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Editorial Results (free)

1. Regional Win -

In an increasingly interconnected world, having a cohesive economic regionalism strategy is becoming more of a must-have for successful metropolitan areas.

To facilitate this, the Urban Land Institute held Memphis’ first RegionSmart Summit in 2016 to gather all of the area’s government, economic development and community leaders in one place to collectively address some of the region’s most pressing planning and development issues.

2. When It Rains, It Pours -

Ray’s Take

I always have an umbrella in my car. Most of the time it just takes up space and I end up pushing it aimlessly around the car to make room for other things. And there are many months of the year when an umbrella seems utterly pointless. But in Memphis, when it rains, it pours, and when that day comes I’m happy to have it. 

3. Bickerstaff the Grizzlies’ Best Option for Coach -

Would keeping interim head coach J.B. Bickerstaff be the easiest play for the Memphis Grizzlies? Absolutely.

Would keeping the 39-year-old assistant who was promoted after David Fizdale was fired amid a losing streak and conflict with star center Marc Gasol be the best budget move for the Grizzlies? Probably.

4. One-Year Turnaround? Grizzlies Vow It Can Be Done -

Mike Conley had no doubt: “With health, we’re a completely different team.” This was a day after the season ended, a 22-60 record next to the Memphis Grizzlies’ name and forever the shorthand explanation of their 2017-2018 NBA journey.

5. Sex Week Seems Tame Compared to Session Antics -

Why should UT Knoxville be limited to its annual Sex Week when Tennessee legislators are celebrating year-round?

Based on the scurrilous reports published in these parts over the last couple of years, state legislators are doing more than collecting per diems in Nashville, and there’s plenty of evidence to prove it.

6. Last Word: Failed Test, Trolley Back Story and Violent Crime Down City and County -

The state’s third problem with online student achievement testing in three years is gathering political force in Nashville. And that force is aimed for the most part at testing in general and the role it plays in evaluating teachers and students.

7. Amanda Dunham Talks Changes At East Memphis’ Grove Grill -

Twenty years after The Grove Grill opened in Laurelwood Shopping Center, the restaurant is reinventing itself with modernized decor and the recently launched Third Thursday monthly tasting series. Helping drive the changes are chef Chip Dunham – the son of Grove Grill owners Jeff and Tracey Dunham – and his wife, beverage director Amanda Dunham, who both joined the restaurant after moving to Memphis last July.

8. Memphis Site of One of Golf’s Greatest Events -

The hugs, the handshakes, the slaps on the back, the big smiles and loud, lengthy applause. All things normally saved in the golf world for that moment when a 75-foot eagle putt settles in the bottom of the hole.

9. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

10. Residents React to Cooper-Young’s Tentative Historic Overlay Status -

Though the Memphis City Council on Tuesday, April 10, granted Cooper-Young the historic overlay district status it has been seeking since last year, there is still a sense of concern among many of the residents.

11. UT Board of Trustees Appointees Go Awry -

NASHVILLE – One of Gov. Bill Haslam’s main legislative pushes ran afoul of a Legislature angry about everything from Sex Week at the University of Tennessee to the handling of the football coach hiring at the Knoxville campus.

12. After a Lost Season, Grizzlies Turn Toward NBA Draft -

For seven straight years, Exit Interview Day at FedExForum was a mixture of chronicling the season’s successes and speaking to the wish that the playoff run, whenever it ended, could have lasted longer.

13. How Much Are You Worth? -

Ray’s Take: What do Mike Tyson, Curt Schilling, Marvin Gaye, Francis Ford Coppola and Meat Loaf all have in common?

14. Kunal Shalia connecting young professionals at FedEx -

Kunal Shalia, newly armed with a graduate degree in industrial engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, had a choice to make. He could stay within the sphere of the Bay Area and his native home of San Jose, where he had friends, family and the community that only your original stomping grounds can provide – or he could completely remove himself from everything familiar and start anew.

15. Cooper-Young Overlay OK’d With Footnote -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, April 10, to a historical overlay district for Cooper-Young – the first historic district status granted by the city in 20 years.

