» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
TDN Services
Research millions of people and properties [+]
Monitor any person, property or company [+]

Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Jim Black' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:33
Shelby Public Records:70
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:41
Middle Tennessee:74
East Tennessee:22
Other:1

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Grizzlies’ Mike Conley Bowling to Raise Sickle Cell Awareness -

Mike Conley grew up around cousins who had sickle cell disease. He didn’t understand much about it then, but he saw the impact. Years later, he continues to see it and continues to try and do his part to fight it.

2. Last Word: Jagger, Jerry Lee, Whalum & More and Harris' Plans on BTH -

Sir Mick Jagger and Jerry Lee Lewis walk into Sun Studio Wednesday. That’s not the start of a joke. Variety has reported that Jagger’s film company has signed on to the Elvis biopic being made from Peter Guralnick’s definitive two volume biography of the king. You connect the dots or don’t – who knows if there is a connection? Yes, but they aren’t talking.

3. Some Tennessee Lawmakers Living the Life -

Early in his U.S. Senate campaign, former governor Phil Bredesen shied away from talking about his opponent, Republican U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn, preferring to focus instead on ideas.

4. Testimony Ends in Federal Case Questioning Memphis Police Surveillance Tactics -

After four days, the federal trial where the ACLU sued the city of Memphis over political surveillance of activists, ended Thursday, leaving the decision in the hands of U.S. District Judge Jon McCalla.

5. A Tasteful List 2018 -

MEMPHIS BY THE BITE: Presenting the Tasteful List 2018 – alphabetical local favorites in one decidedly local man’s opinion. Most of the following should come with a gym membership and a warning from the American Heart Association, bless their hearts. Show some restraint; don’t try all of these over the weekend.

6. McCalla Says City Violated Consent Decree on Political Surveillance of Protesters -

U.S. District Judge Jon P. McCalla ruled Friday, Aug. 10, that Memphis Police gathered political intelligence on protesters over the last two years in violation of a 1978 federal court consent decree. And if the plaintiffs in the 2017 lawsuit against the city can establish their standing in court next week, McCalla said he is prepared to declare the city in contempt of the consent decree and impose sanctions.

7. 1940 Civil Rights Worker Slaying Case Reopened -

MEMPHIS — More than 78 years after civil rights worker Elbert Williams' body was found in a Tennessee river, a district attorney announced Wednesday that he is reopening the investigation into the slaying.

8. Police Documents Show Protest Spreadsheet and Fear of 'Radicals' -

Memphis Police brass kept a spread sheet over the past two years on whether a protest received a city permit – was “lawful” or “unlawful” – while continuing to collect information on some of the protesters from public social media.

9. Last Word: Early Voting's Strong Finish, School Moves and City Hall Crackdown -

Most of the major contenders for Tennessee Governor – Democratic and Republican – were in Shelby County over the weekend in which early voting ended and the campaigns now adjust their last minute efforts to the gap between early voting and election day on Thursday.

10. Last Word: The Fuse, TnReady on SCS Literacy Efforts and Death By Amazon? -

More than 32,000 of you have voted early in advance of the Aug. 2 election day through Saturday and going into the final week of early voting, which runs through July 28. That compares to 37,168 early voters through the first eight days in 2014 for this same election cycle and 41,310 in 2010 at the same point. In 2010 and 2014 there were 21 early voting sites compared to today’s 27. And the Downtown location was the only site open for the first two days of those early voting periods compared to five of the 27 sites open for the first three days of the current period. For the full 2014 early voting period, keeping in mind the differences, there were 82,403 early voters and in 2010 there were 93,700.

11. The Fuse -

Where and when to hold early voting has been such a low-grade political tug of war in the scheme of low-turnout Memphis elections that it hasn’t caused much of a ripple in the city’s deep political waters.

12. Last Word: River Museum Review, Tigers' Blended Family and Oxford Crackdown -

It’s not the Gulf. It’s Lake Pontchartrain that draws the crowds on Mud Island. The Riverwalk replica of the Gulf of Mexico’s neighbor that is. A few adjustments is all it took to return authorized wading to the area at the end of the scale model of the Mississippi River. The river park is changing as it continues to make its way through the annual season from the summer and into the fall.

