» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'Hope House' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:7
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:9
Middle Tennessee:23
East Tennessee:3
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Shot Fired From Memphis Ignites Civil War Rematch -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest died in 1877, but 140 years later some people just can’t let their hero or the Old South go away.

In fact, the state Legislature is set to reignite the Civil War – to some degree – in 2018. We hope no gunshots are fired.

2. Retail Workers Feel Disruption From Shifting Shopper Habits -

NEW YORK (AP) – With new options and conveniences, there's never been a better time for shoppers. As for workers ... well, not always.

The retail industry is being radically reshaped by technology, and nobody feels that disruption more starkly than 16 million American shelf stockers, salespeople, cashiers and others. The shifts are driven, like much in retail, by the Amazon effect – the explosion of online shopping and the related changes in consumer behavior and preferences.

3. Splinter Creek Brings Eco-Living to Oxford -

OXFORD, Miss. (AP) — Splinter Creek housing development in Taylor, Miss. is gaining regional attention.

The owners, a mother-daughter team made up of Ellen Leakes and her daughters Elizabeth Keckler and Blair Wunderlich, were recently named one of Southern Living Magazine's Top Southern Tastemakers for 2018. The development, nestled right outside of Taylor, Miss., is a 650-acre plot of land with space for up to 26 homes, where structures are designed to take their cues from nature.

4. Worth the Wait -

A true college football fan’s pain is personal because losing extracts a cost. Food doesn’t taste as good. Sleep doesn’t come as easily. The hurt goes to depths that not everyone can understand.

5. Risk for Middle Class: That GOP Tax Cuts Could Fade Away -

WASHINGTON (AP) – It's a Christmas gift the middle class might want to give back in a few years.

The Republican tax overhaul bestows an initial infusion of cash on nearly every taxpayer next year. That extra income is likely to please millions of households, support consumer spending and perhaps give the economy a short-term lift.

6. Black Steps Down as US House Budget Chair Amid Governor Bid -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – U.S. Rep. Diane Black announced Wednesday that she is stepping down as House Budget Committee chairwoman, but will remain in Congress as she runs for governor of Tennessee.

7. Buoyed by Alabama Win, Democrats Eye Tennessee Senate Race -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Democrats eager to take control of the Senate next year are turning to the state of Tennessee, where a popular Democratic former governor is running for the seat being vacated by the retirement of Republican Sen. Bob Corker.

8. Haslam Considering Changes to UT Board of Trustees -

Gov. Bill Haslam is considering reducing the number University of Tennessee Board of Trustees members and trimming the number of finalists presented for top leadership positions in the UT system, Lt. Gov. Randy McNally has confirmed.

9. Frayser Bauhaus -

Memphis' best and most unique example of art deco-international style Bauhaus architecture has been hiding in plain sight in Frayser for nearly 70 years.

Tens of thousands of daily motorists drive past the white, multilevel building at 3590 Thomas St., on the northeast corner of Thomas and Floyd Avenue, where curved windows look out on the highway down the hill and large trees landscape the slope to the street.

10. Congress Deals 2 Blows to 'Obamacare' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Congress dealt a pair of blows to the Obama health care law Wednesday, including a retreat by two senators who were fighting for a provision this year that would help contain premium costs.

11. House and Senate Tax Bills Treat Disaster Victims Unequally -

If the House Republican tax bill became law, victims of hurricanes in Texas and Florida who've yet to account for all their losses could deduct them on their 2018 taxes. Not so for victims of the California wildfires.

12. Net Neutrality Fans Speak Up as FCC Set to Strike Down Rules -

NEW YORK (AP) – Net neutrality is a simple concept but a dense and often technical issue normally discussed in tech and telecom circles. Now it's hit the mainstream.

This week, the Federal Communications Commission plans to vote on gutting Obama-era rules meant to stop broadband companies such as Comcast, AT&T and Verizon from exercising more control over what people watch and see on the internet.

