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Editorial Results (free)

1. Fields Out at Ford; New CEO Hackett Known for Turnarounds -

DEARBORN, Michigan (AP) – Ford is replacing CEO Mark Fields as it struggles to keep its traditional auto-manufacturing business running smoothly while remaking itself as a nimble, high-tech provider of new mobility services.

2. Past, Present Converge at Lynching Centennial -

The only thing that runs through the area where the Macon Road bridge stood 100 years ago are power lines on wooden poles that take them over the oxbow lake, thick kudzu and two bridge supports almost overtaken by undergrowth on the edge of a thickly-wooded area.

3. Council Faces Railgarten, Beale Bucks, Police Overtime -

Memphis City Council members have a rare evidentiary hearing Tuesday, May 23, at the top of their agenda on an unusual development case the council approved several months ago.

The council holds an evidentiary hearing on the Railgarten bar and restaurant on Central Avenue east of Cooper Street that the council granted a special use permit for. The council moved to possibly revoke that permit after Railgarten added some intermodal containers and an outside area to the development.

4. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they (police) deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Al Lewis, a member of the Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

5. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Al Lewis, a member of the Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

6. Barbecue Decoy Surfaces As Overton Square Protest -

Several dozen people staged a street theater protest in Overton Square Saturday, May 20, after a decoy call for a protest Downtown at the Memphis In May International Barbecue Cooking Contest.

“So while they deployed their resources at BBQ fest, CCC was at Overton Square highlighting the real obscenities,” Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens leader Al Lewis posted on Facebook Saturday afternoon.

7. Last Word: Carousel Preview, New Crime Stats and EDGE Does Multi-Family -

The group Friends of the Fairgrounds got together Thursday evening at the Children’s Museum of Memphis and got the first group tour of the Grand Carousel center under construction at CMOM. This is as the museum focuses more on fundraising for the $6 million project that has already raised the money for the restoration of the carousel itself and now sets about the task of paying for the building around it including a banquet hall. Here’s a look from our Facebook page with more to come on CMOM and the Fairgrounds for the Monday edition that will probably go up on line Friday.

8. If Saban’s the Best, Why Aren’t His Protégés? -

In a recent article at CBSSports.com, Nick Saban was ranked the top coach in the so-called Power Five conferences.

No surprise there.

With all due respect to what Urban Meyer has accomplished at Bowling Green, Utah, Florida and now Ohio State, he’s still playing catch-up to Saban. The same can be said for Dabo Swinney and his recent run at Clemson.

9. 'War' on Blight -

Attorney Steve Barlow has been working on blight issues for 20 years, which is to say he’s been working for two decades almost exclusively on the maze of rules, regulations and procedures that make blight possible and sustainable.

10. New Documentary Tells Story of Tobey Skate Park -

A new documentary on the 6-year-old Memphis Skate Park at Tobey Park takes a look at skate culture in Memphis and the struggle to get the park to reality after securing a grant that ran out and then securing city capital funding for it.

11. Legend Johnny Mathis Still Going Strong, Coming to Memphis -

As the story goes, Johnny Mathis was 8 years old and living on Post Street in San Francisco when his father purchased a piano for $25 and brought it home. But there was a problem: Clem Mathis couldn’t fit the piano through the front door of their small flat.

12. Last Word: Railgarten Redux, Raleigh Springs Mall and Forrest Author Speaks -

Railgarten II, Son of Railgarten, Railgarten, Beyond the Board of Adjustment, Railgarten, Enter The City Council … Take your pick of sequel titles. Railgarten goes back to the City Council Tuesday for at least a committee discussion in which the council considers whether it should take back the special use permit it granted the bar-restaurant. This is a follow up to the Board of Adjustment decision last month to delay any action on approving the other annexes of the business for 30 days.

13. Boyd’s Move for Police Overtime Cut Has Deeper Roots -

Of 10 Memphis City Council members present Thursday, May 4, for the ongoing review of the city budget proposal, half favored a move to cut police overtime and half did not.

Two efforts by council chairman Berlin Boyd to cut the $22.4 million line item – first by $5 million and then by $2.7 million – failed on tie votes both times, with some council members switching sides from one vote to the next.

14. Boyd Police Overtime Cut Approved -

Of 10 Memphis City Council members present Thursday, May 4, for the ongoing review of the city budget proposal, half favored a move to cut police overtime and half did not.

