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Editorial Results (free)

1. Zoo Parking Plan Draws Questions, Skepticism -

The first audience for the Memphis Zoo parking plan Wednesday, Feb. 21, was tough. The crowd of more than 200 at the Memphis Pink Palace museum, many wearing green “Save The Greensward” T-shirts and some carrying banners with the slogan, expressed some skepticism that the zoo would abide by a ban on parking on the Overton Park Greensward once the new parking area is completed.

2. Last Word: Plans and More Plans, Badu and Byrne and Gun Bills In Nashville -

Plans, plans, plans. I’ve seen so many overhead views and schematics in the last 24-hours that I had to go for a walk in the rain Wednesday to avoid vertigo. I saw a lot of green Save the Greensward t-shirts Wednesday evening at the Pink Palace that looked like they hadn’t been out of the bottom drawer in a while and even a couple of banners.

3. Zoo Parking Plan Takes Additional 2.4 Acres, Keeps Lot on Zoo Side of Ridge -

The new Memphis Zoo parking lot is going to be late and will take in 2.4 more acres of land primarily on the eastern border of the Overton Park Greensward. But in the process, the expanded parking will move farther away from a first draft version of the plan that put cars right up against Veterans Plaza and the Doughboy statue in the park.

4. Immigrant Impact -

Immigrant households in Memphis contributed more than $4.2 billion to Memphis’ gross domestic product in 2015 and the immigrant population is growing at a faster rate than the overall population in Memphis, a new study has found.

5. Harris Proposes Bill to Fund Pre-K with Sunday Wine Sales -

State tax revenue from the Sunday sale of wine in stores could be used to fund prekindergarten access for low-income families.

State Senate Democratic Leader Lee Harris of Memphis announced Monday, Feb. 19, that he is sponsoring the bill, which would figure prominently in the local push for more prekindergarten classrooms in the city of Memphis.

6. Harris Proposes Bill To Fund Pre-K with Sunday Wine Sales Revenue -

State tax revenue from allowing the Sunday sale of wine in grocery stores and supermarkets and other stores could be used to fund prekindergarten access for low income families.

State Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris of Memphis announced Monday, Feb. 19, that he is sponsoring the bill, which would figure prominently in the local push for more prekindergarten classrooms in the city of Memphis.

7. Harris Proposes Bill To Fund Pre-K with Sunday Wine Sales Revenue -

State tax revenue from allowing the Sunday sale of wine in grocery stores and supermarkets and other stores could be used to fund prekindergarten access for low income families.

State Senate Democratic leader Lee Harris of Memphis announced Monday, Feb. 19, that he is sponsoring the bill, which would figure prominently in the local push for more prekindergarten classrooms in the city of Memphis.

8. Marchers Mark 50th Anniversary of Start of 1968 Sanitation Strike -

The signs are now iconic. “I Am A Man” signs from the 1968 sanitation workers strike are museum pieces, even collectibles. So more than a few of those who marched Monday, Feb. 12, 50 years to the day that the historic strike began, kept the signs stapled to yard sticks, another nod to the past. Still others went for different versions – “I Am A Woman,” “I Am A Person.”

9. Last Word: The Mural Takedown, Corker's Calculation and Beale Crowd Control -

Cue the organ music from the old-fashioned television soap operas: As the weekend began, city public works crews had painted over – either completely or partially – a lot of the Paint Memphis program murals on the west side of Willett near Lamar. That would be the ones city council members complained about and others that no one complained about.

10. Last Word: Shutdown Round Two, The Pastner Charges and 1968 Virtual Reality -

The federal government technically shutdown at midnight in Washington, D.C., Friday for the second time in 17 days. But the House and Senate were still going for a vote on a two-year budget compromise before dawn Friday morning as this is posted.

11. Editorial: Leadership Should Come With More Dialogue -

When two groups agree on a general goal but not the way to accomplish that goal, the differences can be overcome. When the two groups question the motives of each other, it becomes much more difficult.