13. GOP Leaders Delay Budget Vote As Internal Disputes Linger -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Top Republicans delayed a planned House vote on a short-term budget bill Tuesday to give themselves time to quell party divisions and avert a partial government shutdown by the weekend.

14. Tigers' New Basketball Facility a Palatial Recruiting Tool -

When you donate $10 million toward the construction of new basketball practice facility that bears your name, you are entitled to make a joke. So former Tiger Bill Laurie, who played on the 1972-73 Memphis State team that was NCAA runner-up, went for the laugh at the recent ribbon cutting ceremony for the University of Memphis’ $21 million Laurie-Walton Family Basketball Center on south campus named after Laurie and his wife, Nancy Walton Laurie.

15. Expanding Its Reach -

His was a story as tragic as it is familiar. E. Young had immediate family members in a gang. More than one gang tried to recruit him. His parents were in no way equipped to raise him.

When he moved in with an aunt, Phyllis Brown, he was by his own words “angry, depressed.”

16. Trump Barges Into Tax Debate, Seeks Deeper Cut for Wealthy -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Monday barged into congressional Republicans' carefully calibrated work on revamping the nation's tax code, calling for a steeper tax cut for wealthy Americans and pressing to add a contentious health care change to the mix.

17. Medical Marijuana Might Finally Get Past Objections -

Medical marijuana legislation is evolving, not to ease people’s debilitating pain but to help it pass the General Assembly, where it’s giving some lawmakers heartburn.

State Rep. Jeremy Faison, an East Tennessee Republican ferrying the bill through the House, is offering several changes to a bill he is sponsoring with Sen. Steve Dickerson, a Nashville Republican, to soothe the nerves of state bureaucrats and lawmakers who get shaky when the word marijuana is mentioned.

18. Two Reasons Brand Stories Take Off -

Recently, Tony Allen’s not-goodbye letter to Memphis spread across our social-media feeds and dinner conversations. It was a letter that left some misty-eyed and others full of hometown pride and hope for the future.

19. House Backs $4T Budget, Faces Challenges on Trump Tax Plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans powered a $4 trillion budget through the House on Thursday by a razor-thin margin, a close vote underscoring the difficulties that lie ahead in delivering President Donald Trump's promise to cut taxes.

20. Democrats Hope Bredesen Run Will Reinvigorate Party -

Tennessee Democrats are canvassing the state to find candidates at every political level, but their next star is a well-known veteran who has people of all political stripes holding their breath.

Phil Bredesen, the former mayor of Nashville and a two-term governor, could alter the landscape of Tennessee politics if he enters the race for U.S. Senate to fill the void by departing Republican Sen. Bob Corker in 2018.

21. Last Word: Corker's Quest, Overton Park Transition and The Two Amazons -

The basic political differences between President Donald Trump and U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee returned to the top of the news cycle Tuesday with an extraordinary airing by the two leaders that went beyond Twitter, at least for Corker. Here is the basic account from Associated Press of what was a story that unfolded over the course of a work day in the Beltway. It was a day that included Trump going to Capitol Hill for a meeting with Republican Senators, including Corker.

22. Remarkable Public Row Between Trump, GOP Sen. Corker -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a startling verbal assault on the president of his own party, Republican Sen. Bob Corker charged Tuesday that Donald Trump "debases our nation" with constant untruths, name calling and bullying, and will leave behind a sad legacy of damaging division.

23. Trump shoots down retirement limit to pay for GOP tax cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump shot down a possible approach for raising revenue to finance tax cuts in politically must-do legislation for the Republicans, promising Monday the popular 401(k) retirement program will be untouched.

24. Budget Deficit Hits $666B, an $80B Spike for the Year -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The federal budget deficit rose to $666 billion in the just-completed fiscal year, a spike that comes as Republicans are moving to draft a tax code rewrite that promises to add up to $1.5 trillion to the national debt over the coming decade.

