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Editorial Results (free)

1. Amid Retail and Industrial Growth, DeSoto County Office Market Lags -

In the last few years, DeSoto County has become a magnet not only for retail development, but also for the industrial market.

Numerous new retail ventures have opened, and several other companies have opened industrial locations there, including FedEx Supply Services, XPO Logistics and Sephora.

2. Last Word: Ouster History, Lake District in Foreclosure and Crosstown -

Five of the seven flags that fly on the southern tip of Mud Island River Park are folded and stored as of Thursday. The Riverfront Development Corporation took down the five flags that have flown over the turf we now call Memphis – before and since it became a city – including a version of the Confederate flag – leaving only the U.S. flag and the Tennessee flag. This was a reaction to the week-long and counting aftermath from the violence in Charlottesville.

3. Monument Effort Reflects Differing Strategies -

The call to remove Confederate monuments in Memphis city parks is increasingly meeting with local officials pointing toward Nashville and state officials. And local activists are pointing to a clock.

4. Mayor's Office Says Confederate Monument Protesters Asking City To Break Law -

Jefferson Davis was surrounded this week, first by a group of more than 100 citizens seeking to remove his statue from Memphis Park and then by police after the Tuesday, Aug. 15, protest.

The gathering, heavy with religious leaders, was coordinated by several groups that have been active about various community issues the past year and a half and pursuing the removal of Confederate monuments.

5. Charting a Course -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t have her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years. “I don’t want to be chosen because I’m a woman, but because I’m the best,” Large said, voicing a sentiment that many women business owners agree with.

6. Last Word: Charlottesville Reaction, Stax & Atlantic Together Again and MEMFix -

The violence in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend will be on a lot of minds in a lot of other places including Memphis as this week begins. And the discussion here in Memphis is already underway. The gathering point Saturday just hours after a suspected white supremacist drove his car into a group of counter protesters in Charlottesville really didn’t even need a lot of billing or explanation.

7. MIM Posts Surplus in ‘Electrifying’ 2017 Festival -

At the end of her year-long tenure as chairwoman of the board of the Memphis In May International Festival, Bobbi Gillis summed up the 2017 festival as “a fast moving roller coaster ride.” Rain wasn’t a problem for the month-long set of events. But lightning and straight-line winds were. MIM president and CEO Jim Holt could joke Thursday, Aug. 10, at the organization’s annual meeting that the festival was “electrifying.”

8. Memphis Police Department Adds 85 New Officers -

The Memphis Police Department has 85 new officers who were acknowledged at a graduation ceremony Thursday, Aug. 10, marking the first of two classes to go through the Memphis Police Academy this year.

9. Women-Owned Businesses Chart Progress of Diversity Contracting Efforts -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t get her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years.

10. The King's Castle: Graceland, Whitehaven open 40th anniversary Elvis Week -

It begins with a trivia contest and a sock hop. Those are the first two events Friday, Aug. 11, at the top of a crowded Elvis Week itinerary that marks 40 years since Elvis Presley died at Graceland.

11. Crosstown Concourse Reopening to Include Open Houses, Performances, More -

The formal dedication of the redeveloped Sears Crosstown building next week will include tours of the different uses of the 1.5-million-square-foot building and 20 musical acts as well as a banner drop.

12. Kelly Wins Praise Across The Aisle, But Bigger Task is Ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Raised voices could be heard through the thick door to the Oval Office as John Kelly – then secretary of Homeland Security – offered some tough talk to President Donald Trump.

13. ‘Fed Up’ Campaign Warns Of Tougher Gun Penalties -

The Memphis Shelby Crime Commission and the city of Memphis have launched a marketing campaign to warn would-be offenders about tougher state penalties and possible federal prosecution for violent criminals in possession of a gun.

14. Trump Says Transgender People Should be Barred From Military -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump said Wednesday he wants transgender people barred from serving in the U.S. military "in any capacity," citing "tremendous medical costs and disruption."

15. NCAA Rule Ending Two-a-Days Forcing Teams to Adjust -

The two-a-day football practices that coaches once used to toughen up their teams and cram for the start of the season are going the way of tear-away jerseys and the wishbone formation.

As part of its efforts to increase safety, the NCAA approved a plan this year that prevents teams from holding multiple practices with contact in a single day.

16. Bad Leadership or Politics? Motlow President’s Fall -

One day he was the golden boy, touting Motlow State’s success and posing with the governor for the signing of the Reconnect Act. The next, seemingly, he was gone with the wind.

