» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'John Light' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:51
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:3
Middle Tennessee:37
East Tennessee:84
Other:1

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Dream Redux -

On a recent afternoon at AutoZone Park, manager Stubby Clapp’s team had a two-run lead going into the bottom of the ninth inning. Assigned the task of getting the last three outs: veteran big league closer Greg Holland, he of 186 career saves and three All-Star appearances, and on this day pitching for the Memphis Redbirds on a rehab assignment.

2. Midstate Transit Future is Paved With Tired Ideas -

If you ask state Rep. William Lamberth, Davidson County voters gave a resounding answer on the future of mass transit in this region. Based on their overwhelming defeat of an early May referendum, they don’t want to raise taxes for mass transit, preferring to be more like Atlanta and Los Angeles and less like New York.

3. Last Word: One for Graceland, Randy Boyd in Millington and Green Eyeshades -

From the distance of 50 years – half a century – it’s hard to relate what it was like to grow up in the 1960s – in particular the year 1968 in a city that figured prominently in the year’s turbulent trajectory.

4. One Beale, St. Jude, Sedgwick Projects Move Forward -

263 Wagner Place, Memphis, TN 38103: Carlisle Corp.’s expanded plans for One Beale received unanimous approval from the Center City Revenue Finance Corp. on Tuesday, May 29.

5. Landing NFL Draft is Fine, But How About a Super Bowl? -

One after another, many of the nation’s top sporting events are finding their way to Nashville. News that Music City is playing host to the 2019 NFL Draft really came as no surprise, considering the city’s other recent sports successes here.

6. Last Word: Bar-B-Foo, Grizz Draft Prospects and The Hampline -

Alleged sightings of Dave Grohl at the barbecue contest Thursday in Tom Lee Park and a photograph from a distance that might or might not be the head Foo Fighter. This does happen at the barbecue contest – celebrities quietly coming in with a team. Sometimes not so quietly as when Vice President Al Gore returned in the 1990s to a contest he had a booth at during his time as a U.S. Senator.

7. Senate Democrats Push to Reinstate 'Net Neutrality' Rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Don't expect the House to go along with the Senate's expected passage of legislation that would revive an Obama-era rule requiring equal treatment for all web traffic by internet providers.

8. Parts Shortage That Hit Ford Spreads to More Companies -

DETROIT (AP) – A fire that damaged a Michigan auto parts supply factory is causing production problems at Ford, Fiat Chrysler, BMW and General Motors, but it's too soon to tell yet whether dealers will run short of vehicles.

9. Harris, Lenoir to Battle for County Mayor -

Republican David Lenoir and Democrat Lee Harris will meet in the Aug. 2 county general election to decide who will be the next Shelby County mayor. Lenoir and Harris won their respective primaries easily Tuesday, May 1, 2018.

10. Lenoir and Harris Advance in County Mayor's Race -

Republican David Lenoir and Democrat Lee Harris will meet in the Aug. 2 county general election to decide who will be the next Shelby County Mayor. Lenoir and Harris won their respective primaries easily Tuesday, May 1, 2018.

11. The Week Ahead: April 16-20 -

Good morning, Memphis! It’s time for Africa in April, which in the minds of many Memphians, is the seasonal kick-off for festivals. The annual Southern Hot Wing Festival comes this weekend on Tiger Lane, so get ready for good times to replace that winter weather. Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

12. Pruitt Brings Fresh, Quieter Approach To Football Practice -

I find the culture shift of Tennessee football under new head coach Jeremy Pruitt this spring to be refreshing.

13. Religious Leaders Recount Catechism of 1968 Memphis -

Rev. James Lawson, the architect of nonviolent resistance who counseled Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on it, walked in a circle last week around the new “I Am A Man” bronze and stainless steel sculpture. As he walked with his head down, still and video photographers scrambled for the best angle to capture the seminal strategist of the civil rights era, seemingly deep in thought.

14. Week Ahead: April 9-15 -

Good morning, Memphis! We’ve seen in recent national elections how important every vote can be, much less on the local level where far fewer votes are cast than in a national presidential election, for example. It’s one of your basic rights and a great opportunity for you to be an influence in the local community.

15. Lawmakers See Conspiracy In UT Board Alterations -

It’s not that hard to light a fire under some state lawmakers, but the University of Tennessee FOCUS Act raised blood pressure considerably in the House of Representatives before barely passing with 51 votes.