12. The Metrics Mayor -

At times in the last two years, political supporters of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland have been worried. They agree with what got him elected, his “brilliant at the basics” philosophy that makes basic services and fundamental play-it-safe financial strategies the priority at City Hall.

13. Bill Could Expand Residential PILOT -

In an effort to encourage residential infill and density beyond the confines of Downtown and Midtown, new legislation is making its way through the Tennessee Senate and House of Representatives that would allow Shelby County to offer tax incentives to multifamily and hotel developers outside of the central business district.

14. City Council Approves 2 Percent Gas and Electric Rate Hikes -

Memphis City Council members approved gas and electric rate hikes Tuesday, Feb. 6, for Memphis Light Gas and Water Division effective in July.

The two percent rate hikes for each of the sectors came after a prolonged council debate and a council vote that initially voted down the 2 percent rate hike for gas.

15. Bill Introduced to Expand EDGE’s Residential PILOT Boundaries -

In an effort to encourage residential infill and density beyond the confines of Downtown and Midtown, new legislation is making its way through the Tennessee Senate and House of Representatives that would allow Shelby County to offer tax incentives to multifamily and hotel developers outside of the central business district.

16. Homeless Work Program Increases Scope, Pay -

Work Local, a Downtown-centric program providing work opportunities for homeless Memphians is expanding its scope using additional funding from the Downtown Memphis Commission and the Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau.

17. Digest -

Memphis Toys R Us

To Remain Open

A representative with Toys R Us has confirmed to The Daily News that the retailer’s Memphis location, at 7676 Polo Ground Blvd., won’t close after all.

18. Fairgrounds Project May Get More Acreage -

More than 12 acres of land next to the Mid-South Fairgrounds could open up with the move of the Shelby County Schools central office as the city embarks on a redevelopment of the Fairgrounds and surrounding area.

19. SCS Looking To Move Out of Central Offices Near Fairgrounds -

Shelby County Schools is in the due diligence phase of a relocation out of its long-time central office near the Mid-South Fairgrounds. And it comes as the city is pursuing a redevelopment of the fairgrounds and areas around it.

20. Events -

NAWBO Memphis will host a reception honoring Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland Wednesday, Jan. 31, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Hattiloo Theatre, 37 Cooper St. The chapter is recognizing Strickland and the city for the progress being made in increasing business and spending with women- and minority-owned businesses. Tickets are $15. Visit nawbomemphis.org.

21. Ford Outlines Budget Process As Memphis’ New CFO -

Shirley Ford has been named chief financial officer for the city of Memphis. Ford, who was selected to be CFO by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and confirmed by the City Council, has served as the city’s comptroller since 2014. She has more than 30 years of financial, accounting and managerial experience. In addition, she is a certified public accountant and a certified municipal finance officer as designated by the state comptroller.

22. Dunavant Set Gold Standard As Public Servant -

For the late Bobby Dunavant, who worked as Shelby County Probate Court Clerk for 40 years from 1954 to 1994, qualities like being honest, accessible, generous, empathetic and highly attentive to detail made him beloved by friends and colleagues throughout his life.

23. Last Word: Credit Hours & Tn Promise, Opioid Differences and Nikki's Hot Rebrand -

A very busy Monday and I feel like some of this is may be fueled by some of us just now getting completely over the flu or someone close who has the flu for the first time in the New Year. Whatever the case, Monday came with a curtain call of sorts by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, a court order on the Confederate monuments, year-end stats on crime in Memphis and countywide… a PILOT here, a building permit or three there.

24. Work Program for Homeless Increases Scope, Worker Pay -

Work Local, a Downtown-centric program providing work opportunities for homeless Memphians is expanding its scope using additional funding from the Downtown Memphis Commission and the Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau.

