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Editorial Results (free)

1. Teachers Wary of Haslam’s Push For Increased Pay -

Pushing a budget with more than $100 million for K-12 teacher pay raises, Gov. Bill Haslam says Tennessee is taking education to new levels by raising standards, linking teacher evaluations to student performance and expanding education options.

2. Last Word: History As Geology, Beyond the Greensward and City Hall's HR Director -

History can be like geology once you get it in something that isn’t in the form of a book.
There are layers on top of layers that you may not ever see or miss until a site is wiped clean for the next present that used to be the future and will eventually become the past.
That’s the case with the city’s historic Medical Center where much has come and gone several times over as our city’s considerable investment in medicine and health approaches the end of its second century.
Health Sciences Park used to be the site of a hospital. You would think something as massive as the tower of Baptist Memorial Hospital’s central campus on Union Avenue would be missed. Yet even those of us who grew up with its presence drive past it every day without a thought of what was once there.
The same with the site of Russwood Park on the north side of Madison Avenue and the old bus barns where Beale used to run further east than it does now.
In recent years, new facilities have arisen as the medical center makes itself over in a kind of economic regeneration without a comprehensive plan.
There is now an effort to come up with a comprehensive plan for the area that is more than different ventures buying or leasing land and making plans for their needs.
Eight of the institutions in the area have hired a consulting firm to develop a master plan that includes not just facilities but residential and retail areas.
It’s a significant step for an area that remains intriguing for those of us trying to remember what was where and how long some of the survivors have been holding out in much different streetscapes than were there when they arrived.
The Masonic lodge at the dead end of Dunlap into Union Avenue is a survivor. It’s where the funerals were held for some of those killed in the 1925 river disaster in which Tom Lee rescued so many others.
The lodge at one time had an earth-shaking pipe organ that I had the rare privilege of hearing at a concert following its restoration in the 1980s – the ancient 1980s.
And I still wonder about the tiny medical textbook storefront and how it endures at a time when students rent books and others use digital versions.
There are still remnants of the porous border between the medical center and the Union Avenue auto row that used to exist and arose around the old Ford plant.

3. Minority Leader Harris Confident Even on Wrong Side of Supermajority -

Lee Harris says he ran for state Senate because he felt Memphis could do better on Capitol Hill, defeating Ophelia Ford in 2014.

4. Last Word: New Minority Business Numbers, The House Affair and The Heights -

The recently revived discussion on minority business in Memphis is about to go back on the front burner again. Fueling the intensity are new U.S. Census numbers. They show the percentage of business receipts in Memphis produced by black-owned businesses has dropped since the 2007 census numbers showed a 1.08 percent share of those receipts by black-owned businesses. That in a city whose population is 63 percent African-American.
The drop to below one percent is even though the overall receipts in 2012 were higher than they were in 2007.
Madeline Faber is the first to report the new numbers as part of a cover story in our weekly, The Memphis News, that will be on the streets and in the racks Saturday, on-line Friday afternoon.
The numbers are such a telling story and such an important indicator that we broke it out as its own story in advance of the cover story.

5. Last Word: Kroger Disses Clarence Saunders, Mud Island Plans and The Australians -

What is old has become new again. And judging by your reaction to Andy Meek’s story on the Kroger plans for online ordering of groceries, what is old has gone viral as well.
Here are the basics:
You order from a list of items and Kroger fills the order and has it waiting for you to pick up.
When you think about the idea of supermarkets, which originated here in Memphis with Piggly Wiggly, it’s enough to make the Piggly Wiggly founder himself, Clarence Saunders, spin in his grave.
Before he came up with the idea of taking store shelves from behind the counter and putting them out there for you to get your own stuff from them, you would tell your grocer what you wanted and he would write it down on a paper bag and get it for you, wrap it up and present it to you.
Saunders changed all of that as you know if you’ve seen the Pink Palace’s child-sized replica of a Piggly Wiggly store from the start of the 20th century.
A century later, no paper bags and you can still walk among the shelves if you wish.
Perhaps this isn’t that extreme. Maybe this is simply a swing of the pendulum, back toward the middle ground.
Saunders tried to push it even further with his Keedoozle stores that followed Piggly Wiggly. In those stores, the items were lined up in what amounted to vending machines with shoppers releasing an item from the vertical row with a key.
Here Saunders went too far. He mashed the bread.

6. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

7. The Week Ahead: Jan. 18, 2016 -

How was your weekend Memphis? Here are some local events to keep on your radar this week, from a full slate of MLK activities to a David Bowie tribute to a Marco Rubio fundraiser…

8. After First Meeting, Personality of New Council Emerges -

The judgments began early for the new Memphis City Council, which met for the first time Tuesday, Jan. 5, at City Hall.

State Sen. Lee Harris, on hand to be honored as a former city council member, called the group the “Kumbaya Council,” as it approved 13 appointees by Mayor Jim Strickland, 11 of them with unanimous votes.

9. Last Word: The River, The New Mayor and Explaining Boll Weevils -

Hello, 2016. What’s your hurry?

First things first – the Mississippi River at our doorstep is above flood stage. But the crest is now predicted to come Friday and will be just over 40 feet – lower than predicted last week.
We will be posting web stories on the forecasts and other announcement from the county’s Office of Preparedness each evening to work with their schedule for summarizing where we are.
Floods are a slower moving cause for concern because we know what is happening upriver from us where the river is narrower. But this is also the Mississippi River, which is the definition of unpredictable.

10. Refugees, Regents, Privatization On Tap for New Session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

11. Last Word: Recovery in North Mississippi, Opera in 2016 and Uptown North of Chelsea -

It’s been a holiday season of challenged hopes and muted emotions in our corner of the world.
The beginning of the series of storms and tornadoes they spawned killed eight people in North Mississippi where recovery is still a fact of life in this last week of 2015.
This will be a week of funerals and damage assessments for federal disaster aid throughout our region.
And you will hear more stories of escapes and new beginnings after losing everything of any material value.
But even in our spared city, our thoughts will return instinctively to the young lives taken so suddenly and so close to the family gatherings in which our youngest give so much more in the way of hope than they will realize at this tender age.

12. Northwestern Defense Tough, But Give Edge to UT -

There’s nothing like spending the Christmas holidays in Florida, and Tennessee’s football team will savor every minute of it for the second consecutive year.

The Vols (8-4) board a flight Saturday morning to Tampa, Fla., where they will spend almost a week before the Jan. 1 Outback Bowl against Northwestern (10-2).

13. Last Word: More Medical Expansions, Norris & Harris and Christmas In Hell's Kitchen -

Last Word is a new daily online column that offers an overview of what’s happened at the end of shift, so to speak. Picture a dimly lit newsroom in the Downtown night and the last person in the place leaving a memo for the morning shift and you have a pretty good idea of what we are aiming for.

14. Council's New Crop -

They ran in the considerable shadow of the most competitive Memphis mayoral race in a generation. The new Memphis City Council that takes office with Mayor-elect Jim Strickland in January isn’t necessarily a generational shift. It doesn’t signify a wholesale ousting by the electorate, either.

15. College Football Notebook: Memphis Coaching Search a Waiting Game -

As this is being written, the University of Memphis coaching search is a game of wait and see. Athletic director Tom Bowen & Co. apparently remain fixed on Missouri defensive coordinator Barry Odom, who served in the same position for three seasons at Memphis before going to Missouri before the 2015 season.

16. SRVS Program Helps People With Disabilities and Employers Who Hire Them -

Mike Harris is production manager at American Stairways Inc. on Lamar Avenue. He has a warehouse full of employees and, just saying it like it is, some are happier to be there than others.