25. Elvis Items to Hit Celebrity Auction Block on Nov. 11 -

Elvis collectors and fans will soon have the chance to own a piece of history when a variety of items once owned by the King become available.

GWS Auctions is auctioning off 150 celebrity items in an online event on Nov. 11, with an impressive array of memorabilia from Elvis, Hugh Hefner, Marilyn Monroe, Whitney Houston, JFK, Jackie O, Michael Jackson and more.

26. Last Word: Alexander on Trump, Gibson Sells and Chandler Home Sales Numbers -

If you tuned out at half-time in Houston Thursday evening, you may need to examine your committment and give me five sets of wind sprints from East Parkway to the fountain at the other end of Tiger Lane. And no drinking the blue water.

27. Events -

Living Beyond Breast Cancer will host its “Sharing Wisdom, Sharing Strength” national conference Friday through Sunday, Oct. 6-8, at The Peabody hotel, 149 Union Ave. The conference, held in partnership with the Memphis Breast Cancer Consortium and the Common Table Health Alliance, will convene national experts, survivors and caregivers for a weekend of information, yoga and support. Limited walk-up registrations available. Visit lbbc.org for details.

28. Events -

Living Beyond Breast Cancer will host its “Sharing Wisdom, Sharing Strength” national conference Friday through Sunday, Oct. 6-8, at The Peabody hotel, 149 Union Ave. The conference, held in partnership with the Memphis Breast Cancer Consortium and the Common Table Health Alliance, will convene national experts, survivors and caregivers for a weekend of information, yoga and support. Limited walk-up registrations available. Visit lbbc.org for details.

29. Trump's Health Secretary Resigns in Travel Flap -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump's health secretary resigned Friday, after his costly travel triggered investigations that overshadowed the administration's agenda and angered his boss. Tom Price's regrets and partial repayment couldn't save his job.

30. Crosstown Crossroads -

For the past 90 years, Crosstown has seen its share of ups and downs. In the beginning, it was a shining beacon for the city’s eastward expansion; at its height, it anchored several vibrant and diverse neighborhoods; and at its lowest, Crosstown became the poster child for once-great inner-city areas of Memphis that had deteriorated.

31. NARCAN Useful Against Opioid Overdose -

With the number of overdose deaths from opioids such as OxyContin, Vicodin and Percocet at all-time highs, a new nasal spray is now available to counteract overdoses, and it can be acquired at local pharmacies without a prescription.

32. VA Running Out of Money for Private Health Care Program -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Weeks after a veterans' health initiative received $2.1 billion in emergency funding, the Trump administration says the private-sector Veterans Choice health care program may need additional money as early as December to avoid a disruption of care for hundreds of thousands of veterans.

33. Congress at Crossroads After Another GOP Health Care Failure -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Congress is at a crossroads after Republicans' stinging failure to repeal Barack Obama's health care law. But what's next – more partisan conflict or a pragmatic shift toward cooperation?

34. Republicans Unveil Long-Shot Effort on Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senators on Wednesday rolled out competing plans for the nation's health care system, with a group of GOP senators making a last, long-shot effort to undo Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act and independent Sen. Bernie Sanders proposing universal government-run coverage.

35. Graceland: New Arena Not Competing With Forum -

Graceland plans to go to the Economic Development Growth Engine (EDGE) in the next week seeking a bigger percentage of the city and county property tax revenue from its 120-acre campus for a $50 million arena in Whitehaven.

36. ‘Divisive Symbols’: Mississippi Case Offers Hope for Forrest Bust Removal -

State Sen. Lee Harris is encouraged by the U.S. Supreme Court’s request for the state of Mississippi to respond to a lawsuit seeking to remove the Confederate battle flag from its state flag.

37. Graceland Says New Arena Not Competition For Forum -

The managing partner of Graceland Holdings LLC says the plan for a new $40 million  to $50 million Whitehaven arena with 5,000 to 6,000 seats isn’t to compete with any venue in Memphis and Shelby County.

