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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Early Voting Goes Bigger, Worst Kept Secret and Christmas on Carr -

By 9:30 p.m. Monday, 599 people were still without power from weekend storms, according to MLGW with crews working into Tuesday. Meanwhile, 4,324 citizens had voted early through Monday at five sites with early voting expanded to all 27 sites Tuesday. There has to be some kind of connection there but at the moment it eludes me. Meanwhile, here is the grid of early voting sites and their hours from the Shelby County Election Commission… grid, get it?

2. Efforts To Grow Black Business Face Wealth Gap -

The story of a business founded by maxing out personal credit cards or using home equity or both is usually told when that big financial risk works. You don’t hear a lot about when it doesn’t work.

3. The Daily Memphian to Launch in Fall as Memphis' Definitive News Source -

A new seven-days-a-week news outlet called The Daily Memphian will make its debut this fall, with many of the biggest names in Memphis journalism and a unique not-for-profit funding model. The ambitious effort’s goal is to become the city’s definitive news source with reporting of, by and for Memphis.

4. City Looks Broader for Shared Mobility Services -

In its first 19 days of operation, the Bird system of electric scooters has averaged 1,200 rides a day for a total of 24,000 total rides an average distance of 1.9 miles and 8,600 individual riders.

5. Size of Memphis Police Force Study Weighs Numbers in Ranks and How to Use Them -

The Memphis Police Department is zeroing in on an exact number of officers it should have with a “zero-based” study to be completed in the fall.

“There is pretty much a consensus that we need at least about 2,300 officers,” Bill Gibbons, president of the Memphis Shelby Crime Commission, said on the WKNO-TV program “Behind The Headlines.”

6. Bike Share, Greenway and Bike Lane Efforts Point Toward Common Goal -

Four years after it made its tentative debut with the opening of the Overton Park Bike Gate, the Hampline, across East Parkway from the eastern end of Overton Park, is about to become permanent.

“The Hampline that exists today is about to be changed,” city bikeway and pedestrian program manager Nicholas Oyler said on WKNO-TV’s “Behind The Headlines.”

7. MEM Grows Five Years After Delta De-Hub -

Five years after Delta Air Lines de-hubbed Memphis International Airport, the airport’s transition to most of its customers being origin and destination passengers has had mixed results in other ways.

8. MIFA Marks 50 Years of Interfaith Activism -

When a group of Memphis religious leaders marched from St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral to City Hall the day after Dr. Martin Luther King’s assassination in 1968, they were in the middle of a pivotal year for an ecumenical movement whose impact is still being felt.

9. Leaders of Local Pre-K Expansion Say Opposition More About State Funding -

Since three of the four major Republican contenders for Tennessee governor said at a Memphis forum in April that they oppose universal prekindergarten, the forces behind such a plan for Shelby County have been talking with them about their position.

10. Strickland: City Given Enough For Entertainment -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says he would support some kind of incentives for the manufacturing facility Graceland wants to open in Whitehaven. But not if it’s linked to a greater share of city and county property tax revenue for a 6,200-seat arena Graceland also wants to build.

11. Young Says Construction About to Begin on South City Residential -

South City is about to begin construction east of Danny Thomas Boulevard and the road to construction has had some unexpected turns. “There’s a certain amount of anxiety when you talk about these big projects because people don’t know whether it’s actually going to happen or not,” Memphis Housing and Community Development Division director Paul Young said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

12. Riverfront Development Corp. Becomes MRRP -

The Riverfront Development Corp. is changing names as the organization that manages city property by the Mississippi River has a change in leadership.

13. Coletta Talks About Phase One of Riverfront Redevelopment After Memphis In May -

Once the Memphis In May International Festival ends, workers will move into Mississippi River Park to begin the $65 million first phase of redevelopment of the riverfront.

The redevelopment will move south from the park, across the cobblestones and to Tom Lee Park, the home of the major events of Memphis in May.

14. Riverfront Development Corp. Becomes MRRP on April 20 -

The Riverfront Development Corp. is changing names as the organization that manages city property by the Mississippi River has a change in leadership.

15. RDC Rebrands With Leadership Change -

The Riverfront Development Corp. is changing names as the organization that manages city property by the Mississippi River has a change in leadership.

