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Editorial Results (free)

1. View From the Hill: ‘Moral Mondays’ Draw Crowds, But Are Lawmakers Listening? -

Johnny and Julie Erwin don’t look like typical protesters, but the senior couple joined the “moral Mondays” ruckus recently at the State Capitol, Johnny wearing his Air Force cap and Julie holding a list of social legislation they oppose.

2. State Lawmakers Confronted Over Anti-LGBT Bills -

NASHVILLE – The unveiling of legislation undercutting same-sex marriage and enforcing transgender bathroom rules turned into a short-circuited press conference and confrontation Wednesday, Feb. 15.

3. Criswell Take Reins As MAAR Board President -

Tommie Criswell has begun her yearlong tenure as president of the Memphis Area Association of Realtors’ board of directors. Criswell has actively volunteered with MAAR for more than 20 years. At Crye-Leike East Memphis, where she serves as broker/manager, she focuses on residential real estate along with some commercial real estate sales. 

4. Dr. Bethune Was True Fundraiser -

In the early 1950’s, I had the honor to hear Dr. Mary McLeod Bethune speak in a packed, hot and humid Clayborn Temple in Downtown Memphis. She was a powerful orator. She mesmerized me, she mesmerized the crowd. She raised money for Bethune-Cookman College the old fashioned way: “She passed the hat.” 

5. The Week Ahead: February 13-19 -

Music is a common theme this week, which is nice to know, isn’t it, Memphis? And the sounds of other balls – not the dribbling kind – will take the stage again as the Memphis Open gets into swing and the University of Memphis throws its first real pitch of the 2017 season. Check out this week's list of need-to-know happenings...

6. Last Word: Impasse Flashback, Pot Alliances in Nashville and The Age of Etsy -

The late 1970s – bell bottoms, punk rock, disco, that perpetual haze floating over those lucky enough to get the most expensive concert seats for as much as $10 each on the floor of the Mid-South Coliseum… and yes, the impasse ordinance.

7. Arkansas Breaks From Other Red States on Sanctuary Campuses -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Arkansas lawmakers rejected a proposal Tuesday to block funding to colleges and universities that don't cooperate with federal immigration authorities, a stance that differs with other Republican states targeting campuses and cities offering sanctuary to immigrants in the country illegally.

8. Repeal of Health Law Could Mean Women Pay More for Less -

WASHINGTON (AP) – From a return to higher premiums based on gender, to gaps in coverage for birth control and breast pumps, experts say women could end up paying more for less if the Obama-era health care law is repealed.

9. What are the Odds? Blackburn is Still the Favorite -

Tennessee has its search firm and its search committee is in place to find the replacement for Dave Hart as the university’s athletic director.

Hart announced last August he would retire June 30, and with Tennessee undergoing a transition in its chancellor’s position, the search for Hart’s replacement was put on the back burner.

10. Last Word: The TVA Well Controversy, Fred Smith Redux and Norris On The Gas Tax -

The new Trader Joe’s in Germantown won’t be alone by the plans the supermarket chain got approved Tuesday night by the Germantown Design Review Commission. The conversion of the old Kroger store on Exeter includes seven other bays as Trader Joe’s goes for a smaller footprint than the size of the original building.

11. Ernest Strickland Takes On Workforce Role at Chamber -

The Greater Memphis Chamber has promoted Ernest Strickland to senior vice president of workforce development, a newly created role. Strickland, who has worked at the chamber since 2006, previously served as vice president of international and business partnerships.
In his new position, he is responsible for creating and implementing the chamber’s workforce development strategy. His department serves as a liaison, working directly with existing and prospective businesses to ensure they are able to attract and retain a qualified workforce today and in the future.

12. City Begins Forums On Youth Violence -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and his administration begin a set of four meetings Saturday, Jan. 21, to address the problem of young violence.

The sessions, which will include elected and religious leaders, are billed as a “citywide peace forum” by the city’s Office of Youth Services.

13. City Begins Forums On Youth Violence -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and his administration begin a set of four meetings Saturday, Jan. 21, to address the problem of young violence.

14. Final 4 is Proof NFL Teams Must Have Elite QBs -

Now that the NFL playoffs are down to four teams remaining, it is easy to point out the common thread among them: Elite play at the quarterback position.

