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Editorial Results (free)

1. Mayor Strickland Defends Anonymity Of Memphis Police Director Applicants -

Releasing the names of everyone who has applied for the job of Memphis Police Director would have “a chilling effect” on good candidates for the critical public safety post and “hurt public safety,” Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says.

2. Memphis Lawsuit Over Police Applicants Could Hinge on Nashville Legal Opinion -

The city of Memphis isn’t entitled to a list of everyone who applied for the job of Memphis Police director and will only get a list of five to six finalists from the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

3. City Responds to Police Search Lawsuit -

The city of Memphis isn’t entitled to a list of everyone who applied for the job of Memphis Police Director and will only get a list of 5 to 6 finalist from the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

4. Redbirds Home-Game Attendance Ahead of Last Season -

As this baseball season was dawning, new Memphis Redbirds majority owner Peter B. Freund was at AutoZone Park and being made to field questions about the team’s sliding attendance.

As recently as 2013, the Redbirds had drawn nearly 500,000 fans – averaging 7,223 tickets sold – to finish fifth in the 16-team Pacific Coast League attendance standings.

5. Last Word: Budget No Go, Largest Home Sale of 2016 and Crosstown Moves -

The Shelby County Commission probably has enough votes to approve the funding in the county budget the Shelby County Schools system wants, which includes $24.7 million on new funding.

Yet after about four hours of discussion, the commission didn’t take votes on any budget resolutions or the county property tax rate resolution Monday.

6. Hagler Launches Solo Practice as Real Estate Sector Picks Up -

Monice Moore Hagler grew up in a real estate family. Her father owned a real estate company and her brothers studied finance and real estate before going on to become brokers.

So of course it only made sense that she pursued a career in social work, where she worked with children on welfare and children who were placed for adoption. She worked closely with special needs adoptions, including older children who were more difficult to adopt.

7. Area Colleges Ramp Up Security in a World of Growing Violence -

Five years ago, a police officer with the University of Tennessee Health Science Center shot and killed a man. The man, who had just pulled out a gun at Regional One Health, was making his way down Dunlap Street to the UTHSC campus.

8. Last Word: The First Surrogate, Parkside at Shelby Farms and Manilow Memories -

Here they come, fresh from Iowa and New Hampshire – first the surrogates and in the next two weeks the Presidential contenders themselves.

The nation’s “first surrogate” – former President Bill Clinton is at Whitehaven High School Thursday evening to rally early voters in the heart of a large reliably Democratic middle class community.
And it is that voter base that was integral to Barack Obama carrying Shelby County in the 2008 Democratic Presidential primary even as Hillary Clinton carried the state that year.
As mentioned here Tuesday, the local Bernie Sanders campaign opens its Memphis HQ over the weekend.
Hillary Clinton headquarters in Memphis and Nashville are on the way soon with the Nashville HQ opening Thursday as the former President is in Whitehaven and the candidate is preparing for another television debate Thursday in Milwaukee with Sanders.
And early voting opened Downtown Wednesday.
The first day's turnout Wednesday was 177 early and absentee voters. Combined with another 645 absentee votes cast before the early voting period, that makes 822 early or absentee votes.
Another Republican contender on the ballot in Tennessee is out of the race. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie dropped out the day after his dismal finish in New Hampshire. He did not have a slate of delegates on the ballot here.

9. McMullen Takes on Public Sector Challenges as City’s Legal Chief -

Bruce McMullen remembers his hometown of Sparta, Georgia, as small, about 3,000 people.

“Life was pretty simple,” he said. “A lot of family, a lot of friends.”

10. Bertelkamp Made Right Call in Going with the Vols -

Bert Bertelkamp would be the first to tell you he’s pulling for Tennessee when calling basketball games as color commentator for the Vol Network.

And why wouldn’t he?

Bertelkamp is Big Orange to the bone. His father Hank played for the Vols (1951-53), was a team captain and remains a big supporter of UT.

11. In the Game -

Way back in the 1990s, perhaps before the Grizzlies and FedExForum were even a twinkle in anyone’s eye, Chris Wallace came to Memphis and The Pyramid for a preseason NBA game featuring Michael Jordan and the Chicago Bulls.

12. Reaves: Memphis Should Pay Share of Schools Liability -

The Shelby County commissioner who sought a legal opinion over who pays $1.1 billion of Shelby County Schools’ benefits liability says he has more questions.

Commissioner David Reaves requested the opinion from Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery in December through state Sen. Brian Kelsey.

13. Memphis City Schools Liability Questions Remain -

It’s been overshadowed by City Hall’s liability crisis of the last two years.