25. Events -

The Shelby County Office of Resilience will gather public input on the creation of the Mid-South Regional Resilience Plan at three workshops: Tuesday, Jan. 30, at Memphis Leadership Foundation, 1548 Poplar Ave.; Wednesday, Jan. 31, at the Baker Community Center, 7942 Church St. in Millington; and Thursday, Feb. 1, at the Southaven Public Library, 8554 Northwest Drive. All meetings run from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Workshops offer an opportunity for residents to share their opinions on the best strategies to mitigate effects of and manage recovery efforts for future weather-related incidents. Learn more at resilientshelby.com.

26. Building Memphis From the Core -

When I delivered this year’s State of the City speech to the Kiwanis Club of Memphis at its meeting at the University Club, long planted at the corner of Lamar and Central, it would’ve been easy to think that the ground on which we stood had been part of Memphis from its very start.

27. Events -

Novel will host Wintrell Pittman, author of the “Children of the World” book series, for a discussion and book signing Saturday, Jan. 27, at 2 p.m. at 387 Perkins Road Extended. The 12-book series uses crayon characters to teach children basic morals and values while enhancing reading and comprehension skills. Visit novelmemphis.com.

28. Council Reopens MLGW Rate Hike Consideration, Approves Term Limit Referendum -

Memphis City Council members decided Tuesday, Jan. 23, to take a second look at the gas and electric rate-hike proposals they rejected two weeks ago, but put off any new votes on the matter until February.

29. Shelby County Joins Memphis in Landfill Moratorium -

Shelby County commissioners approved a six-month moratorium on any new construction landfills in unincorporated Shelby County on Monday, Jan. 22.

The resolution is the companion to a Memphis City Council resolution passed earlier this month that imposed a six-month moratorium on such landfills within the city of Memphis.

30. Commission Adds County Landfill Moratorium to City Ban -

Shelby County commissioners approved a six month moratorium Monday, Jan. 22, on any new construction landfills in unincorporated Shelby County. The resolution is the companion to a Memphis City Council resolution passed earlier this month that imposed a six-month moratorium on such landfills within the city of Memphis.

31. Council Talks With Head of TVA, Votes on Two More Ballot Questions -

Memphis City Council members talk with Tennessee Valley Authority president Bill Johnson Tuesday, Jan. 23, meet Mayor Jim Strickland’s nominee to replace retiring Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division president Jerry Collins and may renew discussions of electric and gas rate hikes proposed by MLGW that it voted down two weeks ago.

32. Some Express Interest in Monuments Removed From City Parks -

The private nonprofit that had the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments removed from city parks in December says it has fielded numerous offers to take the statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest, Jefferson Davis and a bust of Confederate Capt. Harvey Mathes in Memphis Park where the Davis statue stood.

33. Around Memphis | January 22, 2018 -

Here’s a look at recent Memphis-related news from around the web…

Doubting MLK During a Strike in Memphis
Conor Friedersdorf, The Atlantic

34. Last Word: The Snow Split, Amazon Post-Mortem and Intermodal Comeback -

A split verdict on Snow Day 4. Some school systems and colleges and universities are out again Friday, others are not and still others are opening later in the day. Shelby County Schools, which is out, says it has 13 extra days built into its schedule for just such an event or events – that is 13 days extra beyond the 180 days the state requires as the bare minimum for a school year.

35. MLGW Names Interim Chief Utility Officer -

The vice president and chief financial officer of Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division will serve as the interim leader of the utility when MLGW president Jerry Collins retires at the end of January.

36. Greenspace Nonprofit Details Offers For Confederate Monuments -

The private nonprofit group that had the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments removed from city parks in December says it has had numerous offers to take the statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as well as a bust of Confederate Captain Harvey Mathes in the same park where the Davis statue stood.

37. Growing the Ranks -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland defines the state of the city halfway through his four-year term of office as “strong and getting stronger every day.”

