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Editorial Results (free)

1. The Week Ahead: May 9-15 -

Alright, Memphis, grab your calendars! Whether you want to book it over to the Ruby Bridges Reading Festival or just baste in the scent of barbecue, there’s plenty to do this week. Here’s our roundup...

2. Events -

Center for Southern Folklore will host Bill Donoghue for a seminar and Q&A titled “Sonny Boy Williamson II: Rock’s Missing Blues Link” on Wednesday, May 4, at 3 p.m. at 119 S. Main St. Following the seminar, co-researcher Jim Basnight will perform Delta-style selections on his 12-string guitar. Cost is free. For reserved seating, email jlpeiser@gmail.com or call 901-525-3655.

3. Last Word: BSMF Looks Up, Overton Park Respite and Slow Economic Growth -

The Beale Street Music Festival box office numbers won’t be in for a bit yet. But it looks like the three-day event that ended Sunday evening with Beck and Paul Simon weathered the weather very well, maybe better than usual.

4. Last Word: The Bible Veto Override Vote, Grizz Nostalgia and Kroger Goes Online -

The Tennessee Legislature hoped to end its 2016 session Wednesday at the end of an eventful day that included a failed attempt to override Gov. Bill Haslam’s veto of the bill that would have made the Bible the official state book.
But into Wednesday evening, the state House was still debating the Hall tax on dividends – specifically further roll backs of it. And the Senate had gone home for the night.
So Thursday looks like a good bet for the adjournment for the year and the formal start of the election season for incumbents.

5. Most Political Hopefuls Follow Through in August Elections -

Shelby County election commissioners meet Tuesday, April 19, to set the ballot for the Aug. 4 state and federal primaries and county general elections.

Of 99 qualifying petitions for the ballot pulled in Shelby County, some by the same citizen pondering multiple races, 65 were filed by the April 7 qualifying deadline and four of those 65 petitions had been withdrawn by the April 14 withdrawal deadline.

6. Three Withdraw From August Ballot At Thursday Deadline -

Three contenders in the Aug. 4 state legislative primaries in Shelby County withdrew from the races by the Thursday, April 14, withdrawal deadline including two would-be challengers of veteran Democratic state House members from Memphis.

7. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

8. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

9. 8th Congressional District Primaries Draw 22 Contenders, 13 Republican -

The Republican primary race to fill the 8th District Congressional seat Republican incumbent Stephen Fincher is giving up drew a field of 13 contenders – seven from Shelby County and four from Jackson, Tennessee – at the Thursday, April 7, noon filing deadline for the Aug. 4 ballot.

10. Last Word: The De-Annexation Express, Return of The Curb Market and Different Fuel -

When time ran out Wednesday on the state Senate’s state and local government committee in Nashville, de-annexation legislation was still on the tracks as the Tennessee Legislature draws closer to adjournment for the year.

11. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

12. The Week Ahead: March 14-20, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the first look at the Greater Memphis Chamber’s proposed diversity program to a truly Irish celebration of St. Paddy’s Day.

13. City Has Offer On Adams Police Station -

The realty group that proposed a short-lived Hotel Overton for Overton Square in 2015 has offered the city of Memphis $1.1 million for the old Central Police Station building at 128 Adams Ave.

14. Last Word: Mudslide, The Deannexation Storm and Kilzer at Calvary -

Lots of news on a very rainy day including the flooding from the constant rain that closed some schools and cancelled a lot of other events. And then there was a mudslide on Riverside Drive from the bluff overlooking Tom Lee Park and the Mississippi River. The rain has also pushed the Wolf River to the point that it is now over some parts of the greenway in Germantown.

15. City Has Offer On Adams Police Headquarters -

The realty group that proposed a short-lived Hotel Overton for Overton Square in 2015 has offered the city of Memphis $1.1 million for the old Central Police Station building at 128 Adams Avenue.

16. Last Word: Leaving Warren and Tulane, New Police Brass and Losing Housing -

Post Super Bowl edition of Last Word: Broncos 24 – Panthers 10 – Lady Gaga’s National Anthem kudos – Coldplay/Bruno Mars/Beyonce ambitious halftime extravaganza got lost in spots by bad sound.