38. Dorothy Day House Plants New Roots in Midtown -

Sister Maureen Griner, the executive director of the Memphis chapter of the Dorothy Day House, says that every night in Memphis there are about 160 families who will be sleeping in a shelter or somewhere inhabitable.

39. Wizards Return -

The past couple of years has seen the return of pinball tables across the Mid-South, with groups like Memphis Pinball hosting weekly gatherings at places like Memphis Made Brewing and the new pinball arcade in Millington, The Retro.

40. Editorial: Making the Case For Memphis Disorientation -

It can be a bit disorienting. Gateways – Bicentennial, Overton Park, even Binghampton. There’s that second convention center hotel. And Heartbreak Hotel in Whitehaven gives way to a $40 million, 6,000-seat arena that is most certainly not in Midtown or Downtown.

41. Looks Like Another 8-4 Season for Tennessee -

Oops. I goofed last year. So did lots of other people who thought Tennessee’s football team would win the SEC East Division and go to the league championship game for the first time since 2007.

42. Remaking Crosstown -

As he was leading tours through Crosstown Concourse this month, Todd Richardson took a small group to a set of windows for a balcony view of an addition being constructed on the north side of the property.

43. Midtown Gated Community, Shelby Farms Hotel Approved by Planning Officials -

A plan to replace the former Red Cross building in Midtown with a 12-unit luxury gated community was approved by the Shelby County Land Use Control Board at its Thursday, August 10 meeting.

Last month, developers Lee Askew and Martin Edwards presented their plans to nearby residents at a public meeting where it was received with mostly favorable results.

44. Tennessee State Sen. Green Won't Run For Congress Next Year -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – When state Sen. Mark Green abandoned his bid for Tennessee governor in June after his failed nomination for Army secretary, he said he would turn his attention to a "higher capacity" in Washington.

45. Kelly Wins Praise Across The Aisle, But Bigger Task is Ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Raised voices could be heard through the thick door to the Oval Office as John Kelly – then secretary of Homeland Security – offered some tough talk to President Donald Trump.

46. Alexander, Corker Look Beyond ‘Skinny Repeal’; Cohen Rant Goes Viral -

Tennessee’s two U.S. senators see the failure of the “skinny repeal” health care bill in the Senate as a missed opportunity.

Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker both supported the measure, along with all but three of the rest of the Republican majority in the Senate. But the bill that would have repealed Obamacare without an immediate replacement and which Republicans senators didn’t want the House to approve and send to President Donald Trump fell short of passage with only 49 votes.

47. Alexander, Corker Look Beyond ‘Skinny Repeal’; Cohen Rant Goes Viral -

Tennessee’s two U.S. senators see the failure of the “skinny repeal” health care bill in the Senate as a missed opportunity.

Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker both supported the measure, along with all but three of the rest of the Republican majority in the Senate. But the bill that would have repealed Obamacare without an immediate replacement and which Republicans senators didn’t want the House to approve and send to President Donald Trump fell short of passage with only 49 votes.

48. Baptist Opens Midtown Grief Center -

Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. has opened a second grief center, an extension of the grief counseling and related services the hospital has offered for years and is now in the process of expanding.

49. Edge Alley Sets Opening Date -

Edge Alley, the Medical District’s new coffee house/micro-retail incubator, has officially set an opening date – Wednesday, July 26, at 7 a.m.

In addition to offering food, coffee and much-needed common space to the Medical District’s Edge neighborhood, the Edge Alley – located at 600 Monroe Ave. next to High Cotton Brewing Co. – will house four roughly 225-square-foot micro-retail bays with the intention of helping the fledgling businesses transition into a large site.

50. Promising 'A Better Deal,' Democrats Try to Rebrand Party -

BERRYVILLE, Va. (AP) – Promising "A Better Deal" for American workers, Democratic Party leaders rolled out a new agenda with a populist pitch on Monday as they sought to bounce back from their losses in November and look ahead to the 2018 midterms.