38. Memphis Out of Running for Amazon's Second Headquarters -

Memphis is out of the running for Amazon’s massive second headquarters. The Seattle-based ecommerce giant released a list of 20 finalists Thursday, Jan. 18, out of the 238 proposals submitted by cities across the United States, Canada and Mexico.

39. Last Word: Snow Week, Liberal Arts and Their Critics and Tunica Casinos -

Snow Day 3 as this becomes a snow week for many of us. Granted one of those days was a federal holiday in which the temperature was above freezing and the sun was out. During the second consecutive snow day Wednesday for Shelby County Schools students, Candous Brown, a teacher at Raleigh Egypt High School held class anyway via Facebook.

40. Strickland: Memphis About to Meet Goal of Net Gain in Police Ranks -

When the Memphis Police Department graduates a class of about 80 recruits Thursday, Jan. 18, at First Baptist Church–Broad, the MPD will have a net annual gain in police officers for the first time in seven years.

41. Hass Wants Rhodes to Embrace Change -

After six months as president of Rhodes College, Marjorie Hass says small liberal arts colleges like Rhodes are “on the defensive.”

But as she was installed Saturday, Jan. 13, as the 20th president of Rhodes, Hass defended the need for such an education in an age of technological advances and vowed to create an institution that is not fragile to the “shock and disruption” of inevitable changes already underway.

42. Nomination Deadline For Dunavant Awards Feb. 1 -

Memphis is lucky to have an abundance of residents with a passion for public service and it is time once again to honor their commitment to improving this community.

Each year the Rotary Club of Memphis East recognizes the importance of public service by hosting the Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

43. The Week Ahead: Jan. 15-21 -

Good morning, Memphis! We hope you’re thawing out today on the last federal holiday for a while. Check out what you need to know in The Week Ahead, from the National Civil Rights Museum’s Martin Luther King Jr. Day observances to the mayor’s state of the city address and plenty of entertaining events...

44. Last Word: A New Majority, A Plan After Kroger and Cold Cases -

Shelby County elections administrator Linda Phillips has been watching the ebb and flow of petitions for the 2018 elections and has found what she believes is a link to the weather. “Apparently when the dreaded ‘snow’ word is mentioned in the forecast, not only do people go out and clear the shelves of milk, bread and eggs. They also decide to pick up a petition,” she wrote in an email with the list of who has pulled and who has filed in the last two days.

45. Jeanes To Serve as MLGW Chief Utility Officer -

The vice president and chief financial officer of Memphis Light Gas and Water Division will serve as the interim leader of the utility when MLGW president Jerry Collins retires at the end of January.

46. Frayser Dump Dropped By City Council -

Memphis City Council members not only unanimously voted down an expansion of Memphis Wrecking Co.’s construction landfill in Frayser Tuesday, Jan. 9. They followed the vote on the proposal with approval of a six-month moratorium on permits and certificates for any new construction landfills in Memphis.

47. Shelby County Prekindergarten Push Remains in General Terms for Now -

Nearly six years after voters defeated two ballot questions in as many years that would have provided a tax revenue steam for universal prekindergarten, the pre-K quest is back.

The return of a coordinated civic and political push for pre-K comes about five years after a combination of state and federal funding as well as a shift of county government’s early childhood Head Start contract to Shelby County Schools.

48. Dunavant Awards Spotlight Public Servants -

Being a public servant often is thankless job, but each year the Rotary Club of Memphis East recognizes the importance of public service to the community by hosting the Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

49. Frayser Dump Dropped By City Council -

Memphis City Council members not only unanimously voted down an expansion of Memphis Wrecking Co.’s construction landfill in Frayser Tuesday, Jan. 9. They followed the vote on the proposal with approval of a six-month moratorium on permits and certificates for any new construction landfills in Memphis.

50. Shot Fired From Memphis Ignites Civil War Rematch -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest died in 1877, but 140 years later some people just can’t let their hero or the Old South go away.

In fact, the state Legislature is set to reignite the Civil War – to some degree – in 2018. We hope no gunshots are fired.