The two efforts by council chairman Berlin Boyd to cut the $22.4 million line item – first by $5 million and then by $2.7 million – failed on tie votes both times with some council members switching sides from one vote to the next.

15. 'Who is a Democrat?' -

Through two meetings in less than a week, the leader of a reorganization of the Shelby County Democratic Party has heard one discussion more than any other issue raised in the gatherings.

“Who is a Democrat?” attorney and former local party chairman David Cocke said in defining the issue at the start of the second forum in Midtown Wednesday, May 3.

16. Last Word: Three Gs React, More CA Changes and the Forrest Controversy Defined -

The day after Germantown leaders offered his school system $25 million for Germantown Elementary, Middle and High Schools, SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson was fielding calls from parents of students at the schools – the “three Gs” as they are known.

17. Council Moves to Operating Budget Examination -

Memphis City Council members open budget hearings Thursday, May 5, on Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s $680 million operating budget proposal for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

18. Vaughan Meets Byrd-Ashworth in District 95 General Election -

Shelby County Republicans are warning against complacency in the coming State House District 95 special general election in June.

Collierville Schools board member Kevin Vaughan won the Republican primary election for the vacant state House seat Thursday, April 27, by 49 votes over former Germantown alderman Frank Uhlhorn.

19. Vaughan Claims Republican Nomination in State House District 95 -

Collierville Schools board member Kevin Vaughan won the Republican primary election for state House District 95 Thursday, April 27, by 49 votes over former Germantown alderman Frank Uhlhorn.

20. Last Word: Election Day, Game 6 and School Vouchers Get Rolled -

Intermission in the NBA playoffs as tipoff of Game 6 approaches Thursday evening at the Forum. Look at all of the clouds as the lights dimming and letting you know it’s time to take your seats for the show that is reigniting the local passion for basketball.

21. View From the Hill: IMPROVE Act an Insight Into Testy Election Ahead -

In case anyone’s keeping stats, Senate leadership soundly defeated House leadership this session in the gas tax/tax cut battle.

Whether this is a forerunner to a Republican gubernatorial primary remains to be seen as Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris and House Speaker Beth Harwell weigh decisions. It’s not as if they’d be facing off against each other, though, since businessman Bill Lee and former Economic and Community Development Commissioner Randy Boyd are definitely in the race and not hurting for money.

22. Memphis United in Support of Grizzlies on National Playoffs Stage -

Yes, the Grizzlies’ 116-103 loss in Game 5 at San Antonio was disappointing. So step back a moment and remember the atmosphere at FedExForum – and across the city – during the two wins that briefly evened this first-round West Conference Playoff Series at 2-2.

23. City of Memphis Budget Could Face Bumpy Road -

Memphis City Council budget hearings begin Tuesday, May 2, at City Hall starting with Mayor Jim Strickland’s $77.8 million capital budget proposal for one-time spending on construction projects and similar expenses that are normally financed with bonds.

24. Strickland Delivers $680 Million Operating Budget to Council -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland delivered a $680 million city government operating budget proposal to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 25, with no property tax increase and no use of city reserves to balance it.

25. Earnhardt Retiring; FESJC Lands Three Stars -

Fourteen times NASCAR fans made Dale Earnhardt Jr. the sport’s most popular driver. Next season, they will have to find a new favorite. On Tuesday, April 25, Hendrick Motorsports issued a press release saying Earnhardt Jr. will retire as a driver at the end of the season. Junior, now 42, won 26 races since starting his career in 1999. Twice, he won the Daytona 500.

26. Panattoni Moving Forward With Phase Two of Industrial Park -

Since it first broke ground in 2014, Panattoni Development Co.’s Gateway Global Logistics Center has delivered 4.4 million square feet of industrial facilities, $276 million in investment and almost 700 jobs to a formerly vacuous tract of land spanning the Tennessee-Mississippi border.

27. Last Word: Game Day In San Antonio, Gas Tax Compromise and Democrats Talk -

Shelby County Commissioner Justin Ford is out on bond after being charged Monday with domestic violence assault and false imprisonment. And the Shelby County Commission does not appear to have a precedent for taking any kind of action until the charges are resolved one way or another although commission chairman Melvin Burgess is exploring that with attorneys.