17. Miniature Golf Course to Be Built in Cordova -

Vantage Point Holdings LLC has filed an application permit with the Shelby County Land Use Control Board to add an 18-hole miniature golf course to its 15-acre Vantage Point Golf Center in Cordova.

18. Miniature Golf Course To Be Built in Cordova -

Vantage Point Holdings LLC has filed an application permit with the Shelby County Land Use Control Board to add an 18-hole miniature golf course to its 15-acre Vantage Point Golf Center in Cordova.

19. Bipartisan Brakes for Governor Haslam’s Privatization Push -

Plans to put Tennessee’s real estate and government operations in the hands of private business are much further along than Gov. Bill Haslam would like people to think.

A master of downplaying big issues, Haslam says he’s simply looking for ways to make government run more efficiently and save money.

20. Attorney Rob Ratton Joins Fisher & Phillips -

Robert W. Ratton has joined Fisher & Phillips LLP’s Memphis office as of counsel, a role in which he represents employers in a wide range of employment law matters and supports clients with internal investigations and compliance issues. Ratton most recently served as a staff attorney at TruGreen LP.

21. Despite Rhetoric, Florida Game Critical for Tennessee's Butch Jones -

Tennessee’s Butch Jones will coach the biggest game of his three-year tenure with the Vols – and probably the biggest of his entire coaching career – at Florida on Saturday.

Like it or not, Jones is carrying the weight of UT’s 10-game losing streak to Florida on his shoulders.

22. From University Labs to the Marketplace -

The health care industry contributed $38.8 billion to Middle Tennessee’s economy in 2014, according to a study released by the Nashville Health Care Council, which is a 32.9 percent increase from the 2010.

23. Hooker Fights for Right to Die on His Terms -

John Jay Hooker, a household name in Middle Tennessee if nowhere else, is suffering from stage 4 metastatic cancer with weeks, not months to live.

24. Real Deal -

They were tossing around numbers, trying to guess the win total for the 2015 University of Memphis football season.

In the not-too-distant past, the two Highland Hundred members and longtime season-ticket holders might have been able to add their guesses together and still come up short of the six victories needed for their favorite team to be bowl-eligible.

25. Preseason Analysis: Vols Will Defeat Oklahoma, Finish 8-4 -

Tennessee’s football team has something to prove as it concludes the first week of preseason practices and moves forward to the 2015 season.

The Vols must prove they belong in the national picture in Butch Jones’ third year as coach.

26. Five Memphis Tigers Claim Scholar-Athlete Awards -

Five University of Memphis student-athletes claimed Scholar-Athlete Sport Excellence Awards for their efforts on the field and in the classroom during the 2014-15 season, the American Athletic Conference has announced.

27. Southern Heritage Defined Differently Across Tennessee -

Tennessee’s loyalty was divided in the Civil War, and 150 years later, little is changed as the debate over Confederate symbols arises in the wake of the racist-fueled South Carolina church massacre.

28. React: Supreme Court’s Gay Marriage Ruling -

A divided U.S. Supreme Court voted 5-4 that same-sex couples have a right to marry anywhere in the United States. Here is a roundup of local reaction to the landmark ruling.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam:

29. Deloitte Promotes Vince DeGutis -

Vince DeGutis, a partner in Deloitte Tax LLP, has been named Deloitte’s Memphis managing partner.
In his new role, DeGutis is responsible for overseeing the Memphis office, enhancing Deloitte’s brand and reputation in the business and civic community, and facilitating revenue growth by advancing targeting and growth activities. He is also responsible for the development and implementation strategies to attract and retain the next generation of leaders within Deloitte.

30. Time to Produce -

MEMPHIS: THE SEQUEL. “People who make movies – people like Francis Ford Coppola and Milos Forman and Sydney Pollack, and our own Craig Brewer and Willy Bearden – and people like me who write and produce TV spots and videos all have something in common. We know just how damn good Memphis looks through a lens, we know how deep the local talent pool is for actors and crew, we know how wide the choice is for great locations.

