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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: EW&F, Midtown Rent Rise and A Closer Look At The Pyramid Deal -

One seemingly ordinary winter’s night in Downtown Memphis, I was going from event to event focused on work – specifically trying to stay on a schedule in which several things I wanted to cover were happening at the same time.
That is usually when you miss the experience that is Memphis on an everyday but definitely not ordinary basis.
So I get in a parking garage elevator and on the next floor David Porter – of Stax Records fame – gets on and he introduces me to his friend, Maurice White – the founder of Earth Wind and Fire. They too are trying to be in several places at the same time.
As they went their way and I went mine, I remember thinking this is quite a special place.
The encounter slowed my stride a bit and took some of the edge off the schedule – noticing for the first time how many people were out on a winter’s night in our city having nothing but a good time made better by all of us going our different ways.
White, who was from Memphis, died Thursday with his band’s music stronger and more relevant than ever.
If you grew up listening to EWF when the songs were new, you know that the bright and funky sound and the positive, affirming, and diverse identity of this music was quite intentional at a time when there was plenty going on that could have pushed it the other way.
If your parents or grandparents grew up listening to EWF, this music is a part of your family’s tradition that calls to mind special occasions and even your own mild surprise the first time you found yourself dancing to it with your children.
And if your folks’ vinyl record collection from back in the day included Earth Wind and Fire, that was one of the ones you listened to when they weren’t around and one of the ones you took with you when you got a place of your own.

2. Only So Much Durham Could Blame on Media -

It’s little wonder state Rep. Jeremy Durham had to take a two-week break from the General Assembly.

3. Boyd: Tennessee Shifting to ‘Product Development’ Site Selection -

Elected officials are going to say it if they talk long enough about economic development.

They will talk about how quality of life plays a role in business growth, specifically the move or expansion of corporations into a city or region they weren’t in previously.

4. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

5. Bertelkamp Made Right Call in Going with the Vols -

Bert Bertelkamp would be the first to tell you he’s pulling for Tennessee when calling basketball games as color commentator for the Vol Network.

And why wouldn’t he?

Bertelkamp is Big Orange to the bone. His father Hank played for the Vols (1951-53), was a team captain and remains a big supporter of UT.

6. Tech Developments Advance Efficiency in Logistics Industry -

Memphis is known as a center for the logistics industry, and technology advances keep things on the move.

Attention for technology trends in distribution often center on the use of drones, but there are other ways companies look for efficiencies in business. The Memphis EPIcenter created a Logistics Innovation Accelerator in 2015 to help entrepreneurs turn their ideas into businesses that enhance the distribution industry.

7. Memphian Appointed To THDA board -

Gov. Bill Haslam has appointed Memphis-area homebuilder Kim Grant Brown as a member of the Tennessee Housing Development Agency board of directors.

8. Impatient Clemmons Anxious for Minority Voice to Be Heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

9. Memphian Appointed To THDA board -

Gov. Bill Haslam has appointed Memphis-area homebuilder Kim Grant Brown as a member of the Tennessee Housing Development Agency board of directors.

10. Saban Is Tops, Busch Upgrades, Grizz 100-1 -

I really don’t like the debates about the greatest player or coach. But it was unavoidable this past week after Alabama won its fourth national championship under Nick Saban (his fifth, having also won as coach at LSU).

11. Last Word: Overton Park's Restless Winter, Across The Harahan and Higher Ed -

It may be chilly outside, but it might as well be July on the Overton Park greensward with all of the political heat that is building.
The thermometer spiked when more than two dozen trees donated to the Overton Park Conservancy in 2012 were removed this week by the Memphis Zoo which is preparing for large crowds in March.
That’s when its new Zambezi Hippo River Camp exhibit opens to much anticipation and much fanfare.
That and the New Year’s Eve legal opinion favoring the zoo’s position on its use of the greensward for overflow parking set the stage for a dispute the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland has had to mediate at less than two weeks in office.