At least publicly, everything was grand as Anthony “Tony” Kinkel helped Gov. Bill Haslam meet his Drive to 55 effort to put certificates or degrees in the hands of half of Tennessee adults by 2025. With limited space and resources, Kinkel pushed the Tennessee Promise scholarship at Motlow, the state’s fastest-growing community college, bolstering student retention, graduation and fundraising.

17. Resolution, Dollar-Figure Miscues Raise Sanitation Workers’ Grants by $20,000 -

After all of these years, maybe what happened Tuesday, July 25, to the city’s plan to pay the 14 surviving sanitation workers from 1968 a grant of $50,000 each was part of the larger narrative of the enduring turmoil of that historic time.

18. Juvenile Court Oversight Issue Spills Into Larger Criminal Justice Reform Debate -

Talking Monday, July 24, about criminal justice reform, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael mentioned the formal written request he, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell and Sheriff Bill Oldham made to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in June to end Justice Department oversight of the court.

19. Juxtaposing Views Greet Voting Change -

Memphis City Council members Edmund Ford Jr. and Patrice Robinson have each been on the winning side of a council runoff election and share a district border along Elvis Presley Boulevard in Whitehaven.

20. ‘Fed Up’ Campaign Warns Of Tougher Gun Penalties -

The Memphis Shelby Crime Commission and the city of Memphis have launched a marketing campaign to warn would-be offenders about tougher state penalties and possible federal prosecution for violent criminals possessing a gun.

21. Riverfront Concept Plan Intersects With Many Others About Key City Asset -

The Memphis riverfront is hardly a blank canvas. But you would never know that from the number of plans there have been over several decades to make it more of a “front door” for the city – to borrow a phrase from more than a few of those reports.

22. Riverfront Concept Plan Emphasizes Connections, River Access -

A pedestrian bridge between the southern tip of Mud Island and Riverside Drive, more pedestrian use of Riverside Drive, a pavilion at Tom Lee Park and greater access to the edge of the Mississippi River are among the elements of a riverfront concept plan outlined Tuesday, July 18, by a Chicago architecture and urban design firm.

23. US to Create Independent Military Cyber Command -

WASHINGTON (AP) – After months of delay, the Trump administration is finalizing plans to revamp the nation's military command for defensive and offensive cyber operations in hopes of intensifying America's ability to wage cyberwar against the Islamic State group and other foes, according to U.S. officials.

24. Last Word: Rachel Heck, Beale Street's Cover and The Old Peabody -

The “fifth wave” of judicial appointments by President Donald Trump, as The White House termed them, are already causing some political ripples here primarily from state Senator Mark Norris’s appointment to the federal bench.

25. Summer in the City -

Saturday night on Beale Street is more than a catch phrase for businesses there.

It is chapters in old, out-of-print books like Lt. George W. Lee’s “Where The Blues Began” that you can only see in the Memphis-Shelby County Room of the Central Library. You can’t check the book out because of its rarity and age. But you can also find references to the lore of Saturday nights on Beale Street on plaques in the entertainment district that current patrons walk past without even noticing.

26. ‘Cheeseburger Buddies’ Make Nice for TV -

Tennessee coach Butch Jones passed his first test of the 2017 football season Monday. He made it through SEC Media Days.

There were no new catch phrases, although Jones did allude to the team’s “D.A.T.” (Details, Accountability, Toughness) motto. But nothing close to “champions of life” or “five-star hearts.”

27. Enough Expectations to Go Around as SEC Football Season Approaches -

HOOVER, Ala. – The countdown to the start of the next college football season is now measured in weeks, not months. But at an event such as SEC Media Days, the future is always framed by the past.

28. Last Word: Marathon County Budget Session, New Chandler Numbers and Confluence -

As we post this edition of Last Word, there is still some confusion about the KC-130 Marine cargo plane that crashed near the Leflore-Sunflower County line in Mississippi Monday evening.

All 16 people on board were killed in the crash.

29. Low-Key FBI Director Pick Would Lead Agency Through Tumult -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The attorney selected to replace James Comey as FBI director is described by those close to him as admirably low-key, yet he'd be taking over the law enforcement agency at a moment that's anything but tranquil.

30. Bridge Protest Anniversary Draws More Action, Reflection -

A year after the spontaneous protest march that ended with more than 1,000 people shutting down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge for several hours, the leader of that effort was again moving north along B.B. King Boulevard on Sunday, July 9.