31. Your Fantasy Celebrity Board -

If you could have any five celebrities on your nonprofit board, who would you pick?

Visualize yourself as chair of the board of a nonprofit you believe in. Maybe it’s a university, an early childhood education center, a food bank, international research institute or performing arts company. You pick the nonprofit – and the board members!

32. Carnival Memphis Set to Honor Legal Heavyweights at Salute Luncheon -

Carnival Memphis will bring together leaders in the Mid-South legal industry for its Business and Industry Salute on May 5.

The event, which is part of the celebration of the nonprofit’s 84th anniversary, will honor eight organizations vital to the law industry in the Mid-South and four individuals for their contributions to the community.

33. What Better Place for an NRA Convention? -

When the National Rifle Association announced that it would hold its 2015 convention in Nashville, the timing was propitious.

In 2010, gun sales and handgun permits were booming, and Tennessee had just enacted a controversial and contested new “guns in bars” law that allowed people with handgun permits to carry concealed firearms into bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

34. Lee Harris, Brian Kelsey Spend Lunch Hour in Twitter Debate -

State Senators Brian Kelsey and Lee Harris spent their lunch hour Friday, March 27, debating Insure Tennessee, school vouchers and gun rights in a Twitter debate between the two Shelby County legislators – Kelsey a Republican and Harris a Democrat.

35. Harris’ Bill Faces Opposition From Memphis City Council Members -

Legislation by Sen. Lee Harris requiring local governments to hold a referendum before they take on “extraordinary” debt could run into opposition from his own City Council and municipal leaders across Tennessee.

36. Community Building -

Almost three years ago, former elementary school art teacher Erin Harris saw a video about children in Memphis who were working with an artist to start a sculpture garden. She still recalls the happy sight of a few boys in the video throwing balloons filled with paint at an old fence, as well as the reaction the footage generated from her.

37. Collins, Harris Discuss Tax Incentive Concerns -

Memphis City Council members Harold Collins and Lee Harris agree for the most part on the value of the Graceland expansion plan the council approved two weeks ago.

38. Pickard Joins Explorations on Tentative 2015 Ballot -

The contingency plans and other political maneuvering for the city of Memphis elections are well underway.

And a key part of the calculation is making plans for a change in plans.

Architect and planner Charles “Chooch” Pickard is one of several citizens running “exploratory” campaigns at this point.

39. Spillyards Leads Community Advisors Launch -

Greg Spillyards has joined the brokerage team at Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors to launch the firm’s Community Advisors service line.

Community Advisors is focused on the Memphis city core, with a goal to provide real estate advisory services to assist in the revitalization of the city’s underserved areas with passion, creativity and entrepreneurship, and with service to those already living and leading in their neighborhoods.

40. After the Campaign -

The 2014 election year began in January with dissent from the floor.

At the end of the Shelby County Democratic Party’s annual Kennedy Day fundraiser in January, former Memphis City Council member and state Rep. Carol Chumney, who was not among the speakers, challenged the party establishment from her table to do more to support women running for office.

41. Tigers Linebacker Harris Wins Academic Honors -

Memphis senior linebacker Charles Harris, who led the Tigers with seven tackles in last Friday’s 16-13 win at Temple, which made the team bowl-eligible, has been named to the Capital One Academic All-District 3 NCAA Division I Football Team.

42. Paragon Launches Small-Business Group -

Memphis-based Paragon Bank is expanding beyond the city, thanks to its launch of a new division focused on small-business lending.

43. Ole Miss, Memphis Move on to Next Hurdles -

Before they played the game, Ole Miss coach Hugh Freeze suggested it amounted to the “Super Bowl” for the University of Memphis. But in many respects it was more of a Blooper Bowl for both teams.