16. Last Word: TNReady Blinks Again, Gov. Debate Thoughts and Mud Island's Museum -

There was a point Thursday morning during the troubled TNReady testing at some Tennessee school districts when there was a “brief” slow down in the online testing, according to the Tennessee Education commissioner’s office. By noon that had been resolved and more than 250,000 completed tests had been submitted since testing began Monday. One can only imagine what some of the thoughts were in the office during the slow down and the gap between how long the slow down seemed and how long it actually was.

17. Lee, Boyd, Black Talk Confederate Monuments, Oppose Pre-K Expansion -

Three of the four major contenders for governor in the Aug. 2 Republican primary disagree with the removal of Confederate monuments from city parks but also disagree with the state legislature’s decision to cut $250,000 of city funding in retaliation.

18. Last Word: Failed Test, Trolley Back Story and Violent Crime Down City and County -

The state’s third problem with online student achievement testing in three years is gathering political force in Nashville. And that force is aimed for the most part at testing in general and the role it plays in evaluating teachers and students.

19. Republican Gubernatorial Debate Wednesday Will Air Statewide -

The Greater Memphis Chamber Chairman’s Circle announced Tuesday the organization will co-host the first statewide televised Tennessee gubernatorial debate for Republican candidates on Wednesday, April 18, at 7 p.m. at the Halloran Centre of The Orpheum Theatre, 225 S. Main St.

20. New Plans Would Change Memphis Medical District -

With 27,000 people who either work or attend classes in the Memphis Medical District, and about 375 acres of parking space, something has to give.

Following last week’s release of a reconfigured city bus system plan and a new shuttle system that the Memphis Medical District Collaborative is working on, officials hope to convince 2,500 people to leave their cars at home.

21. Local Experts: Health Care So Far Immune to Simplification and Lower Costs -

That Walmart may be close to acquiring the health insurer Humana is one signal that we’re in not just a period of change for the health care industry, but a fundamental reshaping of the landscape and a shifting of the players involved.

22. Link Between Overton Greensward and Zoo Defines Enduring Controversy -

It seemed like a good idea to the Powers-Hill Design firm as it was drawing up plans for a reconfigured Memphis Zoo parking lot to include a pedestrian walkway from the zoo plaza through the new parking lot to the Overton Park Greensward.

23. Events -

Memphis Botanic Garden will hold its Spring Plant Sale Friday, April 13, from from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday, April 14, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 750 Cherry Road. The sale features a wide assortment of plants, herbs, bushes, flowers and more. MBG’s horticulture staff and experienced volunteers will be on hand to answer questions. Admission is free. Visit memphisbotanicgarden.com.

24. City Makes Changes in Approving Final Zoo Parking Plan In Overton Park -

The final design for the expansion of Memphis Zoo parking will move the entrance to zoo parking further north of where the tentative design earlier this year put it. And the final plan announced Thursday, April 12, by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will move 37 parking spaces on the north side of the Prentiss Drive entrance off McLean and create a 3-foot-high berm that eliminates any pedestrian walkway entrances between the zoo parking and the Overton Park Greensward.

25. Events -

Memphis Botanic Garden will hold its Spring Plant Sale Friday, April 13, from from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday, April 14, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 750 Cherry Road. The sale features a wide assortment of plants, herbs, bushes, flowers and more. MBG’s horticulture staff and experienced volunteers will be on hand to answer questions. Admission is free. Visit memphisbotanicgarden.com.

26. Events -

The 2018 Bartlett Business Expo is Thursday, April 12, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Bartlett Recreation Center, 7700 Flaherty Place. A variety of local businesses will showcase their goods and services. Admission is free. Visit bartlettchamber.org.

27. Young Takes Helm at MLGW With Look At Storm Measures, Better Communication -

The new president and CEO of Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division has seen a storm or two in his career, including hurricanes.

“No two storms are the same,” J.T. Young said of his experience as general manager of customer service and marketing for Gulf Power in Pensacola, Florida.

28. Potter Says 100 North Main Building Has Made Progress But Needs More -

A month into his retirement, General Sessions Environmental Court Judge Larry Potter wishes he could have seen more evidence of a turn-around at the city’s tallest building.