28. View From the Hill: Tearful End for Non-Citizen Tuition Relief Bill -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari grew so emotional she couldn’t speak. On the verge of tears, the Memphis Democrat started to talk about a high school from her Shelby County district with a large number of undocumented immigrant students.

29. Last Word: Signs of Life in San Antonio, Steel & Rice and Marco Pave's Rap Opera -

The Grizz were down 19 to the Spurs at the end of the first half in Monday’s game two of the NBA playoff’s opening round – 26 earlier in the game -- and had it down to four at the point in the fourth quarter when Grit & Grind came back to life. It was a short if eventful and promising return to life with the Spurs winning 96 – 82. Game 3 Wednesday at the Forum. And Tigers basketball is well into an eventful off-season of Snapchat moments and “junior college” signings.

30. Initiatives Geared at Boosting Owner-Occupied Housing -

Nearly a third of all homes in Shelby County are owned by investors, a fact which has state and city leaders looking for ways to stem the tide and encourage locals to buy into their communities through owner-occupied homeownership.

31. Memphis’ Political History Reflects Changes With New Entries -

There was a moment during the March unveiling of former Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s portrait in the Hall of Mayors when the task of framing history gave way to the present.

It came when attorney Ricky E. Wilkins talked about the importance of Wharton and his predecessor, Willie Herenton – the only two black mayors in Memphis history – to the city’s political present. Wharton attended the event; Herenton was noticeably absent.

32. Prostate Cancer Tests Are Now OK With US Panel, With Caveats -

CHICAGO (AP) – An influential U.S. government advisory panel is dropping its opposition to routine prostate cancer screening in favor of letting men decide for themselves after talking with their doctor.

33. Toyota Announces $1.33 Billion Investment in Kentucky Plant -

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) – Toyota said Monday it is investing $1.33 billion to retool its sprawling factory in Georgetown, Kentucky, where the company's flagship Camry sedans are built.

No new factory jobs are being added, but Toyota says the upgrades amount to the biggest single investment ever at one of its existing plants in the United States. The retooling also will sustain the existing 8,200 jobs at Toyota's largest plant, where about one-fourth of all Toyota vehicles produced in North America are made, the automaker said.

34. Last Word: Restless Off Season, Memphis Open Closes and Single-Family Rentals -

This is proving to be a restless off-season for Tigers basketball and it is not even summer yet. Add freshman guard Keon Clergeot to the Tigers players exiting the program with word still to come from Markel Crawford. Meanwhile, the Tigers have signed their second junior college recruit – Kyvon Davenport -- at forward.

35. Task Force Backs 3 De-Annexations, 3 Referendums -

A task force on de-annexation is recommending referendums in three recently annexed areas of Memphis, an automatic de-annexation of three other sparsely populated areas on the city’s borders and keeping a part of Raleigh proposed by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland for de-annexation.

36. Last Word: Spring Votes, Those Tax Bills and Tim McCarver on Baseball Changes -

Look for more details on the specifics of the “Gateway” project to start to emerge now that a crucial if overlooked piece of the geographic puzzle in the north Downtown area has come into public view. The city’s largest hotel, also the city’s original convention center hotel, is about to change hands and go back to flying the Marriott flag.

37. De-Annexation Task Force Recommends 3 Referendums, 3 Automatic De-Annexations -

A task force on de-annexation is recommending de-annexation of three recently annexed areas of Memphis, an automatic de-annexation of three other sparsely populated areas on the city’s borders and keep a part of Raleigh proposed by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland for de-annexation in the city of Memphis.

38. Award-Winner McCloy Brings Modern Applications to Library System -

Keenon McCloy got around to doing the math on her time at City Hall. “I just crossed over 25 years,” said McCloy, director of the Memphis Public Libraries system, a position she has held for 10 years. Before that she was director of the city’s Division of Public Service, head of the Memphis Sexual Assault Resource Center and started as director of the transition office for Memphis Mayor-elect Willie Herenton in 1991, one of four mayors whose administrations she has worked in.

39. Last Word: The Catechism of 1968, Downtown Hotels and Earth Day on Auto Row -

What happened 49 years ago this week in our city began long before the first sanitation worker walked off the job or the first “I Am A Man” sign was made. Maybe it was that long arc that explains the timing of what happened here in late March into the first week of April of 1968. For just about half a century now we have thought and thought again about that chronology, reviewed the details. And what we have is a sort of catechism of moments that if they had happened differently, we can’t help thinking, might have produced a different result.