17. Memorable Events of 2015 will Spill Into 2016 -

When you really get down to it, history is a collection of moments, moments that, when they fall one after the other over the long arc of time, eventually form the tapestry representing who we are.

18. The Week Ahead: Dec. 28, 2015 -

How was your (hopefully long) weekend, Memphis? This week, more than most, is a time of change – of renewal, of turning the page, starting over. And of course, a time to ask the annual question: What are we going to do on New Year’s Eve?

19. March 1 Presidential Primary Begins Complex Process -

Shelby County’s first election of 2016 seems like a simple affair. The Tennessee presidential primaries and countywide primaries for General Sessions Court Clerk are the only items on the ballot.

But the ballot approved last week by the Shelby County Election Commission includes 224 names. Only three of those names are the contenders in the two primaries for clerk. And another 17 are the presidential candidates.

20. Howard Stern Announces 5-Year Deal With Sirius XM -

NEW YORK (AP) — Much has changed for Howard Stern and SiriusXM since their first deal a decade ago — except for their desire to stay in business together.

The company announced Tuesday its third five-year deal to keep Stern's radio show at SiriusXM, together with a longer-term video arrangement that will allow fans to see as well as hear his program and have access to 30 years of career highlights.

21. The Week Ahead: Dec. 14, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from the annual AutoZone shareholder convergence Downtown to the new Star Wars movie...

22. The Week Ahead: Dec. 7, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from gift shopping at the Memphis Indie Holiday Market to the latest Beale Street developments ...

23. If Fear Is Goal, Terrorists Have Won in Tennessee -

The terrorists who struck Paris three weeks ago succeeded in more than killing and wounding hundreds of people. Their attack is pitting Americans against each other in how to respond, and Tennessee politicians are no exception.

24. I Choose Memphis: Amy Grow -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Amy Grow

Job title and company: International Paper, Communications Department, Meetings & Events

25. The Week Ahead: Nov. 9, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from revenge on the Warriors to crime reduction through urban planning…

It’s still election season in 70 percent of the city, which sounds like a weather forecast – part warning and part advisory.
But the seven-day outlook calls for an increased chance of political engagement this week. Early voting in the set of five Memphis City Council runoff races continues this week at eight satellite locations as well as the Downtown site, 157 Poplar Ave.
The runoff elections in council districts 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 will determine the identity of a council that will have at least six, possibly seven new members. Super District council members Philip Spinosa and Martavius Jones, the two confirmed new faces on the council, were elected outright on Oct. 8.

26. ULI’s Final Fairgrounds Report Adds Parking Details -

The final report from an Urban Land Institute panel that visited the Mid-South Fairgrounds in June has more to say about parking challenges and scenarios.

The 38-page report released Tuesday, Nov. 3, affirms the group’s June call to add new facilities at the fairgrounds while keeping the Mid-South Coliseum, possibly in an altered form. And it includes more specific drawings and plans for parking that would be adaptable for other uses outside of the eight games a year that are played at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium.

27. Former Senator Fred Thompson Dies -

Former U.S. Sen. and one-time presidential contender Fred Thompson was in many ways a reluctant politician. But he was also a lobbyist with an envious arsenal of political skills honed both by his calling as an attorney and by his service as a lawyer during unprecedented political crises.

28. Five City Council Races Destined for Runoffs -

The identity of the Memphis City Council that will take office in January with six new members was still in flux at the end of a very long and frustrating Oct. 8 election night.

The races for four of those six open seats and the seat now held by an appointee to the council are going to a Nov. 19 runoff election – one week before Thanksgiving.

29. Candidates Play Out Early Voting-Election Day Gap -

The early vote is in but still to be counted. There is still some television time booked for last-minute appeals to election day voters.

The debates and questionnaires speak for themselves, and no longer have a place on schedules that in the run-up to Thursday’s Memphis election day have become about opportunities to meet and be seen by the most people possible.