29. Dunavant Says Gangs ‘Prime Problem’ In West Tennessee -

U.S. Attorney Michael Dunavant says street gangs in various forms and coalitions are “the prime problem and concern here in West Tennessee and Memphis.”

30. Home Sweet Home -

Almost every facet of the Shelby County housing market showed improvement or promise in 2017, and the stellar year saw a new record high for average home sales price and a historic low number foreclosures.

31. Freeman: Wide Income, Poverty Gaps Persist in Shelby County -

The president of the National Civil Rights Museum says the national attention that comes with the 50th anniversary of the 1968 sanitation workers strike and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination can be a guide for the nation as well as Memphis.

32. The Week Ahead: February 26-March 4 -

Good morning, Memphis! There are plenty of business, government and sporting events to keep your interest this week, along with the annual farm and gin show. And Shakespeare could inspire some Shelby County students to have their works published in a literary magazine.

33. Realization of ‘Strength in Numbers’ Can Help Women Continue Advancing -

The accomplished female panelists at the Women & Business Seminar held by The Daily News Publishing Co. on Thursday, Feb. 22, were living evidence of how much progress there has been for women, even if there are still too many difficult moments.

34. Last Word: Corker & Blackburn, More Frost and Dale Watson's Move to The Haven -

It's possible around City Hall these days to get your RFQs mixed up with your RFPs. And there is a difference in requests for qualifications and requests for proposals. Usually RFQs come before RFPs – but there are exceptions – loopholes. The latest RFQ out of City Hall – album title or t-shirt slogan? – is for the adaptive reuse of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art.

35. Realization of ‘Strength in Numbers’ Can Help Women Continue Advancing -

The accomplished female panelists at the Women & Business Seminar held by The Daily News Publishing Co. on Thursday, Feb. 22, were living evidence of how much progress there has been for women, even if there are still too many difficult moments.

36. Experts to Discuss Record Highs, Lows at Chandler Reports Seminar -

Topics ranging from record high average home sale prices to historic low foreclosure numbers will be explored at Chandler Reports’ annual Real Estate Review.

The 2017 year-in-review seminar will be held Thursday, March 1, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Goldsmith Room at Memphis Botanic Garden, 750 Cherry Road, and will be moderated by Eric Barnes, publisher of The Daily News and The Memphis News.

37. Zoo Parking Plan Draws Questions, Skepticism -

The first audience for the Memphis Zoo parking plan Wednesday, Feb. 21, was tough. The crowd of more than 200 at the Memphis Pink Palace museum, many wearing green “Save The Greensward” T-shirts and some carrying banners with the slogan, expressed some skepticism that the zoo would abide by a ban on parking on the Overton Park Greensward once the new parking area is completed.

38. Zoo Parking Plan Takes Additional 2.4 Acres, Keeps Lot on Zoo Side of Ridge -

The new Memphis Zoo parking lot is going to be late and will take in 2.4 more acres of land primarily on the eastern border of the Overton Park Greensward. But in the process, the expanded parking will move farther away from a first draft version of the plan that put cars right up against Veterans Plaza and the Doughboy statue in the park.

39. Rhodes’ Hass Defends Liberal Arts Education -

The president of Rhodes College says trade schools, associate degrees and certification in specific skills can’t be the city’s only economic driver.

“I think we can all agree that we do not and cannot foresee an economy in which the trades are the only drivers,” said Rhodes president Marjorie Hass on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

40. Soulsville Foundation Welcomes Neighboring School, More Ties to Stax -

An application for a new K-5 charter school that would complement the grades 6-12 Soulsville Charter School is being prepared for approval by Shelby County Schools.

The school, by an unidentified charter group, wants to locate at the old Southwest Prep School building at 1237 College St., which closed as a grades 9-12 school in May of 2016. Before it was the prep school, it was Stafford Elementary School.

41. Last Word: Closing the Loophole, Skeleton Hotel Update and Jubilee Conversion -

The state legislator who sponsored the most recent version of the law making it much more difficult to remove Confederate monuments acknowledges that the city of Memphis found a legitimate loophole in the 2016 law he crafted. Republican Steve McDaniel, of Parkers Crossroads, tells our Nashville correspondent Sam Stockard that he has a bill in the House to close the loophole. But it won't undo what happened here. Although there is still a court fight over that taking shape.

