» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Jim Black' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:33
Shelby Public Records:68
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:38
Middle Tennessee:74
East Tennessee:22
Other:1

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. The Week Ahead: July 25-31 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! We’re wrapping up July with an eclectic mix of local happenings, from political campaigning to a celebration of all things Harry Potter. Plus, what you need to know about Tennessee sales tax holiday and much more…

2. Last Word: The Greensward Deal, Pulpit to Protest Call and Leader Federal's HQ -

There is nothing quite like a deadline to produce results.

I’m not talking about this job, although it is more than a coincidence that the closer a deadline gets the more you start to figure out how to write something.

3. Last Word: Baton Rouge Again, Identifying The Memphis Movement & Early Voting -

It is becoming more and more difficult to keep the danger to police officers from extremists and the danger of police training and policies that are used to justify questionable police shootings in the same frame.

4. The Week Ahead: July 18-24 -

It’s supposed to get hotter in Memphis this week, which is pretty normal for mid-July, and the coming week brings what could be a hot debate at the Memphis City Council meeting Tuesday on a plan to solve parking on the Overton Park Greensward. That and some other events planned this week include...

5. Black Lives Matter Movement Defines Itself Beyond Single Leader -

The city’s Black Lives Matter movement doesn’t have a single leader or “figurehead” and shouldn’t be oversimplified, said a coalition of several groups involved in the protests.

6. Last Word: Conley Makes It Official, No "Figure Heads" and Early Voting Opens -

Mike Conley signed on the dotted line about an hour before the press conference confirming that he and the Grizz front office have closed on the deal that makes him the highest paid player in NBA history… for now.

7. BLM Movement Leaders Add to Demands, Conley Says 'Time To Speak Up' -

The city’s Black Lives Matter movement doesn’t have a single leader or “figure head” and shouldn’t be oversimplified, said a coalition of several groups involved in the protests.

8. After The Bridge -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

9. Tenn. Police Look to Keep Peace at Black Lives Matter Protests -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Police in several major Tennessee cities have indicated they made a concerted effort to avoid arrests and maintain peace during recent Black Lives Matter protests.

10. Black Lives Matter Protesters Arrested Outside Graceland -

Six Black Lives Matter protesters were arrested Tuesday, July 12, as they blocked Elvis Presley Boulevard at the gates of Graceland.

The arrests were out of a group of 100 protesters led by Frank Gotti, who was among the organizers of the Sunday rally turned march to the Hernando DeSoto Bridge.

11. Frustrations Aired After Bridge Protest -

To get an idea of just how high emotions were running at the outset of the weekend’s Black Lives Matter rally Downtown that turned into a march, take many of the voices coming through a megaphone in the FedExForum plaza and put them in a church sanctuary with air conditioning and a better sound system.

12. Last Word: The Day After The Bridge, Big River Plans and the U of M Train Tracks -

The lure of the bridge was tempting some of the organizers of Sunday’s Black Lives Matter protest that shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge on the day after the protest that drew thousands.

13. Frustration Day After Black Lives Matter Protest -

To get an idea of just how high emotions were running at the outset of the weekend’s Black Lives Matter rally Downtown that turned into a march, take many of the voices coming through a megaphone in the FedExForum plaza and put them in a church sanctuary with air conditioning and a better sound system.

14. Protest at Memphis Bridge Ends Peacefully -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city’s most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge to Front Street.

15. Black Lives Matter Protest Draws Thousands In Memphis Protest Milestone -

Four and a half hours after it began Sunday, July 10, the city's most significant and largest Black Lives Matter protest ended with police in riot gear slowly walking a group of around 100 protesters off the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and south on Front Street.

16. The Rest of the August Ballot -

If all goes according to plan on the Aug. 4 election day, Linda Phillips hopes the result is that you don’t see her in any of the reporting on election night.

17. The Week Ahead: June 27-July 3 -

It's been a long time coming, but Friday is the kickoff for wine sales in grocery stores. While you're getting your corkscrews ready, check out what else is going on this week – from a deadline in the greensward mediation process to a special superhero stop at St. Jude...

18. June 10-16: This week in Memphis history -

2015: Andrea Miller is named the new president of LeMoyne-Owen College, making her the first woman to lead the city’s only historically black college. Miller is selected by the college’s board of trustees in a meeting on campus that lasts several hours as students, alumni and other supporters wait on the lawn outside Brownlee Hall for the announcement.