51. Graceland Prepares for August Test of Expansion -

The Guest House at Graceland has been sold out for Elvis Week in August for quite a while, with bookings even before the Whitehaven hotel-resort opened last October.

And most of the events marking the anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death are slated for Elvis Presley’s Memphis, the entertainment complex across Elvis Presley Boulevard from the mansion that opened in March.

52. Last Word: Fifth Wave, Hidden Gem in OB and the Freeze Filibuster -

There is one less contender in the crowded field of potential and declared candidates for the Republican nomination for Governor in 2018. State Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was nominated for federal court judge Thursday by President Donald Trump who also nominated Memphis attorney and former federal prosecutor Tommy Parker to the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Tennessee as well. Both are part of what The White House described as a “fifth wave” of judicial nominees.

53. Legislature Losing Some Powerful, Familiar Members -

A shakeup in leadership is looming for the state Legislature, though it may portend more of a change in personalities than party strength.

In the House, longtime Rep. Craig Fitzhugh, the affable Democrat from Ripley in West Tennessee, is preparing for a 2018 gubernatorial run, a move that would knock him out of his House seat, at least temporarily, and the position as Democratic Caucus leader.

54. Micromanaging Nashville is Job 1 for Legislature -

Metro Nashville is used to getting hammered by the Legislature’s Republicans.

Nearly every time the Metro Council tries to come up with a solution to growing problems, conservatives in the General Assembly swoop in and save the rest of the state from Music City’s attempts to better handle its success.

55. Morris Recalls Brother’s Violent Death and Rage -

“Actually, the truth has never been told,” Charlie Morris said this week as he talked about the violent death of his brother 78 years ago in Arlington. Morris, now 96 years old, had family and friends gathered around him at the Memphis Branch NAACP headquarters Monday, July 3, as he marked the new state law that could reopen the investigation into the death of Jessie Lee Bond and other cold cases from the long arc of the civil rights movement.

56. St. Jude Names Thomas VP Of Clinical Trials Operations -

Tangie Thomas has joined St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital as vice president of clinical trials operations. In that role, Thomas will lead support for clinical research at St. Jude and its affiliate sites, with duties that include implementing strategic goals, overseeing recruitment efforts and determining how resources are allocated for offices that support clinical research. Thomas previously served as director of clinical affairs at the Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville.

57. GOP May Keep Some Obama Tax Hikes to Save Health Care Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Top Senate Republicans on Thursday considered keeping President Barack Obama's tax increase on wealthier people's investments and using the money to bolster their proposed health care subsidies in a bid to mollify moderate GOP lawmakers and salvage the party's struggling bill.

58. Tennessee, Left Coast a World Apart on Immigration -

San Francisco resident Terry Karlsson relishes her hometown’s reputation for embracing “multi-cultural diversity.”

The wife of a Swedish immigrant, Karlsson says she believes San Francisco’s status as a sanctuary city, one in which it refuses to participate in the enforcement of federal immigration law, reflects a nation born of people who moved here, a land of immigrants from many countries.

59. Alexander Seeks to Extend ACA Cost-Sharing Payments -

U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee called Thursday, June 15, for the White House to extend temporary cost-sharing payments under the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act “at least through 2018 – and probably should go ahead and do it through 2019.”

60. Alexander Seeks Extension Of ACA Cost-Sharing Payments -

U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee called Thursday, June 15, for the White House to extend temporary cost-sharing payments under the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act “at least through 2018 – and probably should go ahead and do it through 2019.”

61. Last Word: After the Last Hole, Cutting County Property Taxes and A Recycled Gown -

The story of how the Overton Park Conservancy raised $1 million in two months didn’t go according to the script. It wasn’t large donors, it was a lot of contributions of $250 or less it turns out, many from people who have never been to the park, the zoo or the greensward in particular whether it’s on foot or in a car. There were donations from Puerto Rico, the District of Columbia and every state, except South Dakota.