42. Tenn. Governor Candidates Talk Transparency, Medicaid and Megasite -

Five of the seven major contenders in the 2018 Tennessee governor’s race called for more transparency in government but said there are questions about when to disclose information about companies seeking to locate or expand in Tennessee.

43. Last Word: 50 Years Ago, Skeleton Hotel in Court and New Moves on Forrest -

It was 50 years ago Thursday that the event that sparked the 1968 sanitation workers strike happened near Colonial and Sea Isle in East Memphis. City sanitation workers Robert Walker and Echol Cole were killed when the trash compactor on back of their city truck malfunctioned and crushed them.

44. 9:30 a.m.: Live-Stream the Tennessee Gubernatorial Forum -

The Tennessee Press Association holds a forum Thursday, Feb. 1, in Nashville featuring the announced candidates for Tennessee governor. The live stream – moderated by Eric Barnes, publisher of The Daily News and TPA president – starts at 8:30 a.m., and the forum is scheduled to begin at 9:30 a.m.

45. Last Word: Wiretaps in the Wright Case, Target Layoffs and SCS Looks To Move -

Democratic Congressman Steve Cohen of Memphis among those boycotting the State of the Union address Tuesday evening by President Donald Trump. “The president is unworthy of the podium, the position and the power.” Republican Congressman David Kustoff of Germantown among those not boycotting SOTU. “Just one year after president Trump took the oath of office, our economy is the strongest it has been in decades. … We passed historic tax reform and we bolstered our military and support our veterans. Last year, the president kept his promises and tonight, he told the American people that he is not done.”

46. Luttrell Slower to Move on Opioid Lawsuit -

An opioid epidemic lawsuit the county will bring against defendants still needs questions answered and a better focus, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

47. Boyd Says Reprisals For Removal Of Monuments Possible -

The city is bracing for some kind of backlash in the Tennessee Legislature for the December sale of two city parks to a private nonprofit and the removal of Confederate monuments in those parks.

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd says state officials could retaliate by refusing to approve the city’s request for an expansion of the Downtown Tourism Development Zone.

48. Last Word: The Snow Split, Amazon Post-Mortem and Intermodal Comeback -

A split verdict on Snow Day 4. Some school systems and colleges and universities are out again Friday, others are not and still others are opening later in the day. Shelby County Schools, which is out, says it has 13 extra days built into its schedule for just such an event or events – that is 13 days extra beyond the 180 days the state requires as the bare minimum for a school year.

49. McMullen: Legislative Session Influenced Timing in Monuments Removal -

Several nonprofits approached the city administration about buying Health Sciences and Memphis parks before the Memphis City Council approved the sale of each to Memphis Greenspace last month for $1,000 each. And some of them said no.

50. Palazzolo Says Germantown Multifamily Moratorium Result of Pent-Up Demand -

When Germantown began exploring mixed-use development by opening up some commercial areas to residential development with commercial, the market responded quickly.

It revealed a pent-up demand in the larger market, said Germantown Mayor Mike Palazzolo.

51. Party Leaders: Voter Turnout Trumps Trump -

The chairmen of the local Democratic and Republican parties are leading very different game plans into the 2018 elections.

While the focus may be local politics and voter turnout, Shelby County Democratic Party chairman Corey Strong and Shelby County Republican Party chairman Lee Mills are not blind to what is happening nationally.

52. Public Art Process Getting New Brush -

The more abstract or open to interpretation public art is, the more varied the reactions will be. And for some political leaders, the more likely it is they will hear complaints from those who see it.

53. Elections, Term Limits, Assemblies Face Council -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Dec. 5, on a move to repeal ranked-choice voting before it ever gets used. The body also talks about a proposed charter change that would raise council term limits from two consecutive terms to three and takes the first of three readings on changes to the ordinance that sets ground rules for parades, marathons and protests on city streets.

54. Preparing For Park Without Brooks, MCA -

A new Memphis Brooks Museum of Art Downtown would open in 2022 at the earliest and cost $110 million along with an endowment.

“It’s going to be a little bit of a moving target. What we want to do is to build the endowment,” said Brooks director Emily Ballew Neff on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

55. Landers Loss Factored Into Coliseum Not Being in Plan -

The probability of a repurposed Mid-South Coliseum running an operating deficit as part of a youth sports tournament complex at the Fairgrounds was what prompted Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and his administration to put a renovation of the arena on hold for now.