But who is ultimately responsible for more than $1 billion in liability for OPEB – other post employment benefits – of employees of the old Memphis City Schools system has been a question Shelby County government leaders have been pondering for some time.

14. Luttrell: State Likely to Mandate $1B Liability -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said the state of Tennessee will most likely move to require Shelby County Schools to fully fund its $1.5 billion liability for health insurance and similar employee benefits.

15. New Vols Coach Ready to Rebuild -

Tennessee coach Rick Barnes isn’t complaining about the shortcomings of his basketball team.

16. A List of Mayor-Elect Jim Strickland’s Appointments So Far -

Memphis Mayor elect Jim Strickland still has some appointments to make, but he is methodically filling key positions in his administration ahead of taking office Jan. 1.

17. Redshirting: Waiting an Extra Year to Start Kindergarten Has Its Risks -

Mary-Michael and Joe Horowitz know their son Armour, 5, can handle the academics of kindergarten. But instead of pushing him through to meet state age cutoff standards, they decided to delay his start until next year when he is older and emotionally ready.

18. Shifting Memphis Media Market, Like Every Other, In Flux -

Lauren Lee never picks up a newspaper. Which isn’t much of a surprise because she’s 33 years old, works in marketing, and has the technological savvy and finger dexterity to operate a smartphone.

19. Vols Nearly Set on Offense as Season Approaches -

With Tennessee’s football team three weeks into fall camp, the offensive depth charts are set at some positions, while others remain open.

UT coach Butch Jones enters the 2015 season with no questions at quarterback or running back. His has plenty of receivers and all should get their share of playing time.

20. Blues Foundation Taps Newman as CEO -

The Blues Foundation has selected a fourth-generation Memphian to succeed Jay Sieleman as president and CEO.

Barbara B. Newman will begin her new position Oct. 1. She comes to the Blues Foundation from Beth Sholom Synagogue, where she has served as executive director since 2007.

21. Acting Up -

The Knoxville area has a rich legacy of actors who have found success in show business: Patricia Neal, David Keith, Cylk Cozart, David Dwyer, John Cullum, Bruce McKinnon, Polly Bergen, Dale Dickey, Brad Renfro, Johnny Knoxville, perhaps the most famous of all, Dolly Parton, singer/songwriter turned actress.

22. Boner, Peel and a Reporter’s Call Spark a City’s Embarrassment -

Nashville’s mayor broke into a broad smile and funny walk, pointing across the main dining room at the old TGI Friday’s on Elliston Place to a young reporter seated at a long table with eight colleagues and friends.

23. Fast Growth for Knoxville Diocese -

For the smallest Catholic diocese in the U.S., the Knoxville diocese knows how to draw a crowd of movers and shakers.

At the April 19 groundbreaking for the new $25 million cathedral, the lineup of both secular and non-secular dignitaries attending a weekend of events was impressive.

24. Lofton Faces Yet Another Basketball Career Crossroad -

Chris Lofton is on the comeback trail again. The former Tennessee All-American guard is on the mend from a turf-toe injury that ended his 2014-15 season with Besiktas in Istanbul, the top level of Turkish pro basketball.

25. New Coach, Fans Will Keep Eye on Rocky Top League -

KNOXVILLE – Hoops fans, rejoice. Your summer basketball fix is almost here.

The Pilot Rocky Top League returns for its eighth year starting June 15 and should feature 11 players who will be on the University of Tennessee’s roster in 2015-16.

26. Tenn. Sports Hall of Fame Inducting 11 New Members -

Former Memphis and NFL wide receiver Isaac Bruce is among 11 new members of the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame being inducted Saturday night.

27. Ramsey Uses ‘System’ to Reshape State’s Political Landscape -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

28. Changing Hometown, Careers Pays Off for Hyams -

Jimmy Hyams moved to Knoxville from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in the summer of 1985 looking for a fresh start to his journalism career and found a job as a sportswriter for the Knoxville News Sentinel.

29. Sea You in Three Months -

If someone approached you and suggested you try living in an underwater habitat the size of a college dorm for three months, would you do it?

Aquanauts Bruce Cantrell and Jessica Fain jumped at the chance and even ended up breaking a world record while they were at it.

30. Big Leap From Hollywood Hustle to Nolensville ‘Barn’ -

The step-grandmother of Clark Gable’s granddaughter leans back in her chair inside the Mennonite furniture store and holds up a foot.

“Look. I’m wearing orange socks. I must be eccentric,” says Linda Roberts as a gray, misty day chases me from Nolensville Road into the worn building tucked against Mill Creek.