51. Council Rejects MLGW Gas, Electric Rate Hikes, Dumps Frayser Landfill -

Memphis City Council members voted down proposed electric and gas rate hikes Tuesday, Jan. 9. But they left the door open to either reconsidering that or some shorter term rate hikes by delaying for two weeks approval of Memphis Light Gas and Water Division’s annual budget.

52. City Council to Consider Ideas to Mitigate Kroger Closures -

Memphis City Council members will talk Tuesday, Jan. 9, about the decision of Kroger’s Delta Division to close two of its Memphis stores in 3 1/2 weeks.

The sudden announcement could create food deserts in those areas of the city and make it difficult of recruit replacement stores.

53. Weekend Monuments Protests, Response Suggest Shift -

Memphis Branch NAACP president Deidre Malone may have had the most concise description of what has changed since the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments came down Dec. 20.

“What we want happened. The monuments are down,” Malone said Friday, Jan. 5, as the NAACP and other groups called on Memphians to ignore plans for protests in the city the next day by groups opposed to the removal of the monuments.

54. White Nationalist Confederate Monuments Protest Draws Larger Police Presence -

A dozen white nationalists with Confederate flags were the only protest Saturday, Jan. 6, that got anywhere near Health Sciences Park and what’s left of the park’s monument to Nathan Bedford Forrest.

55. $137M Permit Filed For Convention Center Work -

Work on the recently announced $175 million upgrade to the Memphis Cook Convention Center could be on the way soon as a $136.9 million building permit application has been filed with county construction code officials.

56. Ford Appointed City’s New Chief Financial Officer -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has appointed city comptroller Shirley Ford to be the city’s new chief financial officer.

57. Memphis Experts See Economic Growth Building Off 2017 Into 2018 -

With resolutions made and the new year now, another annual exercise rises to the forefront – predictions on what Memphis and its economy can expect in 2018.

If 2017 taught us anything, it’s that there’s so much we won’t be able to even remotely see coming, from Memphis bidding to become the potential home for Amazon’s second headquarters to action finally being taken on the Confederate monuments in city parks and so much more.

58. Ford Appointed City’s New Chief Financial Officer -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has appointed city comptroller Shirley Ford to be the city’s new chief financial officer.

59. Memphis Leaders: Avoid Parks During Protests -

City leaders are urging Memphians to avoid two city parks and a third area Saturday, Jan. 6, after several groups indicated they plan to protest last month’s removal of Confederate monuments. However, city chief legal officer Bruce McMullen said at a Thursday morning taping of the WKNO-TV program “Behind the Headlines” that no group had applied for a city permit to hold a march or demonstration.

60. Attorney, Former Political Activist Lewis Donelson Dies at 100 -

In a century of life that began in Memphis, Lewis Donelson was many things including an attorney, politician and strategist. In all of those pursuits and others, he was one of the city’s most influential citizens and a force in some of the most historic moments in the city’s history as well as the state’s history.

61. Ford Appointed New Chief Financial Officer -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has appointed city comptroller Shirley Ford to be the city’s new chief financial officer.

62. City Hall Urges Memphians To Avoid Saturday Demonstrations -

The city administration is urging Memphians to avoid demonstrations planned for Saturday, Jan. 6, against the removal last month of Confederate monuments in two city parks.

Several groups local and otherwise have posted on social media about different kinds of protests in the city. They range from a plan by the group Confederate 901 to have a car caravan at the Tennessee Welcome Center Downtown that goes past Memphis and Health Sciences Parks to a white nationalist group calling for a demonstration similar to the one in Charlottesville, Virginia last August that ended in violence that killed one person and included a torchlight march by alt-right groups.

63. $137M Permit Filed for Cook Convention Center Work -

Work on the recently announced $175 million upgrade to the Memphis Cook Convention Center could be on the way soon as a $136.9 million building permit application has been filed with county construction code officials.