12. Last Word: El Chapo and Memphis, First Filers for August and Origins in Graffiti -

The Mississippi River at Memphis crested and then it rained.
The weekend rain added about two-tenths of an inch by Saturday to Friday’s crest.
But by Sunday, the river had dropped to 39.12 feet, which is still more than five feet above flood stage.

13. Last Word: The Crest, OPEB Fever, Armstrong Leaves and An Elvis Warning -

The crest is here and it is not quite 40 feet on the Mississippi River gauge. The projections Thursday evening going into Friday’s crest of the river at Memphis changed a bit from the 40.3 foot level. The crest is 39.8 feet.
No reports of major damage anywhere in Shelby County, according to the Shelby County Office of Prepardness.
But the river’s high water is still a sight to behold.

14. Haslam Names Page to Fill Tennessee Supreme Court Vacancy -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam has named Appeals Judge Roger A. Page to fill a vacancy on the Tennessee Supreme Court.

Page will join the state's highest court in mid-March, unless state lawmakers can resolve their differences on a confirmation process for judicial nominees before then.

15. Last Word: Out With the Old, In With The River -

We end 2015 with an eye on the Mississippi River as the city marks the New Year with three major New Year’s Eve outdoor celebrations – one on Beale Street, another in the newly-awakened Overton Square and yet another in the Broad Avenue Arts District.
Two come with lots of memories of past New Year’s eves – with soon-to-be memories.
Overton Square’s comeback as a theater district has been a big story of the last two years.
But Beale Street at the end of 2015 is an institution that has also seen a lot of change in the last year with the move to a Beale Street Tourism Development Authority at year’s end.
Broad is a different story with a different context. The context is a diversified Memphis whose crowd is likely to be at least slightly more local than the mix in Overton Square and on Beale Street.
It's example could very well show us the path to a New Year's eve with public celebrations from Whitehaven to Frayser.

16. Memorable Events of 2015 will Spill Into 2016 -

When you really get down to it, history is a collection of moments, moments that, when they fall one after the other over the long arc of time, eventually form the tapestry representing who we are.

17. Steamship Supporters Seek Exemption to Resume Cruises -

HELENA-WEST HELENA, Ark. (AP) – Supporters of the Delta Queen say they'll continue working to get Congress to approve an exemption that would allow the historic steamship to resume cruises on the Mississippi River.

18. City Council Votes On Graceland, Liberty Bowl -

The Memphis City Council approved the Graceland West planned development Tuesday, Dec. 15, the third phase of Graceland’s expansion to a 120-acre campus on both sides of Elvis Presley Boulevard.

19. City Council Votes On Graceland, Liberty Bowl -

The Memphis City Council approved the Graceland West planned development Tuesday, Dec. 15, the third phase of Graceland’s expansion to a 120-acre campus on both sides of Elvis Presley Boulevard.

20. Proposed Used Car Lot In South City Draws Ire -

An applicant seeking to operate a used car lot at 704 Vance Ave. will go before the Shelby County Board of Adjustment Wednesday, Dec. 16, in what seemingly would be a cut-and-dry affair with the BOA staff recommending conditional approval.

21. AutoZone Liberty Bowl Brings Snyder, Bielema Back Together -

In their last game of the regular season, the Kansas State Wildcats were sitting on five wins and down 10 points at halftime. They rallied to defeat West Virginia 24-23.

And all it took was the usual 97-yard kick return for a touchdown, courtesy of senior Morgan Burns.

22. This week in Memphis history: December 11-17 -

2014: Gov. Bill Haslam announces Tennessee will expand its Medicaid program under a proposal similar to one used by the state of Arkansas. Haslam dubs it Insure Tennessee and calls a special session of the Tennessee Legislature in January 2015 for what he anticipates will be quick passage of the program. Instead, legislators defeat the program and quickly adjourn the special session.

