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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Paying the Piper, Sewer Regrets and The New Incumbent's Strategy -

Grizzlies over the Rockets 98-90 after being down 12 on the road in Houston. There is just something in the Memphis sports ethos that happens at halftime or between quarters. The Grizz are 3-0 in this young season. And for the second consecutive game some extracurricular action on the court. Mario Chalmers of the Grizz and James Harden of the Rockets scuffled after Chalmers got floored by Harden after Harden got swarmed by him and James Ennis. Harden got the foul and he and Chalmers each got a technical for what followed.

2. Ring Partners With Conagra on PAM Spray Bottles -

Ring Container Technologies, a product packaging and plastic container manufacturing company based in Oakland, Tennessee, has completed a collaboration with Conagra Brands to create a new plastic bottle for PAM Cooking Spray.

3. Last Word: The Corker Tweets, Market Stabilization and The Rise of the Landshark -

In the “That Didn’t Take Long” department, whatever diplomacy there was in the relationship between President Donald Trump and U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee vanished over the weekend – vanished in the course of several tweets starting with one from Trump claiming he refused an endorsement of Corker in a re-election bid next year and that resulted in Corker’s decision not to seek re-election. He claims Corker “begged” for his endorsement. “Said he could not win without my endorsement,” Trump added. “He also wanted to be Secretary of State, I said, ‘NO THANKS.’ He is also largely responsible for the horrendous Iran Deal.”

4. Memphis Offering Benefits To Part-Time Employees -

The city of Memphis is rolling out a plan to offer benefits to its part-time employees.

Starting this month, part-time employees who are scheduled for 20 or more hours per week and have been employed by the city for at least a year will be eligible to enroll for benefits such as group accident coverage, cancer assistance, critical illness insurance, term life insurance and individual disability insurance.

5. Memphis Offering Benefits To Part-Time City Employees -

The city of Memphis is rolling out a plan to offer benefits to its part-time employees.

Starting this month, part-time employees who are scheduled for 20 or more hours per week and have been employed by the city for at least a year will be eligible to enroll for benefits such as group accident coverage, cancer assistance, critical illness insurance, term life insurance and individual disability insurance.

6. A Tasteful List: 2017 -

DIG IN, MEMPHIS. Presenting the Tasteful List 2017 – alphabetical local favorites in one decidedly local man’s opinion – all good if not good for you. Some are farm to table, some got waylaid by sugar, flour, corn meal and deep-frying along the way, but all are ours, bless their hearts. 

7. All Eyes on Shoop’s Defense Against Gators -

Butch Jones will coach one of the biggest games of his Tennessee career against Florida on Saturday.

It’s an even bigger game for UT defensive coordinator Bob Shoop.

Shoop was hired Jan. 9, 2016, from Penn State to fortify Tennessee’s defense, arriving with much hoopla and great expectations. So far, he has not delivered like he did at Penn State (2014-15) and Vanderbilt (2011-13).

8. More Than 150 Clergy Call for Removal of Forrest Statue -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has posted a letter from 153 local clergy members in the Memphis area backing the city’s call for a waiver from the Tennessee Historical Commission next month to allow the city to remove Confederate monuments from city parks.

9. Breather for Vols Before Traveling to Florida -

Get ready for another thrill ride, Tennessee fans. Your football team is at it again, just like last year.

Tennessee needed a comeback and overtime to beat Appalachian State in its 2016 season opener. The Vols needed comebacks to beat Virginia Tech and Florida and got a Hail Mary touchdown pass as time ran out to beat Georgia.

10. Looks Like Another 8-4 Season for Tennessee -

Oops. I goofed last year. So did lots of other people who thought Tennessee’s football team would win the SEC East Division and go to the league championship game for the first time since 2007.

11. Ken Hause Cooks Up Strategy To Enhance L’Ecole Culinaire -

L'Ecole Culinaire-Memphis has added Ken Hause its campus director. In his new role, Hause is responsible for overseeing operations of the Memphis campus, including ensuring a rich student experience that leads to employment in the culinary field, while enhancing the school’s reputation for educational excellence, compliance and operational performance.

12. Number of Tenn. Seniors Hospitalized Due to Opioids Triples -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Federal data shows the number of senior citizens in Tennessee who are hospitalized due to painkillers has more than tripled over the last decade.