44. Memphis Linebacker Up for CLASS Award -

University of Memphis senior linebacker Charles Harris is one of 30 NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision student-athletes who has been selected a candidate for the 2014 Senior CLASS Award in collegiate football. To be eligible for the award, a student-athlete must be classified as an NCAA Division 1 FBS senior and have notable achievements in four areas of excellence – community, classroom, character and competition.

45. Late Cuts, Pickups Reveal Titans’ Talent Shortfall -

What exactly does it say about the Tennessee Titans that, after they made their own cut to 53 players, they were still sifting through the scrap heap of other teams’ cuts and making five more moves?

46. Millennials Bring ‘Out-of-the-Box Mentality’ to Workplace -

The young creatives included among the workforce at Sullivan Branding don’t just bring fresh thinking and out of the box perspectives to projects and client work.

This particular demographic, often tagged as millennials, also brings with it ideas about what a company culture should look like and how a workplace should operate – including its core values and strategic priorities – that all tend to stand apart from those ideas of older generations.

47. Graceland Campus Financing Relies on Tight Boundaries -

When Elvis Presley Enterprises breaks ground next week on the $75 million, 450-room hotel-resort it will build north of Graceland mansion, it will be the beginning of crossing something off the company’s wish list since Elvis Presley’s mansion opened for tours in the early 1980s.

48. Discriminate at the Ballot Box -

DISCRIMINATING TASTE. By all means, discriminate. Refuse to accept some prepackaged deal as the best you can do, some label to be the quality test. In the known, look for proven performance from each individual offering, standing alone, not just part of some group menu. In the unknown, demand fresh and bold, the promise of new and interesting interpretations from old and predictable ingredients.

49. Health Choice Selects Abisch to Lead Population Health Services -

Ellen Abisch has joined Health Choice LLC as senior director of population health services. In the newly created position, Abisch will be responsible for designing, implementing and managing population health and wellness programs for the Health Choice network.
Prior to joining the physician hospital organization, she served as manager of benefits and wellness for ServiceMaster.

50. Cannon Works for Golf Tournament's Success -

The putter and a few white golf balls sit next to a wall in Phil Cannon’s office at TPC Southwind. It seems logical, the long-time director of the FedEx St. Jude Classic having golf equipment within easy reach.

51. Council Unhappy With Budget Plans So Far -

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. got a rough reception at the Tuesday, April 1, Memphis City Council session as it set the stage for Wharton’s budget proposal to come in two weeks.

52. Tigers Don't Feel Like 'Cinderella' vs. 1 Seed Virginia -

RALEIGH, N.C. – The pressure valve that at times seems to control life for the Memphis Tigers had opened in the form of a 71-66 victory over George Washington in the NCAA Tournament’s round of 64.

53. Shelby County Party Heads Look Ahead to Primaries -

As Shelby County Democrats try to improve on losing every countywide office to Republicans in the 2010 county elections, party leaders are also warning political figures who identify as Democrats not to cross party lines.

54. Council Rethinking Streetlight Fee -

Memphis City Council members are rethinking the streetlight fee Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division has been charging.

The monthly fee has several different rates for homeowners, renters, small commercial property owners and large commercial property owners.

55. Breaking Through -

If it was just an abstraction or a mere theory, it wouldn’t have a definition in the dictionary or a website. It would simply be another urban myth.

But with a few keystrokes you can go right to www.glassceiling.com. And the dictionary definition of “glass ceiling” is tangible – “an unfair system or set of attitudes that prevents some people (such as women or people of a certain race) from getting the most powerful jobs.” In fact, you can almost see a woman stuck in middle management, briefcase in hand, staring up at that glass ceiling and wondering: Where do I find the ladder that gets me from here to there?

56. Council Rethinking Streetlight Fee -

Memphis City Council members are rethinking the streetlight fee Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division has been charging.

The monthly fee has several different rates for homeowners, renters, small commercial property owners and large commercial property owners.

57. County Primary Filing Deadline Arrives -

A couple of days before the filing deadline for candidates in the May county primaries, it looked like a political season with lots of action at the deadline itself.