31. Last Word: Rumors, The Return of Tyreke Evans and Broadband in Millington -

There is a popular saying attributed to Winston Churchill that goes like this: “A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on.” Even before social media, that was certainly the case in this part of the world called Memphis. The part of our history that doesn’t fit in books is littered with rumors that turned the city upside down in a much shorter period of time than it took to repair the damage done. That is what happened this weekend with Memphis Light Gas and Water.

32. Patterson Resignation Comes as Council Examines DMC’s Role -

Terence Patterson exited the Downtown Memphis Commission last week as the Memphis City Council is about to discuss replacing or restructuring not only the DMC, but the Riverfront Development Corp.

33. Last Word: Vince Carter Leaves, Fairgrounds and Pulling the Plug on Green Tech -

Vince Carter joins Zach Randolph with the Sacramento Kings next NBA season with an $8 million one-year pact for Carter. Still no word on Tony Allen’s free agency status as we put this up. The Grizz plan to retire Randolph’s jersey.

34. McCalla Keeps Police Surveillance Lawsuit -

A Memphis federal judge has dropped four citizens as plaintiffs in a lawsuit alleging the city violated a 1978 federal consent decree barring police from conducting surveillance of protesters, saying the citizens don’t have standing.

35. Fairgrounds Movement Triggers Liberty Bowl Questions -

For a prime piece of real estate that is supposed to be in a holding pattern, there is a lot of recent activity on and about the Mid-South Fairgrounds. And even when Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium isn’t the immediate topic, it is an undeniable presence.

36. McCalla Keeps Police Surveillance Lawsuit, Drops Protester Plaintiffs -

A Memphis Federal Judge has dropped four citizens from a lawsuit alleging the city violated a 1978 federal consent decree barring police from conducting surveillance of protesters saying they don’t have standing.

37. Appling Road Greenline Access Awaits Funding -

There is a plan designed and ready for an Appling Road access point to the Shelby Farms Greenline and if the response to last week’s opening of the Perkins Road access point is any indication, it shouldn’t be too difficult.

38. Intel Report: Kremlin Sees US Urging Regime Change in Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Kremlin leaders are convinced America is intent on regime change in Russia, a fear that is feeding rising tension and military competition between the former Cold War foes, the Pentagon's intelligence arm has assessed.

39. Tennessee Weighs Commission to Examine Jim Crow Brutality -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Charlie Morris vividly recalls his brother's murder.

Jesse Lee Bond was a sharecropper in Shelby County. Suspicious because his harvests never seemed to cover his debts, in the spring of 1939, Bond asked the local general store for a receipt of his seed purchases.

40. Memphis Botanic Garden Adds Tamboli Sculpture -

Memphis Botanic Garden has added a bronze sculpture by Memphis sculptor Roy Tamboli to its growing collection. “Destino III” is on display in the Conifer Garden via a long-term loan agreement with Tamboli, who created the piece in 2007.

41. Strickland Pushes Economic Breakthrough Outside City's Current Hot Spots -

The city of Memphis has to grow economically outside of the Poplar Avenue corridor of East Memphis, Midtown and Downtown if the city is to prosper, and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said that economic breakthrough can start in Whitehaven.

42. City Council Pushes Back at Administration -

Sometimes there are seven votes. Other times there aren’t. But Memphis City Council debates increasingly point to different thoughts about the city’s course as outlined by the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland.

43. Memphis Botanic Garden Adds Tamboli Sculpture -

Memphis Botanic Garden has added a bronze sculpture by Memphis sculptor Roy Tamboli to its growing collection. “Destino III” is on display in the Conifer Garden via a long-term loan agreement with Tamboli, who created the piece in 2007.

44. Lawmakers: Talk, Action On Crime Don’t Match -

State Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris of Memphis says some of the rhetoric about criminal justice reform – not locking up as many nonviolent offenders for longer sentences – doesn’t match the push for legislation in Nashville.

45. Gunman Who Shot Congressman Had History of Anti-GOP Activity -

BELLEVILLE, Ill. (AP) – The gunman who shot a top GOP congressman and several other people Wednesday at a baseball practice outside the nation's capital had a long history of lashing out at Republicans and once frightened a neighbor by firing a rifle into a field behind his Illinois house.

