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Editorial Results (free)

1. Connecting to American Values -

As U.S. Sen. John McCain prepared for his death, he wrote a message to America and the world. We share a few of his words as a call to our higher selves, a reminder of our humanity – and fragility – and as beacon of hope.

2. How Memphis Can Learn from Detroit: Creating an Inclusive Comeback Story -

The City of Detroit intends to create the most inclusive comeback story America has ever told.

Detroit is the largest African-American majority city in the country with a population over 400,000. Memphis is the second largest.

3. Magic Man: Under former Memphis Manager Mike Shildt, Cardinals Come to Life -

Manager Mike Shildt, working at a level he never had previously, is talking about the adjustment that he had to make to do right by his players.

“Guys here have more of an opinion because they have more experience,” Shildt said. “I welcome that opinion, but that’s been different. They’re just confident and comfortable with what they’re doing.

4. Innovation Requires Patience in Building a Strategy -

Failure is real and should be feared. Ironically, fear of failure is the most potent saboteur. This is a fact proven time and time again in the world of innovation.

Many expensive and time-consuming efforts to build innovation capability and capacity inside of organizations fail for a few simple reasons. Either they import a framework completely from the outside without attuning it to their practices and the culture and internal systems reject it or an anxiety to “get it right” leads to years of benchmarking, planning, and the formation of the governance of innovation without actually doing the work—and the work is simple: create net new value.

5. Perfect Vision -

As owner of Tharp’s Optical Boutique in Midtown, Dr. Linda Tharp has run her private optometry practice from the same 1720 Madison Ave. location the past 27 years. Despite the fact that she has no street frontage, her business has grown over the years strictly through word-of-mouth and referrals.

6. Kansas Democrats Pick Gay, Native American Nominee for Congress -

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Sharice Davids shattered the mold for a congressional primary winner from ruby red Kansas on Wednesday, becoming the state's first Native American and gay nominee for Congress.

7. Pope Seeks to Abolish Death Penalty, Changes Church Teaching -

VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis has decreed that the death penalty is "inadmissible" under all circumstances and that the Catholic Church must work to abolish it, changing official church teaching to reflect his view that all life is sacred and there is no justification for state-sponsored executions.

8. Primaries For Governor Move to Contentious End -

Randy Boyd has heard the saying about a race for elected office being a marathon and not a sprint. And he agrees. The Republican contender for Tennessee governor is also a marathon runner who has run 36 of the races.

9. In His Final Months as Tennessee Governor, Haslam Reflects on His Education Legacy -

While Gov. Bill Haslam entered office as an education-minded leader intent on reforms, much of his administration’s K–12 public school work has focused on holding the line on sweeping policies launched under his predecessor.

10. Grizzlies’ Front Office Makes Calculated Moves to Give Team Real Shot at Relevance -

We will not be granting general manager Chris Wallace and the rest of the Grizzlies’ front office absolution. Can’t do it. Too many bad draft picks over the years, the bungled Tyreke Evans situation, and the failure to sufficiently vet Chandler Parsons’ health, make that impossible.

11. Is Disney Magic Fading after Four Straight Years of Visits? Maybe Not -

I floated in an inner tube around the hotel’s massive 3-acre lazy river pool and it hit me. I’m floating in a hotel’s lazy river and I’m OK with it.

The previous day we spent much of our time at Disney’s Magic Kingdom. In another two days we’d head back to Disney World to experience a whirlwind of park hopping.

12. HopeWorks Formally Opening New Facility Thursday -

HopeWorks will hold a ribbon cutting Thursday, July 19, to celebrate its new facility, located in Binghampton at 3337 Summer Ave. in the former Southern Security Federal Credit Union. The grand-opening event will begin at 10 a.m., with tours of the facility. Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will speak prior to cutting the ribbon.

13. Students Write Bill to Open Civil Rights Files -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – U.S. Sen. Doug Jones introduced a bill this month that would clear the way to open records from civil rights cold cases – a bill written by high school students.