Whether it is Tom Brady, Ben Roethlisberger, Aaron Rodgers – all of whom have won Super Bowls – or Matt Ryan, who was selected as an All Pro this season and could win the MVP Award, the Patriots, Steelers, Packers and Falcons have a game-changer calling the signals.

15. St. Jude Expansion Looks East of Campus -

The city’s plan for the Pinch District between the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital isn’t the only reason the city will seek expanded uses of the Tourism Development Zone and an expansion of a Tax Increment Financing district.

16. New Details of St. Jude Expansion Look to Medical Corridors To The East -

The city’s plans for the Pinch District between the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are only half of the plan the city will seek expanded uses of the Tourism Development Zone and an expansion of a Tax Increment Financing district for.

17. New Details of St. Jude Expansion Look to Medical Corridors To The East -

The city’s plans for the Pinch District between the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are only half of the plan the city will seek expanded uses of the Tourism Development Zone and an expansion of a Tax Increment Financing district for.

18. Congress Takes First Steps to Dismantle Health Care Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Congressional Republicans are taking the first steps toward dismantling President Barack Obama's health care law, facing pressure from President-elect Donald Trump to move quickly on a replacement.

19. Tennessee Lawmakers Act on Balanced Budget Convention to Curb ‘Crippling’ National Debt -

Saying they can avoid a “runaway” convention for “crazy or radical ideas,” Republican state legislators are filing legislation calling for a convention of states in Nashville to adopt a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

20. Reese: Titans on Track to Match Early Success -

Are the Tennessee Titans on the verge of a breakthrough? It seemed as much over the second half of the 2016 season – the meltdown at Jacksonville notwithstanding.

But a man who knows something about building the Titans says the current edition is on the right track under the guidance of general manager Jon Robinson and head coach Mike Mularkey.

21. Last Word: Charter Schools Views, Capitol Hill Round Up & Explaining The Cold War -

Double trouble Wednesday in Oklahoma. The Grizz lose to the Thunder 103-95 in OKC. They are on their way to Houston for a Friday game before returning home Sunday for the MLK game against the Chicago Bulls at the Forum. Meanwhile Tigers lose to Tulsa Wednesday, also in Oklahoma, 81-71. They are back at the Forum Saturday to play South Florida.

22. Justin Timberlake-Inspired Selfie Bill in Play in Tennessee Legislature -

Pop star Justin Timberlake won’t have to worry about getting into trouble for taking selfies at the voting booth if legislation by a Memphis lawmaker passes.

Democratic state Rep. G.A. Hardaway, a 10-year veteran of the Legislature, was set to file a bill Tuesday, Jan. 10, removing the prohibition on photos at Tennessee voting precincts.

23. Tennessee Acts on Balanced Budget Convention to Curb ‘Crippling’ National Debt -

Saying they can avoid a “runaway” convention for “crazy or radical ideas,” Republican state legislators are filing legislation calling for a convention of states in Nashville to adopt a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

24. Task Force Prepared for Juvenile Justice Legislation -

A General Assembly-led panel is backing legislation to change juvenile sexting laws and adopt measures to stop teens from being held in detention for minor offenses as part of an effort to improve juvenile justice.

25. Robinson Takes on Dual Roles At Campbell Clinic -

Dr. James Robinson recently joined Campbell Clinic Orthopaedics in two roles: as the lead physician for the clinic’s new daytime walk-in program and as a sports medicine family practice doctor treating sports injuries for young athletes and weekend warriors.
The walk-in clinics are offered at all five Campbell Clinic locations, and Robinson staffs the program in the Germantown office. 

26. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

27. Riding Momentum -

Around this time each year, everyone tends to start fetishizing the blank slate a bit, with its attendant allure of reinvention and that sweeping away of the old order to make way for what comes next.

28. New Year, New Resolutions for Legislators -

Some Tennesseans recall the days when the state Legislature met every other year and wonder if it should revert to that schedule. Considering the General Assembly pushes most of its work into 3 1/2 months, it might be worth a try.

29. Awards Recognize Highest Ideals of Public Service -

Public service is a worthy legacy, and one that the Rotary Club of Memphis East wants to recognize and encourage in the next generation.

The annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards recognize one elected official and one non-elected public employee who have exemplified the virtues of former Probate Court Clerk Bobby Dunavant, for whom the award is named.