31. Manning Lecture Moving -

In the summer of 1966 I met Archie Manning in his hometown of Drew, Miss. In a game of touch football, I caught a pass or two from the future All-Pro quarterback. A few months later he spent a Friday night at my house in Greenville, after a dance to which he took a Greenville girl he was dating.

32. Former Miami Mayor Diaz to Speak in Memphis -

In his forward to former Miami mayor Manny Diaz’s book “Miami Transformed,” Michael Bloomberg said Diaz will go down in history as one of the country’s most innovative urban leaders.

33. Jones, Vols Make Honor Roll With Recruiting Class -

KNOXVILLE – Butch Jones has done it again.

Tennessee’s football coach has created a national buzz with his 2015 recruiting class.

UT finished with the No. 4 class in the nation as rated by 247Sports and ended up ranked No. 5 by Rivals when the Feb. 4 national signing day was over.

34. From the Edge -

“[I]f you’re not living on the edge, you’re probably taking up too much room.” This lyric, from a 1998 folk song bearing David Roth’s byline, appears earlier in H. Jackson Brown Jr.’s 1993 book, “Live and Learn and Pass It On.”

35. Campbell’s Gamble Finally Pays With Scholarship -

KNOXVILLE – Galen Campbell might get to play a minute here or there as the University of Tennessee men’s basketball team pursues its surprising run toward bubble status for the NCAA tournament.

36. Randy Odom Named CEO of Memphis Athletic Ministries -

Randy Odom has been named president and chief executive officer of Memphis Athletic Ministries. Odom joined MAM in 2006 as a neighborhood center director and became chief operating officer in 2012. In his new role, he oversees all operations and programming for 10 neighborhood youth centers that serve more than 900 underserved youth after school each day.

37. Vols Take Plenty of Momentum Into Offseason -

KNOXVILLE – There’s nothing like going into the offseason on a high note. The Vols will be riding the momentum from the resounding 45-28 victory against Iowa in the Jan. 2 TaxSlayer Bowl through the end of recruiting season, winter workouts, spring practices and into the summer months.

38. UT’s Tyndall Winning Fans Despite NCAA Investigation -

KNOXVILLE – Donnie Tyndall has hardly slowed down since the former Southern Miss head coach took over Tennessee’s basketball program in April.

Of course, Tyndall had little choice.

39. Recruiting Wars -

Memphis Grizzlies point guard Mike Conley is in his eighth year in the NBA. But he’s just 27 years old and his 10-year class reunion at Lawrence North High School in Indianapolis is still an event in the future.

40. Spillyards Leads Community Advisors Launch -

Greg Spillyards has joined the brokerage team at Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors to launch the firm’s Community Advisors service line.

Community Advisors is focused on the Memphis city core, with a goal to provide real estate advisory services to assist in the revitalization of the city’s underserved areas with passion, creativity and entrepreneurship, and with service to those already living and leading in their neighborhoods.

41. Skip Check-In; Latest Hotel Room Key is Your Phone -

NEW YORK (AP) – Hotels don't want guests to have to linger at the front desk – or even stop by at all.

New programs are helping speed up the check-in process for busy travelers, or in at least one case, letting them go straight to their rooms by using their smartphone to unlock doors.

42. Events -

Vatterott Career College will hold a car, bike and truck show open house Wednesday, Oct. 29, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 6991 Appling Farms Parkway. Attendees can explore vehicles and learn about careers in powersports, diesel and more. Visit vatterott.edu.

43. Events -

The Orpheum Theatre will present “Once” Tuesday, Oct. 28, through Nov. 2 at the theater, 203 S. Main St. Buy tickets at orpheum-memphis.com.

44. Jones’ Wide Net Gathers Old Friends, Top Prospects -

Butch Jones was sitting in the office of Knoxville’s South-Doyle High School athletic director and football coach Clark Duncan during a visit to see recruit Jocquez Bruce last winter.

45. Vols: Looks Like 6-6 Season -

Pull out your 2014 schedules, UT fans.

Fall camp is done, and it’s time to get in game-week mode with the season opener against Utah State fast approaching.

So go to the little box next to each of UT’s opponents on the 2014 schedule and pick the winner.

46. Harris Files Ford Challenge at Deadline -

Memphis City Council member Lee Harris is challenging Democratic state Sen. Ophelia Ford in the August primary for District 29, the Senate seat held by a member of the Ford family since 1975.

47. Events -

Literacy is Key: A Book and Author Affair, sponsored by the Memphis Alumnae Association of Kappa Kappa Gamma, will be held Thursday, Jan. 30, at 11 a.m. at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis, 3700 Central Ave. The program will feature W. Bruce Cameron, Joshilyn Jackson and Molly Crosby. Tickets start at $45; proceeds benefit First Book Mid-South. Visit memphiskkg.org.