14. Around Memphis: July 9, 2018 -

The Daily News offers a weekly roundup of Memphis-related headlines from around the web, adding context and new perspectives to the original content we produce on a daily basis. Here are some recent stories worth checking out…

15. When You Need Money Fast -

Ray’s Take: It’s something we hope never happens to us, but at least once in your life, you will find yourself needing money fast. More than you ever dreamed of when you set up your six months’ worth of expenses emergency fund. So what do you do if you find yourself in this situation?

16. Seivers in College Hall? Yeah, Sure, Why Not? -

Don’t look for any campaign propaganda to be mailed out. There won’t be any personal stumping. Heck, Larry Seivers even refused to fluff up his own bio.

If the former University of Tennessee two-time All-America wide receiver finds his way into the College Football Hall of Fame, it will happen because of the numbers and the memories that made him one of the game’s best in the 1970s.

17. Online sellers consider how to comply with sales tax ruling -

NEW YORK (AP) — While a Supreme Court ruling on sales taxes will create more obligations and expenses for many small online retailers, owners are already thinking about how they'll comply.

18. MIFA Marks 50 Years of Interfaith Activism -

When a group of Memphis religious leaders marched from St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral to City Hall the day after Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination in 1968, they were in the middle of a pivotal year for an ecumenical movement whose impact is still being felt.

19. NFL Takes on Anthem Protesters -

ATLANTA (AP) – Stand or stay out of sight.

Looking to quell a national debate that was sparked by Colin Kaepernick, stoked by President Trump and some say chipped away at the very popularity of America's game, NFL owners approved a new policy Wednesday that allows players to protest during the national anthem by staying in the locker room but forbids them from sitting or taking a knee if they're on the field.

20. Memphis Rox New Experience -

Climbing mountains, metaphorically speaking, has become my preferred lifestyle. The exhilaration of the climb, whatever the challenge, I find inspirational. However, I have never considered actually scaling a mountain, even a large boulder, until last week when I visited Memphis Rox, a premier rock climbing facility that opened two months ago in Memphis.

21. Memphis Giving Area Players, Fans Taste of Professional Soccer -

In the hotel-casino universe they’d call this a “soft opening” – hold the bells and whistles, but concentrate on the building blocks that will make up the ultimate experience. So it was on a recent Saturday night as USL Memphis sporting director Andrew Bell excitedly paced around Christian Brothers High School’s stadium waiting to watch some soccer rather than just talk about it.

22. Tom Wolfe, Pioneering 'New Journalist,' Dead At 88 -

NEW YORK (AP) – Tom Wolfe, the white-suited wizard of "New Journalism" who exuberantly chronicled American culture from the Merry Pranksters through the space race before turning his satiric wit to such novels as "The Bonfire of the Vanities" and "A Man in Full," has died. He was 88.

23. Last Word: Veto Override Drama, Iran Reaction & Rise of the Rest Meets Soundways -

Shelby County Commissioners have a busy committee day Wednesday with a budget presentation – county mayor Mark Luttrell’s final one as the county’s chief executive, more discussions about the Graceland plan and a veto override.

24. Inner Fortitude -

Amid a teacher shortage attributed partly to economic opportunities luring away candidates, local educators are creating urban teaching programs and adopting new recruitment strategies.

Rhodes College is launching a master’s program in urban education in June and is offering a $10,000 scholarship to each student. If the student receives a Stafford federal loan of $15,000 and commits to teaching at a “high-need” school, the degree essentially will be free.

25. FTC Frowns on Bogus Product Claims -

Parents want to see their kids do better in school. Seniors want to avoid or delay the cognitive decline that often accompanies aging. People who are overweight or suffering from a serious disease hope to find a miracle treatment.

26. Building Heritage -

The basement of the Universal Life Insurance building, a Memphis landmark at Danny Thomas Boulevard and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, is still defined by the intersection of overhead ventilation shafts and pipes.