16. The Aftermath: Memphis' Political Journey Since 1968 -

For 50 years and counting, April 4 has been an important day in the life of Memphis.

To some Memphians, it is a holy day; to others, it’s a day of reflection, or perhaps one of action and service.

17. Davy Crockett’s Fine, But Let’s Not Get Carried Away -

The Tennessee General Assembly is making some monumental decisions these days – literally.

Not only is the Legislature prepared to put a statue of Tennessee folk hero Davy Crockett in front of the State Capitol, replacing obscure Nashville politician Edward Carmack, it’s also likely to erect a monument, or memorial, to unborn children in the ongoing battle against abortion.

18. Events -

The Overton Park Conservancy will host a Park Fun Day and Science Fair Sunday, March 25, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Overton Park’s East Parkway Pavilion. Events include a science fair with research partners from the University of Memphis, Rhodes College and Christian Brothers University; an 11:30 a.m. mini-BioBlitz, a tour of the Old Forest with conservancy staff to record as many species as possible; the finals of the International Society of Arboriculture Southern Chapter's tree-climbing contest; and games and food trucks. Cost is free. Visit overtonpark.org.

19. Last Word: Moot Points in Orlando, EDGE Responds and A Mayoral Forum -

The Tigers basketball post season continues to a Friday game with Tulsa the day after the Tigers beat South Florida 79-77 in the AAC tournament in Orlando. But all of this seems to have been rendered a moot point by the all-but-official exit of coach Tubby Smith with Penny Hardaway, and probably much if not all of his staff, waiting in the wings.

20. Olympus Opens Expanded Bartlett Campus -

Medical device manufacturer Olympus celebrated the grand opening of its $12 million expanded Bartlett campus at 2937 Appling Road on Tuesday, March 6. The state-of-the-art facility expands Olympus’ existing R&D and surgical manufacturing building on Appling Road, which has operated in Bartlett since 1984.

21. White House Downgrades Kushner's Security Clearance -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The security clearance of White House senior adviser and presidential son-in-law Jared Kushner has been downgraded, significantly reducing his access to classified information, according to two people informed of the decision.

22. Transport Safety Rules Rolled Back Under Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) – On a clear, dry June evening in 2015, cars and trucks rolled slowly in a herky-jerky backup ahead of an Interstate 75 construction zone in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Barreling toward them: an 18-ton tractor-trailer going about 80 mph.

23. Last Word: Murals and IRV at City Hall, Alexander on Trump and Schools Standoff -

Sometimes when you look at the Election Commission filings in an election season and no one has so much as pulled a petition let alone filed one, your thoughts tend to be along the lines of what is there to focus on beyond the day-to-day activity. And then you get a press release by email that really makes you remember the volatility of this whole business of running for elected office.

24. This Week in Memphis History: December 22-28, 2017 -

1929: Memphis Power & Light Co. advertises Christmas gifts in The Daily News, including Christmas tree lamps at $1.25 for a set of eight; washing machines for $99.50 or $185; waffle irons from $8.45; cigar lights “attachable to any socket” at $5 each; and curling irons “for maid or matron” at $1.95 and $3.

25. Conyers Resigns From Congress Amid Harassment Allegations -

DETROIT (AP) – Besieged by allegations of sexual harassment, Democratic Rep. John Conyers resigned from Congress on Tuesday, bringing an abrupt end to the civil rights leader's nearly 53-year career on Capitol Hill.

26. Coalition Taps Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

27. Coalition Signs on With Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

28. Conyers Gives Up Judiciary Post Amid Sex Harassment Probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Even while fiercely denying allegations of sexual harassment, Michigan Rep. John Conyers is giving up his leadership position as top Democrat on the House Judiciary Committee, acknowledging a congressional probe into his possible misconduct had become an unwelcome distraction.

29. Museum of the Bible, Built by Hobby Lobby Owner, Opens in DC -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Eight years ago, Hobby Lobby president Steve Green found a new way to express his Christian faith. His family's $4 billion arts and craft chain was already known for closing stores on Sundays, waging a Supreme Court fight over birth control and donating tens of millions of dollars to religious groups.

30. Interim Coach Can Get Vols Into Bowl Game -

Brady Hoke makes his debut as Tennessee’s interim football coach Saturday at 7 p.m. EST (ESPN) against LSU in Neyland Stadium.