48. 15 Vie for County Commission Seat -

Shelby County Commissioners will interview a group of 15 citizens Wednesday, Jan. 8, who want to become the newest member of the elected body.

The committee session interviews come before the full commission is to vote Monday, Jan. 13, on a replacement for Commissioner Wyatt Bunker.

49. Fred’s Opens New Super Dollar in Memphis -

Memphis-based general merchandise retailer Fred’s Inc. began the year reporting a revenue uptick in January, and it’s ending the year with the opening of a new fred’s Super Dollar store in Memphis.

50. This week in Memphis history: December 13-19 -

2010: In The Memphis News cover story on new leadership at The Regional Medical Center at Memphis, MED president and CEO Reginald Coopwood said, “It was somewhat daunting in that, ‘Am I the closer, the guy who’s coming in to close the organization down, or is there an opportunity?’”

51. Darker’s Diverse Background Translates Into Right Career -

Legalese is the formal language of the law that comes across as gibberish to those without a juris doctorate. For attorney Tatine Darker, though, it’s just one more etymological arrow in her quiver of languages.

52. Wealthy Business Executives Eye Political Races -

CHICAGO (AP) – He has never been elected to anything, not even "student council in high school," as he boasts. He has little patience for schmoozing. In dealing with people, he admits to being "pretty blunt" - more suited to running a large private equity firm, which Bruce Rauner did successfully for 30 years, than seeking votes for governor, which he intends to do in Illinois next year.

53. SEC Seeks to Prolong Football Dominance -

HOOVER, Ala. – There is no effort at denial. Nor should there be or could there be. Southeastern Conference Commissioner Mike Slive began his annual address at football media days by mentioning his “annual brag bag” and then spilled the entire contents while barely taking a breath:

54. Horseshoe Celebrates Newly Minted Millionaires -

Horseshoe Casino & Hotel Tunica recently hosted a Millionaire Maker dinner for eight of its weekly $1 million winners in the Millionaire Maker promotion dubbed “One Winner. One Million Dollars. Every Saturday.”

55. Christian Brothers Names Doyle Vice President of Student Life -

Tim Doyle has joined Christian Brothers University as associate vice president of student life. In the role, Doyle supervises multiple aspects of campus operations – including housing, student government, health services and Greek organizations – working to address non-academic student needs and help students develop into active, engaged alumni.

56. Fisher Named Director Of Economic Development -

Gwyn Fisher has been named the greater Memphis regional director of economic and community development by the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development. In her new role, Fisher will work with companies, municipalities and stakeholders in Shelby, Fayette, Tipton and Lauderdale counties to create jobs, attract new businesses and expand existing businesses.

57. Kramer Given Crystal Award by Carwash Association -

Bruce Kramer, an attorney with Apperson Crump PLC, has been given the Crystal Award by the International Carwash Association for his 20 years of service as the association’s general counsel. The association, which was started in Memphis in 1955, is comprised of 15,000 professional car wash operators, retailers and suppliers in 25 nations.

58. Arkansas Lawmaker Files In-State Tuition Proposal -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Some illegal immigrants would be able to pay in-state tuition rates at Arkansas colleges and universities under a proposal a state lawmaker introduced Monday that aims to provide more education opportunities for students who entered the country as children.

59. Phillips Joins Spirco as Manager, Vice President -

Mike Phillips has joined Spirco Manufacturing as general manager and vice president of operations. In his new role, Phillips will oversee all divisions of the metal-building manufacturer and direct its organizational needs.

60. US Poverty Rate 15 Percent; Record Numbers Persist -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The ranks of America's poor remain stuck at a record 15 percent, the Census Bureau reported Wednesday.

Roughly 46.2 million people remained below the poverty line in 2011, unchanged from 2010. The figure is the highest in more than half a century.

61. Brown Joins REACH As Vice President -

Stephen Brown has joined REACH Human Capital as vice president of business development. In his new role, Brown will assist companies in selecting and training employees.

62. Modern Crossword Humor -

The past two weeks I’ve highlighted some stuff in New York Times crossword history that served to give crosswords a bad name. That is, obscure, nobody’s-ever-heard-of-‘em words and their clumsy, who-gives-a-darn clues. My focus was exclusively on the Farrar and Maleska Eras, so called for the Times’ first and third puzzle editors.

63. School of Rock Germantown to Hold Grand Opening -

National music store School of Rock will hold its official grand opening on Saturday, Aug. 11, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., adjacent to Lane Music at 9309 Poplar Ave.