30. Faison’s Folly? Pushing Pot as a Conservative -

By just about any measure, state Rep. Jeremy Faison is a hardcore conservative. But when it comes to the cannabis plant, the East Tennessee legislator is ready to fire up the General Assembly with a move to liberalize the state’s pot law.

31. Young Democrats Hold Conference in Memphis -

The Young Democrats of America is holding its annual winter conference in Memphis Friday, Dec. 9, through Dec. 11.

Congressman Keith Ellison, who is among the contenders to become new chairman of the Democratic National Committee, is the featured guest at an opening-night reception.

32. Last Word: St. Jude Dollar Amounts, Fred's On The Move and The Treble Clef -

Grizz over the Trailblazers 88 – 86 Thursday evening at the Forum. At the end of the first half, Grizz coach David Fizdale had to be restrained by players on the way off the court after a technical was called on him. And welcome to Memphis, Toney Douglas. We love what you are doing with the fourth quarter.

33. Young Democrats Hold Winter Conference in Memphis -

The Young Democrats of America is holding its annual winter conference in Memphis Friday, Dec. 9, through Dec. 11.

Congressman Keith Ellison, who is among the contenders to become new chairman of the Democratic National Committee, is the featured guest at an opening-night reception.

34. House Passes $611 Billion Defense Policy Bill by Wide Margin -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Republican-led House on Friday overwhelmingly backed a $611 billion defense policy bill that rejects a number of President Barack Obama's key proposals for managing the nation's vast military enterprise.

35. Harwell Learning How to Dodge Challengers -

Beth Harwell has been called a lot of things over the last few years, “trailblazer” chief among them as Tennessee’s first female House speaker. 

Now she’s a “survivor” after eking out a Republican Caucus victory as speaker nominee to continue leading the lower chamber in the 110th General Assembly.

36. November 18-24, 2016: This week in Memphis history -

2013: “This is not going to happen without your help.” St. Louis Cardinals chairman and CEO Bill Dewitt Jr. in outlining the basics of a proposal in which the city of Memphis would buy AutoZone Park, home of the Memphis Redbirds AAA baseball team in return for the Cardinals buying the team. The deal, backed by Mayor A C Wharton, was later approved by the Memphis City Council after considerable debate.

37. Spanish McGregor Walk A Gasol-Conley Production -

Put aside the big contracts the Grizzlies gave center Marc Gasol and point guard Mike Conley. Because truth is, although the Grizzlies could pay them more as returning agents, Conley and Gasol also could have earned rich deals in bigger cities where the rosters were closer to being title-ready.

38. Tennessee Manufacturers Seek Workers As Industry Rebounds -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee manufacturers are in need of young employees as the industry rebounds and older manufacturing workers retire.

According to State Economic and Community Development commissioner Randy Boyd, of the 344,000 manufacturing workers in Tennessee, about 77,000 will retire in the next decade, the Tennessean (http://tnne.ws/2f9AKGW) reported.

39. Last Word: An Early Voting Challenge, Raleigh Settlement and Rocky Top Tumult -

Early voting in Shelby County ended with some lines Thursday at several of the 21 sites. We should have the final turnout numbers Friday morning and you can get the totals first @tdnpols, www.twitter.com/tdnpols.

40. Haslam's Rejection of Trump Roils Tennessee Republicans -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's public rejection of Donald Trump's presidential aspirations has sent shock waves through the Tennessee Republican party.

Two state members of the Republican National Committee issued a memo this week to remind party leaders that "all hands on deck" are required to ensure a Trump victory in Tennessee. And Rebecca Ann Burke, a party executive committee member from Franklin, said the governor's announcement that he will write in the name of Trump running mate Mike Pence is "disingenuous and confuses voters."

41. Last Word: Mud Island Round 3, Newsmakers Notes and North Midtown -

Cue the organ. You know, the one from those old soap operas or radio dramas. And prepare for the latest episode of Island of Mud. When last we looked in on Mud Island River Park, the city had two finalists to redevelop all or a part of the southern half of the island that is really a peninsula.

42. Legislator: Marijuana Law Has Problems -

State Rep. William Lamberth balks at the notion Memphis and Nashville are softening the punishment for simple pot possession.