56. Zoo Parking Redesign Faces Public Input -

A team designing options for a reconfigured Memphis Zoo parking lot has presented three options that each include a circular road that would run along the eastern edge of the Overton Park greensward just north of Veterans Plaza.

57. Mud Island Garage Ruled Out As Convention Center Hotel Site -

The city of Memphis continues to field proposals for a second convention center hotel Downtown, but it won’t be on the city-owned site of the Mud Island parking garage, which had been at the center of at least one proposal pitched to City Hall for such a hotel in the last year.

58. Memphis College of Art Closing Doors -

Memphis College of Art, the 81-year-old Overton Park institution, will close by May of 2020 after years of financial struggles.

The college’s board described the pending process as an “orderly dissolution of MCA’s real estate and other assets to fund the College’s debt obligations and other liabilities, including providing sufficient funding to serve existing students who remain at MCA.”

59. Memphis College of Art Closing Its Doors -

The Memphis College of Art will close by May of 2020 in what the board of the 81-year old Overton Park institution is describing as an "orderly dissolution of MCA’s real estate and other assets to fund the College’s debt obligations and other liabilities, including providing sufficient funding to serve existing students who remain at MCA."

60. Publisher of New Tri-State Defender Dies -

Bernal E. Smith II, president and publisher of The New Tri-State Defender newspaper, died Sunday, Oct. 22, at his home, according to Smith’s family.

Smith, 45, oversaw the resurrection of the legacy African-American owned newspaper starting in 2010.

61. Mayor Stands By Decision On Sewer Connections -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says if he had it to do over again, he would probably give more advance notice that the city was ending city sewer connections for developments outside the limits of Memphis.

62. Collins Says Smart Grid Era Will Improve MLGW Service -

At Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division, storms causing power outages that affect more than 30,000 homes and businesses are considered major storms.

There were five major storms by that standard in 2011, making it the worst on record for the utility. So far in 2017 there have been four major storms.

63. City Announces 10-Member Zoo Parking Advisory Team -

A 10-member city advisory panel will be part of the process for settling on a specific design for expansion and reconfiguration of Memphis Zoo parking in Overton Park.

The city administration announced Thursday, Oct. 5, the names of 10 people to the panel, which will first offer feedback on the preliminary work of designers and then select a concept plan.

64. City Announces 10-Member Zoo Parking Advisory Team -

A 10-member city advisory panel will be part of the process for settling on a specific design for expansion and reconfiguration of parking for the Memphis Zoo in Overton Park.

The city administration announced Thursday, Oct. 5, the names of 10 people to the panel, which will first offer feedback on the preliminary work of designers and then select a concept plan.

65. Doubts About Congress Cloud DACA Debate -

With Washington’s attention on the vote count of the Republican Cassidy-Graham health care coverage bill, those on all sides of the immigration reform issue are watching the outcome of Cassidy-Graham closely.

66. Overton Park Conservancy Embarks On Master Plan -

As leaders of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art announced this month they are considering a move to a newly built facility elsewhere in the city, the Overton Park Conservancy was beginning to develop a master plan for the Midtown park, including the museum, Memphis Zoo, Memphis College of Art and Levitt Shell.

67. Juvenile Court Outcomes Still Questioned -

Rev. Keith Norman says just about every time federal monitors in the settlement agreement with Juvenile Court come to Memphis they meet with him and want to hear from a broad cross section of Memphians with no filtering of those they encounter.

68. Juvenile Court Resisting Remedies, Says Former Settlement Coordinator -

The coordinator overseeing the Memphis and Shelby County Juvenile Court settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice resigned in June as a reaction to the letter County Mayor Mark Luttrell, Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael and Sheriff Bill Oldham sent U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions requesting an end to federal oversight of the court.

69. City Hall Stands Ready to Assist Brooks Museum -

The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art’s first and only home is owned by the city of Memphis, and the institution is the state’s largest art museum. Those two facts make city government more than an interested onlooker in what happens next as the museum’s board explores possibly moving out of Overton Park to a newly built facility elsewhere in the city.