But the 7-3 vote on third and final reading will require approval of a companion ordinance further defining what can and cannot be built there or how properties can be changed so the local Landmarks Commission can properly enforce terms of the overlay district.

16. Last Word: Play Ball, Porch & Parlor and A New Bus System -

If you go to enough political gatherings you start to see parallels. Sometimes you see things that aren’t there but that’s another story. Many political gatherings begin with the pledge of allegiance and a prayer as well. Sometimes the pledge isn’t enough and there is someone there to sing the National Anthem.

17. City Council Grants Historic Overlay Status to Cooper-Young -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, April 10, to a historical overlay district for Cooper-Young – the first historic district status granted by the city in 20 years.

But the 7-3 vote on third and final reading likely isn’t the end of the discussion about how decisions will be made by the local Landmarks Commission enforcing terms of the overlay that govern what can and cannot be built there or who it can be changed.

18. State of Flux -

Anyone paying attention to recent news headlines alone should have a pretty good indication that health care in the U.S. – really anywhere you look, on local, state or national levels – remains a byzantine, expensive proposition. Health care keeps getting more expensive. It involves navigating a lot of paperwork with bureaucratic legalese that bears the fingerprints of a tangle of stakeholders, including insurers, doctors and lawmakers.

19. King's Children See New Movements, Same Challenges 50 Years After Mountaintop -

The bright and multi colored lights at Mason Temple Church of God In Christ gave way for a few minutes Tuesday, April 3, to a single white spotlight on the empty pulpit of the South Memphis church and a recording of part of the speech Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered from the pulpit 50 years ago Tuesday.

20. Perry Leading Fire Museum Forward as Executive Director -

Shannon Perry became executive director of the Fire Museum of Memphis earlier this year, a role that brings her back to the institution she helped launch in the 1990s, when she served as its first curator. As executive director, Perry is the Fire Museum’s only full-time employee, and she handles a range of functions – including its collection, exhibits and facilities, budgets, fundraising, public relations, special events, staff and volunteers – while also working directly with the museum’s board.

21. Last Word: Holder in Memphis for MLK 50, EDGE Sets a Date and South City Moves -

The week of MLK50 commemorations began Monday with a speech by former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and the arrival Monday afternoon of Rev. Bernice King, the youngest child of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Meanwhile, Monday's day of free admission to the museum, underwritten by FedEx drew a long line. It also drew some remote trepidation that tends to make the situation seem worse than it is once you actually go there for yourself.

22. Last Word: MLK 50 Arrives, Heritage Trail and Medical Marijuana's Comeback -

This will be a big week in the national spotlight for the city. But whenever someone with a megaphone like a newspaper or a television station says that in Memphis there is something that happens that gives me pause and I think gives a lot of other Memphians pause. Some of us start to open the floodgates of our long-held need to please at all costs.

23. Last Word: Opening Day, Slowing the Flow and 30 Years of Shangri-La -

There is something about opening day of the Major League Baseball season – especially when it is opening day for just about every team at the same time. Just seeing the green fields with a solitary outfielder, the low brick walls behind the symmetry of batter, catcher and umpire renews my love for the game. I don’t really pay attention to players – don’t know any of their names. And how and when did the Astros wind up in the American League and the Brewers in the National League? I just like watching the game in a sport where the team and the individual coexist as in no other sport.

24. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

25. MarShon Brooks Makes Most Of Call in Debut From China -

Every day at Camp Grizzlies, school is in session. So many young players. And many of them are now getting minutes in NBA games that they haven’t earned so much as had handed to them in the name of development in an otherwise lost season.

26. Experts To Weigh In On Health Care Landscape -

Eight years after the Affordable Care Act was signed into law, the cost of health insurance premiums bought in marketplace exchanges locally has seen a big spike so far in 2018.

That’s according to a new report out from the Urban Institute, which notes among other things an average 32 percent jump nationwide between 2017 and 2018 for the exchanges’ lowest-priced “silver” plans.

27. Explore Bike Share Reveals Station Locations -

The launch of Explore Bike Share is getting closer with the nonprofit revealing Wednesday, March 28, the locations of the stations for the 600-bike system.