The Tennessean reports the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality data showed that in 2005, 467 seniors out of every 100,000 spent time in the hospital due to opioids. In 2015, the rate had increased to 1,505.

13. Resolution, Dollar-Figure Miscues Raise Sanitation Workers’ Grants by $20,000 -

After all of these years, maybe what happened Tuesday, July 25, to the city’s plan to pay the 14 surviving sanitation workers from 1968 a grant of $50,000 each was part of the larger narrative of the enduring turmoil of that historic time.

14. ‘Cheeseburger Buddies’ Make Nice for TV -

Tennessee coach Butch Jones passed his first test of the 2017 football season Monday. He made it through SEC Media Days.

There were no new catch phrases, although Jones did allude to the team’s “D.A.T.” (Details, Accountability, Toughness) motto. But nothing close to “champions of life” or “five-star hearts.”

15. New Memphis Plans to Expand Programming for Millennials -

Through the end of this month, the New Memphis Institute is continuing the yearly Summer Experience it hosts each year that’s comprised of free events for local and visiting college students and recent graduates, all with a view toward encouraging them to put down roots in Memphis.

16. Last Word: Vince Carter Leaves, Fairgrounds and Pulling the Plug on Green Tech -

Vince Carter joins Zach Randolph with the Sacramento Kings next NBA season with an $8 million one-year pact for Carter. Still no word on Tony Allen’s free agency status as we put this up. The Grizz plan to retire Randolph’s jersey.

17. Intel Report: Kremlin Sees US Urging Regime Change in Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Kremlin leaders are convinced America is intent on regime change in Russia, a fear that is feeding rising tension and military competition between the former Cold War foes, the Pentagon's intelligence arm has assessed.

18. Last Word: Health Care Plan React, Treasury Footprint and Tom Bowen - Take Two -

It’s like they aren’t even looking at the same legislation. That’s one explanation of the very different reviews the Senate health care bill got Thursday as it was unveiled in Washington. Illustrating the contrast, the reactions of Republican U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee and Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis.

19. Last Word: Cyber Attacks, Second Farmers Market Downtown and The Council Way -

It’s on. Shelby County commissioners coming out Wednesday in committee against the idea of ending Justice Department oversight of Juvenile Court. And the discussion was, as always, an interesting one including not only critics like commissioner Van Turner but commissioner Terry Roland and County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

20. City Council Pushes Back at Administration -

Sometimes there are seven votes. Other times there aren’t. But Memphis City Council debates increasingly point to different thoughts about the city’s course as outlined by the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland.

21. The Week Ahead: June 12-18 -

Get ready to groove, Memphis, because this week we're welcoming the inimitable Ruthie Foster to town, along with the return of both the Juneteenth Urban Music Festival and the Soulsville Record Swap. Plus, we've got details on the state House District 95 election, free MATA rides and what else you need to know in The Week Ahead...

22. Last Word: Easy Fishing on Big River, Competing City Priorities and Durham's Fine -

The Arkansas side of the Big River Crossing opened Wednesday for the first time since May 2 when a rising Mississippi River prompted its closing while the crossing proper on the north side of the Harahan Bridge remained open. There is still some of the muddy river left on the Arkansas flood plain and several dozen cranes stopping in Wednesday afternoon for some easy fishing in the shallow waters.

23. Last Word: Recovery Day 6, Trezevant Allegations Resurface and Memphis Is Hard -

There is some debate about how the Memorial Day weekend storm compares to the Ice Storm of 1994 and Hurricane Elvis in 2003. A city public works supervisor who is a veteran of both earlier incidents weighed in this week as Mayor Jim Strickland stopped by Collins Yard to rally the city’s troops in the recovery effort. Rodney Wakefield also had a lot to say about what motivates city workers to tackle this hard work in a sweltering spring and do it as quickly and as safely as possible.

24. Last Word: Popovich's Tip, Strickland's Budget and Haslam's Jump Start on Roads -

Game 5 goes to the Spurs in San Antonio 116-103 over the Grizz who are back here Thursday. Spurs coach Gregg Popovich is not effusive in his comments to the media, which is fun to watch, but it does make tracking down and veryifying this next story a bit difficult. A credit card receipt showed up on Redditt that appears to show Popovich left a $5,000 tip on an $815.73 bill at McEwen’s Friday night between the two Memphis-based playoff games.