19. Committee Recommends Pay Raises for City Employees -

The Memphis City Council’s budget committee completed its budget reviews Tuesday, May 31, recommending a 1.5 percent pay raise for city employees other than fire and police and $300,000 in grant funding to hire a full-time director for the Whitehaven Economic Development Council.

20. Council Committee Recommends Pay Raises Beyond Fire and Police -

It took six hours. But the Memphis City Council’s budget committee completed its budget reviews Tuesday, May 31, with a recommendation of a 1.5 percent pay raise for city employees other than fire and police and $300,000 in grant funding to hire a full-time director for the Whitehaven Economic Development Council.

21. Council Committee Probes Grant Requests -

Memphis City Council Budget Committee Chairman Edmund Ford Jr. likens it to the television show “Shark Tank.”

Instead of entrepreneurs, leaders of nonprofits made their pitches to the budget committee Tuesday, May 24, for grants from the council as part of the budget process.

22. Wilson Urges Family Philanthropic Efforts at Dunavant Awards -

When most people think of the Kemmons Wilson family, there is an image that comes to mind. It’s a black and white photo from the 1950s of the five children – three boys and two girls – of the Holiday Inn founder cutting the ribbon on the very first Holiday Inn at 4925 Summer Ave.

23. 'Underground' Stars in Memphis Tuesday -

Three stars of the WGN America television series “Underground” are in Memphis Tuesday, May 10 – the day before the finale airs – for a sneak peek and panel discussion at the National Civil Rights Museum, 450 Mulberry St.

24. Last Word: Behind Grit N Grind, Brooks at 100 and Massacre -

This is a 12-month-a-year basketball town. There’s the season, possibly a post season, which by NBA standards is a second season. (Yep, they are still playing.) And then there is the rest of the year when whatever has been about to boil over behind the façade of sports clichés finally begins to spill out into the open.

25. Massacre: 1866 and the Battles Over How Memphis History is Told -

At the end of March with much secrecy, Rev. Keith Norman took delivery and responsibility for a large, heavy crate that stayed in his office for the next month.

“Don’t tell anybody, don’t let anybody get it, if they come in and say they work for the park commission or anybody, tell them to show identification,” were the instructions said Norman, who is president of the Memphis Branch NAACP.

26. Last Word: BSMF Looks Up, Overton Park Respite and Slow Economic Growth -

The Beale Street Music Festival box office numbers won’t be in for a bit yet. But it looks like the three-day event that ended Sunday evening with Beck and Paul Simon weathered the weather very well, maybe better than usual.

27. The Week Ahead: May 2-8 -

So, you think this is the “off-week” of the Memphis In May International Festival – the gap between the Beale Street Music Festival and the World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. But, while Tom Lee Park gets a breather, there are plenty of cultural experiences to soak up across Memphis. Here's our weekly roundup of local happenings you need to know about...

28. The Week Ahead: April 18-24 -

Let’s get this week started, Memphis! Here’s our roundup of local happenings you need to know about, from the dreaded federal income tax filing day, to the scheduled end of the Tennessee Legislature for this session, to a couple of big round-ball games at FedExForum beginning Friday.

29. Last Word: Tubby Time, Haslam's Veto and Africa in April's 30th Year -

It was just four weeks ago that all of this talk about change at the top of the Tiger basketball chart was put to rest. Coach Josh Pastner’s performance was reviewed by the University of Memphis administration and he was staying at least for another season. Four weeks to the day of that announcement, Pastner is the new coach at Georgia Tech and we are in the first day of the Tubby Smith era at the U of M.

30. Parkinson: OK to ‘Go A Little Bit Extreme’ to Get Job Done -

With U.S. Marine Corps training, Rep. Antonio Parkinson knows how to grab people’s attention.

He did that earlier this year when he sponsored legislation to kill the Achievement School District, Tennessee’s solution for turning around struggling schools.

31. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

32. August Primaries Feature Intra-Party Challenges -

Two years after a disastrous slate of races for countywide offices, there is a move among younger Democratic partisans in Memphis to shake up the Democrats who represent the city in the Tennessee Legislature.