43. The Crooked Path to Durham’s Ouster -

State Rep. Kevin Brooks set the tone for Jeremy Durham’s ouster in prayer, of all places. Quoting from Luke, the Cleveland Republican opened the recent extraordinary session of the General Assembly saying, “Heavenly Father, you’re very clear in your word when you say that every valley will be filled, every mountain and hill brought low and the crooked places made straight and the rough places made smooth.

44. Memphis Homicides Surpass Total for All of 2015 -

With the fatal shooting Wednesday, Sept. 15, of a man outside a Frayser convenience store, Memphis’ homicide count for 2016 reached 161 – more than the total number of homicides in all of 2015.

45. A Tasteful List 2016 -

MEMPHIS BY THE BITE. Presenting the sixth serving of the Tasteful List, updated for 2016 – alphabetical local favorites in one decidedly local man’s opinion – the only things easy to swallow in an election year.

46. No Quick Fix in State Health Insurance Issue -

State Rep. Ron Travis is perplexed.

On one hand, the Republican from Dayton is concerned with escalating premiums for Tennesseans participating in the insurance marketplace, worried costs are increasing to the point people simply can’t afford health insurance.

47. Photographer Steber Captures Fading Legends on Blues Highway -

Bill Steber stood at the crossroads in the Mississippi Delta and made a deal with the devil that would allow him to not only master his photographic skills but become one of the most respected documentarians of Mississippi Delta blues. And kind of make a living (or at least fashion his life) while he’s at it.

48. GPAC Official Touts Importance Of Arts in Education -

Dear Editor: As students begin their school years and we approach the fall in our community, it is important for us to remember the impact of education in our homes, schools and communities. For decades, research has shown that when students participate in the arts as a part of their education, they go on succeed in school, work and life. I was fortunate enough to grow up with the arts (dance and theater) being a major part of my life.

49. Strickland Used Polls to Hone Campaign Strategy -

Political strategist Steven Reid calls Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s campaign “the perfect example” of using polling to win an election.

50. American Contract Bridge League Committed to Teaching Youths Game -

Bill Gates, Warren Buffett and Paul Firemen, CEO of Reebok International. All three of these men have achieved success in life few could fathom, and all are regular players of the card game bridge.

51. Global Ministries Plans to Sell Its Subsidized Housing Portfolio -

Memphis-based Global Ministries Foundation is getting out of the federally subsidized housing game with a move to sell all of its Memphis properties and about half of its nationwide portfolio, which includes complexes in eight states.

52. Tennessee AG Slatery Names Ney as New Chief Deputy -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Paul Ney, a former legal counsel to the Tennessee Republican Party, has been named chief deputy to state Attorney General Hebert Slatery.

Slatery said in a release Thursday that Ney will supervise the legal work of all five sections of the attorney general's office.

53. Vanderbilt Pays $1.2M to Remove 'Confederate' From Dorm Name -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Vanderbilt University announced Monday that it will pay more than a million dollars to remove an inscription containing the word "Confederate" from one of its campus dorms.

54. Westminster Names Sparks Head of Upper School -

Amanda Sparks has joined Westminster Academy as the head of upper school for the 2016-17 school year. Sparks, who previously was principal of Haw River Christian Academy in Pittsboro, N.C., will lead the upper school faculty and staff in providing classical academics and a Christian culture for grades 7-12.

55. Memphis Mother Waives Hearing in Stabbings of 4 Children -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – A woman accused of stabbing her four young children has waived her preliminary hearing, meaning a grand jury will decide whether to indict her in the killings.

Twenty-nine year old Shanynthia (Shuh-NIN-thee-uh) Gardner was arrested after her 7-year-old son escaped from their Memphis apartment on July 1 and told someone that his mother was stabbing his sister. Authorities found the bodies of three daughters and a son, all younger than 5.

56. What Would It Take for Trump to Lose Tennessee Voters? -

Murfreesboro Realtor Larry Sims almost closes his ears when Donald Trump speaks.

“He gets out of bounds. Of course, the press, they love it because they get to exploit his sayings and doings,” says Sims, who traveled to Cleveland, Ohio, as a Trump delegate for the Republican National Convention. 

57. Books From Birth Taps Wicks As New ED -

Since joining Books from Birth in 2014 Jamila Wicks has done everything from develop a corporate gift strategy to strengthen the non-profit’s relationships with civic and business leaders throughout Shelby County.