Perhaps it’s an audition for the head coaching vacancy left when Butch Jones was fired on Sunday morning, hours after the Vols (4-6, 0-6 SEC) returned to Knoxville from a 50-17 loss at Missouri.

31. Former Pilot Exec: Jimmy Haslam 'Loved' Trucking Rip-Off Scheme -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – A former truck stop company executive boasted in a secretly recorded conversation that Cleveland Browns owner Jimmy Haslam "loved it" when the sales team ripped off customers.

32. Trump Nominates Jerome Powell to be Next Fed Chairman -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Thursday announced his choice of Federal Reserve board member Jerome Powell to be the next chairman of the nation's central bank, succeeding Janet Yellen, the first woman to hold the position.

33. SCS Board Refuses State Order to Share Student Information With Charters -

Shelby County Schools board members put their feet down Tuesday, Oct. 31, and said they will not share student information with the state-run Achievement School District and charter schools operating as part of the ASD.

34. SCS Board Refuses State Order to Share Student Information With Charters -

Shelby County Schools board members made their intent clearer Tuesday, Oct. 31, on sharing student information with the state-run Achievement School District and charter schools operating as part of the ASD. And in the process, the school system is likely to be in court along with the Metro Nashville Schools system over the decision.

35. Events -

The 2018-Model Memphis International Auto Show takes place Friday through Sunday, Oct. 27-29, at Memphis Cook Convention Center, 255 N. Main St. Experience the latest in-car technology, research your next vehicle and test drive more than a dozen vehicles on site. Buy discount e-tickets at memphisautoshow.com.

36. Events -

The 2018-Model Memphis International Auto Show takes place Friday through Sunday, Oct. 27-29, at Memphis Cook Convention Center, 255 N. Main St. Experience the latest in-car technology, research your next vehicle and test drive more than a dozen vehicles on site. Buy discount e-tickets for the show at memphisautoshow.com.

37. Mildred Muhammad To Address Domestic Abuse At Free UTHSC Forum -

For domestic abuse survivor Mildred Muhammad, ex-wife of “D.C. Sniper” John A. Muhammad, writing out her thoughts in a journal and primal scream therapy helped her to deal with the pain she had experienced.

38. Events -

Audio Video Artistry’s third annual Blues Bash is Thursday, Oct. 26, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the AVA design studio, 7750 Trinity Road, suite 116. The party will feature live music, local food and beer, and the debut of AVA’s Memphis-made Master Artist Speakers. RSVP to brad@avartistry.com.

39. Last Word: Fincher in Autumn, Brooks and Mud Island and 115 Years of Chocolate -

This is a very autumnal part of the political season. Leaves falling and moving toward the end of the calendar year. But before you get too into the year-end holidays, candidates are making their declarations about what they will be running for in the new year. It’s a light touch when it’s done right – just a way of letting you know they will be around once the holiday trappings are put back in the closet on the other side of New Year’s.

40. Raised From the Dead -

GHOST AND SPIRIT. I walked through the town at mid-morning. Like any town you spend a lifetime in, you know people.

I spoke to the guy that owns the coffee shop, Jimmy Lewis, as he walked between customers over cups and conversation. He and I went to the same high school, and I see they’re building a new high school right here in town – going to be trying all kinds of new ideas in there, a public/private, secondary/higher education partnership model for the country I’m told.

41. Skipping School -

The farm field at East Shelby Drive and Sycamore Road is “growing” steel beams, classroom walls and concrete floors. Nearby, the athletic fields of the new $90 million Collierville High School are being traced and laid out at summer’s end next to the framework of the large school.

42. Trump Rescinding DACA Program Protecting Young Immigrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Tuesday began dismantling the government program protecting hundreds of thousands of young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children. Attorney General Jeff Sessions declared the Obama administration's program "an unconstitutional exercise of authority" that must be revoked.

43. US Job Growth Slowed in August But Economy Still Looks Solid -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. job market hit a lull in August, with employers adding a solid but less-than-robust 156,000 jobs and holding back on meaningful pay raises for most workers.

Friday's jobs report from the government pointed to an economy that is still steadily generating jobs, though more slowly than it did earlier in its recovery from the Great Recession. With the economy now in its ninth year of expansion and unemployment near a 16-year low, fewer people are looking for work and fewer jobs are being filled.