25. Earnhardt Retiring; FESJC Lands Three Stars -

Fourteen times NASCAR fans made Dale Earnhardt Jr. the sport’s most popular driver. Next season, they will have to find a new favorite. On Tuesday, April 25, Hendrick Motorsports issued a press release saying Earnhardt Jr. will retire as a driver at the end of the season. Junior, now 42, won 26 races since starting his career in 1999. Twice, he won the Daytona 500.

26. View From the Hill: Tearful End for Non-Citizen Tuition Relief Bill -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari grew so emotional she couldn’t speak. On the verge of tears, the Memphis Democrat started to talk about a high school from her Shelby County district with a large number of undocumented immigrant students.

27. Last Word: Restless Off Season, Memphis Open Closes and Single-Family Rentals -

This is proving to be a restless off-season for Tigers basketball and it is not even summer yet. Add freshman guard Keon Clergeot to the Tigers players exiting the program with word still to come from Markel Crawford. Meanwhile, the Tigers have signed their second junior college recruit – Kyvon Davenport -- at forward.

28. Last Word: Spring Votes, Those Tax Bills and Tim McCarver on Baseball Changes -

Look for more details on the specifics of the “Gateway” project to start to emerge now that a crucial if overlooked piece of the geographic puzzle in the north Downtown area has come into public view. The city’s largest hotel, also the city’s original convention center hotel, is about to change hands and go back to flying the Marriott flag.

29. Corker To Keynote Dunavant Awards -

U.S. Sen. Bob Corker will be the keynote speaker at the Rotary Club of Memphis East’s annual Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

Co-sponsored by The Daily News, the awards luncheon is 11:30 a.m., April 18, at the Memphis Hilton, 939 Ridge Lake Blvd.

30. Commission Debates Interim Appointment to State House -

Shelby County commissioners have to decide Monday, March 20, whether or not to appoint someone to the vacant state House District 95 seat until special primary and general elections are decided in three months.

31. Last Word: Milhaus Sells, Voucher Debate Gets Heated and Boyd's Fly Around -

Highland Row isn’t fully open yet and it is already up for sale as part of a real estate portfolio. The owner, Milhaus, based in Indianapolis, is a development, construction and property management company that works in mixed use development. And the portfolio being on the market could turn into a recapitalization.

32. Norris Presents Amended Fuel-Tax Bill With Larger Sales Tax Cut -

NASHVILLE – Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris pushed a revised fuel-tax bill through the Transportation Committee on Monday, March 13, making a sharper cut in the grocery tax to offset phased-in increases at the gas pump.

33. Norris Presents Amended Fuel-Tax Bill With Larger Sales Tax Cut -

NASHVILLE – Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris pushed a revised fuel-tax bill through the Transportation Committee on Monday, March 13, making a sharper cut in the grocery tax to offset phased-in increases at the gas pump.

34. Clayborn Temple Restoration Approaches One-Year Mark -

Box lunches and stained glass were the order of the day as developers of Clayborn Temple hosted the Rotary Club last month at the landmark Downtown church.

It was one in a series of events Frank Smith and Rob Thompson have hosted at the AME Church since they reopened its doors last October to explore uses for it and start a fuller renovation in time for the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the spring of 2018.

35. The Week Ahead: February 28-March 6 -

It's Monday, Memphis – time to peek at this week's (very busy) dance card, from the opening of Graceland's $45 million entertainment complex to a showcase of the latest high-tech ag innovations to a celebration of some local "hidden figures." Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...  

36. Strickland Calls For Review of City Hall Escort List -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings is reviewing a list of 81 citizens who cannot come to City Hall without a police escort to wherever they are going in the building after Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland requested the review Saturday, Feb. 18.

37. Strickland Calls For Review of City Hall Escort List -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings is reviewing a list of 81 citizens who cannot come to City Hall without a police escort to wherever they are going in the building after Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland requested the review Saturday, Feb. 18.

38. Strickland Calls For Review of City Hall Escort List -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings is reviewing a list of 81 citizens who cannot come to City Hall without a police escort to wherever they are going in the building after Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland requested the review Saturday, Feb. 18.