23. A Bowl Game, By Any Name, Is a Chance for Another Victory -

Once upon a time, all you needed was a tuft of Cotton, a taste of Orange, a simple Rose and a cup of Sugar. That was your college football bowl season.

But the 2015-16 bowl season is full of often long, usually corporate, and frequently wacky college bowl names given to games with sometimes questionable purpose.

24. Baptist Taps New Finance Chief -

Baptist Memorial Health Care has tapped Bill Griffin to replace the organization’s current chief financial officer, Don Pounds, who’s retiring at year’s end.

25. Baptist Taps New Finance Chief -

Baptist Memorial Health Care has tapped Bill Griffin to replace the organization’s current chief financial officer, Don Pounds, who’s retiring at year’s end.

26. Baptist Taps New Finance Chief -

Baptist Memorial Health Care has tapped Bill Griffin to replace the organization’s current chief financial officer, Don Pounds, who’s retiring at year’s end.

27. Civil Asset Forfeiture: 'It's a State License to Steal' -

The drugs in Kathy Stiltner’s car were over-the-counter antacids. The $12,000 in cash was from an inheritance. Still, police took the money – quite legally – and are still fighting to keep it, even after the drug charge was dropped.

28. Competition for Jones Lang Lasalle in Tennessee -

Amid debate about privatization within state government, legislators are glad to see Tennessee seeking competition in its building leasing program.

“To me, when you’ve got competition, you’ve got people who may do something for next to nothing just to get their foot in the door,” says state Rep. Mike Sparks, who raised questions about the state’s leasing program and contract with Jones Lang Lasalle, which started charging commissions when it got involved in 2012.

29. Council OKs Raleigh Springs Mall Conversion, Again -

The Memphis City Council on Tuesday, Nov. 17, approved – for the second time in a year and a half – the plan to turn the Raleigh Springs Mall into a “town center” with a city library branch, new police precinct and the Memphis Police Department’s traffic precinct.

30. Council OKs Raleigh Springs Mall Conversion, Again -

The Memphis City Council on Tuesday, Nov. 17, approved – for the second time in a year and a half – the plan to turn the Raleigh Springs Mall into a “town center” with a city library branch, new police precinct and the Memphis Police Department’s traffic precinct.

31. Memphis Council to Consider Graceland Plaza Development -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Nov. 17, on Elvis Presley Enterprises’ plan to redevelop Graceland Plaza into an entertainment complex.

The 46-acre complex, located on the west side of Elvis Presley Boulevard, will include two restaurants, a soundstage, new retail development and two new museums, including a car museum.

32. Tennessee’s Landlords Find Hidden Costs of Privatization -

Murfreesboro businessman Tom Hyde felt the sting of Tennessee’s privatization practices two years ago when a representative of Jones Lang Lasalle notified him he would have to pay the company a commission as part of his next lease agreement.

33. Former Senator Fred Thompson Dies -

Former U.S. Sen. and one-time presidential contender Fred Thompson was in many ways a reluctant politician. But he was also a lobbyist with an envious arsenal of political skills honed both by his calling as an attorney and by his service as a lawyer during unprecedented political crises.

34. Five Indicted in FedEx Shipping Theft Scheme -

Three former FedEx Memphis hub employees and two other defendants from New York City face federal charges in an alleged $1.7 million scheme to steal wireless mobile devices being shipped by FedEx throughout the country.

35. Five Indicted in FedEx Shipping Theft Scheme -

Three former FedEx Memphis hub employees and two other defendants from New York City face federal charges in an alleged $1.7 million scheme to steal wireless mobile devices being shipped by FedEx throughout the country.

36. Late John ‘Bull’ Bramlett To Be Honored Saturday -

The city of Memphis, the Memphis City Council and the University of Memphis will honor the late John Bramlett in a ceremony to be held Saturday, Oct. 17, at 8:45 a.m. before Ole Miss plays the Tigers at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium.