62. After the ‘Tom Lee Storm’: A Look At Recovery Efforts, What's Next -

Eleven days after the May 27 storm that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses, Memphis Light, Gas and Water officials declared victory in the recovery with a Wednesday, June 8, late afternoon Tweet: “Update: Restored.”

63. Pelley Out, Mason Temporarily In as CBS News Anchor -

NEW YORK (AP) – CBS' effort to brand itself as the home of hard-edged newscasts has been a success in the morning, not so much in the evening – and "CBS Evening News" anchor Scott Pelley paid the price for it with his job.

64. ServiceMaster Almost Ready for First Employees to Occupy Downtown HQ -

By mid-June the first wave of employees will move into the new ServiceMaster Global Headquarters at 150 Peabody Place, bringing to fruition what many city leaders believe is one of the biggest wins for Downtown Memphis in a decade. 

65. Huge Cuts to Food Stamps Part of Trump's Budget Proposal -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump's budget would drive millions of people off of food stamps, part of a new wave of spending cut proposals that already are getting panned by lawmakers in both parties on Capitol Hill.

66. Prospect of NAFTA Rewrite Gives US Farmers a Case of Jitters -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A sizable majority of rural Americans backed Donald Trump's presidential bid, drawn to his calls to slash environmental rules, strengthen law enforcement and replace the federal health care law.

67. US, Europe Swap Air Security Information at Laptop Ban Talks -

BRUSSELS (AP) – European Union and U.S. officials swapped information Wednesday about threats involving air travel amid concern that the United States will soon broaden its ban on in-flight laptops and tablets to include planes from Europe.

68. View From the Hill: Haslam Credits GOP ‘Experiment’ for Tennessee’s Success -

If you ask Gov. Bill Haslam, Republican government is the best thing since sliced bread.

Not only is GOP leadership responsible for a myriad of tax cuts leading to record surpluses and a $37 billion budget funding better K-12 and higher education, shoring up the rainy day and TennCare funds, shrinking state debt and building an economic environment for job creation, Haslam says. It’s even bringing us the cleanest air since before the industrial revolution.

69. Ronald McDonald House Welcomes St. Jude Children, Families -

Jill Crocker knew of Ronald McDonald House Charities and its mission to provide a “home away from home” for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital families and their children receiving treatment. But she had not been there.

70. Dorothy Day House Embraces Families in Need -

About 30 percent of Memphians live below the poverty line and 50 percent of them are children under age 18. It's a problem that Tracey Burgess, director of development and communication at the Dorothy Day House in Memphis, calls an "epidemic."

71. Privatization Opposition Renewed as No Bids Come in for Falls Creek Falls Project -

The lack of bidders for a $20 million inn reconstruction project at Fall Creek Falls could spur legislative hearings this summer on parks funding and privatization amid growing lawmaker concern about the governor’s outsourcing plans.

72. House Committee Postpones Action on Short-Term Rentals -

A day after the House targeted Nashville with a tough bill on short-term rentals, the Senate deferred action on legislation blocking the Metro Council from enacting any prohibitions.

The Senate Finance, Ways and Means Committee postponed a bill by Sen. John Stevens until January 2018, ending the debate this year on a measure singling out Davidson County efforts to restrict short-term rentals such as Airbnb.

73. Why I Wrote 'Nathan Bedford Forrest’s Redemption' -

Nathan Bedford Forrest recently made the news again, but it is never for a good reason. Rep. Mike Sparks of Smyrna introduced a House Resolution (HR 97) to honor me, and shortly thereafter Forrest made the news. Some might wonder why I would write a book praising Forrest. My answer is, “I didn’t.” I wrote a book praising Jesus for having the ability to save any sinner, including Nathan Bedford Forrest. This is why the word “redemption” is used in my title.

74. Alexander: Senate Will Write Own Version of Health Care Act -

U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee says the Senate will write its own version of the American Health Care Act that includes keeping coverage for pre-existing conditions.