39. Last Word: The TVA Well Controversy, Fred Smith Redux and Norris On The Gas Tax -

The new Trader Joe’s in Germantown won’t be alone by the plans the supermarket chain got approved Tuesday night by the Germantown Design Review Commission. The conversion of the old Kroger store on Exeter includes seven other bays as Trader Joe’s goes for a smaller footprint than the size of the original building.

40. Last Word: The Grizz Farm Club Moves, Changing the NAACP and $15 An Hour -

How many of you knew the Iowa Energy was what amounts to a minor league team connected to the Grizz? How many of you knew that before Wade Baldwin and Troy Williams got sent there last month?

41. Sports Bind City -

Maybe it is your spouse’s Christmas party. Or a local business conference and no one else from your company is attending. When you give the room the once-over, it’s full of unfamiliar faces.

42. Huston to Lead Downtown Marketing Initiatives -

Penelope Huston has joined the Downtown Memphis Commission as vice president of marketing, communications and events. Huston has more than 20 years’ experience in advertising, marketing, public relations, and relationship management, most recently serving as director of marketing for Memphis in May.
In her new role, she will be responsible for developing the DMC’s marketing strategy; driving activities to enhance the image of Downtown and public awareness of its growth and value to the region; and lead initiatives to position Downtown as a center for culture, tourism, business and entertainment. 

43. Last Word: Turner Dairy Plans, Fred's HQ and Fred Smith's Remarks About Trump -

Lots of traffic at FedExForum this weekend with two graduation ceremonies for the University of Memphis – morning and afternoon shifts. Another double-header at the Forum Saturday. The Grizz beat the Warriors 110-89 and the Tigers beat UAB 62-55.

44. The Week Ahead: December 5-11 -

Good morning, Memphis! December has arrived, which mean holiday happenings are officially underway – from tours of decked-out historic Collierville homes to shopping all things local at the Holiday Farmer’s Market. Oh, and did we mention Jerry Springer’s in town? Here’s the 411 on this week’s need-to-know events…

45. Memphis Wins ‘Maker City’ Designation from Etsy -

The local community of makers and artisan entrepreneurs this year has been the subject of increased attention from the city and other key stakeholders who want to learn more about and ultimately see that community expand.

46. Broke and Broken: Democrats Lose More Ground in State Legislature -

Tennessee House Democrats will have to start calling themselves the “Fighting 25,” down from the “Fighting 26,” after dropping a district in the battle to regain relevance statewide.

47. Memphis Continuing to Rebuild Police and Fire Benefits -

The private health insurance exchange for city retirees announced by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland this week is just part of an emerging package of benefits designed to bolster efforts to hire more Memphis police officers and firefighters.

48. Strickland to Make Decision On Retiree Health Insurance -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will make a decision Tuesday, Nov. 8, on city health insurance coverage for retirees that could involve a private health care exchange.

49. With Some Gas Stations Dry, Pipeline Works to Send More Fuel -

ATLANTA (AP) – Gas prices spiked and drivers found "out of service" bags covering pumps as the gas shortage in the South rolled into the work week, raising fears that the disruptions could become more widespread.

50. A Tasteful List 2016 -

MEMPHIS BY THE BITE. Presenting the sixth serving of the Tasteful List, updated for 2016 – alphabetical local favorites in one decidedly local man’s opinion – the only things easy to swallow in an election year.

51. ‘Breathtaking’ Transformation in Bristol -

This isn’t just any football game. It’s the Battle at Bristol.

When Tennessee plays Virginia Tech on Saturday night at Bristol Motor Speedway, about 150,000 fans are expected to be in attendance, making it the largest crowd ever to watch a football game.

52. Looks Like 10-2, SEC Title Game, Orange Bowl for UT -

Editor’s note: Nashville sports correspondent Dave Link has been accurate in predicting season outcomes for the Tennessee Vols in recent years. His 2016 season predictions, released just before press time, culminates with an SEC Championship appearance. Here’s his take on the season…

53. Last Word: $60 Million, Frozen Graceland and Wreck It Ralph's Return -

The federal government’s problem with a law the Tennessee Legislature passed earlier this year is serious -- $60-million serious.

And Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, in Hickory Hill Thursday, said he’s working on a compromise that would have the Legislature undo what it did this year when the new legislative session begins in January.

54. City, Wiseacre Set to Discuss Brewery’s Proposal for Coliseum -

The first order of business is to figure out what the city and the owners of Wiseacre Brewing Co. are negotiating about when it comes to Wiseacre’s proposal to convert the Mid-South Coliseum into a brewery.