The deadline is noon Thursday, Feb. 20, with another week for any candidates who meet that deadline to withdraw if they wish.

58. Destination: Memphis -

On a slow Sunday afternoon Downtown with the Broncos and Chargers NFL playoff game on a bar TV screen, a trio of 20-somethings – two men and one woman – watched the game, speculated about whether the Grizzlies were playing a few blocks away and quizzed one another about their plans for the future.

59. Business Leaders Optimistic About Local Economy -

As they have for a few quarters now, Memphis-area business leaders continue to acknowledge an incremental sense of optimism about specific aspects of their companies and the economy, according to the results of the third Memphis Economic Indicator.

60. City Council Talks Rules and Elections -

Memphis City Council members could vote in two weeks on a resolution expressing “no confidence” in Shelby County Elections Administrator Richard Holden.

61. City Council Talks Rules and Elections -

Memphis City Council members could vote in two weeks on a resolution expressing “no confidence” in Shelby County Elections Administrator Richard Holden.

62. Shelton Returns Home After Traveling Globe -

Before settling in for a career in law, Jack Shelton, an associate with Harris Shelton Hanover Walsh PLLC, needed to quench his thirst for travel.

63. Hollywood Poised for Best-Ever Box-Office Year -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Despite a string of summertime flops, Hollywood is expected to have a banner year at the domestic box office, coming in just shy of $11 billion, the largest annual take ever. But because of higher ticket prices, actual attendance at North American theaters remained flat after a decade of decline.

64. Archer-Malmo Announces Hires and Promotions -

Memphis-based marketing communications agency archer-malmo has made several hires and promotions across its account service, digital, public relations and media teams.

Beverly Mattingly has been promoted to senior vice president, group account director. She’s joining the management team and will report directly to archer-malmo CEO Russ Williams.

65. City Council Questions Pension Plan -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. plans to ask the Memphis City Council sometime in February or March to close the city’s defined benefits pension plan to new hires and those city employees with less than 10 years of service.

66. Archer-Malmo Announces Hires and Promotions -

Memphis-based marketing communications agency archer-malmo has made several hires and promotions across its account service, digital, public relations and media teams.

Beverly Mattingly has been promoted to senior vice president, group account director. She’s joining the management team and will report directly to archer-malmo CEO Russ Williams.

67. Crosstown Effort Shines as Development Example -

Construction documents for the $180 million revitalization of the Crosstown building were scheduled to be finished Friday, Dec. 6, with the project moving toward closing and construction in the next months.

68. Chisley Named CEO of Methodist North Hospital -

Gyasi C. Chisley has joined Methodist North Hospital as CEO. In his new role, Chisley will lead thousands of associates and aligned and contracted medical staff. He says that as health care transitions from volume to value, his platform is to grow outpatient practices, physicians and services while creating a viable patient-centered environment.

69. Next Step for Harris is Consulting Venture -

After stints as a digital media coordinator and technical writer for a handful of companies, Nicole Harris has decided to launch a digital media consulting business to pursue the work she loves full time – while also filling a need she keeps seeing go unaddressed.

70. Cousins Join Forces as Rosenblum & Reisman Law Firm -

As the law firm of Rosenblum & Reisman celebrates its 15th year in business, it is with the knowledge and a sense of accomplishment that clients have been treated with the utmost respect, and that fellow lawyers and staff are treated as family. Indeed, the principals, Jeff Rosenblum and Marc Reisman, are first cousins.

71. Council Grapples With Attrition Plan Reality -

Every version of a city budget the Memphis City Council and Mayor A C Wharton Jr. considered in June included a plan to lose 300 city employees through attrition for long-term savings toward meeting rising future debt obligations.

72. ‘Back to Life’ -

Memphis resident Geraldine Harris has been shopping at the Habitat for Humanity of Greater Memphis ReStore since it opened two years ago, finding discount prices and unique items she couldn’t locate anywhere else.