33. 8th Congressional District Primaries Draw 22 Contenders, 13 Republican -

The Republican primary race to fill the 8th District Congressional seat Republican incumbent Stephen Fincher is giving up drew a field of 13 contenders – seven from Shelby County and four from Jackson, Tennessee – at the Thursday, April 7, noon filing deadline for the Aug. 4 ballot.

34. Can GOP Keep Grasp On Success Ramsey Built? -

As much as Tennessee Republicans want to put a happy face on the departure of Senate Speaker and Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey, holding it together in the wake of his departure will be an awesome task.

35. 1866 Massacre Author Says Riot Has Important Lessons -

When historian Stephen V. Ash went looking for source material on that most difficult of events to piece back together – three days of mob violence in a 19th century Southern city – he expected a challenge.

36. Last Word: Deannexation, Pastner Past the Season and Chewing Gum and Walking -

The much-discussed deannexation bill in the Tennessee Legislature always had the votes Monday evening in the House with Memphis Democrats succeeding only in delaying the outcome in Nashville by about two hours.
The bill passed by a wide margin after a debate that was for the most part Memphis against the rest of the state starting just outside the city limits with Republicans in the Shelby County legislative delegation.
And there is some dispute between the bill’s sponsor from the Chattanooga area and Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland. Strickland puts the potential loss of tax revenue to the city at $80 million. Rep. Mike Carter says it is more like $27 million.

37. Green Sword -

First it was a rumor – there would be a move by the Memphis City Council aimed at putting a quick end to the long-simmering Overton Park Greensward controversy.

It would come quickly and just before the start of the third spring of protests against the Memphis Zoo's use of the northern part of the Greensward for overflow parking.

38. Mississippi Will Defend Lawsuit Over Confederate-Themed Flag -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi's attorney general says he will defend the Confederate-themed state flag against a lawsuit that seeks to remove the banner, even though he thinks the flag hurts the state and should change.

39. Trailblazer -

Carolyn Chism Hardy is a trailblazer, a success story, an advocate for the poor and middle class, and now she’s one of the most influential people in the private sector.

40. Last Word: Presidents Day In An Election Year, Minority Business and Spring Training -

Presidents Day in a presidential election year.
Consider the political kaleidoscope of a foggy office-bound or home-bound Monday in Memphis with former President George W. Bush on the tube in the late afternoon defending his brother’s presidential campaign without once uttering the word Trump.
No further word of a Trump appearance promised for Memphis and some of Donald Trump’s own statements Monday suggested that by the time Memphis is on his schedule, he might be running as an independent.
Then there is the obsession in one corner of social media with Supreme Court history in rich detail.
And heads were turned Monday evening by the excerpt on the Grammys from the Broadway musical about Alexander Hamilton – a founding father born in the West Indies who established the nation’s financial system and the Federalist party. He never became a president, in part, because the vice president killed him. Hamilton wasn’t the only one who had been talking bad about Aaron Burr. The top of the ticket, President Thomas Jefferson, had decided to dump Burr from the ticket in the next election and Burr was trying to transition to become governor of New York.

41. Massey to Lead Memphis' Consolidated Minority Business Office -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is combining the two city offices overseeing minority business efforts into one agency.

42. New Brass -

Just days before Toney Armstrong was off the city payroll, his successor as interim director of the Memphis Police Department, Michael Rallings, was getting used to the attention and ring kissing that comes with being the city’s top cop.

43. Bourbon, Tennessee Whiskey Producers Toast More Strong Sales -

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Producers of Kentucky bourbon and Tennessee whiskey are toasting another year of strong sales and revenue growth, led by consumers increasingly ordering high-priced, super-premium brands.

44. Minority Leader Harris Confident Even on Wrong Side of Supermajority -

Lee Harris says he ran for state Senate because he felt Memphis could do better on Capitol Hill, defeating Ophelia Ford in 2014.