27. New Lynching Memorial Evokes Terror of Victims -

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) – Visitors to the new National Memorial for Peace and Justice first glimpse them, eerily, in the distance: Brown rectangular slabs, 800 in all, inscribed with the names of more than 4,000 souls who lost their lives in lynchings between 1877 and 1950.

28. Events -

Circuit Playhouse will present the regional premiere of “Stupid F#!&ing Bird” Friday, April 20, through May 13 at 51 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org for times and tickets.

29. Events -

Memphis Botanic Garden hosts 30 Thursdays: Nature at Night Thursday, April 19, at 6 p.m. at 750 Cherry Road. Join an MBG staff member on an evening guided tour of the gardens. Free with garden admission. Visit memphisbotanicgarden.com/30thursdays for details.

30. New Plans Would Change Memphis Medical District -

With 27,000 people who either work or attend classes in the Memphis Medical District, and about 375 acres of parking space, something has to give.

Following last week’s release of a reconfigured city bus system plan and a new shuttle system that the Memphis Medical District Collaborative is working on, officials hope to convince 2,500 people to leave their cars at home.

31. Analysis: Blacks Largely Left Out of High-Paying Jobs -

BOSTON (AP) – Jonathan Garland's fascination with architecture started early: He spent much of his childhood designing Lego houses and gazing at Boston buildings on rides with his father away from their largely minority neighborhood.

32. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

33. Events -

The Overton Park Conservancy will host a Park Fun Day and Science Fair Sunday, March 25, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Overton Park’s East Parkway Pavilion. Events include a science fair with research partners from the University of Memphis, Rhodes College and Christian Brothers University; an 11:30 a.m. mini-BioBlitz, a tour of the Old Forest with conservancy staff to record as many species as possible; the finals of the International Society of Arboriculture Southern Chapter's tree-climbing contest; and games and food trucks. Cost is free. Visit overtonpark.org.

34. Prescription for Tragedy -

He has his own GPS, an internal shield that keeps him from driving anywhere near 637 Poplar Ave. Home to the Memphis morgue. That’s where they showed Jerry Davidson his 22-year-old son, Oliver, his eyes closed and his lips purple.

35. Events -

David Lusk Gallery-Memphis will hold an opening reception for Libby Johnson’s “Tempest” and Rob Matthews’ “Peace Like a Fever” Friday, March 23, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at DLG, 97 Tillman St. Johnson and Matthews will also give an artist talk Saturday, March 24, at 11 a.m. Visit davidluskgallery.com.

36. Mixed Emotions as Vols, Lady Vols Exit Postseason -

Wait till next year. Again. Hope for better. It’s going to be a long offseason for Tennessee basketball.

The Vols were seeded No. 3 in the NCAA Tournament’s South Region and were upset by No. 11 seed Loyola-Chicago, 63-62, in the second round in Dallas.

37. Events -

Employment Seeker will host a veterans job fair and entrepreneur expo Thursday, March 22, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Memphis Cook Convention Center, 255 N. Main St. Veterans and civilians can meet with employers or learn more about entrepreneurship and how to start a business. Admission is free; register at employmentseeker.net.

38. Good Shepherd Pharmacy Continues Growth with new Chief Medical Officer -

Whenever Dr. Amara Elochukwu discharges a patient and sends them away with medications, she always worries after they leave if they’ll actually be able to afford the drugs.

If they can’t, she often wonders, what’s the point? Why even prescribe them? That concern explains why Dr. Elochukwu is in the process of joining Good Shepherd Pharmacy in Memphis on a part-time basis as the pharmacy’s first chief medical officer.

39. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will present “Laughter on the 23rd Floor” Friday, March 2, through March 25 at 66 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org for times and tickets.

40. Events -

Playhouse on the Square will present “Laughter on the 23rd Floor” Friday, March 2, through March 25 at 66 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org for times and tickets.