44. I Recommend a New Novel -

They read us like a book. When I was growing up, The Book Shelf was about where the northwest corner of the Kroger in Poplar Plaza is now. It smelled like books – not the library smell of tomes and the weight of knowledge, but the smell of brand-new information, shiny new possibilities, a world of discovery on a personal scale.

45. Outsourcing by Any Other Name Still Not So Sweet -

Outsourcing is starting to become a four-letter word in state government.

Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration told lawmakers during a summer study session it’s giving up on privatization of state parks, including a plan to hire a company to raze the inn at Fall Creek Falls and build a new one, at a cost of more than $22 million, then take over the keys and the profits.

46. Historic Eclipse Turns Day into Night Across the US -

Millions of Americans gazed in wonder through telescopes, cameras and disposable protective glasses Monday as the moon blotted out the sun in the first full-blown solar eclipse to sweep the U.S. from coast to coast in nearly a century.

47. American Paper Optics, St. Jude Promote Safe Solar Eclipse -

In anticipation of the historic solar eclipse Aug. 21, Bartlett-based American Paper Optics (APO) is partnering with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital to educate the public on safe solar eclipse viewing.

48. Seeing the Light -

Four years ago, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell was in Knoxville for a college football game. But with several hours before kickoff, he took a side trip to view the green initiatives at the Knox County Jail.

49. Last Word: Freeze Warning, Corker on Obamacare Repeal and The Disney Example -

What do you call it when you expect a lot of trouble coming from a specific direction – with a detailed roadmap -- and a completely different controversy comes in from a different direction, hits and leaves a crater. Whatever you call it, that is what happened to Ole Miss football coach Hugh Freeze Thursday evening. Or did it?

50. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

51. Micromanaging Nashville is Job 1 for Legislature -

Metro Nashville is used to getting hammered by the Legislature’s Republicans.

Nearly every time the Metro Council tries to come up with a solution to growing problems, conservatives in the General Assembly swoop in and save the rest of the state from Music City’s attempts to better handle its success.

52. Gunman Who Shot Congressman Had History of Anti-GOP Activity -

BELLEVILLE, Ill. (AP) – The gunman who shot a top GOP congressman and several other people Wednesday at a baseball practice outside the nation's capital had a long history of lashing out at Republicans and once frightened a neighbor by firing a rifle into a field behind his Illinois house.

53. Pelley Out, Mason Temporarily In as CBS News Anchor -

NEW YORK (AP) – CBS' effort to brand itself as the home of hard-edged newscasts has been a success in the morning, not so much in the evening – and "CBS Evening News" anchor Scott Pelley paid the price for it with his job.

54. Russia-Trump Campaign Contacts a Concern, Ex-CIA Chief Says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former CIA Director John Brennan told Congress Tuesday he personally warned Russia last summer against interfering in the U.S. presidential election and was so concerned about Russian contacts with people involved in the Trump campaign that he convened top counterintelligence officials to focus on it.

55. Lawyers: Wells Fargo Created About 3.5 Million Fake Accounts -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Lawyers representing aggrieved customers suing Wells Fargo have said the bank may have opened about 3.5 million unauthorized accounts, far more than bank and regulators disclosed last year.

56. View From the Hill: Forrest Kerfuffle Might Be Sign of Bigger Problem -

Legislation that slipped through the House of Representatives honoring an unknown author who penned a Nathan Bedford Forrest apologist biography was enabled by the climate within the Republican-controlled body, a Memphis legislator says.

57. Last Word: Season's End, 100 N. Main Delays and Voting With Popsicle Sticks -

The last Grizz game of the regular season is a loss to the Mavericks Wednesday evening at the Forum 100 – 93. Look for further word Thursday on Tony Allen's right leg injury. Here comes the “second season” starting with the Spurs. Inbetween is a trip down memory lane as the two-hour "30 for 30" documentary on John Calipari debuts Thursday on ESPN. There was a screening Monday in Kentucky that Calipari attended. The Lexington Herald-Leader has more.

58. Collierville Mayor Stan Joyner Says Political Path Kept Calling -

Before he ever ran for anything in Collierville, Stan Joyner spent a dozen years on the town’s planning commission. And he was an elected alderman for another 12 years before he ran for and was elected mayor of the town of 48,000 people.