13. Building Diversity -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has been looking for a good deal on cars. “City Hall, as you can imagine, buys a lot of vehicles,” he told a group of 300 gathered Wednesday, June 27, at the city’s third annual symposium promoting a larger share of city contracts for local, minority- and women-owned businesses.

14. Mayoral Security Comes with Controversy and Price Tag -

Some mayors and other elected officials have referred to it as “fan mail.” It ranges from explicit threats of violence to vague statements that could be taken as threats of physical harm or a prediction of defeat in the next election.

15. Last Word: Kim Kardashian's Plea, The Duran Stay and Mid-Term Moves -

A drug case from Memphis federal court in the early 1990s was the reason Kim Kardashian West was at the White House Wednesday. Kardashian West is among those pushing for a presidential pardon for Alice Marie Johnson – serving a life sentence on a federal drug and money laundering conviction. Here is the Associated Press story.

16. Minority Business Growth Aim of 'The 800 Initiative' -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is proposing $500,000 in city funding each of the next three fiscal years to help fund a new initiative to bolster the city’s 800 minority-owned businesses that have paid employees.

17. From Enduring to Thriving -

By fall 1967, Memphis had a diverse group of people of faith working on a plan to better the community. Diversity, back then, mainly meant black and white, and Christians and Jews. The notion of them working together was considered bold.

18. Last Word: BSMF Opens, Germantown's New Elementary and Links at St. Jude -

The Beale Street Music Festival opens Friday and the clouds appear right on cue. But that, in and of itself, doesn’t stop the proceedings in Tom Lee Park. Lightning is another matter, of course. Poncho and boots are a part of the Memphis In May identity. And one day there will be a digital map of the park’s terrain that shows the areas that are the mud pits and those that are largely mud proof. That’s for some of you to avoid them and others among you to find them and “celebrate” them.

19. Black Men Arrested at Starbucks Settle With the Company -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) – Two black men arrested for sitting at a Philadelphia Starbucks without ordering anything settled with the coffee-shop chain Wednesday for an undisclosed sum and an offer of a free college education.

20. Last Word: Trolleys Roll, Primary Election Day and The Rise of South City -

MATA CEO Gary Rosenfeld likes to joke that the new trolleys are quieter since the transit authority decided to change from using square wheels. Transit humor. They really are quieter. And that may be because MATA wasn’t doing much of anything in the way of maintenance on them four years ago and even less in the way of record keeping when a second trolley car burst into flames causing MATA to shut down everything it ran on rails. So the trolley that rolled out of the MATA barn on North Main Street Monday morning and into service was symbolic of more than getting a trolley or three ready for service. It was about building a new system around the operation of the trolleys.

21. Last Word: The Graceland Campaign, NFL Draft Run Down and Heritage Trail's Story -

Riverside Drive is partially closed through Tuesday and then completely closed starting Wednesday marking the official start of Memphis In May and much of what is spring and summer in Memphis. Following close behind is registration for the Dragon Boat Races in mid-May. But it’s not all fun and games and detouring as you draw close to the river.

22. Last Word: Graceland Offensive, Mural Lawsuit, and a TNReady Encore -

It’s on in The Haven. Graceland’s managing partner, Joel Weinshanker, is looking to turn out Whitehaven residents in support of Graceland’s plans for a 5,000 to 6,000 seat arena and in the process a showdown over just what the city and county noncompete for FedExForum means. During a townhall meeting at Guest House Thursday evening, Weinshanker made his case to about 150 Whitehaven residents and around eight or nine candidates in this election year. And he said the chief problem is Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland won’t talk to him about projects he says will open up Whitehaven for future economic development and prosperity.

23. Building Heritage -

The basement of the Universal Life Insurance building, a Memphis landmark at Danny Thomas Boulevard and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, is still defined by the intersection of overhead ventilation shafts and pipes.

24. Last Word: Last Day of Early Voting, Senate Poll and Legislature Goes to Overtime -

The last day of early voting before the May 1 election day is Thursday. And the turnout count through Wednesday has eclipsed the total early voting turnout in this same set of elections in 2010 and 2014. You can find a list of early voting locations and the hours at www.shelbyvote.com, the website of the Shelby County Election Commission. The winners on election night next Tuesday advance to the August county general election.

25. Strickland Proposes City Property Tax Rate Change After Windfall -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is proposing a change in the city property tax rate from the current $3.27 to a $3.19 rate as part of his third budget proposal.