41. Events -

Memphis Heritage hosts Preservation Posse: After Hours at the Universal Life Insurance Building Thursday, March 1, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. (doors at 5:30 p.m.) at 480 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Take a behind-the-scenes tour of the Universal Life Insurance Building led by Jimmie Tucker of Self + Tucker Architects, and learn about the history and future of this adaptive reuse project from the experts making it happen. Tickets are $10 in advance or $15 at the door. Visit memphisheritage.org for details and tickets.

42. Love at Center of Pancreatic Cancer Battle -

This Valentine’s Day, Bartlett residents Kathryn and Tom Craig want to share their story of love and support as encouragement to those who are battling cancer with a loved one.

43. Events -

The Home Show of the Mid-South takes place Friday through Sunday, Feb. 9-11, at Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove Road. Exhibitors will showcase home decor, lighting, pools, patios, services and more. Matt Blashaw, host of DIY Network’s “Yard Crashers,” will hold seminars/meet-and-greets Saturday and Sunday at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Visit memphishomeshow.com for show hours, tickets and other details.

44. Events -

Home Show of the Mid-South will be held Friday through Sunday, Feb. 9-11, at Agricenter International, 7777 Walnut Grove Road. Exhibitors will showcase home decor, lighting, pools, patios, services and more. Matt Blashaw, host of DIY Network’s “Yard Crashers,” will hold seminars/meet-and-greets Saturday and Sunday at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Visit memphishomeshow.com for show hours, tickets and other details.

45. Serious Diversion -

ZEN FOR CYNICS. Do not walk behind me, for I may not lead. Do not walk ahead of me, for I may not follow. Do not walk beside me for the path is narrow. In fact, just buzz off and leave me alone.

46. Events -

The Morris and Mollye Fogelman International Jewish Film Festival continues with a screening of “An Act of Defiance” Thursday, Feb. 8, at 7:30 p.m. at the Malco Ridgeway Cinema Grill, 5853 Ridgeway Center Parkway. The festival, which features award-winning Jewish-themed films, continues throughout February. Screenings are $5 for MJCC members and $7 for the community. Visit jccmemphis.org/film for tickets and a schedule.

47. The Week Ahead: Feb. 5-11, 2018 -

Good morning, Memphis! If you’re looking for a legit reason to “space out” this week, The Orpheum’s got you covered with two out-of-this-world events. Meanwhile, LeMoyne-Owen College honors Black History Month and a pair of local nonprofits celebrate the hope and heart of the city. And that’s just a taste of what’s on tap in The Week Ahead.

48. People Hire People -

If you’re looking for a job, there’s a good chance you’re applying online. And chances are good that applying online is your go-to option. It makes sense.

The last time you reached out to a HR person at a job fair or on LinkedIn (or anywhere else), they said, “Apply online. If you’re a good fit, we’ll call you!” They may even have said, “Don’t reach out to us. We review every application carefully.”

49. New Name, Other Changes On Tap for Nikki’s Hot Products -

The popularity of Nikki Schroeder’s homegrown line of food and cooking products can be followed partly by tracking tweaks in the name of her product line, which is in the process of changing yet again.

50. Developer Halts Plans After Likely Civil War Graves Found -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Developers halted plans Friday for a sprawling entertainment and residential complex in Tennessee after archaeologists discovered what they believe are graves on a site near a Civil War fort built by slaves.

51. Lamar Avenue Mural Draws Council Contempt -

The state’s largest collaborative mural might be missing a few panels soon after a City Hall showdown Tuesday, Jan. 9, between the head of Paint Memphis and City Council members upset by the images on Lamar Avenue near Willett Street.

52. Retail Workers Feel Disruption From Shifting Shopper Habits -

NEW YORK (AP) – With new options and conveniences, there's never been a better time for shoppers. As for workers ... well, not always.

The retail industry is being radically reshaped by technology, and nobody feels that disruption more starkly than 16 million American shelf stockers, salespeople, cashiers and others. The shifts are driven, like much in retail, by the Amazon effect – the explosion of online shopping and the related changes in consumer behavior and preferences.