45. Last Word: Rallings Meets the Council, Million Dollar Auditions & A Pinch Plan Emerges -

His second day on the job, the new Memphis Police Director, Michael Rallings, met the Memphis City Council and discovered just what a huge issue police body cameras are – if he didn’t know that already.
His answers to some pointed questions about when police can turn off those cameras and why made this an uneven first encounter.
Council members told him they got an earful from constituents over the weekend in the wake of the fatal police shooting of Johnathan Bratcher in South Memphis. And some of the reaction they got was to reports that a police dispatcher ordered police trying out the body cameras to turn them off as they arrived at the scene of the shooting.
There are three cameras being tested. And one of the officers with them showed up after the shooting, according to police.
Meanwhile, Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland still didn’t have a timetable for the roll-out of the cameras but did offer some specifics including hiring by the MPD of 10 new personnel to deal with the handling of what the camera records.
And Strickland’s intention is to pay for it out of the existing MPD budget.

46. For the World's Most Scrutinized Body, Barbie Has a New Look -

NEW YORK (AP) — At 57, Barbie is getting a major makeover.

The iconic plastic doll, whose small waist and long legs have been criticized for creating unrealistic expectations for girls, will soon be sold with three new bodies — curvy, tall and petite. Barbie will also be more diverse, coming in seven skin tones, 22 eye colors and 24 hairstyles.

47. Last Word: Winter Pre-Game Show, The Zoo Goes To Court And Hotel Fever -

You wouldn’t call this the eye of the storm, would you? We’ll go with calling this the pre-game show for the winter storm that is supposed to show up in Memphis at around 7 a.m. Friday morning. Think Super Bowl pre-game.
There is so much that’s been said in advance of this that whatever happens, it might be hard to live up to the preparation.
Much of the rest of this is like an arms race of sorts.
Consider the equipment list from Memphis International Airport.
10 snow brooms, 12 plow trucks, four de-icing trucks each with 40,000 gallons of deicer, four 2-ton salt spreaders and four tractors to keep the runways clear.
The city of Memphis Public Works division has eight snow plows ready to roll on major thoroughfares if the snow gets within the three-inch mark. A set of 16 salt trucks were to load up at 11 p.m. Thursday evening to begin applying salt and sand when needed, with continual inspections of road conditions. And that includes some pre-treated priority areas.
And then there was this truly unusual announcement from Shelby County Schools: the optional school parent camp-out was suspended Thursday evening because of the weather.
This is the camp out the school system tries its best to discourage each and every year at this time. That includes bar-coded applications and repeatedly emphasizing that 99.9 percent of those with the bar-coded applications get their first choice of optional schools, making the camp-out unnecessary. The applications are handed out over several days and are then time-stamped when they are turned in for consideration.
Nevertheless, the tents go up each year and voices are raised in the debate about whether this is parents who care more or parents who are carried away.
This year, the school system, while emphasizing that it “does not authorize or direct” the camp-out, says the line will resume Sunday at 7 a.m.
The school system also adds: “The current process being managed by parents will be recognized due to potential health and safety risks related to forecasted inclement weather.”
But is there a line to get back in line? And when does that start?

48. Last Word: The View Across The Harbor, Crosstown Undercurrents and Bonnaroo -

The fishing puns are overpowering as Bass Pro Shops expresses its interest in redeveloping Mud Island River Park, on the other side of the city harbor from the Pyramid Bass Pro Shops opened at just this past May.
Bass Pro Shops is one of five companies to express interest in Mud Island as part of the process by the Riverfront Development Corporation to go a different way with the park.
The RDC released the names of the companies Thursday.
Earlier this month, we outlined the RVC Outdoor Destinations proposal.
We don’t know nearly as much about what Bass Pro Shops has in mind or the other three firms.
All five now head for what amounts to a second round in which they submit specific plans to a search committee of the RDC including how they will pay for their plans.