“The Senate will write its own bill,” the Republican chairman of the Senate Health Committee said in Memphis Friday, May 5. “We’ve already started that. The House has passed its bill. If we find good ideas, we will borrow them and put them in our bill. But we’ll write our own bill. That’s why we have two houses of Congress.”

75. Governor’s Supplemental Budget Includes More Transportation Funding -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris calls the governor’s $125 million supplemental budget a “strong foundation” for completing work on the IMPROVE Act.

76. Memphis Democrats Prepare To Reorganize -

Shelby County Democrats hope to have the local party up and running by the Fourth of July. The Shelby County Democratic Party was disbanded by the Tennessee Democratic Party in August after two disastrous county election cycles for the Democratic slate and increasing dysfunction by the local party’s executive committee.

77. University of Memphis, UTHSC May Soon Face Outsourcing Decisions -

Forty-one state lawmakers signed a letter requesting the state put a hold on its outsourcing plans until the General Assembly can scrutinize its effect on state workers and services.

The state is set to sign a contract April 28 with Chicago-based JLL for facilities management work that could be used by universities and departments statewide. Even local government jobs could be doled out to the contractor.

78. View From the Hill: Tearful End for Non-Citizen Tuition Relief Bill -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari grew so emotional she couldn’t speak. On the verge of tears, the Memphis Democrat started to talk about a high school from her Shelby County district with a large number of undocumented immigrant students.

79. Gas Tax, Health Care Complicate Tennessee Governor's Race -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The repeal of former President Barack Obama's health care law was supposed to provide a springboard for U.S. Rep. Diane Black's entry into the Tennessee governor's race.

80. The Week Ahead: April 17-23 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! You’ve got plenty of reasons to celebrate this week: The Grizzlies are in the NBA Playoffs, the Africa in April festival is back, and the area is getting greener with both a park and a greenway opening. Check out the rest of our top picks in The Week Ahead…

81. Immigrant Student Tuition Bill Fails In House Education Committee -

Karla Meza dreams of enrolling in the University of Tennessee Law School after growing up in Knoxville and watching college students walk along Cumberland Avenue.

But that dream is on hold after a House Education committee refused Tuesday, April 11, to allow all students, including illegal immigrants, who graduate from Tennessee high schools to pay in-state tuition at state colleges.

82. Immigrant Student Bill Fails in House Education Committee -

Karla Meza dreams of enrolling in the University of Tennessee Law School after growing up in Knoxville and watching college students walk along Cumberland Avenue.

But that dream is on hold after a House Education committee refused Tuesday, April 11, to allow all students, including illegal immigrants, who graduate from Tennessee high schools to pay in-state tuition at state colleges.

83. “Gateway’ Puzzle Begins To Come Together -

Starting last summer, a new ownership group for the city’s largest hotel by room count was undertaking its due diligence largely out of the public eye.

There were some rumblings about the Sheraton Memphis Downtown changing hands three years after a renovation of the 600-room hotel attached to the Memphis Cook Convention Center.

84. City's Largest Hotel Changes Hands In Latest 'Gateway' Puzzle Piece -

The largest hotel in the city by room count is changing hands in what is a key part of the city’s effort to remake the Memphis Cook Convention Center as a part of a larger “Gateway project” in the general convention center area.

85. GOP Happy to ‘Wait and See’ on Medicaid -

Republicans say ho, Democrats say go. In the wake of Trumpcare’s congressional crash, states such as Kansas and North Carolina are joining the majority of the nation in expanding Medicaid rolls.

86. Conservative State Republicans Want ‘Restart’ on Gas Tax -

Claiming they’re not getting fair treatment by House leadership, a group of irritated Republicans demanded the governor’s gas-tax increase package go back to the starting line.

Rep. Jerry Sexton, a Republican from Bean Station in East Tennessee, said in a press conference Monday, April 3, he had spoken with House Speaker Beth Harwell and was told “we would get a restart.” He said the details haven’t been worked out.