53. In a Milestone Year, Gene Therapy Finds a Place in Medicine -

After decades of hope and high promise, this was the year scientists really showed they could doctor DNA to successfully treat diseases. Gene therapies to treat cancer and even pull off the biblical-sounding feat of helping the blind to see were approved by U.S. regulators, establishing gene manipulation as a new mode of medicine.

54. US Industries Can Start Counting Their Benefits From Tax Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Craft breweries are raising a glass to the Republicans' new tax overhaul: It cuts the excise tax on beer. Retailers, long saddled with heavy tax bills, will get relief. So will some high-profile names in corporate finance, led by Wells Fargo.

55. What to Give Them for Christmas -

GIVE THEM TOMORROW. See the children. See them run. 

See the children. See them play. 
See the children. See them see. 
See the children. See them learn. 
See the children. See all that’s possible.

56. Former AD Dickey has Confidence in Fulmer, Pruitt -

Doug Dickey lived and breathed some of Tennessee’s football glory days, and he would like nothing better than to see those days return.

Dickey, 85, retired and living in Jacksonville, Florida, still loves Tennessee football. He coached the Vols to the Litkenhous national championship in 1967 when the Vols finished 9-2. USC, 9-1, was declared the national champs in the AP, Coaches, FWAA and NFF polls.

57. Net Neutrality Fans Speak Up as FCC Set to Strike Down Rules -

NEW YORK (AP) – Net neutrality is a simple concept but a dense and often technical issue normally discussed in tech and telecom circles. Now it's hit the mainstream.

This week, the Federal Communications Commission plans to vote on gutting Obama-era rules meant to stop broadband companies such as Comcast, AT&T and Verizon from exercising more control over what people watch and see on the internet.

58. Expanding Its Reach -

His was a story as tragic as it is familiar. E. Young had immediate family members in a gang. More than one gang tried to recruit him. His parents were in no way equipped to raise him.

When he moved in with an aunt, Phyllis Brown, he was by his own words “angry, depressed.”

59. Ignite Memphis Coming to New Ballet Memphis Digs -

If it was possible to create a mixtape of Memphis creativity, it might look like an event set to take place this week at Ballet Memphis.

The 11th edition of Ignite Memphis moves to Ballet Memphis’ new Overton Square space on Thursday, Nov. 16, bringing its signature slideshow-based presentation format to the ballet company’s Midtown digs. Organizers look for spaces like this – big enough to hold a crowd of around 300, and buzzy enough that people want to go there, be there and absorb what Ignite has to offer.

60. City’s Maxson Plant Upgrade Offers Cutting Edge Water Treatment -

“Everything has a life,” city Public Works Division director Robert Knecht said last week as he stood at the western edge of the wastewater treatment plant that processes 70 million gallons of wastewater a day from the southern part of the city.

61. Film Produced by Genotyping Company Gets Indie Memphis Slot -

As an automated genotyping resource for researchers in universities, hospitals and bioscience companies around the world, the Memphis-based company Transnetyx would seem to be an unlikely producer of a film in this year’s Indie Memphis Film Festival.

62. Trump shoots down retirement limit to pay for GOP tax cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump shot down a possible approach for raising revenue to finance tax cuts in politically must-do legislation for the Republicans, promising Monday the popular 401(k) retirement program will be untouched.

63. City Lays Out Numerous Paths to Statue Removal -

City officials laid out numerous paths forward in the Confederate monuments controversy Tuesday, Oct. 17, that include closing Health Sciences Park entirely or building a memorial to lynching victims in the park plaza where a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is now the centerpiece.

64. City Lays Out Numerous Options in Confederate Monuments Controversy -

The city administration and Memphis City Council laid out numerous paths forward in the Confederate monuments controversy Tuesday, Oct. 17, that include closing Health Sciences Park entirely or building a memorial to lynching victims in the park plaza where a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is now the centerpiece.