Explore Bike Share’s 60 stations span from Downtown, South Memphis and Cooper-Young to Orange Mound, Overton Square and Crosstown. The stations and bikes are being funded through a combination of donations from foundations and individuals, plus a $2.2 million federal Congestion Mitigation Air Quality grant, said Explore Bike Share executive director Trey Moore.

28. Last Word: Graceland's New Lawsuit, Memphis March For Our Lives and Trolley Test -

Remember the comment from last week’s EDGE meeting by EDGE board member Tom Dyer who said the economic development body was likely to be sued no matter what it did on Graceland’s application for tax breaks on its “convention center” plan in Whitehaven? At week’s end, Graceland followed through with a lawsuit in Chancery Court against EDGE for delaying a decision on the matter. The lawsuit contends EDGE has no intention of making a decision on incentives and that Graceland is entitled to those incentives.

29. Prescription for Tragedy -

He has his own GPS, an internal shield that keeps him from driving anywhere near 637 Poplar Ave. Home to the Memphis morgue. That’s where they showed Jerry Davidson his 22-year-old son, Oliver, his eyes closed and his lips purple.

30. Mixed Emotions as Vols, Lady Vols Exit Postseason -

Wait till next year. Again. Hope for better. It’s going to be a long offseason for Tennessee basketball.

The Vols were seeded No. 3 in the NCAA Tournament’s South Region and were upset by No. 11 seed Loyola-Chicago, 63-62, in the second round in Dallas.

31. Plan to Expand Pre-K Would Leverage Private Funds -

After voters defeated two ballot questions in two years for sales tax increases – city and county – to fund an expansion of prekindergarten classrooms primarily in Memphis, the effort is back with a momentum that seemed unlikely five years ago.

32. Walker Named President Of Black Swan Digital Forensics -

Jim Walker has been named president of Memphis-based Black Swan Digital Forensics, the only forensics lab in the U.S. that focuses exclusively on data recovery from digital devices such as cellphones, vehicle systems, computers and social media accounts. Walker comes to Black Swan after more than 30 years of military and public service at the federal, state and local level, including eight years as Alabama’s director of homeland security and more than 20 years in the U.S. Army, where he was an Airborne Ranger and retired as a lieutenant colonel.

33. Dunavant Says Gangs ‘Prime Problem’ In West Tennessee -

U.S. Attorney Michael Dunavant says street gangs in various forms and coalitions are “the prime problem and concern here in West Tennessee and Memphis.”

34. Making Art Work -

After he’d finished his part in a Memphis Symphony Orchestra performance a few weeks ago that included Leonard Bernstein’s Serenade for Violin, guest violinist Charles Yang came out on stage and did something unexpected.

35. A Look Back At UT’s History In NCAA Tourney -

Basketball coach Rick Barnes was fired by Texas in late March of 2015 when he refused to fire members of his coaching staff.

36. The 2018 NBA Draft Might be Deep, But It’s Not Mistake-Proof for Grizzlies -

In one analysis before the 2009 NBA Draft, nbadraftnet.com decided the pro player most comparable to Connecticut big man Hasheem Thabeet was Dikembe Mutombo. Each of them was at least 7-foot-2. Each played basketball. That’s where the similarities ended.

37. Florida’s Epiphany On Guns Means Little in Tennessee -

Memphis resident Stevie Moore has been waging a war to take illegal guns off the streets since someone shot his son in the head with an AK-47 15 years ago.

“It’s my mission to fight these guns whatever way I can,” says Moore, who founded the organization Freedom From Unnecessary Negatives in an effort to steer youth away from violence.

38. Memphis Inner City Rugby Plans March 16 Fundraiser -

Memphis Inner City Rugby is planning “An Evening With MICR” Friday, March 16, to celebrate the young men and women who take part in the league.

Among the evening’s highlights, Freedom Preparatory Academy’s girls’ rugby team will receive rings for their recent championship win, and World Rugby Hall of Famer Phaidra Knight will present the keynote address.