58. 'Student' Credit Cards Aren't for All Students, or Even Most -

As parents prepare their rising freshmen for life at college, many are leaving out a crucial piece of information: how to build credit.

The college years are the best time to begin the process. After graduation, adults with no credit history have a harder time renting apartments, obtaining car loans or, eventually, mortgages.

59. Outnumbered Democrats Hope To Ride Anti-Trumpmentum -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari identified herself with the “Fighting 26,” also known as the Tennessee House Democratic Caucus, when she took the podium to support Hillary Clinton at Philadelphia’s Democratic National Convention.

60. Willmarth to Lead Facilities Management at Trezevant -

Brian Willmarth has joined Trezevant as director of environmental operations. In that role, he oversees maintenance, housekeeping and plant operations at the continuing care retirement community. He also oversees Trezevant’s construction and renovation projects. 

61. And Now It's Comcast vs. The Wait for the Cable Guy -

NEW YORK (AP) – Did you hear the one about the cable company that's actually improving customer service? The punchline: Comcast and its rivals say it's no joke.

These companies have poured hundreds of millions into new tools and staff to de-agonize the process of getting cable TV, Internet or phone service. It's part of a yearslong effort to assuage customers as the specter of "cord-cutting" – dumping cable for Netflix and the like – haunts the industry. More than 2 million customers have fled from cable and satellite over the past three years, according to research firm SNL Kagan, and the pace has been accelerating.

62. Chism Readying 2018 Bid for County Mayor -

Former Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism wants to be the Democratic nominee for Shelby County mayor in 2018, and he plans to begin his campaign after the November presidential election.

63. MSU’s Mullen Defends Simmons At Media Days -

HOOVER, Ala. – In another year and another circumstance, Mississippi State coach Dan Mullen might have spent all his time at SEC Media Days answering questions about having to replace Dak Prescott at quarterback.

64. Gordon: ‘You’re Not Alone on Your Journey’ -

If you know anything about Kat Gordon at all, it’s likely the Technicolor version that’s clearest in press photos: There she is, gingham apron tied on, smile dazzling, holding a tempting plate of cupcakes or pie from her wildly popular bakery, Muddy’s Bake Shop, which now comprises two retail locations and a commercial kitchen and custom studio.

65. Williams Hired for Memphis Blight-Fighting Fellowship -

The city of Memphis and University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law recently hired Brittany J. Williams as the city’s first Neighborhood Preservation Fellow. In that role, Williams will represent the city in Environmental Court lawsuits against property owners who have vacant, abandoned or dilapidated properties that violate city codes.

66. 4 Children Fatally Stabbed in Memphis; Mother Charged -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Four young children were stabbed to death in a gated apartment complex in suburban Memphis on Friday, and the Shelby County Sheriff's Department has charged their mother, Shanynthia Gardner, with first degree murder as well as other charges.

67. Mayor, DA Discuss Approach To Curb Crime -

Much of the attention in local crime statistics this year goes to the jump in the city’s homicide rate.

But that rate pales in comparison to aggravated assaults.

From January through May, there were 492 aggravated assaults per 100,000 people in Memphis, according to statistics from the Memphis-Shelby County Crime Commission.

68. Scotty Moore, Elvis Presley's First Guitarist, Dies At 84 -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Scotty Moore, the pioneering rock guitarist whose sharp, graceful style helped Elvis Presley shape his revolutionary sound and inspired a generation of musicians that included Keith Richards, Jimmy Page and Bruce Springsteen, died Tuesday. He was 84.

69. Symbols of War Keep Dragging Us Down -

More than 150 years ago, we fought our nation’s most bloody war, a conflagration that claimed 620,000 lives, almost as many as were killed in all other American war efforts combined.

Despite the horror of it all, we just can’t seem to learn a lesson, possibly because of Southern hardheadedness, and a century and a half later, we seem doomed to an eternal task: pushing Sisyphus’ rock to the top of a hill only to have it chase us back to the bottom.

70. Chamber Names Simmons Director of Public Policy -

Haley Simmons has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as the director of public policy, a new position in the chamber’s community development department. In this role, Simmons will be focused on enhancing the chamber’s advocacy efforts to inform and engage its members on important policy issues, and he’ll also be responsible for growing the chamber’s role in education initiatives.

71. Brush With Death Recalled, Part 1 -

I was 50 when I died. April 21, 2002. I can’t forget the date.