64. Last Word: Liberty Bowl Post Mortem, Confederate Protest Plans and Absorption -

As soon as it was confirmed the Tigers would play in the AutoZone Liberty Bowl, there was some concern locally about the impact that would have on tourism at the holidays with only one of the bowl teams – Iowa State – being from out of town. The exact dollar figures aren’t in just yet. But the game was enough of a success out of the box that the executive director of the game is talking about a more constant presence in the bowl game for the Tigers now that they’ve made their first appearance in the 59-year history of the game which began in Philadelphia. And there is some precedent in college football for what Steve Ehrhart is talking about.

65. Mayor Says Memphis 'Will Be Prepared' for Statue Protests -

If opponents of the removal of the city’s two most visible Civil War monuments follow through on plans for a Memphis protest Jan. 6, Mayor Jim Strickland said city government will be ready.

66. Strickland Touts 'Solidarity' Around Confederate Monuments Removal -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland marked the halfway point in his four-year term of office Monday, Jan. 1, by calling on citizens to make use of the “spirit of solidarity” shown in the removal of the city’s two most visible Civil War monuments just before Christmas.

67. City, County Governments on Different Paths -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and the city council members are half way through their four-year terms of office with the new year.

68. City Puts Price of Convention Center Renovation at $175M -

The renovation of the Memphis Cook Convention Center will cost $175 million and should be completed by the end of 2019, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland announced Friday, Dec. 29.

69. City Puts Price of Convention Center Renovation at $175 Million -

The renovation of the Memphis Cook Convention Center will cost $175 million and should be completed by the end of 2019, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland announced Friday, Dec. 29.

70. Monuments Moment Spans Generational Lines -

Van Turner Sr. celebrated his 73rd birthday Wednesday, Dec. 20, as his son, county commissioner Van Turner Jr., was somewhere near the epicenter of the most significant chapter of the city’s long-running controversy over Confederate monuments.

71. Forrest Down -

It’s hard to know where the equestrian statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is when there aren’t lights on it.

That was the case Wednesday, Dec. 20, as the spotlights normally illuminating the likeness of the Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan grand wizard were doused.

72. Forrest and Davis Statues Removed As City Sells Parks -

With a quick vote without debate on a last-minute substitute ordinance, the Memphis City Council set in motion Wednesday, Dec. 20, the removal of Confederate monuments in two city parks.

And four hours later the equestrian statue of Confederate General, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard that has stood for more than 100 years was removed from its base by a crane and taken to an undisclosed location. An hour after that another crane moved into Memphis Park to remove the statue of Confederacy president Jefferson Davis.

73. Black Theater Museum Plan Gets Good Reviews at City Hall -

For about five months, Hattiloo Theatre founder Ekundayo Bandele had been working on the idea he proposed Tuesday, Dec. 19, to establish the National Black Theater Museum inside the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art building in Overton Park.

74. County Commission Approves Sheriff Pay Raise -

Shelby County commissioners voted 10-0 Monday, Dec. 18, to raise the pay of the Shelby County sheriff elected in 2018 from $116,955 a year to $135,575 annually.

The ordinance approved was an amended version of an earlier ordinance that was voted down in November, coming up short of the nine votes – a two-thirds majority – needed to pass. Two related ordinances were also voted down in November that would have raised the pay of four other county elected officials and all 13 county commissioners effective with those elected in 2018. Those two ordinances were not reconsidered by the commission Monday.

75. County Commission Approves Sheriff Pay Raise -

Shelby County commissioners voted 10-0 Monday, Dec. 18, to raise the pay of the Shelby County sheriff elected in the 2018 elections from the current $116,955 a year to $135,575 annually.

The passage of the ordinance was a reconsidered and amended version of an earlier ordinance that was voted down in November, coming up short of the nine-vote two-thirds majority needed to pass. Two other ordinances were also voted down in November that would have raised the pay of four other countywide elected officials and all 13 county commissioners effective with those elected in 2018. Those two ordinances were not reconsidered by the commission.