59. Last Word: Watching the Masthead, Dunavant Award Winners and Gin Blossoms -

Jones Lang LaSalle says it can save the University of Memphis and by extension the state 12.5 percent of the cost of running its facilities. That’s included in a statewide higher education facilities contract the Haslam administration appears poised to award in a fast-moving return to privatization proposals. But the administration is encountering resistance from legislators who cite a letter from the Tennessee Comptroller that calls into question the cost savings estimates.

60. Genetic Code -

While the anachronistic farmer trope may be a common pop-culture perception, these stewards of the land have in fact been on the cutting edge of technology for thousands of years.

And every milestone since the Neolithic period, from the first plows to today’s automated tractors, has allowed farmers to increase their yields and support a perpetually growing population.

61. Last Word: Veep Visit, Women and Baseball and Civil Rights Cold Cases -

Game time at FedExForum for the NCAA South semifinals and Vice President Mike Pence is expected to be here to cheer on the Butler Bulldogs. The Butler mascot – a live bulldog – was already in town Thursday making the rounds. I think March Madness requires that all involved up their mascot game if they get this far. So UCLA, we expect to see a live bear roaming Beale Street. You might be able to work a deal with the zoo on this. But if there’s a cost split make sure you nail down those percentages.

62. Reflecting on 2017 Class, Looking Ahead to 2018 -

Recruiting is the lifeblood of a college football program, and the cycle never ends.

As UT’s recruiting grind continues and spring practices opened this week, I caught up with Ryan Callahan of 247Sports to talk about the 2017 class. Callahan covers UT recruiting, and here’s what he has to say about the 2017 class, which consists of 22 three-star recruits, four four-stars and one five-star (offensive lineman Trey Smith of University School of Jackson), according to 247Sports’ composite rankings.

63. High Court Bolsters Rights of Learning-Disabled Students -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A unanimous Supreme Court on Wednesday bolstered the rights of millions of learning-disabled students in a ruling that requires public schools to offer special education programs that meet higher standards. The court struck down a lower standard endorsed by President Donald Trump's nominee to the high court.

64. Chuck Berry's Influence on Rock ‘n’ Roll Was Incalculable -

Rock n' roll was more than a new kind of music, but a new story to tell, one for kids with transistor radios in their hands and money in their pockets, beginning to raise questions their parents never had the luxury to ask.

65. The Week Ahead: March 20-26 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! It’s the first day of spring, and a bounty of social gatherings, government meetings and business events are in bloom. Check out our top picks in The Week Ahead…

66. Leave Your Car Home Event Slated March 22 -

A group of local leaders will host an event Wednesday, March 22, to explore how Memphis can secure dedicated funding that grows and improves the city’s transportation system.

The event, part of the “How To Leave Your Car at Home” series, will be facilitated by Suzanne Carlson of Innovate Memphis, Memphis Area Transit Authority commissioner Andre Gibson, Smart City Memphis’ Tom Jones and John Paul Shaffer of the Community Development Council of Greater Memphis. They will share their thoughts on moving Memphis transit forward.

67. Grizzlies Updating FedExForum With Fans’ Enjoyment in Mind -

Every NBA offseason brings questions about the roster for the next season. But regardless of on-court changes for the Grizzlies’ 2017-18 season, FedExForum will be improved with multimillion-dollar upgrades highlighted by a new high-definition scoreboard roughly four times the size of the current board.

68. Leave Your Car Home Event Slated March 22 -

A group of local leaders will host an event Wednesday, March 22, to explore how Memphis can secure dedicated funding that grows and improves the city’s transportation system.

The event, part of the “How To Leave Your Car at Home” series, will be facilitated by Suzanne Carlson of Innovate Memphis, Memphis Area Transit Authority commissioner Andre Gibson, Smart City Memphis’ Tom Jones and John Paul Shaffer of the Community Development Council of Greater Memphis. They will share their thoughts on moving Memphis transit forward.

69. Norris Says Proposed School Voucher Legislation ‘Problematic’ -

NASHVILLE – Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris expressed reservations Wednesday, March 15, about legislation allowing tax dollars to be used to send low-income students in struggling public schools to private schools.

70. State Of The Suburbs -

With its central location, unparalleled access to major roads, rails, runways and rivers and low cost-of-living, it’s no surprise that Memphis and the surrounding area is a popular destination for corporate headquarters, national retail brands and major industrial centers.

71. View From the Hill: Haslam Plan Tilts Broadband Playing Field -

State Reps. Pat Marsh and Art Swann emerged from a meeting underwhelmed by Gov. Bill Haslam’s legislation to spread broadband internet access across Tennessee.