46. RedRover Adds Will Cook As Design Architect -

RedRover Sales & Marketing has added three new employees in recent months, including design architect Will Cook, who has more than 10 years of graphic design experience and comes to RedRover from The Commercial Appeal and Savant Learning Systems. In his new role, Cook primarily designs print and web collateral for RedRover’s clients while also assisting the sales and marketing teams in other ways, including participating in sales meetings and calls.

47. After the ‘Tom Lee Storm’: A Look At Recovery Efforts, What's Next -

Eleven days after the May 27 storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses, Memphis Light, Gas and Water officials declared victory in the recovery with a Wednesday, June 8, late afternoon Tweet: “Update: Restored.”

48. Last Word: Don McMinn, Frayser's Recovery and The Clean Line -

Back in the late 1970s when Beale Street was still rotting and behind chain link fences and Downtown Memphis was in recovery in every sense of the word, there was a poster of Don McMinn standing in front of the statue of W.C. Handy on Beale with his back to the camera spreading open the raincoat he was wearing in Handy’s direction. The caption was something about exposing the world to the blues. That’s not the only image that comes to mind of those times with word Sunday that McMinn has died.

49. Last Word: Don McMinn, Frayser's Recovery and The Clean Line -

Back in the late 1970s when Beale Street was still under construction and Downtown Memphis was in recovery in every sense of the word, there was a poster of Don McMinn standing in front of the statue of W.C. Handy on Beale with his back to the camera spreading open the raincoat he was wearing in Handy’s direction. The caption was something about exposing the world to the blues. That’s not the only image that comes to mind of those times with word Sunday that McMinn has died.

50. Winds of Change -

Humans have been harnessing the power of the wind since the first Egyptians began to use sails to move their boats along the Nile. More than 7,000 years later, wind power capacity in the U.S. alone has surpassed 82 gigawatts, or enough energy to power 20 million homes, making it the largest renewable generation capacity in the country.

51. Last Word: Recovery Day 6, Trezevant Allegations Resurface and Memphis Is Hard -

There is some debate about how the Memorial Day weekend storm compares to the Ice Storm of 1994 and Hurricane Elvis in 2003. A city public works supervisor who is a veteran of both earlier incidents weighed in this week as Mayor Jim Strickland stopped by Collins Yard to rally the city’s troops in the recovery effort. Rodney Wakefield also had a lot to say about what motivates city workers to tackle this hard work in a sweltering spring and do it as quickly and as safely as possible.

52. Crews Move To Smaller Areas, Storm Damage Estimates Grow -

Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division’s response to the Saturday storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses will cost the utility at least $7 million.

“We will spend in excess of $7 million and it could be well in excess of $7 million,” said MLGW president Jerry Collins.

53. Last Word: Your Neighbor Has Power, City Budget Wrap Take One and BBQ -

We are at the point in our storm recovery where the novelty and sense of adventure have reached the end of their very short lives in areas where the power is still out. And the restoration of that service is at a point where you now have people on one side of a street with power and those on the other side may still be in the dark and the heat.

54. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

55. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

56. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

The storm that raked Memphis with 80 mile-an-hour winds Saturday evening was similar to the 2003 storm nicknamed “Hurricane Elvis” but not quite as widespread.

“It did have some similar characteristics to Hurricane Elvis,” said Gary Woodall, warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service Memphis. “Fortunately, this go around it was not quite physically as large as it was.”

57. Full Restoration After Smaller 'Hurricane Elvis' To Take More Than a Week -

UPDATE: As of 9 a.m. Monday, May 29, 125,000 Memphis Light Gas and Water Division customers were without power. And 32 people were staying at the Red Cross shelter at the Orange Mound Community Center. City Public Works has hired more contractors to help clear downed trees and other debris from roads.

58. Crime & Punishment -

Federal prosecutors have the discretion to pass on charging a defendant with every possible criminal charge that can be made.

But U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions told a room full of federal prosecutors in Memphis Thursday, May 25, that he will enforce his directive that they pursue “the most serious, readily provable offense … with judgment and with fairness.”

59. Fields Out at Ford; New CEO Hackett Known for Turnarounds -

DEARBORN, Michigan (AP) – Ford is replacing CEO Mark Fields as it struggles to keep its traditional auto-manufacturing business running smoothly while remaking itself as a nimble, high-tech provider of new mobility services.

60. Past, Present Converge at Lynching Centennial -

The only thing that runs through the area where the Macon Road bridge stood 100 years ago are power lines on wooden poles that take them over the oxbow lake, thick kudzu and two bridge supports almost overtaken by undergrowth on the edge of a thickly-wooded area.