76. City Council May Vote To Phase In MLGW Rate Hikes -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Dec. 19, on a set of water, gas and electric rate hikes recommended by Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division to take effect next month.

A council committee is recommending the electric and gas-rate increases be phased in over several years.

77. Last Word: California Extradition, Corker's Vote on Tax Reform and Post Kirk & Crum -

The ex-wife of Tigers and Grizz basketball great Lorenzen Wright is due in a California courtroom Monday morning as extradition proceedings begin following Sherra Wright’s arrest there Friday evening on a Shelby County grand jury indictment here on charges of conspiracy, first degree murder and attempted murder.

78. Groundswell of Support -

(From left to right) Alberto Garibi, Joann Massey, Bruce Lerner, Robert Knecht, Patrice Robinson and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland celebrate the groundbreaking for the partnership between PeroxyChem and the Maynard C. Stiles Wastewater Treatment Plant. In partnership with the city of Memphis, PeroxyChem’s production will result in reliability of supply and save the city the cost of shipment, while also creating local jobs with a particular focus on hiring minority-owned subcontractors.

...

79. The Cutoff -

When Memphis leaders got together with suburban mayors in September at Agricenter, it was to talk about a unified countywide approach to getting Amazon’s $5 billion HQ2 project.

It was supposed to be a time for leaders of the county and its seven cities to talk about their common good, regionalism and all things they agree on, with none of what they disagree on at least for the moment.

80. Shelby County Housing Market Remains Strong -

As the year winds to a close, Shelby County home sales remained strong in November, continuing the nearly uniform rise in average sales price, volume and overall units that has been indicative of the local housing market in 2017.

81. MLGW President Delays Retirement Until January -

Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division president and CEO Jerry Collins Jr. is postponing his retirement to Jan. 31 to ensure a smooth transition for his successor, the utility has announced.

Collins initially planned to retire Dec. 19.

82. Mayor’s Critics Have Their Own Plans for Strike Anniversary -

When the 1968 sanitation workers strike ended in April 1968, Cleophus Smith didn’t feel like the formal city recognition and a minimal pay raise he and other sanitation workers had gained was something to be celebrated.

83. U of M Expands Toy Drive This Holiday Season -

The University of Memphis athletics department has announced that the annual Tiger Toy Drive will be expanded to include partnerships with the city of Memphis, CW30 and iHeart Radio.

The partnership with Mayor Jim Strickland and the city of Memphis has been a long-standing effort to provide toys for those in need in the Memphis area. However, this year, the Tigers welcome two community leaders to help in the drive: CW30 and iHeart Radio.

84. Last Word: Bredesen Runs, Germantown Moratorium, Monsanto Fights Dicamba Ban -

The big reveal at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s annual luncheon Wednesday, at least for me – Dale Watson lives in Memphis now. The Americana musician, producer and author was among the performers at the Peabody and he had a bit of trouble getting the group of 700 business and political leaders to sing along with the refrain of one of his most popular tunes – “I Lie When I Drink and I Drink A Lot" -- with at least a dozen video cameras panning the room. But he continued on without audience participation. Other entertainment highlights featured Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland as the voice of Amazon’s Alexa.

85. U of M Expands Toy Drive This Holiday Season -

The University of Memphis athletics department has announced that the annual Tiger Toy Drive will be expanded to include partnerships with the city of Memphis, CW30 and iHeart Radio.

The partnership with Mayor Jim Strickland and the city of Memphis has been a long-standing effort to provide toys for those in need in the Memphis area. However, this year, the Tigers welcome two community leaders to help in the drive: CW30 and iHeart Radio.

86. RCV Goes To Ballot, Term-Limit Change May Join It -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Dec. 5, to a November 2018 referendum that would repeal the use of ranked-choice voting (RCV) in some city council races starting with 2019 city elections.