40. Motor Vessel Mississippi Returns to Memphis Riverfront -

The largest diesel towboat on the Mississippi River has been known to move 16 to 17 barges at one time – although it has done 33.

The motor vessel “Mississippi” does plenty of other heavy lifting including helping put in place the concrete mats that stabilize banks along the river.

41. Senate Douses Memphis and Nashville Pot Ordinances -

State senators are intent on striking down Memphis and Nashville marijuana laws giving police discretion to hand out citations for possessing small amounts of pot.

Despite opposition from Shelby County and Davidson County legislators, the Senate voted 26-5 Monday to clarify that state law overrides local government regulations involving drugs and similar substances.

42. Last Word: Basketball Capitol, Gang Fight in Southwest Memphis and Moving Polk -

There is something to be said for hosting a round of the NCAA’s March Madness without having a team in the playoffs. Much to be said against it. But after a weekend of what I think most of us here will call the most compelling of the regionals featured prominently on national television, you really can find very little to complain about. It might even have rekindled the intensity of our civic love of basketball.

43. Fed’s Bullard: Slow-Growth Economy Will Continue -

The economy has been in low-growth mode for years, and it’s probably unwise to assume things will change this year.

That’s according to Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis president Jim Bullard.

44. Political Past, Present Meet as Wharton’s Portrait Joins Hall of Mayors -

When A C Wharton Jr. was Memphis mayor, his relationship with the Memphis City Council wasn’t always good. And it would usually get worse whenever he’d call a press conference in the Hall of Mayors on a Tuesday the council was meeting. Some council members thought it was to draw attention from them.

45. Beale Street Authority’s Days May Be Numbered -

The Beale Street Tourism Development Authority would be out of business by May 21 and the city would be charged with hiring a day-to-day manager for the Beale Street entertainment district under a proposal by council member Martavius Jones.

46. Council Receptive To Restoring City Control of Beale -

The Beale Street Tourism Development Authority would be out of business by May 21 and the city administration would be charged with hiring a day to day manager for the Beale Street entertainment district under a proposal by council member Martavius Jones.

47. Last Word: 'Ono Poke and the Ghost of The Luau, Council Day and $3 Concerts -

The ghost of the Luau lives on. Loeb has a new tenant for the Shops of Chickasaw Gardens called ‘Ono Poke that features Hawaiian cuisine. And the restaurant will be just about on the other side of Poplar Avenue from where the Luau used to stand with its large concrete Easter Island head, Polynesian dishes and Hawaii Five-O era architecture – not the remake, the real Five-O and the real McGarrett.

48. Council Agenda Includes Final Impasse Vote And Beale Street Management Discussion -

Memphis City Council members take up third and final reading Tuesday, March 21, of changes to the city’s impasse process and talk more specifically about a move to do away with the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority.

49. Commission Debates Interim Appointment to State House -

Shelby County commissioners have to decide Monday, March 20, whether or not to appoint someone to the vacant state House District 95 seat until special primary and general elections are decided in three months.

50. Singing Along With Tone-Deaf Legislators -

Often dull, but never boring. They might even make you break out into song.

Halfway through the 2017 session, the General Assembly could be accused of lacking sharpness or sensibility, but what it lacks in luster it makes up for with lots of political song and dance.

51. Dean Brings Business Focus to Nonprofit Alliance as Interim CEO -

In 1995 when Nancy McGee became executive director of what is now known as the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence, it was just a small grant-writing center. It grew into a holistic nonprofit support organization that offers management services to more than 200 members.

52. Tennessee Fusion Center Monitored July Protests In Memphis, Emails Reveal -

A state “fusion center” that coordinates information among local law enforcement has been keeping a detailed list of legal protests in Memphis and other Tennessee cities, according to emails from last July requested by a student researching “predictive policing” efforts in Memphis.

53. Kelsey’s School Voucher Bill Faces Legislative Showdown -

NASHVILLE – A showdown is looming over a pilot voucher program targeting Shelby County Schools after the legislation moved out of Senate and House panels this week with unanimous votes.