61. Council Faces Railgarten, Beale Bucks, Police Overtime -

Memphis City Council members have a rare evidentiary hearing Tuesday, May 23, at the top of their agenda on an unusual development case the council approved several months ago.

The council holds an evidentiary hearing on the Railgarten bar and restaurant on Central Avenue east of Cooper Street that the council granted a special use permit for. The council moved to possibly revoke that permit after Railgarten added some intermodal containers and an outside area to the development.

62. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they (police) deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Al Lewis, a member of the Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

63. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Al Lewis, a member of the Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

64. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens leader Al Lewis posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

65. Last Word: Carousel Preview, New Crime Stats and EDGE Does Multi-Family -

The group Friends of the Fairgrounds got together Thursday evening at the Children’s Museum of Memphis and got the first group tour of the Grand Carousel center under construction at CMOM. This is as the museum focuses more on fundraising for the $6 million project that has already raised the money for the restoration of the carousel itself and now sets about the task of paying for the building around it including a banquet hall. Here’s a look from our Facebook page with more to come on CMOM and the Fairgrounds for the Monday edition that will probably go up on line Friday.

66. If Saban’s the Best, Why Aren’t His Protégés? -

In a recent article at CBSSports.com, Nick Saban was ranked the top coach in the so-called Power Five conferences.

No surprise there.

With all due respect to what Urban Meyer has accomplished at Bowling Green, Utah, Florida and now Ohio State, he’s still playing catch-up to Saban. The same can be said for Dabo Swinney and his recent run at Clemson.

67. 'War' on Blight -

Attorney Steve Barlow has been working on blight issues for 20 years, which is to say he’s been working for two decades almost exclusively on the maze of rules, regulations and procedures that make blight possible and sustainable.

68. New Documentary Tells Story of Tobey Skate Park -

A new documentary on the 6-year-old Memphis Skate Park at Tobey Park takes a look at skate culture in Memphis and the struggle to get the park to reality after securing a grant that ran out and then securing city capital funding for it.

69. Legend Johnny Mathis Still Going Strong, Coming to Memphis -

As the story goes, Johnny Mathis was 8 years old and living on Post Street in San Francisco when his father purchased a piano for $25 and brought it home. But there was a problem: Clem Mathis couldn’t fit the piano through the front door of their small flat.

70. Last Word: Railgarten Redux, Raleigh Springs Mall and Forrest Author Speaks -

Railgarten II, Son of Railgarten, Railgarten, Beyond the Board of Adjustment, Railgarten, Enter The City Council … Take your pick of sequel titles. Railgarten goes back to the City Council Tuesday for at least a committee discussion in which the council considers whether it should take back the special use permit it granted the bar-restaurant. This is a follow up to the Board of Adjustment decision last month to delay any action on approving the other annexes of the business for 30 days.

71. Boyd’s Move for Police Overtime Cut Has Deeper Roots -

Of 10 Memphis City Council members present Thursday, May 4, for the ongoing review of the city budget proposal, half favored a move to cut police overtime and half did not.

Two efforts by council chairman Berlin Boyd to cut the $22.4 million line item – first by $5 million and then by $2.7 million – failed on tie votes both times, with some council members switching sides from one vote to the next.

72. Boyd Police Overtime Cut Approved -

Of 10 Memphis City Council members present Thursday, May 4, for the ongoing review of the city budget proposal, half favored a move to cut police overtime and half did not.

The two efforts by council chairman Berlin Boyd to cut the $22.4 million line item – first by $5 million and then by $2.7 million – failed on tie votes both times with some council members switching sides from one vote to the next.

73. 'Who is a Democrat?' -

Through two meetings in less than a week, the leader of a reorganization of the Shelby County Democratic Party has heard one discussion more than any other issue raised in the gatherings.

“Who is a Democrat?” attorney and former local party chairman David Cocke said in defining the issue at the start of the second forum in Midtown Wednesday, May 3.

74. Last Word: Three Gs React, More CA Changes and the Forrest Controversy Defined -

The day after Germantown leaders offered his school system $25 million for Germantown Elementary, Middle and High Schools, SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson was fielding calls from parents of students at the schools – the “three Gs” as they are known.