26. MPAA Head Says Theaters Will Survive Rise of Streaming Sites -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – Two film industry leaders told theater owners Tuesday that are optimistic about the movie and theatrical exhibition business despite concerns about declining attendance and competition from streaming services.

27. New Lynching Memorial Evokes Terror of Victims -

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) – Visitors to the new National Memorial for Peace and Justice first glimpse them, eerily, in the distance: Brown rectangular slabs, 800 in all, inscribed with the names of more than 4,000 souls who lost their lives in lynchings between 1877 and 1950.

28. Opioid Litigation, FedExForum NonCompete Top Local Law Developments -

Here are some of the legal issues making news in recent months.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery says lawsuits by local prosecutors over the opioid epidemic are complicating his efforts to reach a multistate settlement with drug companies. In response, the prosecutors, who represent about half of Tennessee's counties, say local communities lose out when lawsuits like theirs are rolled into one settlement.

29. Last Word: TNReady Blinks Again, Gov. Debate Thoughts and Mud Island's Museum -

There was a point Thursday morning during the troubled TNReady testing at some Tennessee school districts when there was a “brief” slow down in the online testing, according to the Tennessee Education commissioner’s office. By noon that had been resolved and more than 250,000 completed tests had been submitted since testing began Monday. One can only imagine what some of the thoughts were in the office during the slow down and the gap between how long the slow down seemed and how long it actually was.

30. The Week Ahead: April 16-20 -

Good morning, Memphis! It’s time for Africa in April, which in the minds of many Memphians, is the seasonal kick-off for festivals. The annual Southern Hot Wing Festival comes this weekend on Tiger Lane, so get ready for good times to replace that winter weather. Check out what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead...

31. Religious Leaders Recount Catechism of 1968 Memphis -

Rev. James Lawson, the architect of nonviolent resistance who counseled Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on it, walked in a circle last week around the new “I Am A Man” bronze and stainless steel sculpture. As he walked with his head down, still and video photographers scrambled for the best angle to capture the seminal strategist of the civil rights era, seemingly deep in thought.

32. Herenton Acknowledges New Generation Politics, Criticism in Mayoral Bid -

Eight years and counting since he resigned as mayor of Memphis, Willie Herenton says he has heard the discussions about the city’s economic stagnation when it comes to growing black prosperity and wealth. Especially the part about how that remains the case despite having “black leadership.”

33. Three Incumbents Unopposed at August Primary Ballot Deadline -

Three incumbent Democratic state House members in the Shelby County delegation to the Tennessee Legislature were effectively re-elected Thursday, April 5, at the noon deadline for candidates in the Aug. 2 state and federal primaries to file their qualifying petitions.

34. Around Memphis: April 9, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly roundup of Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and new perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis. Here are some recent stories worth checking out…

35. Editorial: Universal Life a Blueprint For Building Black Wealth -

While many of us were thinking about and remembering the turbulent events of 1968, this week brought another significant nod to the past with a commitment to the future.

The Universal Life Insurance Co. building isn’t a Pyramid, though its architecture has an Egyptian theme. It’s not the tallest building in the city, but then again, the tallest building in the city is boarded up these days.

36. Three Incumbents Unopposed at August Primary Ballot Filing Deadline -

Three incumbent Democratic state House members in the Shelby County delegation to the Tennessee Legislature were effectively re-elected Thursday, April 5, at the noon deadline for candidates in the Aug. 2 state and federal primaries to file their qualifying petitions.

37. Herenton Says He Wants to Be Mayor Again -

Former Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton says he intends to run for mayor again in the 2019 city elections.

Herenton told an audience at LeMoyne-Owen College Thursday, April 5, that he wants to return to offer leadership to “a young emerging group” of leaders.

38. Last Word: MLK50s Big Day, Hotel Changes and Murica on Capitol Hill -

The peak of the MLK50 events came Wednesday with a chill but some sunshine and lots to consider. Understand -- this isn’t over. There are still a few more events to go through the weekend and even into next week. If nothing else, a lot more Memphians and visitors got a good look at most of South Main in the best way possible – on foot. And if the Beale Street District ever expands east to Danny Thomas, the intersection there makes a really good place for a party.