30. Memphis Mayor's Race Poised For Close Finish -

A political summer dominated by the campaign for Memphis mayor begins turning toward fall Friday, Sept. 18, with the opening of the early voting period in advance of the Oct. 8 election day.

All 16 early voting sites are open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Oct. 3.

31. Events -

New Ballet Ensemble & School will present “FreeFall” Friday and Saturday, Sept. 11-12, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 13, at 2:30 p.m. at Hattiloo Theatre, 37 S. Cooper St. The performance showcases eclectic dance pieces, collaboratively performed by students and the ensemble. All performances are pay-what-you-can. Visit newballet.org for tickets.

32. Memphis Mayoral Debate Participants Announced -

The field is set for an upcoming televised Memphis mayoral debate scheduled for the eve of early voting.

The four mayoral contenders who will participate in the Sept. 17 debate, sponsored by The Daily News and Urban Land Institute Memphis, are incumbent Mayor A C Wharton, city council members Harold Collins and Jim Strickland and Memphis Police Association president Mike Williams.

33. Alabama Still Team to Beat, Tennessee On the Rise in 2015 Football Season -

Dak Prescott, the best returning quarterback in the Southeastern Conference, isn’t buying the national narrative that the league is “down” because the first College Football Playoff title game featured Ohio State beating Oregon.

34. First Mayoral TV Debate Features Aggressive Contenders -

The first televised debate of the 2015 race of Memphis Mayor Monday, Aug. 10, saw incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. and city council member Jim Strickland clash repeatedly while fellow council member and mayoral challenger Harold Collins said Strickland and Wharton were “acting like Tom and Jerry.”

35. Joe Cooper Case Raises Questions About County Election Commission Discretion -

The definitive ballot for the Oct. 8 Memphis election was a bit late because of a challenge by city council contender Joe Cooper.

36. Preseason Analysis: Vols Will Defeat Oklahoma, Finish 8-4 -

Tennessee’s football team has something to prove as it concludes the first week of preseason practices and moves forward to the 2015 season.

The Vols must prove they belong in the national picture in Butch Jones’ third year as coach.

37. Bikesmith Ready to Roll Into First Brick-and-Mortar Store -

Memphis’ traveling bike repairman has finally found a home. A year and a half after enrolling in the Mayor’s Innovation Delivery Team initiative MEMMobile, Jim Steffen, known as The Bikesmith to cyclists needing an adjustment or a hail-Mary overhaul, has signed a lease on a brick-and-mortar extension of his mobile repair truck.

38. Joe Cooper Denied Spot on Memphis Election Ballot -

Memphis City Council contender Joe Cooper will not be on the October Memphis election ballot.

Shelby County Chancellor Jim Kyle ruled Thursday, Aug. 6, that Cooper’s request to be allowed on the ballot was not valid because Cooper didn’t gather the required 25 voter signatures by the July 16 deadline.

39. Joe Cooper Denied Spot On Memphis Election Ballot -

Memphis City Council contender Joe Cooper will not be on the October Memphis election ballot.

Shelby County Chancellor Jim Kyle ruled Thursday, Aug. 6, that Cooper’s request to be allowed on the ballot was not valid because Cooper didn’t gather the required 25 voter signatures by the July 16 deadline.

40. Strickland, Collins Clash on DROP Freeze -

Two political challengers to Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. clashed Tuesday, Aug. 4, over a plan by his administration to keep the city’s police ranks above the 2,000 mark.

City chief administrative officer Jack Sammons approached the council Tuesday in executive session about a plan to freeze the deferred retirement option plan (DROP) for city employees who have set their retirement date up to three years ahead of schedule.

41. Wharton Opens Whitehaven Headquarters as Collins Intensifies Challenge -

On the broiling parking lot of his Whitehaven campaign headquarters this weekend, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. talked about “still water” after firing up a crowd of 150 supporters in a tent next to Elvis Presley Boulevard.

42. Kyle Puts Memphis Election Ballot On Hold -

The ballot for the Oct. 8 Memphis election is not final.