39. Wiuff Looks to Boost Engagement As MAAR Board President -

Lauren Harkins Wiuff, a broker at Marx-Bensdorf Realtors, has begun her tenure as the 2018 president of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors board of directors. Wiuff, who will serve a one-year term as board president, is also a lifetime member of MAAR’s Multi Million Dollar Club. At Marx-Bensdorf, she leads a team that includes her sister, Stephanie Sheahan.

40. Milwaukee Bucks Send Grizzlies To 18th Consecutive Loss -

The longest losing streak in the history of the Memphis edition of the Grizzlies stretched to 18 games with a 121-103 loss to the Milwaukee Bucks at FedExForum on Monday, March 12.

This latest loss also marked the Grizzlies’ seventh straight defeat at home. Memphis now stands at 18-49, the worst mark in the NBA. Milwaukee got 24 points from Khris Middleton and 20 from Giannis Antetokounmpo. The Grizzlies were led by Marc Gasol’s 17 points. Jarell Martin, Dillon Brooks and Ben McLemore each finished with 16 points.

41. Digest -

Memphis Grizzlies Suffer 15th Consecutive Loss

The Grizzlies lost their 15th straight game, 119-110 at Chicago, on Wednesday, March 7.

The team has not won since defeating the Phoenix Suns at FedExForum on Jan. 29.

42. What’s Best for State, Education or Punishment? -

Carlos Reyes, a graduate of Murfreesboro Oakland High School’s Class of 2017, would be in his second semester at MTSU majoring in business administration – if he could afford it.

43. Grizzlies Set April 6 As Faith and Family Night -

The Memphis Grizzlies will celebrate Faith and Family Night on April 6 with a postgame performance by California-based band For All Seasons following the Grizzlies’ matchup against the Sacramento Kings. Christian group The Young Escape had been scheduled to perform after the game, but is now unable to attend due to scheduling conflicts.

44. Grizzlies Set April 6 As Faith and Family Night -

The Memphis Grizzlies will celebrate Faith and Family Night on April 6 with a postgame performance by California-based band For All Seasons following the Grizzlies’ matchup against the Sacramento Kings. Christian group The Young Escape had been scheduled to perform after the game, but is now unable to attend due to scheduling conflicts.

45. U of M’s Kevyanna Rawls Truman Scholarship Finalist -

Kevyanna Rawls, a University of Memphis junior majoring in English and African and African-American Studies, is a finalist for the prestigious Truman Scholarship. She will travel to Nashville March 13 to interview with the Truman Scholarship Foundation’s Regional Review Panel.

46. RBG Promotes Callicutt To Audit Partner -

Accounting firm Reynolds, Bone & Griesbeck PLC recently promoted Joseph D. Callicutt Jr. to audit partner from the position of senior audit manager. Callicutt, a certified public accountant and 10-year RBG employee, works exclusively in the financial institutions industry niche and oversees audit, tax and consulting services, including outsourced internal audit, interest rate risk management, bank profitability and efficiency, and strategic planning facilitation for RBG’s financial institution clients. 

47. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre will perform “Selma: A Musical Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” Friday, Feb. 23, through March 18 at Hattiloo, 37 S. Cooper St. The dramatic musical captures prominent moments such as the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the crossing of the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. Visit hattiloo.org for showtimes and tickets.

48. The Church Health Way -

One of the easiest ways to tell that Scott Morris is not your typical prescription-writing family doctor – and that the health care organization he founded, Church Health, is no ordinary medical practice – is when he starts talking about softer concepts like joy and happiness and spirituality.

49. After a Year, Trump Holds Firm Grip on Conservative Movement -

OXON HILL, Md. (AP) – Donald Trump's outsider candidacy rattled the conservative movement. But more than a year into his presidency, the onetime Democrat now holds what seems to be a near-total grip.

50. Godspeed, Helen. We Were There -

A HAPPY DAY AT A FUNERAL. Her name was Helen Larkin. She was a couple of years younger than me when she started at the University of Tennessee and pledged the same sorority my wife did a few years earlier. Two of her three older brothers were in my fraternity there and one of her two sisters was in my high school class. Spring quarter of her freshman year, Helen would become a Little Sister of that fraternity.