37. Tenn. Senator Calls for Further Investigation Into Inmate Death -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A West Tennessee inmate died from natural causes, according to prison officials, but an autopsy showed he died from multiple traumatic injuries — and a state senator said Monday that Gov. Bill Haslam should further investigate the case.

38. EPA to Change Diesel Tests to Thwart VW-Like Cheating -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency said Friday that it will launch sweeping changes to the way it tests for diesel emissions after getting duped by clandestine software in Volkswagen cars for seven years.

39. Health Care Suffers As Rural Hospitals Continue Slow Fade -

Fayette County is the latest victim of hospital closings in Tennessee as many rural health care facilities continue to struggle financially.

Methodist Healthcare-Fayette Hospital closed in late March, bringing to four the number of shuttered hospitals in West Tennessee after Gibson General, Humboldt General and Haywood Park Community called it quits in 2014.

40. ‘Graceland West’ to Cover 46 Acres -

With construction underway on its $90 million resort hotel north of Graceland, Elvis Presley Enterprises Inc. has filed paperwork for its plan for the plaza area across Elvis Presley Boulevard from the mansion itself.

41. UT Population Study Predicts Steady Growth -

Tennessee’s population will reach 8.5 million by 2040, according to a new study by the University of Tennessee’s Center for Business and Economic Research.

Middle Tennessee is projected to lead the population growth from the 6.3 million Tennesseans counted in the 2010 U.S. Census. And five of the 10 counties with the highest projected growth rate through 2040 are in the Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin Metropolitan Statistical Area.

42. Arkansas Airports Get $8.5M in FAA Grants -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Members of Arkansas' congressional delegation have announced $8.5 million in Federal Aviation Administration grants to improve airports throughout the state.

U.S. Sens. John Boozman and Tom Cotton, and U.S. Reps. Rick Crawford, French Hill, Steve Womack and Bruce Westerman said in a statement Monday that 13 airports will receive the grants.

43. Three in Tennessee Test Positive For West Nile Virus -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Three people in Tennessee have tested positive for West Nile virus.

The Tennessee Department of Health announced Thursday that one case is in East Tennessee, while the other two are in West Tennessee. Department spokesman Bill Christian says one of the cases has been identified as being in Shelby County. Christian says he could not be more specific about where the cases were discovered because of privacy regulations.

44. Council Gives Final Approval To Forrest Statue Removal -

Memphis City Council members gave final approval Tuesday, Aug. 18, to an ordinance setting the stage for removal of the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park

45. New Graceland Hotel Sets Opening Date -

The new $90 million, 450-room resort hotel Elvis Presley Enterprises is building in Whitehaven is scheduled to open Oct. 27, 2016.

The Guest House at Graceland, located on Elvis Presley Boulevard north of the Graceland mansion, will open with a four-day event including concerts and other activities as well as the traditional ribbon cutting.

46. Binghampton Retail Plan Goes to Land Use Board -

Neighborhood retail in Binghampton tops the Thursday, Aug. 13, agenda of the Memphis-Shelby County Land Use Control Board.

Among the 25 items on the board’s agenda is Binghampton Development Corp.’s request for a planned development to accommodate a retail center with grocery store on 4.87 acres at Sam Cooper Boulevard and Tillman Street.

47. Bates Family Indicted on $18 Million Fraud -

After years of controversy and civil litigation, Memphis federal prosecutors announced Wednesday, Aug. 5, that a grand jury has indicted former Tennessee state Rep. Larry Bates and his two sons on multiple counts of mail and wire fraud and fraud conspiracy.

48. Bates Family Indicted On $18 Million Fraud -

After years of controversy and civil litigation, Memphis federal prosecutors announced Wednesday, Aug. 5, that a grand jury has indicted former Tennessee state Rep. Larry Bates and his two sons on multiple counts of mail and wire fraud and fraud conspiracy.

