rule requiring major out-of-state retailers to collect Tennessee sales taxes will create more equity for his shop.

But Doty, who has been selling everything from bicycles to kayaks and camping gear for 34 years in Nashville, is definitely tired of people shopping in his store for hours, snapping a picture of shoes they like, then going home and buying them online “just to avoid sales tax.”

60. Parkside Developers Finish Acquiring Land for Shelby Farms Urban Village -

Developers of Parkside at Shelby Farms, a proposed mixed-use project, took another step forward with the purchase nearly 40 acres of vacant property adjacent to Shelby Farms.

61. Americans Have Good Shot to Ace Memphis Open -

This year’s Memphis Open field includes three Americans ranked in the top 35, two former past champions, and the certainty that Japan’s Kei Nishikori will not win a fifth straight title.

62. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

63. What Lies Ahead for UT Athletics in 2017 -

Hey Vols fans, Happy New Year. May your 2017 year in Tennessee sports be better than your 2016 year in Tennessee sports. Perhaps, a fresh start is what we all need. Let’s face it. The Music City Bowl wasn’t where Tennessee wanted the 2016 football season to end. The Vols were picked to win the SEC East Division in preseason and floundered to an 8-4 record in the regular season, 4-4 in the SEC. Their football season was about the norm for most UT sports in 2016: average. Here are some dates to mark in hope of better things ahead in 2017...

64. Friendraising: Two Examples of Success -

As the year comes to an end, many of us are fortunate to receive invitations to events large and small. With Hanukkah falling on Dec. 24 there will be simultaneous celebrating by Jews and Christians this year. And even more will celebrate the New Year. Some events are family parties, work gatherings or faith celebrations. Others are fundraisers or “friendraisers” for nonprofit organizations or institutions.

65. Outsourcing: Savings, But No Specifics -

The Haslam administration is forging ahead with plans to nab a statewide facilities services contractor after an outside analysis backed up a study showing estimated cost savings of more than $35 million a year at Tennessee universities.

66. This Week in Memphis History: Nov. 25-Dec. 1 -

2015: Republican presidential contender John Kasich is in Memphis for a fundraiser at the home of Brad Martin. It is one of two fundraisers that evening – the other is for state Senate Republican leader Mark Norris who is considering a bid for Tennessee governor in 2018.

67. County Law Library Director Johnson Celebrates 50 Years as Librarian -

Gary Johnson, director of the Shelby County Governmental Law Library, is celebrating his 50th year as a librarian. In his current role, he directs the county law library’s operations, including budgeting, staffing and library services, and reports to a 10-member board that include nine attorneys and one judge. 
When asked about his longevity in the field, Johnson says the libraries where he’s worked – which include public, school and law libraries – have been different enough to keep him challenged and interested. 

68. Last Word: Big River Weekend, Buying Local and The Rehabilitation of Lane Kiffin -

The city’s riverfront will be a very busy place Saturday with several events – the one getting the most attention is the opening of the Big River Crossing – the bicycle and pedestrian boardwalk across the Mississippi River on the north side of the Harahan Bridge.

69. Vols Get Midterm B Despite Back-to-Back Losses -

Tennessee’s football team is spending this week’s open date trying to get healthy after a rugged four-game stretch of SEC football in which they defeated Florida and Georgia and lost to Texas A&M and Alabama.

70. Could This Be the Year the Crimson Tide Rolls Out With a Loss at Tennessee? -

Tennessee defensive end LaTroy Lewis was raised in Akron, Ohio, and recalls a special Saturday of football each fall when he was a youth: Ohio State vs. Michigan.

“That’s what I was taught my whole life,” Lewis says, “and then I got down here in the South, and it was kind of like: ‘Is there any other game beside Tennessee and Alabama?’”

71. For the First Time This Season, Vols Set to Play as Underdog -

You almost can feel Tennessee is a football team of destiny as the most difficult games of the schedule loom Saturday at Texas A&M and Oct. 15 against Alabama at Neyland Stadium.

There aren’t many successful Hail Mary passes, but the Vols got one last Saturday and beat Georgia 34-31 in Athens. Tennessee trailed Georgia 17-0 in the first half.