65. Pettit Joins Food Bank As Chief Development Officer -

Attorney Peter Pettit has joined Mid-South Food Bank as chief development officer following his recent retirement as a partner in the Memphis office of Bass, Berry & Sims PLC. In his new role, Pettit works closely with food bank leaders to develop strategies and relationships with major gift donors, and specifically is working to complete the $12.5 million “Hunger to Hope” capital campaign.

66. Good Shepherd, Transplant Foundation Team to Provide Low-Cost Medication -

Because of the high cost of their medications, transplant patients frequently are confronted with difficult-to-impossible choices in figuring out how to obtain and pay for the drugs they need.

That’s according to National Foundation for Transplants president and CEO Michelle Gilchrist, whose Memphis-based organization has teamed up with the local Good Shepherd Pharmacy to help bring affordable medications to transplant patients in Tennessee.

67. Seeking Relevance -

As he prepared to kick off his first season as the Memphis Symphony Orchestra’s music director with a pair of opening weekend concerts Sept. 30 and Oct. 1, principal conductor Robert Moody looked back on a career that’s taken him to some impressive highs, and acknowledged the power of serendipity.

68. VA Running Out of Money for Private Health Care Program -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Weeks after a veterans' health initiative received $2.1 billion in emergency funding, the Trump administration says the private-sector Veterans Choice health care program may need additional money as early as December to avoid a disruption of care for hundreds of thousands of veterans.

69. Widening The Path -

He asked to only be a small part of this story. But when you come up with an idea so good, so powerful, that it’s named as one of the top 20 ideas in the Forbes Change the World Competition, you are the story’s foundation.

70. The Stars – Ferguson, Miller, Norvell – Lead Memphis into the Spotlight -

The team has not yet cracked this season’s Top 25, but at the University of Memphis everyone gets how this works. You beat No. 25 UCLA 48-45 on national television and the Bruins fall out of the rankings.

71. Steps to a Survivor -

Phyllis Roy lost her husband, John W. Roy, to Alzheimer’s disease on April 27. He was 75 years old and had been diagnosed seven years earlier.

From her personal experience, plus all the facts and figures she has come to know about Alzheimer’s, Phyllis will speak to audiences seeking help, share with people often reaching out after a loved one has been diagnosed.

72. Last Word: Back From Jury Duty, ASD Changes and Southern Heritage Classic Is Here -

Back from a very short-lived jury duty on a short week for the courts – criminal and civil. Even a slow week at the Criminal Justice Center is a learning experience about not only our criminal justice system but also the Constitutional framework that puts those notices in the U.S. mail and results in several hundred citizens at a time showing up in a jury assembly room after the adventure of trying to find parking Downtown.

73. Wizards Return -

The past couple of years has seen the return of pinball tables across the Mid-South, with groups like Memphis Pinball hosting weekly gatherings at places like Memphis Made Brewing and the new pinball arcade in Millington, The Retro.

74. Down on the Corner: Titans Fix Old Problem -

The Titans have been searching for years for an answer at cornerback. They think they found two answers during the offseason.

Through free agency and the draft, second-year general manager Jon Robinson orchestrated a total makeover of the crucial position, adding veteran Logan Ryan and rookie Adoree’ Jackson to a defense that has been easy pickings for a well-thrown football.

75. Monogram Foods Awards $25K to Memphis Nonprofits -

Memphis-based Monogram Foods is awarding a total of $25,000 to eight local nonprofits through its Monogram Loves Kids Foundation.

The grants are part of $250,000 the foundation is awarding this year to charities benefiting children and families in regions of the country where Monogram Foods operates.

76. HealthChoice Promotes Henning To Director of Population Health -

Sarah Henning has been promoted to director of population health programs at HealthChoice. Henning previously served as manager of the department. In her new role, Henning is responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness initiatives and programs for the HealthChoice network.
She also collaborates with stakeholders to promote and support these programs and to ensure they meet the needs of the affected populations and adapt with the changing health care environment.