54. Clayborn Temple Restoration Approaches One-Year Mark -

Box lunches and stained glass were the order of the day as developers of Clayborn Temple hosted the Rotary Club last month at the landmark Downtown church.

It was one in a series of events Frank Smith and Rob Thompson have hosted at the AME Church since they reopened its doors last October to explore uses for it and start a fuller renovation in time for the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the spring of 2018.

55. City Opens Online Survey On Memphis Riverfront -

A city task force on riverfront development has opened an online survey on the Memphis riverfront. The survey, at MemphisRiverfrontTF.com, is part of a larger process of gathering community input as the task force develops a comprehensive plan for the riverfront area.

56. City Opens Online Survey On Memphis Riverfront -

A city task force on riverfront development has opened an online survey seeking ideas. The survey, at MemphisRiverfrontTF.com, is part of a larger process of gathering community input as the task force develops a comprehensive plan for the riverfront area.

57. The Week Ahead: February 28-March 6 -

It's Monday, Memphis – time to peek at this week's (very busy) dance card, from the opening of Graceland's $45 million entertainment complex to a showcase of the latest high-tech ag innovations to a celebration of some local "hidden figures." Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...  

58. Last Word: How Do You Get On The List, Sedgwick & Thornwood and Musicals -

Monday was Presidents Day and thus a holiday at City Hall. But for the occupant on City Hall’s top floor it was anything but a holiday. The list Memphis Police made for who has to have a uniformed police officer next to them to go anywhere in City Hall is turning into a controversy over possible surveillance of citizens participating in the last year or so of protests around the city.

59. Sedgwick Announces $34M Expansion, Will Create 150 New Jobs -

Sedgwick Claims Management has announced plans to expand its corporate headquarters in Memphis, which will result in the creation of 150 local jobs.

The expansion will consolidate Sedgwick’s headquarters into a single campus in Shelby County and locate research and development functions to that site, according to Ted Townsend, chief operating officer for the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

60. Last Word: The List and Who Is On It, Lovell's Impact and Fountain Brook Recovers -

A list of 81 people who can’t come to City Hall without a police escort includes a lot of names from the last year of protests and marches in the city. And as the week begins, the list is under review by Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings at the request of Mayor Jim Strickland.

61. The Week Ahead: February 20-26 -

Enjoying that spring-like weather, Memphis? It’s another week of politics and music in the Bluff City, highlighted by the anticipated announcement Wednesday of acts that will be playing the Beale Street Music Festival in May. Here are some other highlights:

62. Grant Begins New North Memphis Rebuilding Effort -

North Memphis was once a place where heavy manufacturing was across the street from residential development and mom-and-pop retail was just down the street.

It was a thriving, blue-collar area of Memphis with block clubs, union halls, grassroots politics, lumber yards and nightclubs.

63. The Press Box: Men’s Pro Tennis Needs a Slice of Apple Pie -

There are a lot of ways to define the state of men’s professional tennis, but maybe the easiest is to open up the 2017 ATP World Tour Media Guide and turn to the alphabetical listing of players. Let’s try the “K” section.

64. West Memphis Takes Tourism Cue From Big River Crossing -

As a book-end to the newly opened Big River Crossing, West Memphis is rebooting its convention and visitors bureau with a renewed approach to marketing the town and its municipal building and auditorium as a destination for tourists and businesses.

65. Chef Shuttle Teams With Memphis Nutrition Group -

Chef Shuttle has announced a partnership with Memphis Nutrition Group during February’s American Heart Month. The food delivery service and the nutrition and lifestyle counseling practice teamed up to challenge customers to protect their hearts by making smart choices – with a little incentive along the way.

66. Strickland and Luttrell Mark Different Points in Mayoral Tenures -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland was 13 months and nine days in office when he delivered his second State of the City address last week at a Frayser church.

67. Last Word: Little Chairs in Longview, Police Pay Raise and Tiger Football Schedule -

The toys are in their cubbyholes. No stray Legos yet. The little chairs tucked neatly under little tables. The tall trees with their bare branches are much in need of little eyes inspecting their twisted branches and the shadows they make on the winter ground.

68. Palazzolo Urges Slower Phase-Out of Hall Tax, More Revenue for Local Governments -

Germantown Mayor Mike Palazzolo wants Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam to take his foot off the gas pedal when it comes to phasing out the Hall tax on dividend and investment income. And in a Wednesday, Feb. 8, letter to Haslam, Palazzolo makes a case for local governments getting a greater share of Hall tax revenues as the income tax is phased out.