Shelby County Chancellor Jim Kyle issued a court order Thursday, July 30, holding up any printing of ballots or public notice of the election ballot pending an Aug. 6 hearing on a petition by city council candidate Joe Cooper.

43. Sparks Fly at Cooper-Young Mayoral Forum -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was the target of two Memphis City Council members challenging him during most of a Cooper-Young political forum Tuesday, July 28.

It’s what Wharton predicted would happen once the campaign to the Oct. 8 ballot began to throw sparks.

44. Strickland's Memphis Mayoral Bid Heats Up -

Just hours after he dropped out of the race for Memphis Mayor, James Harvey endorsed mayoral contender Jim Strickland at the opening of Strickland’s Poplar Plaza campaign headquarters.

45. Memphis Mayoral Field Set at 10 -

Shelby County Election Commissioners have certified the Memphis election ballot for Oct. 8.

These are the names to appear on that ballot for the 15 elected offices.

The commission met hours after the noon Thursday, July 23, deadline for candidates to withdraw from the ballot if they wished.

46. Filing Deadline Shapes Field in Memphis Elections -

Now that they’ve made the filing deadline for the Oct. 8 Memphis elections, candidates have until Thursday, July 23, to withdraw if they wish before the ballot is set later that day in the 15 city races.

47. Ford Switches Races at Election Filing Deadline -

Darrell Wright cut it about as close as was possible at the noon Thursday, July 16, filing deadline for candidates in the Oct. 8 Memphis elections.

48. Memphis Filing Deadline Features Last-Minute Shifts, Intrigue -

The decision Tuesday, July 14, by a sixth Memphis City Council member to pass up a place on the Oct. 8 ballot has added some intrigue on the way to the noon Thursday, July 16, filing deadline for the Memphis elections.

49. Special Action on Same-Sex Nuptials a Waste of Time -

With Republican lawmakers scrambling for a response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay-marriage ruling, Tennesseans on both sides of the issue say they are seeking "equality."

Immediately after the court’s decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville said, "Love and equality won. I’m glad the Supreme Court ruled on the right side of history."

50. Supporters Seek to Revive Tennessee Medicaid Expansion Plan -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Supporters of a failed plan to expand Medicaid in Tennessee are renewing an effort to try to pass it after a recent ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold health insurance subsidies.

51. Chism Political Picnic Offers Pre-Campaign Snapshot -

Memphis mayoral contender Jim Strickland saw a face he didn’t recognize Saturday, June 13, in the southwest Memphis crowd at former County Commissioner Sidney Chism’s annual political picnic.

52. Ramsey: No Medicaid Expansion Until 2017 -

The Tennessee legislative session ended in late April, giving itself a little more than two and a-half months to handle the state’s business. That’s plenty of time, according to Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey.

53. Two People Emerge For Airport Chairman Post -

A three-member committee of the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority is recommending two candidates to replace outgoing chairman Jack Sammons.

54. Two People Emerge for Airport Chairman Post -

A three-member committee of the Memphis-Shelby County Airport Authority is recommending two candidates to replace outgoing chairman Jack Sammons.

55. Indie Music Shops Prepare for Record Store Day -

Memphis’ stalwart independent record shops are preparing for their moment in the sun this weekend.

The one-day global Record Store Day event is Saturday, April 18. It’s held each year to celebrate and support independent shops.

56. City Requests Fairgrounds Review by ULI Experts -

The upcoming review of the Fairgrounds redevelopment concept by a group of Urban Land Institute experts will move quickly and could be a political wild card.

The city’s request last week for a review by Urban Land Institute’s Advisory Services goes to a part of the planning and land use nonprofit that has been specializing in such political hot potatoes since 1948.

57. New Federal Courthouse in Nashville Included in Obama Budget -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – President Barack Obama's budget proposal includes $181.5 million for a new federal courthouse in Nashville.

U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper, a Nashville Democrat who has long advocated for the new courthouse, lauded Monday's announcement a "critical next step" in getting the facility built.