70. Promoters Exporting Authenticity Of Memphis Music in Another Way -

A new 5,000- to 6,000-seat concert venue at Graceland by early 2019 is competition. But it probably brings more customers to the overall market for concerts in the city, says the founder of Music Export Memphis, the city’s export office for the music business.

71. Juvenile Court Judge Calls Federal Oversight and Monitors a ‘Distraction’ -

Five years ago when the U.S. Justice Department concluded years of review with a scathing report about due process and equal treatment issues in Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court, then Judge Curtis Person Jr. and his staff had to make a decision.

72. Fairgrounds Plan Will Consider Familiar Items -

The Fairgrounds redevelopment plan forming on a fast track will probably look familiar as far as the elements proposed for it.

“We are starting with the premise that we are using the previous planning efforts as insight for how we move forward,” Paul Young, city of Memphis Housing and Community Development director said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

73. Cohen Defines Gap Between Trump and Republicans -

There is a distinction to be made between the Republican majorities in the U.S. House and Senate and President Donald Trump, says U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen, one of Trump’s most vocal and virulent critics.

74. Tax Breaks Broaden For Residential, Retail Deals -

Some changes are coming in the rules surrounding incentives that the Economic Development Growth Engine for Memphis and Shelby County – or EDGE – can use for different kinds of development and for broader use of tax increment financing – or TIF – zones to sustain redevelopment.

75. Last Word: St. Jude School, More Gannett Moves and Maida Pearson Smith -

For most, the school year starts next week. But classes are already underway at St. Jude’s new Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, an idea 15 years in the making, according to the physician who had that idea. The school is a big step in higher education in Memphis and its road to research center status.

76. Barnes Tapped As New Tennessee Press Association President -

Eric Barnes, publisher and CEO of The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc., has become the next president of the Tennessee Press Association, the trade association for the state’s newspapers.

77. City Master Plan Development Aims To Reverse Random Development -

Not too far past a new generation of civic plans is the filter of reality – what is possible by a business bottom line.

At the outset of the still-forming Memphis 3.0 master development plan, the reality without a plan is striking.

78. Blight More Than Out-of-State LLCs -

The prominent role investors play in buying single-family homes in Memphis to rent them out is part of the city’s significant problem with blight.

But there are some property owners who live here who don’t even know that their loved one who died recently made them a property owner.

79. Foote Homes Last Vestige Of Public Housing -

As the last of the city’s large public housing developments is demolished, the oldest of the mixed-income communities that replaced them is about to turn 20.

College Park opened in 1998 on the site of what had been Lemoyne Gardens in the area of South Memphis now known as Soulsville.

80. Lawmakers: Talk, Action On Crime Don’t Match -

State Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris of Memphis says some of the rhetoric about criminal justice reform – not locking up as many nonviolent offenders for longer sentences – doesn’t match the push for legislation in Nashville.

81. Overton Park Conservancy Meets $1M Goal in Parking Compromise -

The Overton Park Conservancy raised $1 million by the June 11 deadline to move ahead with the Overton Park-Memphis Zoo parking compromise. The conservancy announced Sunday afternoon that it met the goal with hours to spare.

82. Luttrell, Commission Working Out Details of 3-Cent Property Tax Cut -

Shelby County Commissioners have talked for several years about cutting the county’s property tax rate. But it’s never been more than talk and never had close to the seven votes necessary to drop the tax rate.

83. City Council Members: Beale Bucks Evolving -

Beale Street’s new $5 weekend night cover charge still has a few details to work out, says Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd.

“We’re not putting a period there, we’re putting a comma because we are taking a pause,” Boyd said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

84. Hardy: EDGE’s MWBE Program Not Working -

The chairwoman of the Greater Memphis Chamber board said first indications are that minority business requirements in tax breaks awarded by the Economic Development Growth Engine – or EDGE – aren’t working.

85. Kustoff Talks Comey Missteps, Health Care -

The FBI investigation into possible Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign will continue without fired FBI director James Comey, says U.S. Rep. David Kustoff.

86. Economy In Flux -

With apologies to Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities,” for the professionals who follow economics for a living this is very much the best of times and the worst of times.

The moment is one of abundant optimism and rampant uncertainty. “Directionally,” they like to say, things look positive. And yet so much could still go very, very wrong.