69. Strickland Says Budget Will Include Police Pay Raise -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will propose a pay raise for Memphis Police officers in his upcoming budget proposal.

70. Palazzolo Urges Governor to Keep Hall Tax Phase-Out at 5 Years -

Germantown Mayor Mike Palazzolo wants Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam to take his foot off the gas pedal when it comes to phasing out the Hall state tax on dividend and investment income. And in a letter Wednesday, Feb. 8, to Haslam, Palazzolo makes a case for local governments getting a greater share of Hall tax revenues as the income tax is phased out.

71. New Book Spurs Call for Fresh Probe of Emmett Till Lynching -

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) – The horrific 1955 Mississippi slaying of Emmett Till, which helped trigger the modern civil rights movement, should be re-investigated now that a key witness is quoted as saying she lied about what the black teen said and did before he was lynched, Till's relatives say.

72. Dean to Replace McGee As CEO of Nonprofit Alliance -

Nancy McGee, who has given 25 years of service to the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence, is retiring as CEO of the organization, but will remain with the alliance as CEO emeritus through April.

73. Last Word: De-Annexation Theories, Clash on School Vouchers and Garth & Trisha -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and his administration come up with some surprises in de-annexation recommendations to the city task force on the issue. The three most recently annexed areas of Memphis were considered likely to be in the recommendations. Although the indication last year was that this would take a lot of discussion before someone actually wrote that on a Power Point presentation at City Hall. Not only did Strickland do that – he also included four other areas.

74. Body Count -

A day at a time, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has been writing the names of those who have been murdered in a notebook he keeps with him since he became mayor in January 2016.

When five people, two of them 15 years old, died violently the weekend that much of the world’s attention was on protest marches and the new administration in Washington, Strickland was getting updates on the latest surge in violence.

75. Strickland Proposes 7 Areas for Possible De-Annexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland wants to at least discuss de-annexing seven parts of the city and reducing the city’s square mileage by 8 percent and thus increasing the city’s population density.

76. Strickland Proposes 7 Areas For Possible Deannexation -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland wants to at least discuss de-annexing seven parts of the city and reducing the city’s square mileage by 8 percent and thus increasing the city’s population density.

77. McGee Retiring, Dean Named CEO of Nonprofit Alliance -

Nancy McGee, who has given 25 years of service to the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence, is retiring as CEO of the organization, but will remain with the alliance as CEO emeritus through April.

78. Strickland Says City Willing to Discuss De-Annexation of "Six to Seven" Areas -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said his administration will recommend six to seven parts of the city that could possibly be de-annexed when a de-annexation task force meets Thursday, Feb. 2, at City Hall.

79. Nonprofit Alliance CEO Nancy McGee Retiring -

Nancy McGee, who has given 25 years of service to the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence, is retiring as CEO of the organization but will remain with the alliance as CEO emeritus through April of this year.

80. Nonprofit Alliance CEO Nancy McGee Retiring -

Nancy McGee, who has given 25 years of service to the Alliance for Nonprofit Excellence, is retiring as CEO of the organization but will remain with The Alliance as CEO emeritus through April of this year.

81. Local and State Reaction To Trump Immigration Executive Order -

Here is reaction from state and local leaders to federal court orders in four states over the weekend blocking an executive order signed by President Donald Trump Friday, Jan. 27, that restricts immigration and travel from seven Muslim-majority countries. The original order applied to those with green cards and has since been changed to allow those with green cards.

82. What are the Odds? Blackburn is Still the Favorite -

Tennessee has its search firm and its search committee is in place to find the replacement for Dave Hart as the university’s athletic director.

Hart announced last August he would retire June 30, and with Tennessee undergoing a transition in its chancellor’s position, the search for Hart’s replacement was put on the back burner.

83. RDC’s Role Changes With New Riverfront Task Force -

The role of the Riverfront Development Corp., a nonprofit group raising private money and receiving a static amount of city funding that was a precursor to the county park conservancies of the last decade, changed this week.