A few weeks earlier, I saw an old friend, Cotton, at a memorial service for a mutual friend. In the early 1980s, Cotton and I were in the same golf group. After the service, we reminisced about a golf outing that no one involved could forget.

72. ‘Prevent’ Defenses: Freeze, Briles Look to Protect Themselves -

It’s safe to say in pretty much every college football program in America that players are made to pay some penalty for the basic infraction of being late to a practice or a team meeting.

Sometimes they are suspended for a quarter. Other times for a half or an entire game against some non-competitive directional school. Sometimes, the players even have a semi-legitimate excuse for being late.

73. Legislators Sweating the Small Stuff -

My late father kept a paper weight on his desk at home that read: “Don’t sweat the small stuff.”

Well, we’re sweating the small stuff – from the federal government down to the states – with this harangue over transgender bathrooms.

74. Balink Chosen to Lead The Exchange Club Family Center -

Jennifer Balink has been named executive director of The Exchange Club Family Center, where she’ll begin her duties July 1. In her new role, Balink aims to secure and direct every available resource toward breaking the cycle of child abuse and family violence in the Memphis community. 

75. State Legislature Closed Door On Progress, Invited Ridicule This Session -

The Tennessee General Assembly spent the last four months selecting a state book, attempting to regulate ingress/egress of bathrooms, and putting guns on college campuses. Given this lamentable priority list, we're not surprised that our House of Representatives chose not to vote on a bill that would have helped young kids realize their dreams, lift families out of poverty, and generate revenue for Tennessee.

76. Station to Station -

Even now, Explore Bike Share founder Doug Carpenter does not try to pretend that the initiative will cure all that ails Memphis. 

It won’t wipe out poverty. It can’t cure cancer. It won’t eliminate diabetes and obesity, solve all of the city’s transportation problems or totally bridge cultural and racial gaps that predate the bicycle’s invention.

77. Dave Thomas Named CEO Of Kemmons Wilson Insurance -

Dave Thomas has joined Kemmons Wilson Insurance Group as chief executive officer. In this role, he’s responsible for overseeing day-to-day operations and also is tasked with growing the Memphis-based property and casualty insurance company. Thomas has 40 years of experience in the insurance industry, most recently serving as CEO of Louisiana Citizens Property Insurance Corp.

78. Tennessee Leads the Nation in Bankruptcies -

Tennessee has a model program for financial literacy in its public schools. All high school students must pass a personal finance course to graduate, and even kindergartners are learning about money under a new initiative to extend the curriculum to primary school.

79. Akbari Proving to be Worthy Successor to Iconic DeBerry -

Those who wondered how Raumesh Akbari would do in following legendary Memphis legislator Lois DeBerry now have a much clearer picture.

80. FDA Effort Aims to Curb Smoking in LGBT Community -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Food and Drug Administration's latest anti-smoking campaign takes aim at young adults in the LGBT community, who officials say are nearly twice as likely to use tobacco as their peers.

81. Events -

Memphis College of Art will host an MFA Open House for prospective students on Friday, April 29, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Nesin Graduate School, 477 S. Main St. The event will take place concurrently with an opening reception for “Hueman: MFA Thesis Exhibition.” Visit mca.edu.

82. Last Word: Memphis Gets Busy, Elections Future and Past and Dad Rock In C-Y -

While their folks are still getting settled over in the front office at The Commercial Appeal, Gannett announces Monday an $815 million offer to buy Tribune Publishing which would put The Los Angeles Times and The Chicago Tribune in the expanding USA Today family.

83. Robots Are Taking Tennessee’s Jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

84. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

85. Tickled Pink -

MEMPHIS IN BLACK AND WHITE. AND PINK. I’m glad Billy Orgel got engaged at Justine’s because that inspired his family to save it, not because they miss the crystal and crabmeat but because the place is personal.

86. FDA Campaign Takes Aim at Chewing Tobacco Use by Rural Teens -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Government health officials will team up with minor league baseball as part of a new $36 million campaign to discourage rural teenagers from using chewing tobacco.

Baseball stadiums will feature the campaign's central message this summer – "smokeless doesn't mean harmless" – via advertising and promotions with players. Ads will also run on local television, radio and online in 35 markets across the U.S., including cities in Michigan, Montana, South Carolina and Tennessee.