39. Universal Life Insurance Building Reopens With New Hope for Black Economic Growth -

There is still some build-out to be done on the Universal Life Insurance building at Danny Thomas Boulevard and Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue. But Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and other dignitaries cut the ribbon Tuesday, April 3, on the formal reopening on the 1920s Egyptian-themed landmark in black business enterprise.

40. Universal Life Building To Reopen Tuesday -

Memphis government and business leaders are preparing to reopen the Universal Life Insurance Co. building, 480 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., following its renovation through a public-private partnership with the city of Memphis.

41. MLK50 Events: A Roundup of Memphis Happenings -

Here's a selection of events in Memphis marking the 50th anniversary of the 1968 sanitation workers' strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. April 3 is the 50th anniversary of King’s last speech – the “Mountaintop” speech at Mason Temple, while April 4 is the 50th anniversary of his assassination on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

42. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

43. Last Word: Yoga's Return, Strickland on MLK50 and The Broad Water Tower Move -

The two parks where Confederate monuments were removed this past December will feature some new experiences now that spring is here both by the calendar and by all that flowers and clouds that are heavy with rain. Memphis Greenspace, the nonprofit that bought Health Sciences and Memphis Parks from the city at the end of 2017, will roll out its first programming for the two parks next week including a Truth Booth at Memphis Park along with the return of Downtown Yoga. It will be tai chi Tuesdays and yoga Thursdays at Health Sciences Park along with a lunchtime music series.

44. Strickland Talks of Work To Be Done 50 Years After Strike -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says the hardest part of growing black-owned business, and thereby black wealth in the city, is increasing the number of minority-owned firms in certain sectors.

45. Mississippi Names First Black Higher Education Commissioner -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — The first-ever African American has been named to oversee Mississippi's eight public universities.

The state College Board announced Friday that Alfred Rankins Jr. will become higher education commissioner July 1 when Glenn Boyce retires. Rankins is the current president of Alcorn State University.

46. Last Word: SCS Plans For $15, IRIS Matinees and The Hard Hit Fund -

“From a financial standpoint, we need our fans back and we need them back now.” University of Memphis president David Rudd breaking the university’s silence on the basketball coaching change that was made formal Tuesday with the announcement that Penny Hardaway is indeed the new coach. And Hardaway had a lot to say that Tigers fans and Memphians wanted to hear.

47. Walker Named President Of Black Swan Digital Forensics -

Jim Walker has been named president of Memphis-based Black Swan Digital Forensics, the only forensics lab in the U.S. that focuses exclusively on data recovery from digital devices such as cellphones, vehicle systems, computers and social media accounts. Walker comes to Black Swan after more than 30 years of military and public service at the federal, state and local level, including eight years as Alabama’s director of homeland security and more than 20 years in the U.S. Army, where he was an Airborne Ranger and retired as a lieutenant colonel.

48. A Look Back At UT’s History In NCAA Tourney -

Basketball coach Rick Barnes was fired by Texas in late March of 2015 when he refused to fire members of his coaching staff.

49. Blackmon Takes City to Task, Says Too Much Focus on MLK Mountaintop Imagery -

A United Church of Christ executive minister from the St. Louis area who is active in protests and other social justice causes told an interfaith gathering in East Memphis Monday, March 12, that there is too much focus on the mountaintop imagery that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. used in his final speech 50 years ago.

50. Blackmon Critical of City Grants and Mountaintop Imagery at MLK50 Gathering -

A Church of Christ executive minister from the St. Louis area and active in protest and other social justice causes in the area, told an inter-faith gathering in East Memphis Monday, March 12, that there is too much focus on the mountaintop imagery that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. used in his final speech 50 years ago next month.

51. Progress Since Sanitation Strike Questioned 50 Years Later -

There was no “reverse march” this past weekend. But there are signs on the Main Street Mall that trace the route of striking sanitation workers from Clayborn Temple to City Hall 50 years ago.

52. Rye Calls City To Task For Lack Of Progress 50 Years After MLK -

The keynote speaker at the city’s commemoration Saturday, Feb. 24, of the 1968 sanitation workers strike took the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland to task for its treatment of today’s protesters.

53. Last Word: The Mural Takedown, Corker's Calculation and Beale Crowd Control -

Cue the organ music from the old-fashioned television soap operas: As the weekend began, city public works crews had painted over – either completely or partially – a lot of the Paint Memphis program murals on the west side of Willett near Lamar. That would be the ones city council members complained about and others that no one complained about.