64. Events -

The Memphis alumni chapter of LeMoyne-Owen College will kick off the Jerry C. Johnson Sports Weekend with a ceremony renaming the school’s gymnasium to the C. Arthur Bruce Hall/Jerry C. Johnson Gymnasium Thursday, June 14, at 10 a.m. at LOC, 807 Walker Ave. Call 435-1235.

65. Events -

Talk Shoppe will meet Wednesday, June 13, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. at Hutchison School, 1740 Ridgeway Ave. Anthony Bradley of The Bradley Law Firm PLLC will present “The Truth About the VA Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit.” Cost is free. Contact Jo Garner at 482-0354.

66. Worldly View -

Ron Paul would feel right at home in the Economic Club of Memphis audience next week.

Duke University professor Bruce Caldwell will speak to the club Thursday, March 15, to make a presentation titled “Some (mostly) Austrian insights for these trying times.” That’s Austrian, as in the Austrian school of economic thought represented by a particular brand of deficit hawkishness, bailout-ballyhooing and bristling against big government that Paul the perennial Republican presidential candidate loudly champions.

67. Manassas High’s Story Part of Memphis’ Story -

Alocal white businessman volunteers to lead a struggling inner-city football team to an undefeated season, yielding an Oscar-winning documentary film.

It sounds like a story right out of the pages of the old Manassas High School that stood for decades in the center of a North Memphis that no longer exists – racially segregated by law, a place where factories stood along side modest neighborhoods.

68. By Any Other Name … -

A couple of weeks ago, I devoted almost an entire column to one item of viewer mail. No one complained, so I might as well do it again. Less than a week after hearing from Carole Hanna of Memphis, I heard from Daphine Craig:

69. Tony Being Tony at Center of Grizz Roller Coaster Season -

Tony Allen is the middle of everything.

If the Grizzlies are making a frantic comeback, like they did recently at home to beat the Denver Nuggets in overtime, Allen is in the highlight reel blocking the shot of Denver forward Al Harrington as he barrels down the lane toward the rim, the potential game-winning basket in hand, Allen flying out of nowhere like some sort of Grit & Grind Superhero.

70. Wharton Keeps Most Division Directors, Shifts Some Duties -

Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. is keeping the same team of division directors except two for his full four year term of office that started Sunday.

But the administration’s lobbyist in Nashville, TaJuan Stout Mitchell, is retiring and the position will change to be more of a contact person with the Memphis City Council instead of state legislators in Nashville.

71. Binkley Promoted to VP at Boyle -

Les Binkley has been promoted to vice president at Boyle Investment Co.

Hometown: Memphis

72. Events -

Bank of America will host a free customer outreach event at which customers can meet face to face with home retention specialists to review options for home loan modifications Friday, Sept. 30, and Saturday, Oct. 1, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Memphis Cook Convention Center, 255 N. Main St. To register or for more information, visit www.bankofamerica.com/homeownerevent or call 1-855-201-7426.

73. Nearly 1 in 6 Americans in Poverty, Census Says -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The ranks of the nation's poor have swelled to a record 46.2 million – nearly 1 in 6 Americans – as the prolonged pain of the recession leaves millions still struggling and out of work. And the number without health insurance has reached 49.9 million, the most in over two decades.

74. The Show Must Go On -

LIVE APPLAUSE. All are in the cast, all responsible for the experience, and all of us have a lot to show for it.

The lines may be drawn on a two-by-four to guide a saw instead of spoken on stage to guide an audience. The song might be whistled to accompany a hammer instead of sung to accompany a chorus. Equal parts sewing needles and director needling. Equal props for props and performances. Equal respect for those who guide you to your seat and those whose talent stands you straight up from it.

75. Retailers Post Strong June Sales -

NEW YORK (AP) – Colossal discounts enticed consumers to shop like it was 1999 last month. But higher prices ahead could cause the party to end soon.

Warm weather and discounts of up to 80 percent on summer merchandise helped retailers deliver the best revenue gains since June 1999 in what's typically the second-biggest shopping month of the year. But pressure on stores to pass along higher costs for everything from clothing and handbags to food has raised concerns that the momentum may not continue heading into the busy back-to-school shopping season.

76. Events -

St. George’s Independent School will host the second session in its early-learning speakers series titled “The Amazing Adventure: Making the Most of the Parenting Experience” Monday at 6:30 p.m. at St. George’s Germantown campus, 8250 Poplar Ave. The session will feature St. George’s Director of Early Childhood Dr. Stewart Burgess and Dr. William Fesmire, board-certified pediatrician. The series is free and open to the public for parents and educators. For more information, call 261-2390 or visit www.sgis.org.