73. Council to Tackle Budget Leftovers -

Meeting for a third consecutive Tuesday, Memphis City Council members take up a few budget leftovers Tuesday, July 2, but also get to some items delayed because of the unusual budget deliberations.

74. Second Round Council Budget Plans Emerge -

Memphis City Council chairman Edmund Ford Jr. and council members Harold Collins and Lee Harris will have plans for the full council to consider when the body meets Tuesday, June 25, in special session.

75. Luttrell: City Has Year Left for Auto Inspections -

The city of Memphis has a contract with the state of Tennessee and the Environmental Protection Agency to perform auto emissions testing through the next fiscal year, according to Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell.

76. Property Tax Complicates Sales Tax Considerations -

Whether it is a tax hike or a tax rate hike, Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s proposed 28-cent increase in the city property tax rate has complicated the idea of a half-percent city sales tax hike to go on the ballot later this year if the property tax hike sticks.

77. Test Drive -

When car sharing meets the parking and driving practices of Memphians on the streets of Downtown, the encounter could go so many ways between bad and good.

So when Zipcar parked four cars in four on-street parking spaces Downtown last month, there were a lot of questions first about how car sharing works but also about whether the national trend would apply to a city with a unique driving culture.

78. Severance Pay Ups Ante in Auto Inspections Stand-Off -

Some on the Memphis City Council weren’t certain Tuesday, April 16, about going ahead with a severance package for the city employees who now work at city-run auto inspection stations.

The council entered the budget season for the new fiscal year that begins July 1 just minutes earlier with Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s budget address.

79. Safeways Crime Program Goes for Long Haul -

When Pierce Ledbetter, the CEO of LEDIC Management, signed up his company’s Autumn Ridge apartment complex for the federally funded Safeways anti-crime initiative in 2009, he was nervous.

And his apprehension was soon borne out as residents in the crime-ridden apartment complex reacted to the new regime of police cameras and stricter regulations on trespassers and unannounced visitors.

80. Malone Meets Challenges Head On at Helm of Carter Malone Group -

Deidre Malone describes the day she resigned from her 10-year tenure as a marketing executive with ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital as the day she “walked out on faith.”

81. Ticket Rush: Film Fans Hand Hollywood Record Cash -

LOS ANGELES (AP) – The big deal for Hollywood is not the record $10.8 billion that studios took in domestically in 2012. It's the fact that the number of tickets sold went up for the first time in three years.

82. Is Going Green Worth It? -

Ray’s Take No matter what your position on global warming, going green and using fewer natural resources still makes sense. Why not preserve as much quality of the air, water, and earth as possible for our grandchildren? It’s another form of saving for the future. Plus, a lot of times it can save you money as well.

83. Wells Fargo Survey: Retirement Picture Looks Grim -

If a Wells Fargo & Co. survey is any indication, there’s no way to sugarcoat it: The retirement years look bleak for a large swath of the U.S. population. Take the fact that, according to the survey, more than one-third of respondents might find themselves living close to poverty in their golden years. Those 34 percent expect their retirement income to be half of their current income.

84. Ciaramitaro Joins Grace-St. Luke’s as School Counselor -

Licensed clinical social worker Courtney Ciaramitaro has joined Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal School as school counselor. She will work primarily with middle school students.

Hometown: Memphis

85. Funding Approved for Felon Program -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration is retooling the city’s “Second Chance” program for felons just released from prison to become a joint city-county program with funding from the state.

86. Live in Memphis -

Memphis’ “Live at the Garden” summer concert series may soon have a permanent stage structure to call home.

One more place, among many in Memphis, to enjoy the sound of music.

87. Council Lowers Property Tax Rate, Approves $609M Budget -

Memphis City Council members approved a $3.11 city property tax rate Tuesday, June 5, to fund a city operating budget of $609,802,357 and Memphis City Schools to the tune of $64,819,307.

The split council vote came nearly 14 hours after the council’s day started at City Hall with a budget committee session in which the basic elements of the ultimate budget compromise were mapped out before noon.

88. Harris Named Payroll Specialist At New Patrick Payroll Div. -

Tammy Harris has been named the payroll specialist at Patrick Payroll, a newly branded division of the certified public accounting firm Patrick Accounting and Tax Services PLLC. Patrick Payroll is housed in Patrick Accounting’s office in Germantown.

89. Clearing Blockage -

The block of Madison Avenue between Main and Second streets hasn’t been easy for quite a while.

It’s where the Main Street Trolley makes the turn to its Madison Avenue leg. It’s also where the trolleys sit idle for long periods of time seemingly unaware that they coexist with auto traffic. Residents of the Exchange Building who don’t have paid parking routinely park there instead, sometimes despite numerous tickets.

90. UPDATE: Jury Hears Recording of Hit Man Talking With Petties Target -

Big drug dealers don’t count the money as soon as they make a drug deal. They wait until they leave the exchange to count it.

That was among the details offered Tuesday, Feb. 14, in the full-day of testimony by Orlando Pride, a long time member of the violent multi-state drug organization headed by Craig Petties.

91. Just Keep Reading -

Last July I wrote of Robert Harris’ “Imperium” and “Conspirata,” novels about the life of Cicero. The third of Harris’ trilogy on the Roman lawyer and consul is slated for release this year.

92. Shelby County DA Race Taking Shape -

With a month to the Dec. 8 filing deadline for the March 6 presidential and Shelby County primary elections, the coming race for Shelby County district attorney general is beginning to show signs of life. That is as voters in one part of Memphis prepare to decide the last election of 2011 this week.

93. City Passes New Wrecker Rules -

Memphis City Council member Harold Collins says he has become “the wrecker city councilman” – the council member who garners the lion’s share of complaints about rogue tow truck operators and complaints from tow truck operators.

94. Trinity Place Sells For Third Time In Five Years -

A Cordova retail center is under new ownership for the third time in five years. Atlanta-based Altus Real Estate Advisors LLC has purchased Trinity Place, 7990 Trinity Road, for $2.8 million.

95. Helping People Drives Campbell to Law Success -

After growing up in some of the poorest neighborhoods in Memphis, Christopher Campbell now works as a partner for Harris Shelton Hanover Walsh PLLC, one of the most respected law firms in the region.

96. Nasty Customers Should Make You Smile -

Poor service seems to always be on our radar, but what about poor customer behavior? I had a chance to watch that during a recent trip to Macy’s.

I was being helped at the checkout desk when a customer approached sales associate Emadeline Harris with an exchange. There are many ways I could describe the customer’s attitude, but let’s just say she had a chip on her shoulder and was on the offense. I tried to concentrate on my own transaction, but I was mesmerized by her loud and attacking manner. She all but accused Ms. Harris of trying to cheat her. I wish I had thought to use my video phone to record the event; it would make an awesome training video.

97. Shelby County Court Filings See Sharp Dropoff From Q2 -

Court filings in Circuit, Chancery and Probate Courts for the third quarter of 2010 were relatively unchanged from the same quarter of 2009 and down significantly from the second quarter of this year

98. Beale Street Chaos -

Four months after Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. announced the city was settling a Chancery Court fight over control of Beale Street with Performa Entertainment Real Estate Inc., Performa is in control of the daily business of the entertainment district.

99. Hospital Liens Top Court Activity -

The business of Shelby County’s civil courts saw some changes in the second quarter of 2010.

Divorces with and without children, normally the dominant category of cases filed in the nine divisions of Circuit Court, took a back seat to hospital liens.

100. Suspension Higlights Immigration Advocacy Issues -

When the Tennessee Supreme Court took up the appeal by a Memphis attorney of his one-year disciplinary suspension, the five judges also ventured into an area some federal judges have expressed concern about.