75. Council Moves to Operating Budget Examination -

Memphis City Council members open budget hearings Thursday, May 5, on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s $680 million operating budget proposal for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

76. Vaughan Meets Byrd-Ashworth in District 95 General Election -

Shelby County Republicans are warning against complacency in the coming State House District 95 special general election in June.

Collierville Schools board member Kevin Vaughan won the Republican primary election for the vacant state House seat Thursday, April 27, by 49 votes over former Germantown alderman Frank Uhlhorn.

77. Vaughan Claims Republican Nomination in State House District 95 -

Collierville Schools board member Kevin Vaughan won the Republican primary election for state House District 95 Thursday, April 27, by 49 votes over former Germantown alderman Frank Uhlhorn.

78. Last Word: Election Day, Game 6 and School Vouchers Get Rolled -

Intermission in the NBA playoffs as tipoff of Game 6 approaches Thursday evening at the Forum. Look at all of the clouds as the lights dimming and letting you know it’s time to take your seats for the show that is reigniting the local passion for basketball.

79. View From the Hill: IMPROVE Act an Insight Into Testy Election Ahead -

In case anyone’s keeping stats, Senate leadership soundly defeated House leadership this session in the gas tax/tax cut battle.

Whether this is a forerunner to a Republican gubernatorial primary remains to be seen as Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris and House Speaker Beth Harwell weigh decisions. It’s not as if they’d be facing off against each other, though, since businessman Bill Lee and former Economic and Community Development Commissioner Randy Boyd are definitely in the race and not hurting for money.

80. Memphis United in Support of Grizzlies on National Playoffs Stage -

Yes, the Grizzlies’ 116-103 loss in Game 5 at San Antonio was disappointing. So step back a moment and remember the atmosphere at FedExForum – and across the city – during the two wins that briefly evened this first-round West Conference Playoff Series at 2-2.

81. City of Memphis Budget Could Face Bumpy Road -

Memphis City Council budget hearings begin Tuesday, May 2, at City Hall starting with Mayor Jim Strickland’s $77.8 million capital budget proposal for one-time spending on construction projects and similar expenses that are normally financed with bonds.

82. Strickland Delivers $680 Million Operating Budget to Council -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland delivered a $680 million city government operating budget proposal to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 25, with no property tax increase and no use of city reserves to balance it.

83. Earnhardt Retiring; FESJC Lands Three Stars -

Fourteen times NASCAR fans made Dale Earnhardt Jr. the sport’s most popular driver. Next season, they will have to find a new favorite. On Tuesday, April 25, Hendrick Motorsports issued a press release saying Earnhardt Jr. will retire as a driver at the end of the season. Junior, now 42, won 26 races since starting his career in 1999. Twice, he won the Daytona 500.

84. Panattoni Moving Forward With Phase Two of Industrial Park -

Since it first broke ground in 2014, Panattoni Development Co.’s Gateway Global Logistics Center has delivered 4.4 million square feet of industrial facilities, $276 million in investment and almost 700 jobs to a formerly vacuous tract of land spanning the Tennessee-Mississippi border.

85. Last Word: Game Day In San Antonio, Gas Tax Compromise and Democrats Talk -

Shelby County Commissioner Justin Ford is out on bond after being charged Monday with domestic violence assault and false imprisonment. And the Shelby County Commission does not appear to have a precedent for taking any kind of action until the charges are resolved one way or another although commission chairman Melvin Burgess is exploring that with attorneys.

86. View From the Hill: Tearful End for Non-Citizen Tuition Relief Bill -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari grew so emotional she couldn’t speak. On the verge of tears, the Memphis Democrat started to talk about a high school from her Shelby County district with a large number of undocumented immigrant students.

87. Last Word: Signs of Life in San Antonio, Steel & Rice and Marco Pave's Rap Opera -

The Grizz were down 19 to the Spurs at the end of the first half in Monday’s game two of the NBA playoff’s opening round – 26 earlier in the game -- and had it down to four at the point in the fourth quarter when Grit & Grind came back to life. It was a short if eventful and promising return to life with the Spurs winning 96 – 82. Game 3 Wednesday at the Forum. And Tigers basketball is well into an eventful off-season of Snapchat moments and “junior college” signings.

88. Initiatives Geared at Boosting Owner-Occupied Housing -

Nearly a third of all homes in Shelby County are owned by investors, a fact which has state and city leaders looking for ways to stem the tide and encourage locals to buy into their communities through owner-occupied homeownership.