49. Last Word: Time and The Greensward, Crosstown High and Race and Sports -

Remember how the schools merger story of about five years ago would change by the hour at times? That story has met its equal in what is becoming the first major challenge of the new Strickland administration at City Hall – the Overton Park Greensward.
So much happened before noon Tuesday on the first day of the short work week that it required waiting for the dust to settle on several fronts.
Here is the latest on a very fluid and volatile situation that could very well change as you are reading this.
Luckily we report at a time when you can change stories on line to keep up with such changes.
Zoos and parks and protests featuring brass bands suggest to a casual observer that this is not very serious as controversies go.
And maybe that was the case about a year and a half ago when a group of high school students decided to block the gravel driveway from the zoo parking lot onto the greensward.
But consider this:
The Memphis Zoo is working toward a March 1 opening of its new exhibit, Zambezi River Hippo Camp, a $22-million attraction that from what we saw just a few months ago will likely draw big crowds to the zoo in the spring.
The zoo was preparing for that starting with the removal of 27 trees from the north end of the greensward.
The best Mayor Jim Strickland could get from both sides – the zoo and Overton Park Conservancy – at his meeting with them Tuesday was a commitment to take his proposal for mediation to their respective boards.
The zoo board has authorized its leaders to file a lawsuit in Chancery Court over the greensward and it’s very likely the zoo would go to court before the March 1 opening because of the crowds on their way.
If the work to come by the zoo in advance of the March 1 opening involves heavy machinery, the reaction is likely to draw a much bigger protest than the ones Memphis Police have so far watched from a distance without making arrests.
As in all pressing political dramas, this controversy has the accelerant of timing.

50. Last Word: Tri-State's Deal With First Tennessee, Matt Barnes' Fine and The Grind -

It sounds strange to refer to this as a holiday weekend – the anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Holidays suggest something different than the rededication to purpose so many of us stress as our definition of this day honoring the memory of a leader whose life made it difficult to imagine what our society would be like without his presence.
That we feel compelled to express the meaning of the day through actions and a recommitment to principles buffeted by reality reflects a hope that we wish to retain as first-hand memories of King’s life fade and his legacy endures.

51. First Tennessee Invests in Tri-State Bank -

As of Dec. 31, Tri-State Bank of Memphis has secured almost $5 million in new capital, an investment fueled in part by an “unprecedented transaction” between it and First Tennessee Bank.

52. Armstrong Leaves MPD After Five Years of Change -

In five years as Memphis Police Department director, Toney Armstrong has seen more changes in law enforcement culture and how officers are perceived than most of his predecessors in the position ever saw.

53. Last Word: Farewell For Now Midtown Kroger, Weather Hype and Tri-State Bank Clues -

A moment of silence for Midtown Kroger if you will, now that you’ve been through the New Year’s mountain of emails etc.
Where to shop with the Midtown supermarket landmark now closed was the water-cooler question of the day for those who have had a love-hate relationship with the store.
If you are a creature of habit and your habit is that store, you’ve known it by many names – Seesel’s, Seesel’s by Albertson, Schnucks and Kroger.
And as many bad names as you called its original parking lot, you came up with some new ones for the God-forsaken parking lot and its marked pedestrian walkway to hell built on the elegant ghost of the old Trousseau shop.
The store's interior wasn’t quite “Double Indemnity” tiny – think Barbara Stanwyck in cat sunglasses talking furtively over doll-like shelves to Fred MacMurray before “My Three Sons.”
But the “super” in its version of a supermarket was the 1950s black-and-white television Superman.
When Pau Gasol – the original Gasol -- was still playing for the Grizzlies, I ran across him on a late-night grocery excursion able to shop two aisles at once peering over his own aisle to the one I was on, suddenly having that feeling that someone was watching me.
An informal and decidedly unscientific sampling Monday found the alternative sites were the Kroger at Poplar and Cleveland, Cash Saver on Madison, West Memphis WalMart (a go to destination for left of Midtowners, otherwise known as Downtowners) and “I’m still waiting for Trader Joe's."
The old Midtown Kroger has closed as the new and bigger Kroger is starting to take shape behind chain link fences with tarps and other construction barriers just west of the original store but still within earshot of the Idlewild Presbyterian Church carillon.

54. Memorable Events of 2015 will Spill Into 2016 -

When you really get down to it, history is a collection of moments, moments that, when they fall one after the other over the long arc of time, eventually form the tapestry representing who we are.

55. The Week Ahead: Dec. 28, 2015 -

How was your (hopefully long) weekend, Memphis? This week, more than most, is a time of change – of renewal, of turning the page, starting over. And of course, a time to ask the annual question: What are we going to do on New Year’s Eve?

56. Council's New Crop -

They ran in the considerable shadow of the most competitive Memphis mayoral race in a generation. The new Memphis City Council that takes office with Mayor-elect Jim Strickland in January isn’t necessarily a generational shift. It doesn’t signify a wholesale ousting by the electorate, either.