84. Last Word: Connecting Downtown, Tranquil Treasure and Gas Tax Complexities -

Temple over the Tigers Wednesday in Philadelphia 77-66. East Carolina at the Forum is coming up Saturday. Grizz and Raptors at the Forum Wednesday evening and the Grizz win 101 – 99. The Grizz are on the road starting Friday against the Trail Blazers.

85. Memphis Mayor Creates Riverfront Task Force to Build Cohesion -

The city’s latest push for riverfront development is putting an emphasis on linking up recent changes on the riverfront like Beale Street Landing to Downtown’s core and filling in gaps between those attractions.

86. Last Word: The Grizz Farm Club Moves, Changing the NAACP and $15 An Hour -

How many of you knew the Iowa Energy was what amounts to a minor league team connected to the Grizz? How many of you knew that before Wade Baldwin and Troy Williams got sent there last month?

87. College Football Bowl Scene Changes, But AutoZone Liberty Bowl Endures -

Step inside the East Memphis offices of the AutoZone Liberty Bowl and the 58-year history of the game is captured in long, mirrored display cases featuring the helmets of every team to play in the game – from the simple crimson-and-white helmet of Alabama to the golden dome of Notre Dame.

88. Sports Bind City -

Maybe it is your spouse’s Christmas party. Or a local business conference and no one else from your company is attending. When you give the room the once-over, it’s full of unfamiliar faces.

89. Saban Dominance Bad for SEC? Not Buying It -

I keep reading that Nick Saban is ruining SEC football because his Alabama program is so dominant.

And I just don’t get it.

The misguided Saban-as-Satan logic goes this way:

90. First Tennessee Parent Closes Book on Solid 2016 -

First Tennessee Bank’s parent company has closed the book on 2016 with a set of quarterly and full-year results attributable to its top executive’s mantra about sticking to the basics.

91. Last Word: Humes Next, Top ZIPs in Residential and Payback in the Legislature -

Add Dave & Buster’s to the list of "it" retail hot spots. The restaurant-arcade has inked a lease in Cordova by Wolfchase Galeria with plans to open later this year, probably fourth quarter.

92. Tennessee Lawmakers Act on Balanced Budget Convention to Curb ‘Crippling’ National Debt -

Saying they can avoid a “runaway” convention for “crazy or radical ideas,” Republican state legislators are filing legislation calling for a convention of states in Nashville to adopt a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

93. Tennessee Acts on Balanced Budget Convention to Curb ‘Crippling’ National Debt -

Saying they can avoid a “runaway” convention for “crazy or radical ideas,” Republican state legislators are filing legislation calling for a convention of states in Nashville to adopt a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

94. More Than One Convention Center Hotel Proposal -

There is another convention center hotel proposal in circulation, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says.

95. Convention Center Hotel Proposal Surfaces -

A Denver financier whose work in the last 15 years is in developing and financing convention center hotels has very general plans for a 600-room Memphis Convention Center hotel at Front and Poplar where the Mud Island parking garage is currently.

96. Convention Center Hotel Proposal Surfaces -

A Denver financier whose work in the last 15 years is in developing and financing convention center hotels has very general plans for a 600-room Memphis Convention Center hotel at Front and Poplar where the Mud Island parking garage is currently.

97. Crime Issue Shows Complexity After Record Homicide Tally -

When the subject is crime in Memphis, it never stays in one place for very long. Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton’s conclusion that the city’s problem with violent crime is a black problem drew criticism Tuesday, Jan. 3, from Memphis City Council member Janis Fullilove.

98. Last Word: 2016's Toll, Strickland & Herenton and Downtown Hotel Changes Hands -

The city’s homicide count was at 228 as 2016 came to an end, breaking the old 1993 record.

In a few years maybe there will be a better idea of the larger trend that made 2016 a more violent year. Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings has said gangs were a factor in more homicides but not necessarily most of them – or if they did, it still remained an act between two people who knew each other and being in a gang wasn’t necessarily what set off the violent reaction.

99. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

100. Memphis Bridge Protest Underscores 2016 National Narrative on Race, Police -

It was a year to the month since Memphis Police officer Connor Schilling shot and fatally wounded Darrius Stewart during a traffic stop in Hickory Hill. Stewart’s death in July 2015 and a subsequent decision by a Shelby County grand jury that Schilling would face no state criminal charges was still an issue in Memphis. This past July, it became the local face of a resumed national narrative.