87. Last Word: The Catechism of 1968, Downtown Hotels and Earth Day on Auto Row -

What happened 49 years ago this week in our city began long before the first sanitation worker walked off the job or the first “I Am A Man” sign was made. Maybe it was that long arc that explains the timing of what happened here in late March into the first week of April of 1968. For just about half a century now we have thought and thought again about that chronology, reviewed the details. And what we have is a sort of catechism of moments that if they had happened differently, we can’t help thinking, might have produced a different result.

88. The Week Ahead: April 3-9 -

This week, Memphis marks the 49th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination with events at the National Civil Rights Museum and elsewhere. The Week Ahead also holds a look into the science of Overton Park’s Old Forest, a chance to support cancer research with Relay for Life, and much more...

89. Senate Douses Memphis and Nashville Pot Ordinances -

State senators are intent on striking down Memphis and Nashville marijuana laws giving police discretion to hand out citations for possessing small amounts of pot.

Despite opposition from Shelby County and Davidson County legislators, the Senate voted 26-5 Monday to clarify that state law overrides local government regulations involving drugs and similar substances.

90. Riverside and Cooper Bike Lanes Draw Complaints -

Out of 10 repaving projects the city is considering for bike lanes by this fall, the two that got the most attention at an open house Monday, March 27, were the Riverside Drive and Cooper Street bike-lane proposals.

91. Trump Plans Office to Bring Business Ideas to Government -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump is establishing a new White House office run by his son-in-law that will seek to overhaul government functions using ideas from the business sector.

92. Local, Federal Authorities Target Southwest Memphis Gang Activity -

When two men were shot to death in January in front of a house at 477 Delta St. in a drive-by shooting, it was part of spike in homicides to start the new year.

93. From Bedroom to Boardroom, Supreme Court is in Your Business -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Quick, name a Supreme Court justice. OK, name three. One of the current justices, Stephen Breyer, once noted wryly that their names are less well-known than those of the Three Stooges.

94. Baptist Opening New Grief Centers -

Baptist Memorial Health Care is expanding its grief services, adding new centers in Midtown and in Jonesboro, Arkansas, later this year, partly in response to demand from the community for the counseling and other benefits the organization has provided for years now.

95. After The Fed: What Some Top Bond-Fund Managers Are Saying -

NEW YORK (AP) – Rising rates don't have to mean despair for bond-fund investors.

Yes, the Federal Reserve raised short-term rates Wednesday, the latest move higher in what economists expect to be a long campaign. Bond investors have historically seen rising rates as the enemy because they result in falling prices for the bonds they own.

96. 'Heartbeat Bill' Put Off a Year -

NASHVILLE – Legislation outlawing abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected is being postponed until 2018, but a House panel voted Wednesday to restrict abortions after the 20th week, a shift from the 24-week period defining “viability.”

97. View From the Hill: Outsourcing Win More About Turf Than Trends -

As Fall Creek Falls folks celebrate a state decision to postpone park privatization, the question is whether public opposition or failure to follow long-standing state protocol led to the plug-pulling.

98. Nintendo Switch's Big Challenge: Luring Casual Gamers -

NEW YORK (AP) – With three kids and constant travel for work, John Hussey jumped at the chance to play an open-world adventure game like "The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild" anywhere, anytime.

99. Robinson Chosen to Lead Cancer Society’s Hope House -

Maria Robinson has been named senior manager for the American Cancer Society’s Harrah’s Hope Lodge in Memphis. In that role, she oversees day-to-day lodge operations, including guest services, volunteer engagement and community involvement.
Robinson, who is an eight-year cancer survivor herself, joined the American Cancer Society in 2012 as community manager for Relay For Life. Prior to that, she worked in the finance, real estate and restaurant industries. 

100. Binghampton Gateway Comes to Food Desert -

The groundbreaking of a shopping center doesn’t always attract a large crowd of city officials and TV cameras, but then again not every shopping center is an oasis in the middle of a food desert.