87. Corker Sees Trump Foreign Policy Evolving, Not Moderating -

U.S. foreign policy should be to “keep the volume up” on North Korea’s progress in developing a nuclear capability and intercontinental ballistic missiles, says U.S. Sen. Bob Corker, “with the acknowledgement that what you could bring in is Russia, China, South Korea and Japan into a conflict.”

88. Mayors Say Region Needs New Mindset, More Density -

When Hernando West first surfaced in 2007, it was going to be a different kind of development south of the state line. But the recession that followed put the plans for the city’s first mixed-use development on hold – until recently.

89. Money Behind New Zoo Parking Terms -

In the third attempt to bring an end to the Overton Park Greensward controversy last summer, Memphis City Council member Bill Morrison decided it was best not to try to reach agreement on all points, but on most points.

90. Council Brokers New Zoo Parking Compromise, Abolishes Beale Authority -

The Memphis City Council went back into the terms for an expanded Memphis Zoo parking lot Tuesday, April 11, just nine months after brokering and approving a compromise on the project between the zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy.

91. Lenoir Calls for Property Tax Cut Beyond New Certified Tax Rate From Reappraisal -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir says there should be a cut in the county property tax rate beyond the new certified property tax rate to be set as a result of the 2017 countywide property reappraisal.

92. Council Faces Beale Street, Parking Decisions -

Memphis City Council members have an agenda full of hot spots Tuesday, April 11. They vote on a move to abolish the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority, check to see if both sides paying for a Memphis Zoo parking solution in Overton Park are on the same page and take a final vote to change on-street parking around FedExForum and The Orpheum Theatre to a flat fee of $10 for “special events.”

93. Investor Dominance in Residential Real Estate Shows Signs of Change -

Investors buying single-family homes to rent them out or have a management firm rent them out may be giving way to banks more willing to make loans on lower-priced homes to owner-occupants.

“I would say the most interesting and big dynamic is folks who come in and buy a house for $20,000 these days, fix it up – sometimes well, sometimes poorly – sell it to a person in California for $64,000 – keep the rental management. And sometimes that helps a street and a neighborhood and sometimes it’s destructive,” said Steve Lockwood, executive director of the Frayser Community Development Corp. on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

94. Rudd Says University Redirecting Neighborhood -

The railroad tracks between Highland Avenue and Zach Curlin Drive have been a fact of life and a border of sorts for as long as there has been a University of Memphis – even before it was called the University of Memphis.

95. Greensward Compromise Text, Discussion Differ on Cost Split -

At the end of a surprising day at City Hall, Memphis City Council member Worth Morgan was anticipating what might happen in the three weeks until the next council session to the compromise for zoo parking in Overton Park.

96. Greensward Compromise Unravels Over Who Pays What and When -

A Memphis Zoo parking plan appears to be in question after a Tuesday, March 21, city council committee session in which Memphis Zoo leaders said they will not put up half of the $500,000 to pay for planning and design work on the reconfigured and expanded zoo parking lot.

97. Zoo Parking Compromise In Doubt -

A Memphis Zoo parking plan appears to be off after a Tuesday city council committee session in which Memphis Zoo leaders said they will not put up half of the $500,000 to pay for planning and design work on the reconfigured and expanded zoo parking lot.

98. Hopson, Caldwell Plan for SCS Long-Term -

Five years into historic changes in public education locally, the rapid pace of change is starting to give way to longer-term views and plans.

“This has been the first year since the merger that we actually are in a position to do some strategic investments in our schools,” Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

99. Conservancy Puts Up $250K For Zoo Parking Redesign -

The Overton Park Conservancy is turning over $250,000 to pay half of the cost for design and engineering work on the Memphis Zoo's reconfigured and expanded parking lot.

The conservancy board approved the release of the funding to the city this week and the funding goes to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, March 21, for approval.

100. Conservancy Puts Up Half of Money for Zoo Parking Redesign -

The Overton Park Conservancy is turning over $250,000 to pay half of the cost for design and engineering work on the Memphis Zoo's reconfigured and expanded parking lot.

The conservancy board approved the release of the funding to the city this week and the funding goes to the Memphis City Council Tuesday, March 21, for approval.