“I thought there would be a lot more to it,” says Marsh, a Shelbyville Republican, calling the proposal “a drop in the bucket” financially but at least a starting point.

72. Tillerson Heading for Confirmation as Secretary of State -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump's nominee for secretary of state headed for approval in a key Senate committee Monday after Florida Sen. Marco Rubio announced his support, backing off from a challenge to the new president.

73. View From the Hill: Taxing Online Sales Not Such an Easy Fix -

Cumberland Transit owner Allen Doty isn’t sure if a rule requiring major out-of-state retailers to collect Tennessee sales taxes will create more equity for his shop.

But Doty, who has been selling everything from bicycles to kayaks and camping gear for 34 years in Nashville, is definitely tired of people shopping in his store for hours, snapping a picture of shoes they like, then going home and buying them online “just to avoid sales tax.”

74. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

75. Magic Pipe: Carnival's Princess Pays $40M Fine for Sea Waste -

MIAMI (AP) – Princess Cruise Lines will pay a $40 million penalty after pleading guilty to seven federal charges in an illegal ocean pollution case that involved one ship's use of a so-called magic pipe to divert oily waste into the waters, authorities said Thursday.

76. Events -

The St. Jude Memphis Marathon Weekend kicks off with the Health & Fitness Expo on Thursday, Dec. 1, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Friday, Dec. 2, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Memphis Cook Convention Center, 255 N. Main St. Open to the public, the expo will feature nearly 100 exhibitors with the latest in all racing needs. Race day on Saturday, Dec. 3, will feature five races: the 5K and 10K starting at 7 a.m., the half-marathon and marathon at 8:30 a.m., and the kids marathon at 1:30 p.m. Visit stjudemarathon.org for details.

77. Data: Better Payoff for Public College Career Program Grads -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Graduates of career training programs at public colleges tend to land better paying jobs than those who attended for-profit schools, according to government data released Thursday.

78. After The Vote -

If you stood in certain places during the last days of the 2016 campaign in Memphis you could see the 2018 elections even if you couldn’t see Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s national victory over Democratic contender Hillary Clinton.

79. Why is It So Difficult for Tennessee To Oust Indicted Politicians? -

Tennessee is lagging much of the nation when it comes to the ability to remove scoundrels from public office.

And, make no mistake, the Volunteer State has had its fair share of ne’er-do-well politicians who would likely have been thrown out of office if the proper procedures had been in place. 

80. Election Fallout: What a Trump Or Clinton Presidency Means for State -

Donald Trump is going to win easily in Tennessee.

Everyone, most of all the campaigns for both Trump and Hillary Clinton, accept this fact, as evidenced by the lack of campaign time spent in the state – and most of the South, for that matter – during this contentious campaign cycle.

81. Impact of Three-Day RiverArtsFest Felt Year-Round -

RiverArtsFest is gearing up for its 10th annual fine arts festival this weekend Downtown in the South Main Arts District, where more than 20,000 people are expected to attend the three-day event.

Launched in 1989 as Arts in the Park in Overton Park before relocating to the Memphis Botanic Garden in 1992, the fest was revitalized in 2007 as RiverArtsFest and moved to its present location.

82. State Rep. Feels Heat From Staffer’s Firing -

Like sands through the hour glass, these are the days of our Legislature’s lives.

When General Assembly candidates run for office, they talk of high ideals such as reforming education, creating jobs, saving tax dollars and stifling sexual offenders, even restricting abortion, adopting a state rifle or making the Holy Bible Tennessee’s state book.

83. Fourth Bluff Momentum Grows With $5 Million Grant -

They’ve been called the “things between things” in Downtown Memphis.

In the earliest plans for the city of Memphis, they were part of the Promenade – a section of public land that includes the city’s first public library, the river view behind what is now the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, and Memphis Park and Mississippi River Park below it on the other side of Riverside Drive.

84. Two More Boutique Hotels to Arrive Soon -

An out-of-town developer with one hotel planned for the Downtown market has purchased the former Memphis College of Art graduate school at 477 South Main for another hotel.

California-based Wessman Holdings was attracted to Downtown’s growth of boutique hotels and abundance of vacant buildings, said principal John Wessman.