55. Last Word: SEC and GMF, Wiseacre's Growth and Apartment Action -

The Securities and Exchange Commission has been investigating Global Ministries Foundation since mid-July. The revelation turned up Wednesday in a Memphis Federal Court filing by the receiver appointed to oversee and sell the Tulane and Warren apartments.

56. Rallings Vows to Reform Memphis Police Dept. -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings will get a pay boost from $150,000 to $219,000 a year as he becomes the permanent head of the Memphis Police Department.

The appointment of Rallings by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland goes to the Memphis City Council for approval Tuesday, Aug. 9, for what is expected to be a unanimous vote.

57. Rallings: 'The World Is In Turmoil' -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings will get a pay boost from $150,000 to $219,000 a year as he becomes the permanent head of the Memphis Police Department.

The appointment of Rallings by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland goes to the Memphis City Council for approval Tuesday, Aug. 9, for what is expected to be a unanimous vote.

58. Game-Changer -

So as it turns out, the FedEx St. Jude Classic in June was a missed opportunity. No one in the gallery shouted, “University of Memphis – Big 12!” The tournament’s “Hush Y’all” signs were obeyed and to no good end.

59. Kustoff Victory Caps TV, Outsider Heavy Congressional Campaign -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff claimed the Republican nomination for Tennessee’s 8th Congressional district Thursday, Aug. 4, in a 15-county contest in which the eastern parts of Shelby County played a decisive role.

60. Kustoff Claims 8th GOP Primary, Todd Upset by Lovell, Jenkins Over Newsom -

Former U.S. Attorney David Kustoff claimed the Republican nomination for Tennessee’s 8th Congressional district Thursday, Aug. 4, in a 15-county contest in which the eastern parts of Shelby County played a decisive role.

61. Zoo and OPC Reach Compromise in Greensward Controversy -

The Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy reached agreement Monday, July 18, on a compromise to end the zoo’s overflow parking on the Greensward that fills in some of the blanks left in Mayor Jim Strickland’s proposal and changes some of the terms.

62. The Rest of the August Ballot -

If all goes according to plan on the Aug. 4 election day, Linda Phillips hopes the result is that you don’t see her in any of the reporting on election night.

63. Memphis Bar Poll Ranks Judicial Candidates -

More than 800 local attorneys have weighed in on the judicial races on the Aug. 4 Shelby County ballot.

The Memphis Bar Association Judicial Qualification Poll asks attorneys which candidate is best qualified for a judicial post. The participation ranged between 818 and 873 votes per question.

64. The Week Ahead: July 4-10 -

Happy Fourth of July, Memphis! We hope you’re enjoying a long weekend – and if you do have to work today, we hope you’re able to sneak out early enough to watch some of the local fireworks displays tonight. Here are details on a few of them, plus other local happenings you need to know about this week…

65. Strickland Unveils Greensward Solution, Zoo Not Happy -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has put forth his plan to end parking on the Overton Park Greensward.

66. Memphis Bar Poll Ranks Judicial Candidates -

More than 800 local attorneys have weighed in on the judicial races on the Aug. 4 Shelby County ballot. The Memphis Bar Association Judicial Qualification Poll asks attorneys which candidate is best qualified for a judicial post.

67. Show Time -

For the first time in years, the Peabody Place mall was packed. On June 3, hundreds of ServiceMaster employees and a handful of business and government leaders ushered in One ServiceMaster Center, a multimillion-dollar headquarters for Memphis’ fourth-largest public company.

68. Last Word: Verdell Smith and Lifeline, Strickland's First 5 Months and Tennessine -

Lots of blue lights in Cordova Thursday evening as the Memphis Police Department remembers Officer Verdell Smith, who died in Saturday’s Downtown rampage in the line of duty. His funeral is Friday.

69. Strickland’s Leadership Style Emerging -

Five months into his four-year term as Memphis mayor, Jim Strickland has his first budget and all but one of his major appointments made – Memphis Police director. The budget cleared the Memphis City Council Tuesday, June 7, with a few minor amendments from council members, next to no debate and no dissenting council votes.

70. Last Word: A Distinct Reaction, City Hall's Budget Season and BreakFest On Broad -

Funeral services for Memphis Police Officer Verdell Smith are set for Friday at Hope Presbyterian Church in Cordova.