49. Challengers Unseat 4 DeSoto County State GOP House Members -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Four DeSoto County House Republican incumbents targeted by a pro-school choice group because of opposition to charter schools are among at least nine incumbents who lost party primaries Tuesday.

50. Warehouse At Perimeter Point Sells for $775,000 -

A Perimeter Point industrial building has been sold for $775,000.

Missouri-based Martabra Real Estate LLC acquired the flex warehouse building at 5055 Covington Way, just off Covington Pike south of Elmore Road, from CP Perimeter Point LLC, an affiliate of California-based Coastal Partners LLC.

51. TDOT Delays I-55 Roundabout To Reconsider Bridge Closing -

The Tennessee Department of Transportation has put on hold plans for an Interstate 55 roundabout on the Memphis side of the Memphis-Arkansas bridge citing a review of its plans to close the bridge for nine months during the construction process.

52. Cardwell a Link to Metro’s Past, Present -

Metro Trustee Charlie Cardwell definitely is a member of the “good old boys” network that ran Nashville for decades.

53. Local Green News Piles Up, From Shelby Farms to CBU -

Chelsea Avenue Floodwall Becomes ‘Permission Wall’: The city’s renaissance of murals is taking a different form on the section of North Memphis floodwalls that are a border of sorts for the still developing Chelsea Greenline.

54. Forrest Vote Signals Change in General’s Legacy -

When the city of Memphis voted to rename Forrest Park and two other Confederate-themed parks in Downtown Memphis two years ago, City Council member Bill Boyd criticized the move and extolled Nathan Bedford Forrest’s virtues.

55. Special Action on Same-Sex Nuptials a Waste of Time -

With Republican lawmakers scrambling for a response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay-marriage ruling, Tennesseans on both sides of the issue say they are seeking "equality."

Immediately after the court’s decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville said, "Love and equality won. I’m glad the Supreme Court ruled on the right side of history."

56. Chelsea Floodwall Focus of Public Art Festival -

More than 70 artists will display public art being painted along the Chelsea Greenline west of North Evergreen Street during a daylong festival July 18.

The festival is being organized by Paint Memphis with assistance from the UrbanArt Commission.

57. Chelsea Floodwall Focus of Public Art Festival -

More than 70 artists will display public art being painted along the Chelsea Greenline west of North Evergreen Street during a daylong festival July 18.

The festival is being organized by Paint Memphis with assistance from the UrbanArt Commission.

58. Southern Heritage Defined Differently Across Tennessee -

Tennessee’s loyalty was divided in the Civil War, and 150 years later, little is changed as the debate over Confederate symbols arises in the wake of the racist-fueled South Carolina church massacre.

59. Haslam Needs to Back Up Call for More Local Control -

If Gov. Bill Haslam is trying to build political capital, he’s making the right move by trying to light a fire under local officials.

He might also want to turn up the flame on his own game.

60. Drug Trafficking Indictment Targets Gang Members -

One of the leaders of a street gang banned last year from the Legends Park area has violated the “no-gang zone” court order and is now charged with drug trafficking.

Steve Nelson, an alleged leader of the Dixie Homes Murda Gang, directed the gang’s drug dealing activities from the Shelby County Jail. When he wasn’t in jail, he was arrested twice in the Legends Park area for violating the court order that bans gang activity as well as gang members from congregating in the area.

61. ‘If It’s on His Mind, You’re Going to Know It’ -

The state legislature’s vote this year to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee raised eyebrows among believers and nonbelievers statewide.

Although the bill passed the House of Representatives, it was tabled by the Senate following questions about its constitutionality and opposition from the governor, other elected officials and community leaders statewide.

62. TDOT Slates Meetings on I-55 Roundabout -

The Tennessee Department of Transportation will hold two public information sessions June 1 and June 4 on plans to build a new Interstate 55 interchange at E.H. Crump Boulevard, changing it to a roundabout design.