85. Commission Eyes Bolton High as Ag Career Center -

When Wade Bolton was shot and fatally wounded in Court Square in 1869 by a former partner in a slave trading firm, it continued a long-running feud across several years in which eight people altogether would die violently.

86. Obscure Midtown Warehouse to Become Company’s HQ -

The warehouse looks like a foreign object that sprouted in the middle of a Midtown neighborhood. Surrounding the two-story warehouse at 802 Rozelle St. are two-story, single-family homes with fenced yards. The adjacent CSX and Union Pacific railyard is the only indicator that this enclave was once an industrial area. After a $2 million renovation, the dated warehouse will emerge as a highly modern neighborhood asset.

87. Yellen, in Speech Friday, Could Send Signal About Next Hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The job market is humming, and so are the U.S. financial markets, with major stock indexes near record highs.

All that would normally trigger a green light for the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates – especially when they're barely above all-time lows. Yet the Fed, still casting a wary eye on the economy, has yet to signal that it will resume raising rates soon.

88. Toast to the Achievement School District -

Somebody forgot to tell the Achievement School District it had to follow a few simple rules when the Legislature formed it a few years ago to save failing schools: Primarily, don’t party with the money.

89. Thrill-Ride Accidents Spark New Demands for Regulation -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over.

90. Last Word: Graceland's Important Day, MAA's $4 Billion Buy and Hotel Napoleon -

Before the rain did its thing Monday night at Graceland, the latest Black Lives Matter movement protest was a fact at Graceland’s annual candlelight vigil.

Some tension and lots of noise on the line at Elvis Presley and Craft where police stopped those whom they identified as protesters. And more than a few allegations of racial profiling by police.

91. With Redbirds Pitcher Reyes the Plan is Attack -

A few hours before St. Louis Cardinals prospect Alex Reyes took the mound at AutoZone Park, Memphis Redbirds manager Mike Shildt confided that it was a good time to “back him off” – or hold down his pitch count.

92. Advance Memphis Aims to Provide Workers Economic Sustainability -

“I’m always thinking about things through an economic lens,” said Steve Nash, executive director of Advance Memphis, at a recent tour of the nonprofit’s new location at 575 Suzette St.

93. Memphis’ ‘Rampage’ Jackson Fights On -

“I’m not a psychic, but I’m gonna predict I’m gonna whup his ass.” No, this was not LeBron James speaking of Draymond Green late in the NBA Finals – after feelings had been hurt with the B-word.

94. Last Word: Chips Moman, ServiceMaster Incentives and Crosstown High -

Chips Moman has died. Word of his death Monday at a hospice in Georgia came two years after Moman was honored for his contributions to Memphis music and the city's history.

Those contributions were substantial and for quite a while they were overlooked – even while he was running the definition of a hit factory at American Sound Studios, a non-descript recording studio on Danny Thomas Boulevard at Chelsea Avenue in North Memphis.

95. ‘Prevent’ Defenses: Freeze, Briles Look to Protect Themselves -

It’s safe to say in pretty much every college football program in America that players are made to pay some penalty for the basic infraction of being late to a practice or a team meeting.

Sometimes they are suspended for a quarter. Other times for a half or an entire game against some non-competitive directional school. Sometimes, the players even have a semi-legitimate excuse for being late.

96. CEO Pay Climbs Again, Even As Their Stock Prices Don't -

NEW YORK (AP) – CEOs at the biggest companies got a 4.5 percent pay raise last year. That's almost double the typical American worker's, and a lot more than investors earned from owning their stocks – a big fat zero.

97. Outsourcing Savings Estimates Strain ‘Credulity’ -

Terry Cowles flashes a photo of ceiling lamp fixtures on the screen and tells state legislators a vendor’s state Capitol team used its electrical training to remove, repair and reinstall fixtures, saving taxpayers $15,500.

98. As Fliers Wait in Security Lines, Gov't Asks for Patience -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Facing a growing backlash over extremely long waits at airport security, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson asked fliers "to be patient" as the government takes steps to get them onto planes more quickly.

99. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

100. Mild Weather Cuts TVA’s Bottom Line by Half -

The Tennessee Valley Authority reported net income of $281 million between Oct. 1 and March 31, the first half of its fiscal year.

TVA, which reported earnings on Tuesday, May 3, said net income was $296 million less than the same period last year, primarily due to the extremely mild winter experienced in TVA’s service territory compared to record-setting cold temperatures in 2015.