54. Withers’ Home Will Be Dedicated as Historic Site -

Photojournalist Ernest C. Withers’ southwest Memphis home is being dedicated as a historic site.

The home at 480 W. Brooks Road will be dedicated at a ceremony Saturday, Feb. 10, at 10 a.m., during which a historical marker will be unveiled.

55. Last Word: Shutdown Round Two, The Pastner Charges and 1968 Virtual Reality -

The federal government technically shutdown at midnight in Washington, D.C., Friday for the second time in 17 days. But the House and Senate were still going for a vote on a two-year budget compromise before dawn Friday morning as this is posted.

56. The Metrics Mayor -

At times in the last two years, political supporters of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland have been worried. They agree with what got him elected, his “brilliant at the basics” philosophy that makes basic services and fundamental play-it-safe financial strategies the priority at City Hall.

57. Withers’ Home to Be Dedicated as Historic Site -

Photojournalist Ernest C. Withers’ southwest Memphis home is being dedicated as a historic site.

The home at 480 W. Brooks Road will be dedicated at a ceremony Saturday, Feb. 10, at 10 a.m., during which a historical marker will be unveiled.

58. Dunavant Set Gold Standard As Public Servant -

For the late Bobby Dunavant, who worked as Shelby County Probate Court Clerk for 40 years from 1954 to 1994, qualities like being honest, accessible, generous, empathetic and highly attentive to detail made him beloved by friends and colleagues throughout his life.

59. Nomination Deadline For Dunavant Awards Feb. 1 -

Memphis is lucky to have an abundance of residents with a passion for public service and it is time once again to honor their commitment to improving this community.

Each year the Rotary Club of Memphis East recognizes the importance of public service by hosting the Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

60. 'Mississippi Burning' KKK Leader Killen Dies in Prison at 92 -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Edgar Ray Killen, a 1960s Ku Klux Klan leader who was convicted decades later in the "Mississippi Burning" slayings of three civil rights workers, has died in prison at the age of 92, the state's corrections department announced Friday.

61. Developer Halts Plans After Likely Civil War Graves Found -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Developers halted plans Friday for a sprawling entertainment and residential complex in Tennessee after archaeologists discovered what they believe are graves on a site near a Civil War fort built by slaves.

62. Legislature Moving on Civil Rights Cold Cases -

Charlie Morris may be nearing 100 years of age, but he’s never given up on his quest for Tennessee to delve into decades-old civil rights crimes.

63. Dunavant Awards Spotlight Public Servants -

Being a public servant often is thankless job, but each year the Rotary Club of Memphis East recognizes the importance of public service to the community by hosting the Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

64. Shot Fired From Memphis Ignites Civil War Rematch -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest died in 1877, but 140 years later some people just can’t let their hero or the Old South go away.

In fact, the state Legislature is set to reignite the Civil War – to some degree – in 2018. We hope no gunshots are fired.

65. Weekend Monuments Protests, Response Suggest Shift -

Memphis Branch NAACP president Deidre Malone may have had the most concise description of what has changed since the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments came down Dec. 20.

“What we want happened. The monuments are down,” Malone said Friday, Jan. 5, as the NAACP and other groups called on Memphians to ignore plans for protests in the city the next day by groups opposed to the removal of the monuments.

66. Memphis Experts See Economic Growth Building Off 2017 Into 2018 -

With resolutions made and the new year now, another annual exercise rises to the forefront – predictions on what Memphis and its economy can expect in 2018.

If 2017 taught us anything, it’s that there’s so much we won’t be able to even remotely see coming, from Memphis bidding to become the potential home for Amazon’s second headquarters to action finally being taken on the Confederate monuments in city parks and so much more.

67. Memphis is Changing -

SOMETHING’S GOING ON HERE. President of the Confederacy Jefferson Davis was invited back to Memphis in 1964 when black folks were getting all uppity during the civil rights movement. He has finally left the podium.

68. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some Who Died in 2017 -

They made music that inspired legions of fans. Rock 'n' roll founding fathers Chuck Berry and Fats Domino, rockers Tom Petty and Gregg Allman, grunge icon Chris Cornell, country superstar Glen Campbell and jazz great Al Jarreau were among the notable figures who died in 2017, leaving a void in virtually every genre of music.