87. Worth the Wait -

Just since 1995, the University of Southern California has stayed home to play in the Rose Bowl more than a half-dozen times. Steve Ehrhart, executive director of the AutoZone Liberty Bowl, couldn’t help but look at that with a bit of envy.

88. Last Word: Norvell's New Contract, Grade-Changing Culture and Buying Gibson -

So the Grizz snap the losing streak Monday with a win over the Timberwolves. They try to start a winning streak Wednesday against the Knicks. Elsewhere, so much for a holiday lull. It was cold outside but many a keyboard around this place was warm enough Tuesday afternoon with both the anticipated and the unanticipated. And then there were those items that fall somewhere inbetween. Could happen but will it be today? In many of those cases, the answer was yes.

89. City Council Gives Final Approval to RCV Repeal Referendum in November -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Dec. 5, to a November 2018 referendum that would repeal the use of ranked-choice voting in some city council races starting with the 2019 city elections.

90. Coalition Taps Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

91. City Administration Sets Dec. 19 Deadline For Mediation On Confederate Monuments -

The city of Memphis is setting a Dec. 19 deadline for mediation efforts on the removal of Confederate monuments from city parks.

Attorney Allan Wade, representing the city administration in the matter, sent a letter to attorneys for the state Friday, Dec. 1, saying city government has received no word when mediation sessions suggested by the state on the controversy are scheduled.

92. Will Pre-K Put the City of Memphis Back in the Education Business? -

For the first time since the city of Memphis ceased funding schools after the historic merger of city and county districts, it’s looking to get back into education – by putting dollars into pre-K classrooms.

93. Last Word: Lake District Recycling, The New First and The AAC 'Glass Ceiling' -

The U.S. Senate vote on a tax reform plan is now set for 10 a.m. our time Friday morning following more debate in D.C. that began Thursday as the trigger provision to raise tax rates if economic growth from the proposed tax cuts doesn't materialize was ruled out of order by the Senate parliamentarian. This was the provision on which the support of U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee hinged. And Corker is leading a group of deficit hawks whose block of votes is considered crucial in what happens to a proposal that was being reshaped as midnight approached. Here's Politico with comments from Corker as of late Thursday

94. Coalition Signs on With Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

95. Sawyer, Goff Kick Off Commission Campaigns -

Tami Sawyer and Sam Goff may be seeing each other on the August county general election ballot. But between now and May, they have separate primary races for the District 7 seat on the Shelby County Commission.

96. Council Moves Toward Alcohol on Main Street -

Memphis City Council members delayed a final vote Tuesday, Nov. 21, on an ordinance that sets out options for the removal of statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis in city parks, but moved forward on a proposal to allow open alcohol containers and consumption on Main Street.

97. Preparing For Park Without Brooks, MCA -

A new Memphis Brooks Museum of Art Downtown would open in 2022 at the earliest and cost $110 million along with an endowment.

“It’s going to be a little bit of a moving target. What we want to do is to build the endowment,” said Brooks director Emily Ballew Neff on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

98. Council to Take Final Vote on Confederate Monuments Alternatives -

Memphis City Council members are scheduled to take a final vote Tuesday, Nov. 21, on an ordinance that sets out options for the removal of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis statues in city parks, and will discuss amending a city ordinance to allow the consumption of alcoholic beverages on Main Street Downtown.

99. Trustee’s Office Promotes Financial Education and Counseling -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will tell you that the myriad financial education programs and initiatives his office is involved with – covering everything from helping improve consumer credit to financial counseling – are what he sees as part of his job as the “banker for the county.”

100. Memphis Lands Minor League Soccer -

AutoZone Park will be home to a team in the United Soccer League, according to multiple media reports. The team, as yet unnamed, would begin play in 2019.

“We are excited about the prospects of a third professional sports team in Downtown Memphis,” Redbirds president and general manager Craig Unger said in a statement. “Coupled with the continued revitalization of Downtown, the time has never been better for investment in the city and its people.”