51. Grizzlies’ Rookies Ivan Rabb, Kobi Simmons Getting On-The-Job Training -

Back in late January, the San Antonio Spurs dropped by FedExForum to give the Grizzlies a 108-85 butt-kicking. But for one young Grizzlies rookie, there was associated value. Because if you’re paying attention, a loss like that is less a trip to the woodshed and more real-time tutoring with a little embarrassment added in so you don’t forget.

52. Election Methods and Murals Dominate Light Council Day -

Memphis City Council members doubled down Tuesday, Feb. 20, on calling for a cover-up of six murals near Lamar Avenue. And the council’s attorney said ranked-choice or instant-runoff voting isn’t needed in Memphis.

53. More Companies Providing Some Parental Leave Pay -

The federal Family and Medical Leave Act ensures that employees with over a year of employment get 12 weeks unpaid time off from their jobs, and the Tennessee Maternity Leave Act allows certain female employees four months of unpaid leave for pregnancy, childbirth, care of a newborn and adoption.

54. Couch-Smith Drives Tsunami Nuances Behind the Scenes -

Tsunami continues to reinvent itself as it approaches 20 years in business this year and is beginning 2018 with its strongest holiday season on the books.

Colleen Couch-Smith, wife of Tsunami chef Ben Smith, is instrumental to the success and world-class status of the restaurant, bringing an artistic eye, discerning palate and insightful management style to the table.

55. Getting to the Top -

An attorney, a physician and a college president. Three success stories. Three women who made it. They had different challenges, yes, but they also shared obstacles that are ever the same.

Dr. Marjorie Hass, Rhodes College president, recently spoke at a breakfast on campus for female students and alumni. Her message to the young women about to set out on their careers was wrapped in truth. She was encouraging, yes, but she also was not going to make promises that life can’t keep.

56. Signing Class Disappointing, But Groundwork Laid -

Tennessee football fans are hoping for a better National Signing Day in 2019. This year’s was a relative dud.

New coach Jeremy Pruitt, hired on Dec. 7, signed six players on Feb. 7 but whiffed on several high-profile recruits he and his staff were pursuing. He had signed 14 players during the first-ever early signing period Dec. 20-22.

57. If You Play the Games, Will They Still Come? -

The other day the NCAA released attendance figures for the 2017 college football season and for the fourth straight year FBS attendance dropped. Yes, fans still pack the giant stadiums around the SEC, which despite having a decrease in average attendance by 2,433 per game, easily had the highest average attendance in the country with 75,074 fans per four quarters of life-and-death football.

58. At All-Star Break, Grizzlies’ Reality Not What Anyone Envisioned -

The start of training camp was less than 24 hours away. With seven straight playoff appearances behind them, the Grizzlies had a track record of substance. True, they would be without half of the Core Four, Zach Randolph and Tony Allen having been allowed to walk and sign elsewhere.

59. Kele Adds Rob Benson As Chief Sales Officer -

Rob Benson has been appointed chief sales officer at Kele Inc., a Memphis-based distributor of building automation products and controls solutions around the world. Benson, who will lead Kele’s sales efforts, brings with him three decades of experience with building automation products and systems at Johnson Controls.

60. Success No Easy Road For Women In Business -

The inspiration was there early. It will seem strange at first, even Tannera George Gibson herself understands that. But all these years later, she can see the connection.

61. Glassman to Tax Pros: Take a Lesson From the Tortoise, Not the Hare -

Richard Glassman’s spacious office in Downtown Memphis is cluttered like a closet, but holds the history of a museum. Everything from a cap signed by actor Tom Cruise back when “The Firm” was being filmed in Memphis, to a framed and autographed No. 45 Michael Jordan Chicago Bulls jersey, to a stuffed cobra positioned under his desk, looking ready to pounce.

62. Council Debate on MLGW Rates Reveals Trust Issues -

It began after the Tom Lee storm last Memorial Day weekend – a burst of sudden, intense winds that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses as well as toppling the circa-1950s obelisk memorial to Tom Lee Downtown.