The day before that Downtown leaders will gather in Handy Park on Beale Street to talk about new measures to make the district safer.

71. Strickland Adds Forces to Combat Rising Crime in Memphis -

There is violent crime in Memphis and then there are the homicides – the murders.

Homicide is a violent crime.

But Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland made a distinction between it and other violent crimes Monday, June 6, in what looked to be the start of a more visible anti-crime strategy that will include the Tennessee Highway Patrol and Shelby County Sheriff’s Office.

72. Last Word: A Different Aftermath and Trolleys Aren't Just for Tourists -

A week that will likely end with the funeral of a Memphis Police officer began with a discussion about violent crime that is even at this early point proving to be different from the past discussions we’ve had at times like these.

73. Strickland Says THP and Sheriff's Office To Assist In Beefed-Up Police Presence -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said Monday, June 6, that the Tennessee Highway Patrol and the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office will be part of a heightened response to violent crime in Memphis.

74. Strickland Says THP and Sheriff's Office To Assist In Beefed-Up Police Presence -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said Monday, June 6, that the Tennessee Highway Patrol and the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office will be part of a heightened response to violent crime in Memphis.

75. Last Word: Delayed Reaction, UTHSC Simulates and Ali Takes On The Fords -

If you like to unplug on the weekends, you probably got plugged back in sooner than expected Sunday to the violent rampage Downtown Saturday evening. It ended with a Memphis Police officer dead – run over at Beale and B.B. King – allegedly by a suspect in the shootings of three people on Downtown’s northern end – two of them in critical condition – less than a half hour earlier.

76. Reaction Grows to Death of Memphis Police Officer In Downtown Crime Spree -

A violent half-hour rampage from one end of Downtown to the other ended Saturday evening with the death of a Memphis Police officer who was hit by the suspect’s car at B.B. King Boulevard and Beale Street. Three people were shot and wounded -- two critically -- at two locations on Downtown’s north end.

77. Police Officer Killed, Three Wounded In Downtown Spree -

A violent half-hour rampage from one end of Downtown to the other ended Saturday evening with the death of a Memphis Police officer who was hit by the suspect’s car at B.B. King Boulevard and Beale Street. Three people were shot and wounded -- two critically -- at two locations on Downtown’s north end.

78. ServiceMaster Disrupting Its Culture With Move Downtown -

ServiceMaster is converting Peabody Place into a corporate headquarters that would rival a Silicon Valley tech outfit.

On Friday, June 3, ServiceMaster laid to rest months of speculation about whether the company would relocate to a larger city like Atlanta or Dallas. Memphis’ available Class A office space can’t currently accommodate ServiceMaster’s needs, so it looked to the retail sector for its new home.

79. New FESJC Director Hoping for Clear Skies, Big-Name Leaders -

Sometimes, the moments that determine your future are seemingly small. Only later can you put everything together and realize that’s when you really made your choice.

This is Darrell Smith’s first year as tournament director of the FedEx St. Jude Classic. Because he is only 33 years old, one could argue he got to this position quickly. But that’s not entirely true and does not take into account the fateful moment when he was 14 years old.

80. Four Judicial Races on Aug. 4 Ballot -

Two years after the big ballot of judicial positions that are up for election once every eight years, there are four judicial races on the Aug. 4, 2016 ballot.

The two races for Bartlett Municipal Court Judge and races for Shelby County Circuit Court Judge and Shelby County Chancery Court reflect a last-minute ballot switch by the Shelby County Election Commission as well as continued turnover in countywide courts.

81. Last Word: Budget Basics, A Peak At Greensward Mediation and Elvis & Nixon -

Spurs 94 – Grizzlies 68 in game 2 of the NBA playoffs. The TNT post-game show just showed the highlights of the game while Shaq and Charles Barkley talked about how big the women are in San Antonio. I’m not making this up. They didn’t even try to talk about the game. This is just grim.

82. Greensward Talks Getting Complex -

A week ago, the board of the Overton Park Conservancy had a visitor at its meeting – Richard Smith, the Memphis Zoo’s representative in the ongoing private mediation talks between the conservancy and the zoo.

83. Tubby Smith's Hire Comes With 'Highest Expectations' -

Wearing a University of Memphis lapel pin on his suit jacket, Tubby Smith was introduced on the floor of FedExForum Thursday, April 14, as the 18th head coach in Tigers history.