77. Alexander Questions Federal Standards -

U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander says the federal government should stop grading schools as part of the federal No Child Left Behind standards.

“I think it’s time to get Washington out of the business of announcing whether schools in Germantown and Collierville are succeeding or failing,” the Tennessee Republican told a group of about 200 Thursday at the Germantown Chamber of Commerce monthly luncheon.

78. Puzzling Tourney 2011 -

Brooklyn, N.Y. – My annual trek to the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament began before daylight March 17. It was St. Patrick’s Day, and I forgot to wear green. Fortunately, I had my green pen in my pocket.

79. Agricenter Gives Region’s Ag Biz Place to Call Home -

In the daily hustle and bustle of city life, it’s easy for Memphians to forget that the urban pocket they call home sits amid one of the nation’s richest agricultural regions.

And the world’s largest urban farm, nonprofit Agricenter International at 7777 Walnut Grove Road, is continually working to create more awareness about farming through educational programs and to advance agricultural technologies through research and trials.

80. Bloom Joins Good Advertising -

Audra Bloom has joined Good Advertising as senior account manager.

Hometown: Delaware, Ohio

81. 70 New State Teachers Get National Certification -

NASHVILLE (AP) – The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards has announced 70 new Tennessee teachers have earned National Board Certification in 2010.

It's a 17.2 percent increase over last year.

82. School Report Card Delayed Until January -

The state is late – so late that long overdue data on adequate yearly progress (AYP) by students and the state report cards for schools will wait until a new administration takes office in Nashville.

83. Ramsey Hits Haslam, Wamp for Celebrities on Trail -

CROSSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Bill Haslam and Zach Wamp are drawing on the help of some prominent friends as they hit the trail for the last days of the Republican gubernatorial campaign in Tennessee.

84. Crump Makes His Name In Local Real Estate -

His surname is synonymous with Memphis political history, but Patrick Crump’s passion lies in Memphis real estate.

85. Bill Would Prohibit Teaching of Gay Relationships -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) - A Democratic lawmaker opposed to legislation that would prohibit teaching about gay relationships in Tennessee public schools told the Republican sponsor on Wednesday that the practice is a "figment of his imagination."

86. UPDATE: Memphis Speaker Says Berwick To Head CMS -

Dr. Donald Berwick will be named director of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, according to a Washington health lawyer speaking in Memphis who once worked for the agency.

“It’s not been announced, but I will tell you it’s going to be Don Berwick,” Bruce Fried said in a lecture Friday at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law. “Dr. Don Berwick, a primary care physician who is director of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement in Boston, who I think is by any measure the thought leader on how do you improve the quality and performance of the health care system – not just quality but efficiency as well. I’ve known this for some time. There was interest in the balloon floated today. There are a couple of articles that rumor has it Berwick has been named.”

87. Schools Face Big Budget Holes as Stimulus Runs Out -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - The nation's public schools are falling under severe financial stress as states slash education spending and drain federal stimulus money that staved off deep classroom cuts and widespread job losses.

88. Bornblum Honored with New Southwest Library -

The Bert Bornblum Library, a new 69,300-square-foot building at Southwest Tennessee Community College’s Macon Cove campus, was named in a ceremony earlier this month.

Among the speakers was John Farris of the Tennessee Board of Regents, who explained that the naming of Board of Regents-governed facilities is a serious matter.  

89. UTHSC College of Medicine Names Smith Interim Dean -

J. Lacey Smith has been named interim dean for the College of Medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

Smith currently serves as the associate dean of clinical affairs for the College of Medicine and the chief medical officer and executive vice president for UT Medical Group Inc.

90. After the Fall: The messy cleanup of Stanford Financial -

R. Allen Stanford, the Texas billionaire now passing time in a Texas jail for his role in what U.S. regulators have called a “massive Ponzi scheme,” once told a roomful of his employees they ought to have three priorities in life.

91. Mass. Senate Delays Debate on Kennedy Interim Bill -

BOSTON (AP) - Massachusetts Republicans temporarily blocked Senate debate Friday on a bill allowing Gov. Deval Patrick to name an interim appointment to the U.S. Senate seat left vacant by the death of Edward Kennedy.

92. Malone Gears Up for County Mayor Run -

Shelby County Commissioner Deidre Malone stood under a carport in Orange Mound earlier this week and kicked off her campaign for Shelby County mayor in 2010.

The timing of the campaign kickoff at her grandparents’ house with her mother, other family members and her friends in attendance had been planned months ago to follow the end of Malone’s year-long tenure as County Commission chairwoman. Malone turned over the chair Monday to fellow Commissioner Joyce Avery.