63. Dreamers Deferred -

You never really get to the point where you can stand at a particular moment in time and forecast with any certainty how your life is going to turn out, how things are going to look or what’s going to be different over a long time horizon. That’s certainly the way it’s been, and still is, for Mauricio Calvo and Memphians like him.

64. Staxtacular Jan. 27 Benefits Soulsville Foundation -

The Soulsville Foundation, in partnership with the Memphis Grizzlies, is bringing basketball and music together for the Soulsville Foundation’s largest annual fundraiser, Staxtacular 2018 presented by SunTrust.

65. Last Word: Eureka Education, Confederate Monuments in Court and Dillon Brooks -

Supermarkets are hard. That is the tag line in every discussion about getting a supermarket or grocery store for a given part of town that doesn’t have one. And once a new supermarket goes up somewhere else, there is inevitably word that a competitor or two is going to build nearby. The discussion always includes the mandatory recitation of the 3 to 4 percent profit margin stores operate on, which even knowledgeable critics of the decisions about where to locate and not to locate stores acknowledge is accurate.

66. Staxtacular Saturday, Jan. 27, Benefits Soulsville Foundation -

The Soulsville Foundation, in partnership with the Memphis Grizzlies, is bringing basketball and music together for the Soulsville Foundation’s largest annual fundraiser, Staxtacular 2018 presented by SunTrust.

67. NBA Coaches Often ‘Interim’ -

In one sense, maybe just about every NBA head coach not named Gregg Popovich should have the word “interim” in his job title. Certainly in Memphis the position of head coach is a lot closer to being an adjunct member of the faculty rather than a tenured professor.

68. Council Reopens MLGW Rate Hike Consideration, Approves Term Limit Referendum -

Memphis City Council members decided Tuesday, Jan. 23, to take a second look at the gas and electric rate-hike proposals they rejected two weeks ago, but put off any new votes on the matter until February.

69. Council Reopens MLGW Rate Hike Consideration, Approves Term Limit Referendum -

Memphis City Council members decided Tuesday, Jan. 23, to take a second look at the gas and electric rate hike proposals they rejected two weeks ago. But they put off any new votes on the matter until the first council meeting in February after what is expected to be a lengthy discussion in committee earlier that same day at City Hall.

70. Humane Society Names Davis 2018 Board President -

Ted Davis has been named 2018 president of the board of directors for the Humane Society of Memphis and Shelby County. Davis, who is a wealth adviser for Regions Bank, joined the humane society board in December 2015. His first priority was a campaign inspiring adopters to become donors, which led him to being the Paw Prints Gala committee chair in 2017.

71. Last Word: Shutdown Over?, Glen Farms Plans and Billy Richmond - Wing Guru -

The federal government shutdown for many of us outside the Beltway amounted to a message on a website saying the agency we were looking up was closed Monday. And Monday was the third and final day of the most recent shutdown. But the immigration policy known as DACA – Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals – is the issue to be explored by Congress in the three weeks that the continuing resolution covers. It’s an issue that there has been plenty of local discussion about

72. Zealous and Growing Fan Base Heralds Soccer’s Return to Memphis -

They can be heard down the hall, or down the block. Roaring. Cheering. Chanting, often nonsensically, at the top of their lungs at whatever hour their beloved teams are playing on TV. Always in uniform – with the proper hats, jerseys – and scarves. Do not forget the scarves.

73. What a Kick -

Peter Freund is a baseball guy. Grew up on the New York Yankees. Today, not only is he principal owner of the Memphis Redbirds, he owns stakes in other minor league teams through his Trinity Baseball Holdings and even has a small slice of the Yankees. But make no mistake, he is a businessman. And it was the businessman in him that was convinced to bring a United Soccer League (USL) team to Memphis and AutoZone Park for the 2019 season.

74. Midlife Look at Insurance Needs -

Ray’s Take: Life insurance is an important part of most overall financial plans. Replacing the capital value of the significant providers is critical should they not be able to provide. Owning the right insurance for the right price at the right time in your life is a crucial element to your financial well-being.

75. Growing the Ranks -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland defines the state of the city halfway through his four-year term of office as “strong and getting stronger every day.”