69. Monuments Moment Spans Generational Lines -

Van Turner Sr. celebrated his 73rd birthday Wednesday, Dec. 20, as his son, county commissioner Van Turner Jr., was somewhere near the epicenter of the most significant chapter of the city’s long-running controversy over Confederate monuments.

70. Memphis Sound at 60 -

As Stax Records and Royal Studios both wrap up a year of celebrating their 60th anniversary, The Memphis News looks back at the creators and purveyors of the Memphis sound and its significance, both in its heyday and today.

71. Black Theater Museum Plan Gets Good Reviews at City Hall -

For about five months, Hattiloo Theatre founder Ekundayo Bandele had been working on the idea he proposed Tuesday, Dec. 19, to establish the National Black Theater Museum inside the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art building in Overton Park.

72. 50 Years Later -

Almost 50 years to the day after he died in a plane crash while on tour, the image and sound of soul singer Otis Redding remains vital and relevant – and heard.

73. RCV Goes To Ballot, Term-Limit Change May Join It -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Dec. 5, to a November 2018 referendum that would repeal the use of ranked-choice voting (RCV) in some city council races starting with 2019 city elections.

74. Black: State, Congress Should Release Sex Harassment Claims -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Congresswoman Diane Black wants Tennessee's General Assembly and Congress to disclose sexual harassment claims and settlements involving lawmakers and staffers.

75. Sawyer, Goff Kick Off Commission Campaigns -

Tami Sawyer and Sam Goff may be seeing each other on the August county general election ballot. But between now and May, they have separate primary races for the District 7 seat on the Shelby County Commission.

76. Despite Massive Turnover, GOP Owns Legislature -

2018 will be a year of change for the Tennessee General Assembly, and 2019 will bring even more, especially in leadership – much depending on the popularity of President Donald Trump.

Not only is the Legislature moving to the Cordell Hull Building, vacating the Legislative Plaza after 45 years or so, a number of legislative faces are changing, too, even before next year’s election.

77. How Should ‘Good People’ React to Racist Ideology? -

Southern nationalists planning to lead rallies in Murfreesboro and Shelbyville are banking on Republican ideas and protection to spread their views, a burr under the saddle for state lawmakers in the controlling party.

78. Dickson Names President Of Tennessee Realtors -

Leon Dickson Sr., owner and principal broker of BenchMark at Southwind Realtors LLC in Memphis, has been installed as the Tennessee Realtors’ 2018 president, becoming the first black president of the organization in its nearly 100-year history.

79. Historical Commission Grants City November Hearing on Forrest Statue -

The Tennessee Historical Commission agreed Friday, Oct. 13, to send the city's request to remove a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest from Health Sciences Park to an administrative law judge for a hearing next month.

80. Process vs. Protest: Opinions Differ On How to Remove Monuments -

Protest and the legal process live in the same neighborhood. Sometimes they are next-door neighbors with borders that may be in dispute. At others times they are allies. But there is almost always a tension between the two.

81. Monumental Decision -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland may not even get a discussion with the Tennessee Historical Commission Friday, Oct. 13, about moving the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest out of a city park.

82. Coming Back -

Heavy machinery has been moving dirt around for a few months now on the E.H. Crump Boulevard lot that was once the site of the Fowler Homes public housing development. Leaders with the city of Memphis and the Memphis-based Church of God in Christ (COGIC) got around to the formalities Wednesday, Oct. 11, of breaking ground for construction of Mason Village – a $12.5 million development of 77 affordable townhomes on the site.

83. Dickson First Black President Of Tennessee Realtors -

Leon Dickson Sr., owner and principal broker of BenchMark at Southwind Realtors LLC in Memphis, has been installed as the Tennessee Realtors’ 2018 president, becoming the first black president of the organization in its nearly 100-year history.

84. Harris Talks ‘Radical’ Action on Confederate Monuments to Build Pressure -

City Council attorney Allan Wade says Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration and the council are not “in different places” when it comes to removing Confederate monuments from city parks.

85. For Memphis Libraries, ‘Start Here’ Message is Reality -

At a time when it might seem that the usefulness of public libraries is waning, they are reemerging as 21st century community hubs — democratic spaces where people from every walk of life can encounter humanity, the elusive element technology cannot conquer.