77. City Master Plan Development Aims To Reverse Random Development -

Not too far past a new generation of civic plans is the filter of reality – what is possible by a business bottom line.

At the outset of the still-forming Memphis 3.0 master development plan, the reality without a plan is striking.

78. Be Boring -

Ray’s Take: Sometimes, it’s tempting to try to beat the market through the excitement of stock picking or by choosing riskier investments with the promise of a higher return. It seems like everyone has a friend of a friend with a great investment story.

79. Last Word: Fifth Wave, Hidden Gem in OB and the Freeze Filibuster -

There is one less contender in the crowded field of potential and declared candidates for the Republican nomination for Governor in 2018. State Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was nominated for federal court judge Thursday by President Donald Trump who also nominated Memphis attorney and former federal prosecutor Tommy Parker to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee as well. Both are part of what The White House described as a “fifth wave” of judicial nominees.

80. Legislature Losing Some Powerful, Familiar Members -

A shakeup in leadership is looming for the state Legislature, though it may portend more of a change in personalities than party strength.

In the House, longtime Rep. Craig Fitzhugh, the affable Democrat from Ripley in West Tennessee, is preparing for a 2018 gubernatorial run, a move that would knock him out of his House seat, at least temporarily, and the position as Democratic Caucus leader.

81. After the ‘Tom Lee Storm’: A Look At Recovery Efforts, What's Next -

Eleven days after the May 27 storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses, Memphis Light, Gas and Water officials declared victory in the recovery with a Wednesday, June 8, late afternoon Tweet: “Update: Restored.”

82. Senses Allowed to Remain Open While Reapplying for Permit -

Senses, the Poplar Avenue nightclub that found itself in the midst of zoning dispute, will be allowed to remain open for business while the owners and the county sort out the zoning issues.

Shelby County Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter ruled Wednesday, May 24, the business could remain open, but with some stipulations.

83. Judge Rules Senses Can Remain Open While Reapplying for Permit -

Senses, the Poplar Avenue nightclub that found itself in the midst of zoning dispute, will be allowed to remain open for business while the owners and the county sort out the zoning issues.

Shelby County Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter ruled Wednesday, May 24, the business could remain open, but with some stipulations.

84. Vaco Risk Solutions' Brian Prentice Talks Data Breaches, Safety -

Vaco Memphis has added Brian Prentice as managing partner of Vaco Risk Solutions, a national consulting firm that works with organizations that have IT security, risk or compliance needs; have had a recent breach; are moving data centers; require a penetration test; or have any other project-based risk management needs.

85. Ronald McDonald House Welcomes St. Jude Children, Families -

Jill Crocker knew of Ronald McDonald House Charities and its mission to provide a “home away from home” for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital families and their children receiving treatment. But she had not been there.

86. Dorothy Day House Embraces Families in Need -

About 30 percent of Memphians live below the poverty line and 50 percent of them are children under age 18. It's a problem that Tracey Burgess, director of development and communication at the Dorothy Day House in Memphis, calls an "epidemic."

87. Boyd: Memphis Public Safety Spending Out of Balance -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd says the city budget is lopsided when it comes to its priorities.

And Boyd called Wednesday, May 3, for a shift away from public safety spending – specifically city spending on police – the largest single part of the operating and capital budgets as well as the largest division in city government.

88. Hits and Misses in UT’s Quest for JuCo Gold -

Things were supposed to be so easy for Jonathan Kongbo. He arrived at the University of Tennessee last year as the No. 1-ranked junior college prospect in the nation. He had the combination of size and speed that everybody wants in a defensive lineman. The sky was the limit.

89. Last Word: Popovich's Tip, Strickland's Budget and Haslam's Jump Start on Roads -

Game 5 goes to the Spurs in San Antonio 116-103 over the Grizz who are back here Thursday. Spurs coach Gregg Popovich is not effusive in his comments to the media, which is fun to watch, but it does make tracking down and veryifying this next story a bit difficult. A credit card receipt showed up on Redditt that appears to show Popovich left a $5,000 tip on an $815.73 bill at McEwen’s Friday night between the two Memphis-based playoff games.