76. Strickland: Memphis About to Meet Goal of Net Gain in Police Ranks -

When the Memphis Police Department graduates a class of about 80 recruits Thursday, Jan. 18, at First Baptist Church–Broad, the MPD will have a net annual gain in police officers for the first time in seven years.

77. Despite Need, Expanding Health Care Not in Cards -

Springfield resident Felicity Palma struggled mightily when she moved to Tennessee from Florida two years ago after suffering health problems and losing her job.

The 47-year-old former social worker became homeless for a period when she came here, and now she finds herself in a health insurance coverage gap as she tries to get treatment for ulcers, sciatica, fibroids and thyroid disease. Debt is piling up on her, too, for the care she does receive.

78. Nomination Deadline For Dunavant Awards Feb. 1 -

Memphis is lucky to have an abundance of residents with a passion for public service and it is time once again to honor their commitment to improving this community.

Each year the Rotary Club of Memphis East recognizes the importance of public service by hosting the Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

79. Orpheum CEO Batterson Honored For Excellence in Performing Arts -

Brett Batterson, president and CEO of the Orpheum Theatre Group, has been named the North American Performing Arts Managers and Agents’ 2017 Presenter of the Year. The award honors individuals in the performing arts field for their excellence in exemplifying mentoring; setting an example of best practices, achievement and leadership in their discipline; and cultivating diversity, practicing inclusion, and creating equity for underserved members of the community.

80. Last Word: Tax Reform Pay Raises, Minority Business Kinks and Elvis at 83 -

A busy but ultimately slow weekend on the Confederate monuments front as a total of fewer than 100 opponents of the removal of the city’s two most visible monuments actively protested Saturday either on the interstate loop or in the “protest area” by Health Sciences Park.

81. Why Aren’t Starved Fans All In for the Titans? -

There is some irony in the Tennessee Titans’ going to the “Show-Me State” for a first-round playoff game against the Kansas City Chiefs.

Perhaps there the 9-6 Titans, a team its own fans have yet to completely embrace, can finally make an impression in their first playoff game in nine years.

82. Attorney, Former Political Activist Lewis Donelson Dies at 100 -

In a century of life that began in Memphis, Lewis Donelson was many things including an attorney, politician and strategist. In all of those pursuits and others, he was one of the city’s most influential citizens and a force in some of the most historic moments in the city’s history as well as the state’s history.

83. Legislators Can’t Get Past Threat of Medical Weed -

Heading into the 2018 legislative session, Rep. Jeremy Faison is looking to send a message about his medical marijuana bill: Tennessee won’t open the door to recreational pot without General Assembly action.

84. Mayor Says Memphis 'Will Be Prepared' for Statue Protests -

If opponents of the removal of the city’s two most visible Civil War monuments follow through on plans for a Memphis protest Jan. 6, Mayor Jim Strickland said city government will be ready.

85. Moore Named Executive Director of Explore Bike Share -

Trey Moore has been named executive director of Explore Bike Share, the Memphis nonprofit that is preparing to launch a local bike-share system with 600 bicycles and 60 stations. Moore, who is returning to Memphis from Atlanta, Georgia, will lead Explore Bike Share’s staff in operations, fund development and community engagement activities in partnership with the organization’s board of directors.
As executive director, he also is committed to bicycling as a sustainable transportation option with access to as many Memphians as possible, and will help promote a bike-friendly culture in Memphis while encouraging exercise and healthy lifestyles.

86. Strickland Touts 'Solidarity' Around Confederate Monuments Removal -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland marked the halfway point in his four-year term of office Monday, Jan. 1, by calling on citizens to make use of the “spirit of solidarity” shown in the removal of the city’s two most visible Civil War monuments just before Christmas.

87. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some Who Died in 2017 -

They made music that inspired legions of fans. Rock 'n' roll founding fathers Chuck Berry and Fats Domino, rockers Tom Petty and Gregg Allman, grunge icon Chris Cornell, country superstar Glen Campbell and jazz great Al Jarreau were among the notable figures who died in 2017, leaving a void in virtually every genre of music.

88. Memphis Players See Football Program Continuing to Excel -

(Editor’s note: This story was published before the AutoZone Liberty Bowl on Dec. 30).