89. Memphis’ Political History Reflects Changes With New Entries -

There was a moment during the March unveiling of former Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s portrait in the Hall of Mayors when the task of framing history gave way to the present.

It came when attorney Ricky E. Wilkins talked about the importance of Wharton and his predecessor, Willie Herenton – the only two black mayors in Memphis history – to the city’s political present. Wharton attended the event; Herenton was noticeably absent.

90. Prostate Cancer Tests Are Now OK With US Panel, With Caveats -

CHICAGO (AP) – An influential U.S. government advisory panel is dropping its opposition to routine prostate cancer screening in favor of letting men decide for themselves after talking with their doctor.

91. Toyota Announces $1.33 Billion Investment in Kentucky Plant -

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) – Toyota said Monday it is investing $1.33 billion to retool its sprawling factory in Georgetown, Kentucky, where the company's flagship Camry sedans are built.

No new factory jobs are being added, but Toyota says the upgrades amount to the biggest single investment ever at one of its existing plants in the United States. The retooling also will sustain the existing 8,200 jobs at Toyota's largest plant, where about one-fourth of all Toyota vehicles produced in North America are made, the automaker said.

92. Last Word: Restless Off Season, Memphis Open Closes and Single-Family Rentals -

This is proving to be a restless off-season for Tigers basketball and it is not even summer yet. Add freshman guard Keon Clergeot to the Tigers players exiting the program with word still to come from Markel Crawford. Meanwhile, the Tigers have signed their second junior college recruit – Kyvon Davenport -- at forward.

93. Task Force Backs 3 De-Annexations, 3 Referendums -

A task force on de-annexation is recommending referendums in three recently annexed areas of Memphis, an automatic de-annexation of three other sparsely populated areas on the city’s borders and keeping a part of Raleigh proposed by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland for de-annexation.

94. Last Word: Spring Votes, Those Tax Bills and Tim McCarver on Baseball Changes -

Look for more details on the specifics of the “Gateway” project to start to emerge now that a crucial if overlooked piece of the geographic puzzle in the north Downtown area has come into public view. The city’s largest hotel, also the city’s original convention center hotel, is about to change hands and go back to flying the Marriott flag.

95. De-Annexation Task Force Recommends 3 Referendums, 3 Automatic De-Annexations -

A task force on de-annexation is recommending de-annexation of three recently annexed areas of Memphis, an automatic de-annexation of three other sparsely populated areas on the city’s borders and keep a part of Raleigh proposed by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland for de-annexation in the city of Memphis.

96. Award-Winner McCloy Brings Modern Applications to Library System -

Keenon McCloy got around to doing the math on her time at City Hall. “I just crossed over 25 years,” said McCloy, director of the Memphis Public Libraries system, a position she has held for 10 years. Before that she was director of the city’s Division of Public Service, head of the Memphis Sexual Assault Resource Center and started as director of the transition office for Memphis Mayor-elect Willie Herenton in 1991, one of four mayors whose administrations she has worked in.

97. Last Word: The Catechism of 1968, Downtown Hotels and Earth Day on Auto Row -

What happened 49 years ago this week in our city began long before the first sanitation worker walked off the job or the first “I Am A Man” sign was made. Maybe it was that long arc that explains the timing of what happened here in late March into the first week of April of 1968. For just about half a century now we have thought and thought again about that chronology, reviewed the details. And what we have is a sort of catechism of moments that if they had happened differently, we can’t help thinking, might have produced a different result.

98. Motor Vessel Mississippi Returns to Memphis Riverfront -

The largest diesel towboat on the Mississippi River has been known to move 16 to 17 barges at one time – although it has done 33.

The motor vessel “Mississippi” does plenty of other heavy lifting including helping put in place the concrete mats that stabilize banks along the river.

99. Senate Douses Memphis and Nashville Pot Ordinances -

State senators are intent on striking down Memphis and Nashville marijuana laws giving police discretion to hand out citations for possessing small amounts of pot.

Despite opposition from Shelby County and Davidson County legislators, the Senate voted 26-5 Monday to clarify that state law overrides local government regulations involving drugs and similar substances.

100. Last Word: Basketball Capitol, Gang Fight in Southwest Memphis and Moving Polk -

There is something to be said for hosting a round of the NCAA’s March Madness without having a team in the playoffs. Much to be said against it. But after a weekend of what I think most of us here will call the most compelling of the regionals featured prominently on national television, you really can find very little to complain about. It might even have rekindled the intensity of our civic love of basketball.