University president M. David Rudd called it a “historic hire” for the school and said Smith arrived as the “most accomplished coach” to lead the program (take that, John Calipari).

84. Last Word: Tubby Time, Haslam's Veto and Africa in April's 30th Year -

It was just four weeks ago that all of this talk about change at the top of the Tiger basketball chart was put to rest. Coach Josh Pastner’s performance was reviewed by the University of Memphis administration and he was staying at least for another season. Four weeks to the day of that announcement, Pastner is the new coach at Georgia Tech and we are in the first day of the Tubby Smith era at the U of M.

85. Last Word: Tubby Fever, School Closings and March Real Estate Numbers -

The Tigers basketball grapevine is nothing but Tubby Smith as of Wednesday when the speculation was joined by torrent of rumors about contact between the Texas Tech coach and the University of Memphis.
Smith has now acknowledged he’s talking with the U of M.
More background on Smith from The Sporting News and Mike DeCourcy, a former sports reporter at The Commercial Appeal, that came out before everything went Tubby here.

86. Basar Out in 8th District Race, Luttrell Pulls Petition, Cohen Could Have Easy Ride -

Shelby County Commissioner Steve Basar has called off his plan to run in the crowded Republican primary for the 8th Congressional District, but Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has pulled his petition to join the same crowded field.

87. County Commission Questions City Figures on Deannexation -

Some Shelby County Commissioners are skeptical about City Hall’s estimate of how much city government would lose in revenue if a deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature becomes law.

The commission’s discussion at Wednesday, March 16, committee sessions came as Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was in Nashville to lobby against the bill in the state Senate.

88. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

89. Grimes Joins Barge Waggoner As Transportation Project Manager -

Keafur Grimes has joined Barge, Waggoner, Sumner and Cannon Inc. as transportation project manager, bringing with him more than 35 years of experience. In his new role, Grimes manages transportation planning and construction projects to meet federal, state and local regulations; ensures that projects meet quality compliance and assurance standards as well as customer needs; and are delivered on time and within budget.

90. Greensward Dispute Mediation Begins -

The city-backed mediation effort between the Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy begins Tuesday, March 8, following a busy weekend in Overton Park that brought out large crowds for the zoo as well as the park in general.

91. Last Word: Hedgepeth Speaks, Josh Pastner's Future and Big Box Liquor -

Where else is there to begin but the Greensward controversy.
And we start with an email from Memphis City Council member Reid Hedgepeth in what is rapidly becoming a Last Word tradition and institution – the email in full.

92. Duke Takes Reins at Friends for Life -

Longtime nonprofit administrator Diane Duke recently took the helm of Friends for Life as its new executive director. In her new role, the Los Angeles native leads and oversees an organization that’s helping those affected by HIV/AIDS through the provision of education, housing, food, transportation and healthy life skills training.

93. Last Word: History As Geology, Beyond the Greensward and City Hall's HR Director -

History can be like geology once you get it in something that isn’t in the form of a book.
There are layers on top of layers that you may not ever see or miss until a site is wiped clean for the next present that used to be the future and will eventually become the past.
That’s the case with the city’s historic Medical Center where much has come and gone several times over as our city’s considerable investment in medicine and health approaches the end of its second century.
Health Sciences Park used to be the site of a hospital. You would think something as massive as the tower of Baptist Memorial Hospital’s central campus on Union Avenue would be missed. Yet even those of us who grew up with its presence drive past it every day without a thought of what was once there.
The same with the site of Russwood Park on the north side of Madison Avenue and the old bus barns where Beale used to run further east than it does now.
In recent years, new facilities have arisen as the medical center makes itself over in a kind of economic regeneration without a comprehensive plan.
There is now an effort to come up with a comprehensive plan for the area that is more than different ventures buying or leasing land and making plans for their needs.
Eight of the institutions in the area have hired a consulting firm to develop a master plan that includes not just facilities but residential and retail areas.
It’s a significant step for an area that remains intriguing for those of us trying to remember what was where and how long some of the survivors have been holding out in much different streetscapes than were there when they arrived.
The Masonic lodge at the dead end of Dunlap into Union Avenue is a survivor. It’s where the funerals were held for some of those killed in the 1925 river disaster in which Tom Lee rescued so many others.
The lodge at one time had an earth-shaking pipe organ that I had the rare privilege of hearing at a concert following its restoration in the 1980s – the ancient 1980s.
And I still wonder about the tiny medical textbook storefront and how it endures at a time when students rent books and others use digital versions.
There are still remnants of the porous border between the medical center and the Union Avenue auto row that used to exist and arose around the old Ford plant.

94. Alexandria Smith Learning the ‘Undercurrents’ of Politics on the Job -

It would have made a good story, how another stone-hearted stockbroker that thrives on the “action” had been honing all the necessary skills since age 10.

How the future Wall Street wolf used to listen in on her grandfather’s speakerphone calls with his stockbroker and then ask questions, how the grandfather bought her shares in McDonald’s and Disney and Yahoo.

95. Last Word: Time and The Greensward, Crosstown High and Race and Sports -

Remember how the schools merger story of about five years ago would change by the hour at times? That story has met its equal in what is becoming the first major challenge of the new Strickland administration at City Hall – the Overton Park Greensward.
So much happened before noon Tuesday on the first day of the short work week that it required waiting for the dust to settle on several fronts.
Here is the latest on a very fluid and volatile situation that could very well change as you are reading this.
Luckily we report at a time when you can change stories on line to keep up with such changes.
Zoos and parks and protests featuring brass bands suggest to a casual observer that this is not very serious as controversies go.
And maybe that was the case about a year and a half ago when a group of high school students decided to block the gravel driveway from the zoo parking lot onto the greensward.
But consider this:
The Memphis Zoo is working toward a March 1 opening of its new exhibit, Zambezi River Hippo Camp, a $22-million attraction that from what we saw just a few months ago will likely draw big crowds to the zoo in the spring.
The zoo was preparing for that starting with the removal of 27 trees from the north end of the greensward.
The best Mayor Jim Strickland could get from both sides – the zoo and Overton Park Conservancy – at his meeting with them Tuesday was a commitment to take his proposal for mediation to their respective boards.
The zoo board has authorized its leaders to file a lawsuit in Chancery Court over the greensward and it’s very likely the zoo would go to court before the March 1 opening because of the crowds on their way.
If the work to come by the zoo in advance of the March 1 opening involves heavy machinery, the reaction is likely to draw a much bigger protest than the ones Memphis Police have so far watched from a distance without making arrests.
As in all pressing political dramas, this controversy has the accelerant of timing.

96. Last Word: Legislature's Return, Uber Pilot, Minivan Comeback and Bowie's Exit -

The gavel falls in Nashville.
The Tennessee legislature is back in session Tuesday. This is an election year session for the legislature. So it will be short – likely an early April adjournment. But that doesn’t mean the session is without expectations from outside Nashville.

97. Last Word: The Crest, OPEB Fever, Armstrong Leaves and An Elvis Warning -

The crest is here and it is not quite 40 feet on the Mississippi River gauge. The projections Thursday evening going into Friday’s crest of the river at Memphis changed a bit from the 40.3 foot level. The crest is 39.8 feet.
No reports of major damage anywhere in Shelby County, according to the Shelby County Office of Prepardness.
But the river’s high water is still a sight to behold.

98. Council OKs Strickland's Directors, He Defends Pay Raises -

Memphis City Council members approved Mayor Jim Strickland’s slate of 12 division chiefs and directors Tuesday, Jan. 5, at the first council meeting of 2016. And Strickland defended the pay raises for some of those positions compared to the salaries those appointed positions paid in the Wharton administration.

99. Deadly Shooting in Chattanooga Voted Top Story of 2015 -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The fatal shooting of four Marines and a sailor in Chattanooga has been voted the top Tennessee news story of 2015.

Muhammad Abdulazeez, a 24-year-old naturalized U.S. citizen, opened fire on a recruiting center and a reserve facility on July 16. The FBI recently described the attack as an act "inspired and motivated by foreign terrorist propaganda."

100. City Hall Shuffle Moves Into Christmas Eve With 8 Positions Cut -

Memphis-Mayor elect Jim Strickland announced on Christmas Eve that he will eliminate eight positions in the current administration, one of them vacant. And a ninth positon will become a part-time position. Strickland will also follow through on his long-held desire to end the city’s involvement in and funding of the Memphis-Shelby County Music Commission.