It was three days before the University of Memphis was to play Iowa State in the AutoZone Liberty Bowl. Much of the talk was about going for what would be a program-record 11th win, and finishing with an undefeated record on the home turf this season.

89. Last Word: Liberty Bowl Sell-Out Prep, Beale's Year and Tubby Talks -

The AutoZone Liberty Bowl is a sell out as of Thursday. And while your thoughts may turn to the sight of a full stadium at the Fairgrounds, at least some of you who are going are thinking about what traffic will be like in the area. Here is the parking and shuttle game plan at the outset and a day in advance. The Liberty Bowl Parade on Beale is at 3 p.m. Friday followed by a pep rally in the entertainment district and all are welcome.

90. His Way: Tubby Smith Figured Out Who He Was Long Ago and He’s Not Changing -

When his visitor was about to leave, Orlando Tubby Smith had one more story. About a time his father had given him an assignment on the family farm in Maryland. 

Tubby was one of 17 children. He had older siblings and younger siblings. He also, at age 12 or 13, already had a sense for what it was to lead and manage.

91. Attorney Wooten Joins Evans Petree as Shareholder -

Attorney William Allen Wooten has joined Evans Petree PC as a shareholder, working in the firm’s Memphis office as well as its new location at the current Wooten Law Firm in Covington, Tennessee.

92. Memphis Sound at 60 -

As Stax Records and Royal Studios both wrap up a year of celebrating their 60th anniversary, The Memphis News looks back at the creators and purveyors of the Memphis sound and its significance, both in its heyday and today.

93. Seeking Independence -

Former U.S. Rep. Zach Wamp of Chattanooga came to Memphis this week for the first time in seven years to call for a new generation of independent candidates for office he says can stop 20 years of elected leaders in Washington putting “party before country.”

94. To Be or Not to Be: Tennessee Shakespeare Company Expanding With New Facility -

Dan McCleary is the founder of the Tennessee Shakespeare Company. But that hasn’t obscured his view of reality, of the fact that many people were first introduced to Shakespeare in a high school classroom in a less than engaging way.

95. Last Word: Early Statewide Poll, New Chandler Numbers and Lyfe in East Memphis -

Vanderbilt has a new statewide fall poll out that shows a few things – most of them very preliminary other than this is still early for voters who don’t live and breathe politics. Diane Black and Randy Boyd are tops in terms of name recognition in the Republican six-pack running for Governor. And the Marsha Blackburn-Phil Bredesen November general election matchup for the U.S. Senate is rapidly becoming a lock before Christmas 2017.

96. ‘Ugly’ Titans Offense Can No Longer Be Ignored -

It had been festering for weeks, but the Tennessee Titans seemed to push the matter aside as they were squeezing out close wins against the NFL’s third-easiest schedule.

“Winning ugly” is how it was seen through rose-colored glasses, with an 8-4 record as exhibit 1.

97. Shelby County Housing Market Remains Strong -

As the year winds to a close, Shelby County home sales remained strong in November, continuing the nearly uniform rise in average sales price, volume and overall units that has been indicative of the local housing market in 2017.

98. Something In The Water -

The Society of Entrepreneurs in Memphis held a book signing and panel discussion at Novel bookstore last week for the society’s book, “There’s Something in the Water.” The book commemorates the 25th anniversary of the society and profiles the entrepreneurial accomplishments of each member.

99. New Memphis Promotes Dakin to Pilot ‘Launch’ Initiative -

Frankie Dakin has been promoted to director of strategic initiatives at New Memphis, a role in which he’ll pilot the organization’s new Launch: Campus to Career program. The initiative, which builds on New Memphis’ Summer Experience, connects college students with professional opportunities and networks to inspire them to launch careers in Memphis. Dakin will lead the program, encouraging area students to find and prepare for internships with local employers.

100. Memphis Football Coach Gets Leadership Forum Nod -

University of Memphis quarterbacks and tight ends coach Kenny Dillingham has been selected to the American Football Coaches Association’s 35 Under 35 Coaches Leadership Institute that will take place Jan. 7 at the 2018 AFCA Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina.