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Editorial Results (free)

1. Agricenter Harvest Festival To Be Held Oct. 15 -

The annual Agricenter Harvest Festival will be held Saturday, Oct. 15, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The event will be held at the Farmer’s Market Big Red Barn on Agricenter property, 7777 Walnut Grove Road, and is free to the public. Among the activities: pumpkin-painting, arts and crafts, hayrides, food, and entertainment by local bluegrass band Tennessee Ripple.

2. Commission Eyes Bolton High as Ag Career Center -

When Wade Bolton was shot and fatally wounded in Court Square in 1869 by a former partner in a slave trading firm, it continued a long-running feud across several years in which eight people altogether would die violently.

3. Templeton Compares Notes on Dicamba Drift Problems -

Tennessee Agriculture Commissioner Jai Templeton joked with a Memphis group last week during a visit to the city that pigweed gets called hogweed when it becomes a real problem for farmers.

It’s an old joke with new relevance as many area farmers have been battling pigweed in particular recently.

4. Agricenter’s FFA Field Day Teaches Students About a Growing Job Market -

As his students listened to presentations on everything from soil testing and diagnostic solutions to plot research and biogenetics to agricultural sales and service, Carol Mason wiped the sweat from his brow and said that standing in a filed at Agricenter International was to step foot into an different world.

5. County Commission Gives Agricenter $100,000 Grant -

Agricenter International has received a $100,000 Shelby County Commission Community Enhancement Grant to further the completion of the Agricenter Trail.

Agricenter Trail, a Greenprint Certified Project, is a partially paved path that starts on the west at the Pick Your Own Strawberry Patch and ends at Agricenter Farmer's Market on the east. The trail showcases the agricultural character of the region and when completed will provide views of production crops, research plots and the solar farm.

6. MATA Route Proposals Straighter, Include Airport, Shelby Farms Shuttles -

A set of 49 proposed route and service changes to the city’s bus system are focused primarily on bus schedules in southwest Memphis and the Memphis International Airport area.

There are also eight new proposed routes and shuttle services.

7. County Commission Gives Agricenter $100,000 Grant -

Agricenter International has received a $100,000 Shelby County Commission Community Enhancement Grant to further the completion of the Agricenter Trail.

Agricenter Trail, a Greenprint Certified Project, is a partially paved path that starts on the west at the Pick Your Own Strawberry Patch and ends at Agricenter Farmer’s Market on the east. The trail showcases the agricultural character of the region and when completed will provide views of production crops, research plots and the solar farm.

8. Agricenter Fundraiser Brings in $65,000 -

Agricenter International’s second annual Feast on the Farm fundraiser netted the organization more than $50,000 for its educational programs, which are offered free to students

The June 17 event drew some 350 people and raised more than $65,000 in gross income.

9. Agricenter Fundraiser Brings in $65,000 -

Agricenter International’s second Feast on the Farm fundraiser netted the organization more than $50,000 for its educational programs, which are offered free to students

The June 17 event drew some 350 people and raised more than $65,000 in gross income. The evening featured produce from the Agricenter farmer’s market and food prepared by local chefs. Annually, more than 4,000 students are educated at the Agricenter about agriculture and the origins of food.

10. The Week Ahead: June 27-July 3 -

It's been a long time coming, but Friday is the kickoff for wine sales in grocery stores. While you're getting your corkscrews ready, check out what else is going on this week – from a deadline in the greensward mediation process to a special superhero stop at St. Jude...

11. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

12. ‘I’m the Steak’ Norris Carries Haslam’s Agenda, Except... -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris refers to himself as a “meat and potatoes” legislator. The four-term Republican senator from Collierville, a self-described policy wonk, is considering a run for governor in 2018. But if the race boils down to charisma, he says the media will have to determine if he has enough to win the top office.

13. The Week Ahead: Feb. 22, 2016 -

Good morning Memphis. The Monday holidays are gone for a while, we’re afraid, but you’ve got a whole week to finish that work instead of just four days. Here are a few items to look forward to this week, led by the annual announcement of performers who will descend on Memphis this May for the Beale Street Music Festival.

14. Winners and Losers From Super Bowl 50’s Advertising Game -

The Super Bowl is the biggest advertising competition of the year. Brands that win big can reap the viral benefits for months to come. And those that fail do so publicly, oftentimes with mounting consumer criticism that can take just as long to overcome.

15. Crossroads Hospice Brings Sense of Mission, Purpose to End-of-Life Care -

There’s a dichotomy that quickly becomes apparent when visiting Crossroads Hospice’s Memphis office, at 1669 Shelby Oaks Drive, and talking to executives about what they do.

16. Karlen Evins Finds Her ‘Most Authentic Self’ in Farming -

A diminutive Karlen Evins walks from her vegetable garden to the reassembled church in which she lives, her arms full of just-picked corn, tomatoes, herbs and okra, and drops them on her kitchen counter.

17. Mallory Marks 90 Years With China Expansion -

Mallory Alexander International Logistics is preparing to expand and operate directly in China later this year with a highly coveted freight license from the Chinese government and the opening of the Mallory Asia Pacific division in Shanghai.

18. Best Hotel Rooms in Nashville – With or Without Helicopter -

Tod Roadarmel, director of sales and marketing for the nearly 2-year-old Omni Hotel downtown, is awestruck by the vitality of Nashville’s hospitality industry. In town since 1988, he remembers when pre-Bridgestone Arena Broadway was not a place you’d want to be late at night.

19. Judge D’Army Bailey’s Legacy Spans Streets, Courtroom -

Shelby County Circuit Court Judge D’Army Bailey was more than a robed courtroom figure. In the wake of his death Sunday, July 12, from cancer, Bailey is being remembered for a life of activism in which the judge had roots as a radical.

20. Circuit Court Judge D'Army Bailey Dies At Age 73 -

Shelby County Circuit Court Judge D’Army Bailey died Sunday, July 12.

Word of the 73-year old jurist’s death comes less than a year after Bailey returned to the bench, winning election to Circuit Court after retiring as a Circuit Court Judge in 2009.

21. Local Green News Piles Up, From Shelby Farms to CBU -

Chelsea Avenue Floodwall Becomes ‘Permission Wall’: The city’s renaissance of murals is taking a different form on the section of North Memphis floodwalls that are a border of sorts for the still developing Chelsea Greenline.

22. Local Restaurants ‘Certified’ for Healthful Approach -

Through a partnership between the Tennessee Department of Health and the United States Healthful Food Council, Eat REAL Tennessee has announced the first REAL-certified establishments in Memphis.

Responsible Epicurean and Agricultural Leadership is a growing national program that helps combat diet-related disease by recognizing food service operators committed to holistic nutrition and environmental stewardship.

23. Local Restaurants 'Certified' for Healthful Approach -

Through a partnership between the Tennessee Department of Health and the United States Healthful Food Council, Eat REAL Tennessee has announced the first REAL-certified establishments in Memphis.

Responsible Epicurean and Agricultural Leadership is a growing national program that helps combat diet-related disease by recognizing food service operators committed to holistic nutrition and environmental stewardship.

24. Welcome to the New Era of Automation -

When Netflix put the video rental retail stores in their coffins, there was still a sizable segment of people who missed the convenience, were suspect of a mail-order or streaming subscription service or simply didn’t have the connectivity to enjoy it.

25. Sounds Like a Hit for Neighbors -

For months, sounds of construction surrounded the Nashville Sounds’ sparkling new First Tennessee Park in Germantown.

The constant thump-thump-thump of pounding jackhammers competed with the irritating, high-pitched beeps of vehicles backing up. Ka-ching! Cranes lifted steel beams into place, keeping time with a syncopated thrumming of never-ending drilling. Ka-ching!

26. Leaving a Life They Love at Nashville Farmers’ Market -

Charles Hardy needs help loading a huge piece of his life: a massive white refrigerator that was part of the Nashville Farmers’ Market home he’s leaving – likely for good – after almost a half-century.

27. I Choose Memphis: Adele Landers -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Adele Landers

Job & company: Client Adviser, SunTrust Private Wealth Management

28. Market Square, Old City Vie for Knoxville Revelers -

Christmas wrapping packed away? Check. 2014 all but in the books? Check. Resolutions for 2015 made? Maybe. Check. Making plans for New Year’s Eve? Check. Check.

New Year’s Eve revelers have choices of how they want to ring in 2015 while celebrating a successful – or at least completed – 2014. There’s no time yet for making resolutions when two of the year’s biggest parties are about to blast Knoxville with noisemakers and fireworks.

29. ‘Amazing Food’ Explosion -

John Minervini quickly turns giddy whenever he’s talking about the food scene in Memphis.

He’s such a fan of the scene, in fact, that this freelance writer and pro-Memphis foodie recently decided to start an online venture called “The Fork” he aims to make a one-stop shop where readers can read about chefs, learn about seasonal ingredients and find a new place to eat in their neighborhoods.

30. A Perfect Union -

Union Ave Books buzzes with activity on a Tuesday afternoon as families from San Francisco and Paris browse the shelves in the children’s section.

A local customer, owner Flossie McNabb explains, has brought the travelers to her store during their East Tennessee visit.

31. A 'Barn Raising' Company Culture -

Let’s think like farmers for a minute. It has often struck me that if you want to develop practical solutions to problems, you should try to think like farmers. That’s because in general farmers are no-nonsense, practical-minded folks. Don’t get me wrong, I like out-of-the-box thinking as much as the next guy. However, there’s a time and a place for all kinds of thinking and when you need to solve a real-world problem quickly, you might want to try thinking like a farmer.

32. Alternative to Gordian-Knot Thinking -

I always liked the so-called Alexandrian solution. In summary, there was a length of rope tied into an unbelievably complex knot in a kingless kingdom located in an area that is considered modern day Turkey. It was called the Gordian knot; named after an ox-cart driving peasant farmer named Gordias.

33. River Infrastructure Fee Tough Sell in DC -

U.S. Rep. Stephen Fincher told a group of business owners and others who work on the Mississippi River that the political environment in Washington is changing.

Fincher is a member of the Congressional Mississippi River Caucus that is pushing for continuing funding for infrastructure along the river.

34. Turley: ‘You Can Be Somebody in Memphis’ -

Years after Henry Turley experienced the Memphis sanitation workers’ strike and the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, took advantage of the Community Reinvestment Act and persuaded banks to reinvest in the Downtown core, not to mention spearheaded revitalization in the Harbor Town and Uptown areas, he’s making a “micro bet” on building nice neighborhoods around excellent schools.

35. Cropping Up -

Earlier this month, workers at the Delta BioRenewables plant at Agricenter International loaded a commercial-sized batch of the processed sugar juice from crushed sweet sorghum stalks into a commercial tanker truck.

36. Midtown Utopia -

Of Memphis’ tales of humble beginnings, of which there are many, the fluctuating renaissance of the Cooper-Young neighborhood is certainly compelling throughout.

The area has cycled from its 19th century roots to 1970s crime and neglect to its present-day status as one of the largest historic districts in the Southeast, a magnet of all ages and walks of life. All thanks to individuals and organizations that wouldn’t settle for sub-par quality in their tiny town within the bustling Bluff City.

37. A Tasteful List 2012 -

A LIST YOU CAN SINK YOUR TEETH INTO. So many of you seemed to salivate over last year’s Tasteful List, I’ve updated it for 2012. While reduced some, make no mistake, there’s nothing dietary about it.

38. Drought-Stricken States Welcome Rain From Isaac -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – The remnants of Hurricane Isaac could bring welcome rain to some states in the Mississippi River valley this week, but experts say it's unlikely to break the drought gripping the Midwest.

39. Some Corn Farmers Mow Fields as Drought Worsens -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Some cornstalks in fields around the farm where David Kellerman works stand tall, but appearances can be deceiving. When the husks are pulled back, the cobs are empty. No kernels developed as the plants struggled with heat and drought.

40. Culinary Passion Began at Early Age for Doty -

A usual day for Jason Doty starts at about 2:30 a.m. The 38-year-old pastry chef is due at Bluff City Coffee’s new commercial kitchen in Pembroke Square by 4 a.m. to begin “the load for the day.”

41. Eat Local For Health, Economy -

Ray’s Take It’s the time of year when local farmers’ markets start to crop up. Patronizing these markets – along with other sources for locally grown food – can be beneficial to your health and taste buds, your family culture, and even have a positive impact on our local economy.

42. Increased Food Prices Passed Down the Chain -

The cost of your Thanksgiving dinner wasn’t much to be thankful for, was it?

Let’s put the situation in this light: According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, prices for 55 food commodities are at their highest level since tracking began in 1990.

43. New Perspective On ‘Growing’ Your Business -

Previously, I wrote about the fact that nature tends to get things right, and if you replicate patterns found in nature, you will likely be successful at whatever you desire to accomplish at work. Now let’s take things a step further and consider a situation where humans and nature must totally cooperate to accomplish a desired result: Let’s talk about farming.

44. Economy Has Little Effect on Fine Dining -

In the wake of 9/11, Estée Lauder Cos. chairman Leonard Lauder noticed his company was selling more lipstick than usual.

A 2008 New York Times article explained Lauder proposed lipstick purchases were a way to gauge the economy. When it’s shaky, he said in the article, women are more apt to boost their mood by buying inexpensive lipstick than pricey shoes.

45. Sea Bass Almost Didn’t Make McEwen’s Menu -

One in an occasional series on the signature dishes of local chefs.

The Pan Seared Chilean Sea Bass at McEwen’s on Monroe not only wasn’t foreseen as a signature dish, it wasn’t even supposed to be on the menu.

46. Agricenter Gives Region’s Ag Biz Place to Call Home -

In the daily hustle and bustle of city life, it’s easy for Memphians to forget that the urban pocket they call home sits amid one of the nation’s richest agricultural regions.

And the world’s largest urban farm, nonprofit Agricenter International at 7777 Walnut Grove Road, is continually working to create more awareness about farming through educational programs and to advance agricultural technologies through research and trials.

47. 25 Years Later, Financial Federal Still Going Strong -

It’s not hard these days to find a local bank trying to attract customers by promising how different it is from the competition.

It is hard, however, to find a bank that can make that claim for as many reasons as Financial Federal, which began its 26th year in business in 2011 with several milestones and announcements that unquestionably help the bank stand out.

48. When One Door Closes, Another Opens for Vaughn -

“By Jan. 2, there will no vestige of Grace,” said Ben Vaughn.

When Vaughn announced two weeks ago that Grace, his restaurant in Cooper-Young, was closing, it seemed like a throwback to the bad economy days of 2009, especially combined with other recent closings.

49. Election Guide 2010 -

A rundown of the key issues and races that voters will decide when they go to the ballot  for early voting through Oct. 28 or on Election Day, Nov. 2.

GOVERNOR'S RACE

Tennessee voters choose a successor to Gov. Phil Bredesen in the Nov. 2 elections. Here’s a summary of where Democratic nominee Mike McWherter and Republican nominee Bill Haslam stand on the major issues:

50. Archived Article: Real Briefs - Chamberlain & McCreery received top honors at the 2001 Vesta Home Show including the Peoples Choice award, which was decide

Chamberlain & McCreery received top honors at the 2001 Vesta Home Show including the Peoples Choice award, which w...

51. Archived Article: Memos - Gene Auerbach Named AutoZone's Gene Auerbach has joined AutoZone Inc. as senior vice president, store development. Auerbach previously was director of Asian operations for The Dairy Farm Co. and senior vice president, international, at PriceCostco. ...

52. Archived Article: Calendar - Aug Aug. 31 The Tennessee Society of Certified Public Accountants will offer a seminar from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. titled "An Engagement Approach to Researching, Evaluating and Understanding the Company" at the Fogelman Executive Center at...

53. Archived Article: Calendar - Aug Aug. 24 Memphis Area Radio Stations Association will present a seminar from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Ridgeway Inn at Poplar Avenue and Interstate 240. Consultant Irwin Pollack will discuss radio ad selling from 8:30 a.m. to noon and radio stat...

54. Archived Article: Calendar - Aug Aug. 18 The American Business Womens Association, Cotton Belles chapter, will meet at the Racquet Club, 5111 Sanderlin Ave. Networking begins at 5:45 p.m., and dinner will begin at 6:15. The speaker will be Paula Sedgwick, who was part of an ABW...

55. Archived Article: Calendar - Aug Aug. 18 The American Business Womens Association, Cotton Belles chapter, will meet at the Racquet Club, 5111 Sanderlin Ave. Networking begins at 5:45 p.m. and dinner will begin at 6:15. The speaker will be Paula Sedgwick, who was part of an ABWA...

56. Archived Article: Govt Briefs - The Tennessee Department of Human Services will administer Tennessees federally funded summer food service program, which fed a daily average of 38,575 children last summer The Tennessee Department of Human Services will administer Tennessees federa...

57. Archived Article: Govt Briefs - The Memphis/Shelby County Industrial Development Board has approved a 13-year payment in lieu of taxes (PILOT) program for an expansion of Cargills corn wet milling plant on Presidents Island. The expansion will involve a capital investment of close...