58. Cohen Calls Tennessee Promise ‘A Fraud’ -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis calls the Tennessee Promise last dollar scholarship program for community college and state technical centers “a fraud.”

59. Stars Flock to Music City’s Ernest Tubb Record Shop -

When Bob Dylan drops by, he generally goes right for “a handful” of Hank and Carter Family recordings, although on one Lower Broadway afternoon the old man from the North Country also is reported to have purchased a “Larry the Cable Guy” DVD.

60. Pickard Joins Explorations on Tentative 2015 Ballot -

The contingency plans and other political maneuvering for the city of Memphis elections are well underway.

And a key part of the calculation is making plans for a change in plans.

Architect and planner Charles “Chooch” Pickard is one of several citizens running “exploratory” campaigns at this point.

61. Obama to Visit Nashville to Discuss Immigration -

President Barack Obama is traveling to Nashville to speak about his executive actions on immigration.

Obama will be in Nashville Tuesday, Dec. 9, according to a news release from the office of U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper. Obama will speak at Casa Azafran, a community center and office space housing nonprofit groups that serve the city's immigrants.

62. Obama to Visit Nashville to Discuss Immigration -

President Barack Obama is traveling to Nashville to speak about his executive actions on immigration.

Obama will be in Nashville Tuesday, Dec. 9, according to a news release from the office of U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper. Obama will speak at Casa Azafran, a community center and office space housing nonprofit groups that serve the city's immigrants.

63. Events -

The Association of Fundraising Professionals will meet Thursday, Dec. 4, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thomas Center at Christian Brothers University, 650 East Parkway S. Jim Duncan, executive director of Memphis Botanic Garden, will present “The Memphis Botanic Garden Experience: From Red to Black.” Cost is $20 for members and $25 for nonmembers. Visit afpmemphis.org.

64. Events -

The Downtown Memphis Commission Design Review Board will meet Wednesday, Dec. 3, at 4 p.m. in the Downtown Memphis Commission conference room, 114 N. Main St. Visit downtownmemphiscommission.com.

65. Events -

National Civil Rights Museum will host the Freedom Award public forum Tuesday, Dec. 2, at 10 a.m. at Temple of Deliverance Church of God in Christ, 369 G.E. Patterson Ave. The Freedom Award ceremony will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, 255 N. Main St., followed by a gala from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the adjacent Cook Convention Center. Admission to the forum is free; tickets to the ceremony and gala are $200. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org for details on this year’s honorees.

66. Events -

American Red Cross will hold a blood drive Tuesday, Dec. 2, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Christian Brothers University, 650 East Parkway S. Visit redcrossblood.org or call 800-REDCROSS for eligibility requirements and appointments.

67. Events -

Small Business Saturday, an annual event that encourages consumers to shop and dine at small, independent businesses, will be held Saturday, Nov. 29. For more information, visit shopsmall.com.

68. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre will present “If Scrooge Was a Brother” Friday, Nov. 28, through Dec. 21 at the theater, 37 S. Cooper St. Buy tickets at hattiloo.org.

69. Events -

SRVS will hold free dance and movement classes for adults with disabilities Wednesday, Nov. 26, at 10 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. at the SRVS Learning Center, 3971 Knight Arnold Road. Email lindsay.weaver@srvs.org to register, or visit srvs.org.

70. Tennesseeans Urged to Fight 'Voter Suppression' -

Tennessee Democratic Congressman Jim Cooper and community leaders are urging people to vote this election cycle following a recent report that shows states that toughened their voter identification laws saw steeper drops in election turnout than those that did not.

71. Tennesseeans Urged to Fight 'Voter Suppression' -

Tennessee Democratic Congressman Jim Cooper and community leaders are urging people to vote this election cycle following a recent report that shows states that toughened their voter identification laws saw steeper drops in election turnout than those that did not.

72. Nashville School News Briefs -

Montgomery Bell Student, Faculty Films Air

Films and videos by Montgomery Bell Academy students and one faculty member will be featured Oct. 23 on the Nashville Education, Community and Arts TV channel’s Artober celebration.