87. Southern Yankee -

To best understand another man’s baseball passion, you must first understand his baseball pain. So if you hope to truly understand Peter B. Freund, new majority owner of the Memphis Redbirds, you must travel back to his youth.

88. Legislators Playing Expensive Game With LGBT Issues -

The silly season is in full swing on Capitol Hill, but the “bathroom bill” and any jokes surrounding it are no laughing matter anymore. It’s getting downright expensive.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery said this week the bill dealing with transgender student use of restrooms could cost the state more than $1.2 billion in federal funds for K-12 and higher education.

89. Last Word: Lipscomb's Successor, MATA School Buses and Roland's Big Breakfast -

Paul Young gets a lot more attention these days than he did when he was the first director of the city-county Office of Sustainability. The attention comes with being the city director of Housing and Community Development where virtually all of the funding comes from the federal government.
That federal funding has changed the face of public housing in the city in the last 25 years. There is only one large public housing project left in the city as a result of the federal funding and its use by Young’s predecessor, Robert Lipscomb.
And what Lipscomb did with the job combined with being the executive director of the Memphis Housing Authority is why a lot of people want to get to know Paul Young these days.
Our centerpiece story by Madeline Faber in Tuesday’s edition makes clear that Young has no desire to wield that kind of power. And it is unlikely anyone in the near future will have the kind of autonomy Lipscomb did.
But beyond that there is still the flow of a lot of federal dollars and Young has some ideas based on his experience in government and finance prior to coming to HCD – everything in government is initials.
It’s a much different experience than Lipscomb’s. Lipscomb coined the phrase “ending public housing as we know it” and at times that slogan wasn’t followed with a lot of detail about what came after public housing was demolished, especially with the first of the projects to fall.
The last public housing project, Foote Homes, will be demolished on Young’s watch which makes his tenure important if more limited than Lipscomb’s tenure.

90. Last Word: Pro Day, Hardwood Patios in C-Y and Memphis' Contested Convention -

It was a windy Pro Day Wednesday at the University of Memphis for Tigers quarterback Paxton Lynch. And if the wind wasn’t for you, you could watch Lynch work out for NFL teams and their representatives on the NFL network.
Don Wade was there to watch in person.

91. Lawmakers Lure Us In With Momentary Sanity, And Then... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

92. From Forest to Flooring, Cafe Ole’s New Deck Has ‘Seen the World’ -

This is a Memphis story. And by now it should be clear that Bill Courtney loves a Memphis story.

93. City Ready to Develop Master Plan for Pinch District -

The Pinch District, one of Memphis’ oldest neighborhoods, is getting its time in the spotlight.

The Downtown Memphis Commission, the city of Memphis Division of Housing & Community Development and the city-county Division of Planning & Development are coming together to develop the Pinch’s first master plan in to bring the area up to date with mixed-use buildings and streetscape improvements.

94. Settle? No. UT Needs to Defend Itself in Title IX Suit -

Lots of smoke. But is there a fire? That is the issue at the University of Tennessee, where a Title IX lawsuit alleges the university has a “hostile sexual environment” and violates federal laws dealing with student discipline hearings for sexual assault cases, especially those involving student-athletes.

95. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

96. Cleaning House -

Every neighborhood in Memphis and Shelby County has the right to be free from the negative effects of vacant, abandoned and blighted properties. That’s the battle cry of the Memphis Blight Elimination Charter, a 23-page pledge that will steer policy and programs dedicated to blight eradication.

97. Rudd + Bowen + Pastner = PR Nightmare at Memphis -

You keep thinking the story can’t get worse, and then it does. What we have here is an ongoing public relations disaster that is the University of Memphis athletic department as it pertains to all matters regarding the men’s basketball program.

98. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

99. Tennessee Senate Speaker Ramsey Announces He Won't Run Again -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey, a leading figure in the Republican takeover of all three branches of Tennessee state government, announced Wednesday that he won't run for re-election.

100. Council Tallies Damage in 'Day of Bad News' -

Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd summed up City Hall’s attitude Tuesday, March 15, during the council’s executive session. “Today is the day of bad news,” he said after a briefing from Mayor Jim Strickland on the deannexation bill approved the night before by the Tennessee House.
That was followed by more details on the estimated $60 million it will cost to replace the entire radio system for local first responders from the radios to the towers used to transmit their signals.