57. Last Word: The Force Reawakens, Methodist Expands and Setting Up 2016 -

Last Word is a new daily online column that offers an overview of what’s happened at the end of shift, so to speak. Picture a dimly lit newsroom in the Downtown night and the last person in the place leaving a memo for the morning shift and you have a pretty good idea of what we are aiming for.

58. Howard Stern Announces 5-Year Deal With Sirius XM -

NEW YORK (AP) — Much has changed for Howard Stern and SiriusXM since their first deal a decade ago — except for their desire to stay in business together.

The company announced Tuesday its third five-year deal to keep Stern's radio show at SiriusXM, together with a longer-term video arrangement that will allow fans to see as well as hear his program and have access to 30 years of career highlights.

59. The Week Ahead: Dec. 14, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from the annual AutoZone shareholder convergence Downtown to the new Star Wars movie...

60. 3 Trends for the Holidays -

NEW YORK (AP) — The holiday season is upon us. Here's what shoppers can expect if they're heading out to stores at any point during the holiday shopping season:

NO FIGHTING OVER MUST-HAVE GIFTS

61. Strickland Vows to Grow Memphis’ Minority Contract Percentage -

Memphis Mayor-elect Jim Strickland says the next month may be the most important of his administration, even though he won’t take office until Jan. 1.

62. Armstrong Ponders Mayoral Transition -

When outgoing Memphis Mayor A C Wharton said last week that Memphis Police Department director Toney Armstrong plans to retire at year’s end, what followed was the best representation of the off-kilter relationship between the mayor’s office and police brass.

63. Wharton’s Transition Reveals Lighter Mood -

The incumbent’s advantage in Memphis politics often keeps playing out after all of the votes are counted – even if the winner isn’t the incumbent.

A version of that is happening now as Memphis Mayor A C Wharton serves out the rest of his term after losing a re-election bid to challenger Jim Strickland in the Oct. 8 city elections.

64. Editorial: Election Night Marred By Recurring Incompetence -

The next 10 weeks will go by quickly for Jim Strickland.

The mayor-elect has decisions to make about who to trust and how far to trust them with his still-forming plan to govern for the next four years.

65. Election Day Beckons In Hard-Fought Memphis Mayor’s Race -

The most competitive Memphis mayor’s race in 24 years goes to the city’s 403,227 voters Thursday, Oct. 8, along with races for all 13 seats on the Memphis City Council and the race for City Court clerk.

66. Early Voting Numbers Tell Still-Moving Story in Memphis Election -

Before the votes are counted Thursday, Oct. 8, there are some other numbers – which are already being counted – to tell the story of the 2015 Memphis elections.

Close to 15 percent of Memphis voters cast early ballots in advance of Thursday’s election day in the races for Memphis mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court clerk.

67. Early Voting Numbers Tell Still-Moving Story -

Before the votes are counted Thursday, Oct. 8, there are some other numbers – which are already being counted – to tell the story of the 2015 Memphis elections.

Close to 15 percent of Memphis voters cast early ballots in advance of Thursday’s election day in the races for Memphis mayor, Memphis City Council and City Court clerk.

68. Taser Contract Controversy Endures As Election Day Nears -

As the city of Memphis closed in on buying body cameras and other associated technology for its police department, the inner circle around Memphis Mayor A C Wharton was concerned.

They were concerned that Taser International, the camera supplier the city had picked, wasn’t getting close to the goal the city had set of at least 10 percent participation by minority- and women-owned business enterprises – MWBEs – in the total project spend.

69. Wharton’s Accomplishments Weighted With Controversy -

It’s a set of events just about any incumbent would envy during a re-election bid.

Overnight riverboat cruises on the Mississippi River picked up just as Beale Street Landing opened in mid-2014. In late April, the long-dormant Pyramid reopened as a Bass Pro Shops megastore with a hotel and other attractions.

70. Police Body Cameras Contract Controversial on Several Levels -

The Memphis Police Department’s $4.5 million contract with Taser International for body cameras, dashboard cameras and other related equipment is drawing fire on several fronts, including an $880,000 community engagement/public relations contract that is part of the overall price tag.

71. Memphis Early Voting Turnout Up 76 Percent So Far -

Early voting in the 2015 Memphis elections is running ahead of the pace from four years ago but behind the pace from 2007 and the special mayoral election of 2009.