73. Events -

The Metal Museum will host Repair Days Thursday, Oct. 2, through Sunday, Oct. 5, at the museum, 374 Metal Museum Drive. Metalsmiths from across the country will solder, sharpen, remove dents and repair items, with all proceeds benefiting the museum. Visit metalmuseum.org for a schedule of events.

74. Events -

Kiwanis Club of Memphis will meet Wednesday, Oct. 1, from noon to 1 p.m. at The University Club of Memphis, 1346 Central Ave. The guest speaker is University of Memphis President M. David Rudd. Cost is $18 for nonmembers.

75. Sen. Summerville Charged With Public Intoxication -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Outgoing state Sen. Jim Summerville, whose behavior has often drawn the ire of his Republican colleagues, has been charged with public intoxication.

76. Is It Really Time to Relax Lending Standards? -

Just when you thought it was safe to believe in the wisdom of the system, they pull this.

Back in 2008, when the Great Recession made its way into Middle Tennessee and the area began to feel the pain that other regions had endured for several years, the financial world collapsed.

77. Longtime Tennessee Civil Rights Lawyer Dies at 86 -

NASHVILLE (AP) – George Barrett, a longtime Tennessee civil rights lawyer known for handling a case that ultimately desegregated the state's public colleges and universities, has died. He was 86.

78. Changing Landscape -

A “high-end” grocery store chain not currently serving the Memphis market has leased the shuttered former Kroger store at 9050 U.S. 64 in Lakeland and should open in the spring, according to a Lakeland official.

79. Council to Vote on Insurance Changes, Budget -

Most of council day at City Hall Tuesday, June 17, will be devoted to closing out most, but not all, of the city’s budget season.

The Memphis City Council should make final decisions Tuesday on a stable city property tax rate and approve operating and capital budgets for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

80. Council Begins Decisions on City Financial Changes -

Memphis City Council members took the first steps Tuesday, June 3, toward major changes in pension benefits for city employees and began delving into the details of even broader changes in health insurance coverage for city employees and retirees.

81. Letting it Ride -

The bicycles aren’t the only thing with wheels in Jim Steffen’s new shop.

His business itself, The Bikesmith, sits on wheels and operates as a mobile bike retail and repair venture.

82. City Council to Review Police Budget -

Memphis City Council members talk with their actuary Tuesday, May 6, about the city’s pension liability crisis as the council budget committee takes a first look at the Memphis Police Department’s budget.

83. Overton Square Parking Gets Latest Solution -

Work on a pair of pedestrian crosswalks across Cooper Street at Monroe Avenue in the next two months could be the beginning of remedying traffic problems in Overton Square.

The crosswalks are the first crucial part in the plan that so far includes permits for residential parking on Monroe and some reserved parking in the Overton Square garage specifically for businesses in the area.

84. Loeb Midtown Center Now Fully Leased -

Loeb Properties’ Belvedere Collection on Union Avenue in Midtown is 100 percent leased.

Agilitas USA Inc., operating as Results Physiotherapy, signed a new lease for 2,280 square feet in Suites 105-106 at the retail strip center.

85. Redistricting Has Little Effect on Tenn. GOP -

While Republican lawmakers in some states may have benefited from congressional redistricting, the changes had little effect in Tennessee.

Republicans were able to give themselves a built-in advantage in House elections by doing well in the statewide elections in many states, then gerrymandering congressional districts in key states after the 2010 census. The strategy may prove to be advantageous going into the 2014 midterm elections and beyond, regardless of the political climate in November.

86. Harris Files Ford Challenge at Deadline -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris is challenging Democratic state Sen. Ophelia Ford in the August primary for District 29, the Senate seat held by a member of the Ford family since 1975.

87. Redistricting Has Little Effect on Tennessee GOP -

While Republican lawmakers in some states may have benefited from congressional redistricting, the changes had little effect in Tennessee.

Republicans were able to give themselves a built-in advantage in House elections by doing well in the statewide elections in many states, then gerrymandering congressional districts in key states after the 2010 census. The strategy may prove to be advantageous going into the 2014 midterm elections and beyond, regardless of the political climate in November.