86. Tennessee Gubernatorial Candidate Diane Black to be Deposed -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican gubernatorial candidate Diane Black is being deposed in a lawsuit related to a television ad that ran in her first campaign for Congress.

87. A Tasteful List: 2017 -

DIG IN, MEMPHIS. Presenting the Tasteful List 2017 – alphabetical local favorites in one decidedly local man’s opinion – all good if not good for you. Some are farm to table, some got waylaid by sugar, flour, corn meal and deep-frying along the way, but all are ours, bless their hearts. 

88. Last Word: The Monument Letter, Soulsville Gateway and Gas Tax Hike Regrets -

The Redbirds take Game 1 of the Pacific Coast League Championship series Wednesday evening with a 6-4 win over El Paso at AutoZone Park. Game 2 is noon Thursday at B.B. King and Union.

89. More Than 150 Clergy Call for Removal of Forrest Statue -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland has posted a letter from 153 local clergy members in the Memphis area backing the city’s call for a waiver from the Tennessee Historical Commission next month to allow the city to remove Confederate monuments from city parks.

90. Editorial: Historical Commissions Must Be Run by Pros -

At some point, the question of what becomes of our city’s Confederate monuments will be resolved. Whenever that is, there are still some critical and arguably larger issues that should be addressed.

91. ‘Divisive Symbols’: Mississippi Case Offers Hope for Forrest Bust Removal -

State Sen. Lee Harris is encouraged by the U.S. Supreme Court’s request for the state of Mississippi to respond to a lawsuit seeking to remove the Confederate battle flag from its state flag.

92. Whitehaven Boom Gets Arena Catalyst -

As she looked across Elvis Presley Boulevard from the parking lot of the new Tri-State Bank headquarters at Elvis Presley and Farrow Road last week, Memphis City Council member Patrice Robinson took in the view of the new five-bay retail strip and looked north at another new strip soon to come online, and talked about a third in the works.

93. Tri-State Hosts Grand Opening of Banking HQ -

Tri-State Bank CEO Thomas Felder estimates that the more than 70-year-old institution – which has shifted its retail bank headquarters from Downtown to Whitehaven – will have a $2.5 million economic impact on the neighborhood surrounding it.

94. State Panel Sheds New Light on Racial Atrocities -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner has seen what can happen when old wounds are never allowed to heal.

She’s seen it most recently in clashes between neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and white supremacists and those who resisted their hatred in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counter-protester was killed and 19 were injured when a car was intentionally driven into a group of counter protesters. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash that weekend.

95. University of Texas in Austin Removes Confederate Statues -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The University of Texas quickly removed statues of Robert E. Lee and other prominent Confederate figures overnight from the main area of the Austin campus, a spokesman said Monday morning, just hours after the school's president ordered they be taken down.

96. Crosstown Concourse Opens With High Hopes -

With the First Baptist Church – Broad choir singing “Amazing Grace,” the $200 million mixed-use Crosstown Concourse development opened Saturday, Aug. 19, 90 years to the month that the building opened as a Sears, Roebuck & Co. store and distribution center.

97. Crosstown Concourse Opens in 'Resurrection' -

With the First Baptist Church – Broad choir singing “Amazing Grace,” the $200-million mixed-use Crosstown Concourse development opened Saturday, Aug. 19, 90 years to the month that the building opened as a Sears-Roebuck store and distribution center.

98. Deadly Rally Accelerates Removal of Confederate Statues -

In Gainesville, Florida, workers hired by the Daughters of the Confederacy chipped away at a Confederate soldier's statue, loaded it quietly on a truck and drove away with little fanfare.

In Baltimore, Mayor Catherine Pugh said she's ready to tear down all of her city's Confederate statues, and the city council voted to have them destroyed. San Antonio lawmakers are looking ahead to removing a statue from a prominent downtown park.

99. Charting a Course -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t have her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years. “I don’t want to be chosen because I’m a woman, but because I’m the best,” Large said, voicing a sentiment that many women business owners agree with.

100. Women-Owned Businesses Chart Progress of Diversity Contracting Efforts -

Daphne Large, founder, CEO and president of Data Facts Inc., didn’t get her company certified as a woman-owned business for 25 years.