93. MERI Names Roberts Human Resources Coordinator -

Nancy Roberts has joined the Medical Education & Research Institute (MERI) as human resources coordinator.

Roberts joins MERI after working as vice president of organization development for a large apartment real estate investment trust. In addition, Roberts has more than 15 years of HR experience, including serving in the human resources capacity for a large retail operation and a large marketing firm.

94. State Budgets Being Delayed by Stimulus Debate -

NEW YORK (AP) - Uncertainty over the final scope of the $800 billion-plus economic stimulus plan in Congress has delayed budget action in some states while governors and legislators wait to see how much federal relief they can expect for their cash-strapped programs.

95. Thompson Case Points To Shady Culture -

Former Shelby County Board of Commissioners member Bruce Thompson told a federal judge this week his behavior was “anomaly.”

96. Thompson Draws Six Month Prison Sentence - $10,000 Fine - Former Shelby County Commissioner Bruce Thompson was sentenced Wednesday to six months in prison and fined $10,000 for telling executive of a Jackson, Tn. construction company that he could influence votes on the Memphis school board.

Thompson was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Jon P. McCalla on one count of mail fraud.

Under federal sentencing guidelines, he could have been sentenced to 21-27 months in prison.

But the plea deal from Thompson's February guilty plea would have allowed Thompson to withdraw his guilty plea if he was sentenced to more than a year and a day in jail. McCalla could have rejected it and the case would have moved toward trial. But McCalla accepted the recommendation of the prosecution and defense to depart from the guidelines.

"I'm here to accept responsibilities for my actions," Thompson told McCalla before the sentence was imposed. "I never expected to be here. ... My reputation has certainly taken a beating. I've spent 25 years building a reputation that's certainly been trashed."

Thompson termed his criminal behavior an "anomaly." His attorney, Leslie Ballin, argued for probation.

McCalla agreed Thompson's behavior in the case was "aberrant." But he also said a prison sentence was called for as a deterrent.

"This is a difficult concept. It only works if people know what happens," McCalla said, referring to the certainty of jail time.

Ballin argued in his position paper that Thompson’s sentence should be determined based on the $7,000 instead of the more than $200,000 Thompson was to be paid by the two construction firms. He also contended Thompson wasn’t using his office as a county commissioner to influence the school board.

“H&M suffered no loss and Thompson only received the fair market value of services rendered by way of his arms-length consulting contract,” Ballin wrote.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Tim DiScenza disagreed on the harm done even if Thompson didn’t influence the outcome.

“Whether or not campaign contributions were required to be given in order for H&M Construction Company to win contract approval is irrelevant, as it is uncontested that the defendant conveyed to H&M .... managers that said contributions would in fact be needed to influence the awarding of the contract,” DiScenza wrote in the government’s position paper submitted last week.

McCalla sided with DiScenza in his ruling and the higher amount was a factor in the prison sentence.

Thompson had no comment as he left the Federal Building Wednesday. The federal Bureau of Prisons will determine where and when he reports to prison.

Several dozen family members and friends were in the courtroom to show support. Rev. Craig Strickland, pastor of Hope Presbyterian Church, testified as a character witness for Thompson. He asked McCalla for leniency.

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97. Thompson Gets Six Month Jail Sentence -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Bruce Thompson was sentenced this evening to six months in prison and fined $10,000 for telling executive of a Jackson, Tn. construction company that he could influence votes on the Memphis school board.

Thompson was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Jon P. McCalla on one count of mail fraud.

Under federal sentencing guidelines, he could have been sentenced to 21-27 months in prison.

But the plea deal from Thompson's February guilty plea would have allowed Thompson to withdraw his guilty plea if he was sentenced to more than a year and a day in jail. McCalla could have rejected it and the case would have moved toward trial. But McCalla accepted the recommendation of the prosecution and defense to depart from the guidelines.

"I'm here to accept responsibilities for my actions," Thompson told McCalla before the sentence was imposed. "I never expected to be here. ... My reputation has certainly taken a beating. I've spent 25 years building a reputation that's certainly been trashed."

Thompson termed his criminal behavior an "anomaly." His attorney, Leslie Ballin, argued for probation.

McCalla agreed Thompson's behavior in the case was "aberrant." But he also said a prison sentence was called for as a deterrent.

"This is a difficult concept. It only works if people know what happens," McCalla said, referring to the certainty of jail time.

Leaders of H&M Construction Company, who hired Thompson in 2004 to win a contract to build three Memphis city schools had some vocal misgivings about what Thompson was doing.

The reservations are detailed in an excerpt from an FBI report in what became a federal corruption case.