88. Flood Insurance Policies Face Hike in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — For many Tennessee property owners in flood-prone areas, a move by Congress to soften steep increases to subsidized insurance policies may come as little comfort.

89. CB Richard Ellis Brokers Four Multifamily Sales -

The multifamily group at CB Richard Ellis Memphis has closed on the sale of four properties in the Memphis market over the last several weeks.

Briar Club Apartments, a 272-unit apartment community constructed in 1985, sold for $8.7 million, or $32,093 per unit. Cinnamon Trails Apartments, a 208-unit apartment community constructed in 1989, sold for $8.6 million, or $41,461 per unit. respectively. CBRE Memphis represented the sellers, Briar Apartments LLC and Cinnamon Apartments LLC in the sale to New York based Briar Club LLC and Cinnamon Trail LLC.

90. Events -

Memphis Pink Palace Museum will host a lecture by Commercial Appeal columnist Wendi Thomas titled “Mid-South Racial Present” Thursday, Feb. 20, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the museum, 3050 Central Ave. The free lecture is presented in conjunction with the “RACE: Are We So Different?” exhibit. Visit memphismuseums.org.

91. Gov't Fails to Issue Rules on Musical Instruments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Busted guitars, mangled cellos, broken banjos, lost lutes — musicians who rely on airlines to get them to performances have seen it all.

Two years ago, Congress stepped in to help, directing the Department of Transportation to write rules to make sure instruments don't get damaged or lost. The rules were due Friday, but the department hasn't even started writing them, citing a lack of money.

92. City Delays Fairgrounds Zone Application Vote -

The city of Memphis won’t be going to the Tennessee Building Commission in Nashville this week for approval of a Tourism Development Zone for the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. decided to delay the proposal last week as it reviewed the fairgrounds renovation financing plan with Memphis City Council members.

93. New Life -

When Rob Clark and his wife moved into their home in the historic Evergreen neighborhood in 1993, catalog and distribution operations were still active at the Sears Crosstown building.

That soon changed, and for roughly two decades the hulking property stood as a towering, painful reminder of the area’s faded glory.

94. New Life -

When Rob Clark and his wife moved into their home in the historic Evergreen neighborhood in 1993, catalog and distribution operations were still active at the Sears Crosstown building.

That soon changed, and for roughly two decades the hulking property stood as a towering, painful reminder of the area’s faded glory.

95. Council Keeps Southbrook Mall Renovation Alive -

Memphis City Council members voted Tuesday, Nov. 5, to start over again in plans to find a legal use for city funds in renovating the Southbrook Mall in Whitehaven.

And the administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. gave a qualified endorsement through what amounts to a new feasibility study on the mall due before the council in a month.

96. Current Elections Merge With Future Campaigns -

The campaigns for elections in 2013 are beginning to overlap with campaigns on the ballot in 2014.

The set of 11 elections in three months ends with the Nov. 21 special general election for state House District 91 and a citywide referendum on a half percent sales tax hike.

97. Events -

Business Over Coffee International will continue its Weave Your Own Web social media training series on Thursday, Oct. 15, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the group’s headquarters, 5865 Ridgeway Road, suite 300. Cost is free for members and first-time guests, and $10 for returning guests. Visit businessovercoffee.biz or call 820-4469.

98. Akbari Takes District 91 Democratic Primary -

As fewer than 2,000 voters participated in the latest of 11 elections in Shelby County in a three-month span, the independent candidate in the Nov. 21 special general election for state House District 91 filed suit against state election officials in U.S. Federal Court for the Middle District of Tennessee.

99. Akbari Wins Democratic State House Primary -

Raumesh Akbari, an attorney making her first bid for elected office, won the Democratic primary State House special election Tuesday, Oct. 8 in a low turnout contest featuring seven contenders and an unofficial voter turnout of 5.4 percent.

100. Voters to Decide Nominee for DeBerry’s Seat -

For the first time in 41 years, Lois DeBerry’s name will not be on a Shelby County ballot for a state House seat.