90. Chef Shuttle Raising Funds For Exchange Club -

Meal-delivery service Chef Shuttle is partnering with The Exchange Club Family Center for a Mother’s Day fundraiser to benefit the organization’s domestic violence and child abuse prevention, intervention and restorative services.

91. Shaffer Named Executive Director Of Rebranded BLDG Memphis -

John Paul Shaffer recently was named executive director of BLDG Memphis, the rebranded entity that brings the Community Development Council of Greater Memphis and Livable Mem-phis under a single organizational identity.
In his new role, Shaffer’s job is to guide the organization in its mission of supporting neighborhood revitalization through a network of organizations and individuals working in the community development space – which BLDG Memphis does primarily through organizational capacity building, community education and engagement, and public policy and advocacy – as well as to promote the new brand. 

92. Overcoming Opioids: The Quest for Less-Addictive Drugs -

Tummy tucks really hurt. Doctors carve from hip to hip, slicing off skin, tightening muscles, tugging at innards. Patients often need strong painkillers for days or even weeks, but Mary Hernandez went home on just over-the-counter ibuprofen.

93. The Week Ahead: April 17-23 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! You’ve got plenty of reasons to celebrate this week: The Grizzlies are in the NBA Playoffs, the Africa in April festival is back, and the area is getting greener with both a park and a greenway opening. Check out the rest of our top picks in The Week Ahead…

94. Sustaining the Rally -

Innings come to an end, games come to an end, and seasons come to an end. Yet the Memphis Redbirds are forever playing against their best selves – those grand and glorious days when AutoZone Park was new and the Triple-A baseball team competed in the highest-level pro sports league in town.

95. Virgin America Will Be the Latest Airline Brand to Disappear -

DALLAS (AP) – After months of teasing, Alaska Airlines has bad news for loyal customers of Virgin America – their airline's name is being dumped.

Alaska announced late Wednesday that it will retire the Virgin brand, probably in 2019, adding that name to a list including Continental and US Airways that disappeared in the past decade.

96. Israel to Lead Greenline Group As Organization’s Focus Shifts -

Andrew Israel recently was named executive director of the Greater Memphis Greenline as the organization shifts its focus to promoting healthy lifestyles and increasing the use of trails, parks and green spaces.
As executive director, Israel is the strategic leader and the chief relationship officer for GMG. Along with creating programs and opportunities to enhance and expand the use of green spaces, GMG works at the grassroots level with neighborhood organizations and individuals to help promote their activities and expand the resources that are available. 

97. Nintendo Switch's Big Challenge: Luring Casual Gamers -

NEW YORK (AP) – With three kids and constant travel for work, John Hussey jumped at the chance to play an open-world adventure game like "The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild" anywhere, anytime.

98. Events -

WKNO Gallery Ten Ninety One will exhibit “Autobiography: Works by Martha Kelly” Thursday, March 2, through March 31 in the WKNO Digital Media Center, 7151 Cherry Farms Road. A closing reception will be held March 31 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Call 901-458-2521 or visit wkno.org.

99. Events -

The city of Memphis Office of Business Diversity & Compliance Outreach will host “Diversity Programs 301: Certification Registration Rally: Getting on the OBDC Registry” Wednesday, March 1, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library, 3030 Poplar Ave., room L50. Gain a more in-depth understanding of the city’s Supplier Diversity programs and how to leverage them to grow your business. Also, register your certifications on site with access to standby assistance. Cost is free. Register at eventbrite.com. 

100. Binghampton Gateway Comes to Food Desert -

The groundbreaking of a shopping center doesn’t always attract a large crowd of city officials and TV cameras, but then again not every shopping center is an oasis in the middle of a food desert.