The early voting period in advance of the Oct. 8 election day runs through Saturday, Oct. 3, at 16 locations across the city.

72. The Field -

The most competitive race for Memphis mayor in 24 years is in the hands of Memphis voters who will determine whether it will be as close as recent polls suggest it could be.

Early voting in advance of the Oct. 8 election day opened Friday, Sept. 18, with all 13 Memphis City Council seats on the ballot as well as the race for the City Court Clerk’s office.

73. A Tasteful List 2015 -

MEMPHIS ON A PLATE. Presenting the fifth helping of the Tasteful List, updated for 2015 – an alphabetical survey of local flavor in one decidedly local man’s opinion.

Could I get another napkin over here?

74. Memphis Mayor's Race Poised For Close Finish -

A political summer dominated by the campaign for Memphis mayor begins turning toward fall Friday, Sept. 18, with the opening of the early voting period in advance of the Oct. 8 election day.

All 16 early voting sites are open weekdays from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Oct. 3.

75. Mayoral Campaigns Ramp Up Media Presence -

Three of the four major candidates for Memphis mayor are now on TV and radio with ads that reflect the intensity of a hard-fought race up to the Oct. 8 election day.

Memphis City Council member Harold Collins joined fellow council member Jim Strickland and incumbent mayor A C Wharton this week with a schedule of television ads running through Oct. 7.

76. Memphis Mayoral Debate Participants Announced -

The field is set for an upcoming televised Memphis mayoral debate scheduled for the eve of early voting.

The four mayoral contenders who will participate in the Sept. 17 debate, sponsored by The Daily News and Urban Land Institute Memphis, are incumbent Mayor A C Wharton, city council members Harold Collins and Jim Strickland and Memphis Police Association president Mike Williams.

77. Kudzukian’s ‘Neo-Radio’ Platform Has Room to Grow -

What does kudzu have in common with a media content company in Memphis that bears its name?

Kudzukian founder Larry Robinson is hoping that his new, neo-radio concept will mirror the foot-a-day growth of the invasive southern vine.

78. Memphis Mayoral Endorsements Split -

The first wave of endorsements in the 2015 Memphis elections finds no mayoral contender with a sweep, one of the four major contenders without an endorsement so far and two of the big three municipal unions backing different mayoral candidates.

79. Collins Knocks 'Puller, Pusher and Picker' Jobs In Whitehaven Opening -

Memphis Mayoral contender Harold Collins opened his Whitehaven campaign headquarters Saturday, Aug. 15, by saying incumbent mayor A C Wharton Jr. has “rendered us a puller, pusher and picker city.”

80. Collins Knocks 'Puller, Pusher and Picker' Jobs In Whitehaven Opening -

Memphis Mayoral contender Harold Collins opened his Whitehaven campaign headquarters Saturday, Aug. 15, by saying incumbent mayor A C Wharton Jr. has “rendered us a puller, pusher and picker city.”

81. Campaign Strategies Shift As Mayoral Debates Begin -

It’s been a scrap from the start.

But with the first televised debate in the 2015 race for Memphis Mayor Monday, Aug. 10, more citizens got a first-hand look at what the top contenders have agreed is a milestone political race.

82. Wharton Calls Challengers "Thermometer People" -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. continues to respond more aggressively to criticism from his challengers in the October mayoral election.

At the opening of his East Memphis campaign headquarters Saturday, Aug. 8, Wharton referred to them as “thermometer people.”

83. Sparks Fly at Cooper-Young Mayoral Forum -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. was the target of two Memphis City Council members challenging him during most of a Cooper-Young political forum Tuesday, July 28.

It’s what Wharton predicted would happen once the campaign to the Oct. 8 ballot began to throw sparks.

84. Family, Art Bleed Into History At House of Mtenzi Museum -

Part performing arts space and part family scrapbook come-to-life, the House of Mtenzi Museum is made to “tell the story of forgotten legends,” according to owner Stanley Campbell.

85. Granddad, Hambone And The KKK -

IF THE KLAN DOESN’T LIKE YOU, PAT YOURSELF ON THE BACK.