63. TDOT Slates Meetings on I-55 Roundabout -

The Tennessee Department of Transportation will hold two public information sessions June 1 and June 4 on plans to build a new Interstate 55 interchange at E.H. Crump Boulevard, changing it to a roundabout design.

64. Coliseum Fans Push for Roundhouse Reconsideration -

The city’s effort to either restart or reconfigure its plan for the Mid-South Fairgrounds began Saturday, May 23, on the steps of the south entrance to the Mid-South Coliseum.

And it continues Monday and Tuesday, June 1-2, with a set of four town hall meetings – two each evening.

65. Nashville's Next Mayor Must Solve Traffic, Education Woes -

“Traffic is getting worse by the day.” I must have heard that complaint six times last week. Those exact words.

Perhaps some road construction coupled with Vanderbilt’s graduation complicated the situation, but that seems to be the feeling here.

66. Baker Book Traces Conciliatory Political Philosophy -

Long before his death last June, former U.S. Sen. Howard Baker of Tennessee was aware that other Republicans, including those who worked in his groundbreaking campaigns of the 1960s and 1970s, believed it was no longer possible for a political moderate like him to get elected in Tennessee.

67. Restrictions for Tennessee's 7 Abortion Clinics Head to Governor -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Legislation that would place licensing restrictions on all seven of Tennessee's abortion clinics was overwhelmingly approved by state lawmakers Tuesday and sent to the governor, who's expected to sign them into law.

68. Egypt Central Road to Close Temporarily -

Egypt Central Road will be closed Tuesday, April 28, for road construction from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The closing for road construction is 500 feet west of Singleton Parkway. Traffic will detour approximately four miles on each side of the road closure using Bolen Huse and Coleman Roads.

69. What’s Better for Commuters? More I-24 Lanes or Monorail? -

With growing population comes increasingly congested commuter traffic, and the Rutherford County corridor between Nashville and Murfreesboro along I-24 is considered the most congested in Middle Tennessee.

70. Five of the Nation’s Finest -

Each year the U.S. Chamber of Commerce recognizes the contribution of small business to the national economy with the Blue Ribbon Small Business Awards. Five from Knoxville’s business community – The Tomato Head, Management Solutions LLC, Design Innovation Architects Inc., Visionary Solutions LLC and AMS Corp. – have been chosen for inclusion in the annual program.

71. What Better Place for an NRA Convention? -

When the National Rifle Association announced that it would hold its 2015 convention in Nashville, the timing was propitious.

In 2010, gun sales and handgun permits were booming, and Tennessee had just enacted a controversial and contested new “guns in bars” law that allowed people with handgun permits to carry concealed firearms into bars and restaurants that serve alcohol.

72. Lowery, Boyd Urge Wharton to Change Riverside Drive -

Memphis City Council chairman Myron Lowery and council member Berlin Boyd are urging Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. to “compromise” on the current layout of Riverside Drive between Beale Street and Georgia Avenue.

73. Is ‘Getting Rid of Public Schools’ Legislature’s Goal? -

Are Tennessee’s public schools headed for extinction? Not if it’s up to Memphis teachers.

A group from Shelby County recently packed a House committee meeting room at the Legislative Plaza in an effort to turn back bills they consider damaging to their profession and the future of public education.

74. US Home Sales Rebound Slightly in February -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Slightly more Americans bought homes in February, but tight inventories, affordability problems and nasty winter weather point to sluggish sales in the coming few months.

75. Prosecution Team Named For Jackson Retrial -

Preliminary hearings in the case of a Memphis woman who received a new trial in the stabbing death of her mother continue in Shelby County Criminal Court.

Mike Dunavant, the special prosecutor in the second-degree murder case against Noura Jackson, announced in a Monday, March 17, hearing before Judge Chris Craft that he has assigned assistant district attorneys Walt Freeland of Tipton County and Mark Davidson of Fayette County to the case.