72. Thrill-Ride Accidents Spark New Demands for Regulation -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over.

73. State Senator Tate Selected For Fellowship Program -

Tennessee state Sen. Reginald Tate, D-Memphis, has been selected to participate in one of the nation’s premier leadership development programs for state government officials, The Council of State Governments’ Henry Toll Fellowship program.

74. State Senator Tate Selected for CSG Fellowship Program -

Tennessee state Sen. Reginald Tate, D-Memphis, has been selected to participate in one of the nation’s premier leadership development programs for state government officials, The Council of State Governments’ Henry Toll Fellowship program.

75. White House: Budget Deficit to Rise to $600 Billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House on Friday predicted that the government's budget deficit for the soon-to-end fiscal year will hit $600 billion, an increase of $162 billion over last year's tally and a reversal of a steady trend of large but improving deficits on President Barack Obama's watch.

76. Pat Summitt, Winningest Coach in D1 History, Has Died at 64 -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Pat Summitt, the winningest coach in Division I college basketball history who lifted the women's game to national prominence during her 38-year career at Tennessee, died Tuesday. She was 64.

77. Ledford Engineering and Planning Grows at Steady Pace -

Almost 20 years ago, Kevin Ledford opened his own engineering firm in Arlington. He was taking flying lessons at the time and so he liked the idea of being near the town’s airport.

78. Rose Guiding Memphis Symphony to Firm Financial Footing -

What is classical music good for? How can it remain relevant in the 21st century? For most people, these are abstract questions – but for Gayle Rose, they couldn’t be more pressing.

79. May 20-26: This Week in Memphis History -

2006: Shelby County’s reliance on manufacturing jobs is dropping, according to state labor figures, which show that 14 manufacturing companies have closed or cut back their workforces in Shelby County since January 2003. The closings and cutbacks account for the loss of 1,240 jobs.
The losses include 98 jobs at Coors Brewing Co., 5151 East Raines Road; 112 workers at Memphis Hardwood Flooring Co., 1551 Thomas St.; and 327 employees at Great Dane LP at 1095 Harbor Ave.

80. Outsourcing Savings Estimates Strain ‘Credulity’ -

Terry Cowles flashes a photo of ceiling lamp fixtures on the screen and tells state legislators a vendor’s state Capitol team used its electrical training to remove, repair and reinstall fixtures, saving taxpayers $15,500.

81. Last Word: Mud Island Money, Elvis Mystery and Beyond Barbecue -

It looks like the dry rub will be in order for Memphis in May's barbecue weekend with a shower or two keeping the dust down in Tom Lee Park Wednesday.

If you can see it through the smoke, Mud Island might strike a first-tme observer as a marked contrast to all of the activity in Tom Lee Park that goes right up to the bluff's edge.

82. State Halts City Board From Issuing Bonds -

The city of Memphis entity that sold $12 million in municipal bonds on behalf of Global Ministries Foundation has been told it can no longer conduct such business.

The Tennessee Housing Development Agency has temporarily de-authorized the Health, Educational & Housing Facility Board of the city of Memphis to sell bonds. The decision is related to the withdrawal of federal subsidies going to Global Ministries Foundation’s portfolio and a subsequent downgrading of those bonds as well as leadership changes at the Health & Ed Board.

83. State Halts Memphis Health & Ed Board From Doing Business -

The city of Memphis entity that sold $12 million in municipal bonds on behalf of Global Ministries Foundation has been told it can no longer conduct such business.

The Tennessee Housing and Development Agency has temporarily de-authorized the Health, Educational and Housing Facility Board of the city of Memphis to sell bonds. The decision is related to the withdrawal of federal subsidies going to Global Ministries Foundation’s portfolio and a subsequent downgrading of those bonds as well as leadership changes at the Health & Ed Board.

84. Shipmon Joins Lending Team at Paragon -

Thomas “Tee” Shipmon has joined Paragon Bank as senior vice president, specialty lending. In this role, Shipmon is responsible for developing products for Paragon that solve customers’ challenges and that are profitable to the bank. Currently, specialty lending is providing short-term commercial construction loans to companies, often franchisees, that are expanding operations.

85. Free Speech Bill Withdrawn After Islamic State Comments -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Republican lawmaker on Thursday defended his comments that free speech rights on Tennessee college campuses should apply to everyone – even recruiters for the Islamic State group.

86. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

87. Tri-Star Chronicles Captures Tennessee’s Lesser-Known Stories -

J.R. “Pitt” Hyde III is not Memphis’ most famous name across the state of Tennessee. But he is an important name, has a deep and rich story worth telling, and that is exactly the point.

88. Pastner Hopes ‘Right Memphis Team' Shows Up at AAC Tourney -

Remember El Paso in 2011? Remember how the Tigers were down to about six minutes in their season, playing in the Conference USA championship game on UTEP’s home floor, and trailing by 12 points?

89. Last Word: Rain & Votes, Setting Madison's Boundaries and The Rise of Renters -

Here comes the rain. Not a Beatles tune but close enough with the word late Tuesday that George Martin – to my mind at least, the closest thing to a fifth Beatle – has died.
Rolling Stone’s story and many links within to their coverage of Martin over the decades.

90. Stop Trump Efforts Intensify As Election Day Arrives -

It’s hard to gauge how far it is going. But the “Stop Trump” effort among local and state Republicans includes trying to talk Democrats into crossing over and voting in Tuesday’s Tennessee Republican presidential primary.

91. Kasich Draws Memphis Crowd of 700 -

Republican presidential contender John Kasich told a group of more than 700 people in Memphis Friday, Feb. 26, the country needs leaders who think as Americans first and Republicans and Democrats second.

92. Kasich Draws Memphis Crowd of 700 -

Republican presidential contender John Kasich told a group of more than 700 people in Memphis Friday, Feb. 26, the country needs leaders who think as Americans first and Republicans and Democrats second.

93. Confident Serrano Playing for Future at UT -

Tennessee baseball coach Dave Serrano wasn’t setting the bar too high when he met with the media for his 2016 preseason press conference.

Serrano made that mistake before the 2015 season with talk of reaching an NCAA regional and perhaps Omaha, Nebraska, site of the College World Series.

94. Complex path to higher-ed reform -

Only half a year after taking on the presidency of Motlow State Community College, Anthony Kinkel is trying to keep his eye on the pea.

The task of running one of the state’s fastest-growing community colleges is becoming increasingly complex, and it has nothing to do with thousands more students enrolling to take advantage of free tuition through the Tennessee Promise scholarship program.

95. Bertelkamp Made Right Call in Going with the Vols -

Bert Bertelkamp would be the first to tell you he’s pulling for Tennessee when calling basketball games as color commentator for the Vol Network.

And why wouldn’t he?

Bertelkamp is Big Orange to the bone. His father Hank played for the Vols (1951-53), was a team captain and remains a big supporter of UT.

96. Complex Path to Higher-Ed Reform -

Only half a year after taking on the presidency of Motlow State Community College, Anthony Kinkel is trying to keep his eye on the pea.

The task of running one of the state’s fastest-growing community colleges is becoming increasingly complex, and it has nothing to do with thousands more students enrolling to take advantage of free tuition through the Tennessee Promise scholarship program.

97. This week in Memphis history: January 1-7 -

1993: Production of the motion picture "The Firm" is underway in Memphis with Tom Cruise, Gene Hackman and Jeanne Tripplehorn in the city to film the adaptation of the John Grisham novel. Producers of the movie decide to shoot exterior scenes in the city as well and use the old International Harvester plant in Frayser, which includes a law library for the fictional law firm.

98. Steamship Supporters Seek Exemption to Resume Cruises -

HELENA-WEST HELENA, Ark. (AP) – Supporters of the Delta Queen say they'll continue working to get Congress to approve an exemption that would allow the historic steamship to resume cruises on the Mississippi River.

99. Kasich Makes Fundraising Stops in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican presidential candidate John Kasich said Tuesday that his visit to Tennessee is aimed at avoiding having to scramble for support in the state's March 1 primary if he emerges as a strong contender from the earliest contests.

100. Presidential Primary Ballot Set in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — When Tennessee voters go to the polls for the March 1 presidential primary, they will be able to choose among either 14 Republicans or three Democrats.

Secretary of State Tre Hargett on Tuesday released the final list of candidates that will appear on the Super Tuesday ballot.