Before their last sheety little show here a couple of years ago, an Exalted Cyclops of the KKK – must be just one hole in his hood – was quoted on Channel 5 and in The Huffington Post, “Y’all are going to see the largest rally Memphis, Tennessee, has ever seen. It’s not going to be 20 or 30 – it’s going to be thousands of Klansmen from the whole United States.”

86. Memphis Mayoral Election Heating Up As Strickland, Wharton Take Turns -

Here come the yard signs.

The first indication that candidates in the Oct. 8 Memphis elections are taking their appeals to the public will begin sprouting on lawns across the city in the next week.

87. Old-Time Country, Stones Intertwined -

Joey, the CowPolka King, well remembers the times he would play acoustic bass, piano or his specialty – the accordion – and try to catch up after Cowboy Jack Clement launched into one of his favorite songs….

88. This week in Memphis history: May 22-28 -

2014: Morrissey plays The Orpheum.

1994: Lisa Marie Presley weds Michael Jackson in a marriage announced weeks later. During Elvis Week in August, the marriage spawns unfounded rumors that the couple will close Graceland to the public. At a fan club forum, Graceland CEO Jack Soden fields questions about whether gift shops in the plaza will sell Michael Jackson souvenirs alongside Elvis Presley souvenirs. The marriage lasts four years, during which the couple attends an Elvis tribute concert at The Pyramid.

89. Is ‘Getting Rid of Public Schools’ Legislature’s Goal? -

Are Tennessee’s public schools headed for extinction? Not if it’s up to Memphis teachers.

A group from Shelby County recently packed a House committee meeting room at the Legislative Plaza in an effort to turn back bills they consider damaging to their profession and the future of public education.

90. Size of Mayoral Field Shadows Race -

Nobody running for election on the Oct. 8 ballot can even pull a qualifying petition to get on the ballot until April, yet February is shaping up as the month when it is determined what kind of challenge and how many challengers incumbent Mayor A C Wharton Jr. will face.

91. TV Makers Design for Streaming Video to Stay Relevant -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – Does anyone just watch TV anymore? The dramatic shift toward online and mobile viewing is driving television set makers to design as much for streaming video as for watching broadcast or cable channels.

92. Events -

The Association of Fundraising Professionals will meet Thursday, Dec. 4, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Thomas Center at Christian Brothers University, 650 East Parkway S. Jim Duncan, executive director of Memphis Botanic Garden, will present “The Memphis Botanic Garden Experience: From Red to Black.” Cost is $20 for members and $25 for nonmembers. Visit afpmemphis.org.

93. Events -

The Downtown Memphis Commission Design Review Board will meet Wednesday, Dec. 3, at 4 p.m. in the Downtown Memphis Commission conference room, 114 N. Main St. Visit downtownmemphiscommission.com.

94. Events -

National Civil Rights Museum will host the Freedom Award public forum Tuesday, Dec. 2, at 10 a.m. at Temple of Deliverance Church of God in Christ, 369 G.E. Patterson Ave. The Freedom Award ceremony will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Cannon Center for the Performing Arts, 255 N. Main St., followed by a gala from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the adjacent Cook Convention Center. Admission to the forum is free; tickets to the ceremony and gala are $200. Visit civilrightsmuseum.org for details on this year’s honorees.

95. Events -

American Red Cross will hold a blood drive Tuesday, Dec. 2, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Christian Brothers University, 650 East Parkway S. Visit redcrossblood.org or call 800-REDCROSS for eligibility requirements and appointments.

96. Events -

Small Business Saturday, an annual event that encourages consumers to shop and dine at small, independent businesses, will be held Saturday, Nov. 29. For more information, visit shopsmall.com.

97. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre will present “If Scrooge Was a Brother” Friday, Nov. 28, through Dec. 21 at the theater, 37 S. Cooper St. Buy tickets at hattiloo.org.

98. Events -

SRVS will hold free dance and movement classes for adults with disabilities Wednesday, Nov. 26, at 10 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. at the SRVS Learning Center, 3971 Knight Arnold Road. Email lindsay.weaver@srvs.org to register, or visit srvs.org.

99. Stonewall Jackson's Little Slice of Heaven in Brentwood -

“Everybody has to meet his Waterloo,” sings honky-tonk hero Stonewall Jackson in his breakthrough No. 1 hit back in 1959.

Of course, that line, the entire song really, means everybody must meet his or her fate someday.

100. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.