The FBI report excerpt, also known as a “302,” was filed as part of Ballin’s argument that Thompson should avoid prison time and instead be sentenced to probation.

Back and forth

Thompson admitted taking $7,000 in 2004 from two construction firms, H&M Construction and Salton-Fox Construction of Memphis. The payment was made to Thompson after he told the companies’ executives he could control votes on the Memphis City Schools board because of his position as a county commissioner. The companies, working in partnership, were seeking the construction contract.

Thompson quibbled about his precise role, according to the FBI report on its interview with James E. Campbell of H&M.

“I’m not lobbying, I’m consulting,” Campbell quoted Thompson as saying.

Campbell drew up a consulting contract, but Thompson never signed it.

Campbell had five meetings with Thompson when he spotted Thompson on H&M’s parking lot in Jackson talking with another company official, Dewitt Day. Thompson asked Campbell what he thought about making campaign contributions to four school board members.

“It looks like this for that,” Campbell remembered replying.

He said Thompson’s response was, “It’s legal to do.”

Campbell planned to write the campaign contribution checks and “it was agreed Thompson would deliver the checks to the recipients.”

“While writing the first check, Campbell decided it didn’t look good for H&M to give campaign contributions to these individuals,” the FBI report reads. “Campbell then thought about using H&M subcontractors to give the contributions but ultimately decided Day could give the $7,000 to his relatives in Memphis and have them deliver the contributions in their name.”

Day “grabbed” $7,000 and drove to Memphis, according to the FBI. His brother-in-law also didn’t like the looks of the money exchange and consulted attorney and former Memphis City Council member John Bobango.

“Bobango advised Day not to give these campaign contributions because H&M already had the (school board) votes to win approval,” the FBI 302 reads. Campbell told Thompson and others, including construction executive Kirby Salton, that the deal was off.

“Thompson and Salton went on to say that the four individuals would be disappointed and Campbell got the impression the ‘votes could go the other way,’” according to the report. It was Thompson’s conduct during the conference call that broke the law, Ballin conceded.

Campbell then wrote Salton a check for $7,000 and “never questioned Salton on whether he delivered the campaign contribution to the four individuals.”

Money differences

Ballin argued in his position paper that Thompson’s sentence should be determined based on the $7,000 instead of the more than $250,000 Thompson was paid by the two construction firms. He also contended Thompson wasn’t using his office as a county commissioner to influence the school board.

“H&M suffered no loss and Thompson only received the fair market value of services rendered by way of his arms-length consulting contract,” Ballin wrote.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Tim DiScenza disagreed on the harm done even if Thompson didn’t influence the outcome.

“Whether or not campaign contributions were required to be given in order for H&M Construction Company to win contract approval is irrelevant, as it is uncontested that the defendant conveyed to H&M .... managers that said contributions would in fact be needed to influence the awarding of the contract,” DiScenza wrote in the government’s position paper submitted last week.

McCalla sided with DiScenza in his ruling and the higher dollar amount was a factor in the prison sentence.

Salton and school board members Wanda Halbert, Sara Lewis, Willie Brooks and Hubon Sandridge all testified before the federal grand jury that indicted Thompson. Salton said publicly that he paid several thousand dollars to a campaign worker for Halbert, who has since been elected to the Memphis City Council. Halbert denied any knowledge of getting the cash but listed on an amended campaign finance report $2,000 that was lost.

DiScenza said in February that the four school board members mentioned by Thompson but never identified in court were not aware of the deal, and none has ever been charged with taking the money.

Thompson had no comment as he left the Federal Building this evening. The federal Bureau of Prisons will determine where and when he reports to prison.

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98. Caraway Named ‘Rising Star’ By Midsouth Superlawyers -

Kirk Caraway of Allen, Summers, Simpson, Lillie & Gresham PLLC has been selected as a “Rising Star” in the field of Labor and Employment Litigation by Law & Politics Midsouth Superlawyers publication for 2008.

99. UT Medical Group Names Martin VP of Corporate Compliance -

Linda Martin has joined UT Medical Group Inc. as vice president of corporate compliance.

100. Events -

The Memphis Bar Association, IPSCO and TRT Inc. will present two three-hour dual credit continuing legal education seminars today and Dec. 15 at The Crescent Club, 6075 Poplar Ave. The morning session will be from 8:45 a.m. to noon and the afternoon session will be from 1 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. The presenter for both sessions is Dr. William D. Brown, an ethicist and clinical psychologist in private practice in Washington. Cost is $199 for each seminar. Cost for those attending both the morning and afternoon sessions on the same day will be $380. To register, visit www.trtcle.com or call 800-672-6253.