76. Dunavant Names Prosecution Team for Jackson Retrial -

Preliminary hearings in the case of a Memphis woman who received a new trial in the stabbing death of her mother continue in Shelby County Criminal Court.

Mike Dunavant, the special prosecutor in the second-degree murder case against Noura Jackson, announced in a Monday, March 17, hearing before Judge Chris Craft that he has assigned assistant district attorneys Walt Freeland of Tipton County and Mark Davidson of Fayette County to the case.

77. State Legislators Misfire In Rush to Impress NRA Attendees -

With the National Rifle Association bringing 75,000 people to Nashville for its April 10-12 convention, the timing is seemingly right for the General Assembly to impress by passing a bevy of gun bills.

78. Battle of the Band(width) -

Joyce Coltrin’s business is wandering in Bradley County’s technological wilderness. And it’s likely to remain there – because of legal threats – until the General Assembly changes state law.

79. U of M Adds ‘Materials Science’ to Physics Name -

The University of Memphis Department of Physics is now the Department of Physics and Materials Science.

The name change reflects the department’s status as offering the only materials science program in West Tennessee.

80. University of Memphis Adds ‘Materials Science’ to Physics Name -

The University of Memphis Department of Physics is now the Department of Physics and Materials Science.

The name change reflects the department’s status as offering the only materials science program in West Tennessee.

81. Auto Industry Slows for Bad Weather, But Stays on Course -

DETROIT (AP) – February threw snowstorms and other roadblocks at the auto industry, but U.S. sales of new cars and trucks are still poised to hit their highest level in more than a decade this year.

82. Office That Defends Death Row Inmates Comes Under Fire -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A state agency that defends death row inmates is being criticized for using taxpayer dollars to pay for a legal battle that seeks information on the drugs and people involved in executions while also challenging a law that says electrocution can be used as an alternative to lethal injection.

83. Kelsey’s New Private School Voucher Plan Looks More Like Haslam’s -

Momentum is building this session for voucher legislation that would allow state dollars to follow students from struggling public schools to private and religious institutions.

But it is hardly etched in stone.

84. Haslam Wary of Gas Tax Hike -

Despite low gas prices, a backlog on road projects and prevailing winds for fuel-tax reform, Gov. Bill Haslam is pulling back from a gas-tax increase this session.

After floating the possibility of raising the tax in December, the Republican governor appears to be changing course, in part because of his loss in a Senate committee on Insure Tennessee, the Medicaid expansion alternative that failed to make debate in the full House or Senate.

85. Wharton: Tourism Is Serious Business -

Sometimes in tourism, it is the little things that count. But “little” is relative. Consider the digital LED display screen on the west wall of the Memphis Cook Convention Center – big enough to be seen by eastbound traffic on the Hernando DeSoto Bridge – which local leaders debuted this month after three years of planning.

86. This Week in Memphis History: February 13-19 -

2005: Molson Coors Brewing Co. announced it would close its Memphis brewery in Hickory Hill in 2007 as a result of the Canadian company’s merger with Adolph Coors Co. of Colorado. At the time, the brewery and bottling plant employed 410 people. The phase-out was to begin in the second half of 2005. Today the brewery is known as Blues City Brewery, a part of City Brewing of Latrobe, Wis., producing beers and other beverages under numerous brand names.

87. Common Core is Working – So Kill It -

Common Core determines what Tennessee’s K-12 students should know and when they should learn it, yet like many other issues it has become a political pariah, especially for the state’s Republican leaders.

88. Digital Billboard Debuts On Convention Center -

A digital LED display screen on the west wall of the Memphis Cook Convention Center was turned on Wednesday, Feb. 12, with a ceremonial flip of the switch.

The screen, 39 feet by 14 feet 6 inches, is visible to eastbound traffic on the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and has been a goal of the Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau for three years.

89. Seven Memphis-Area RadioShacks to Close -

Seven RadioShack stores in the Memphis area are among the 1,784 retail sites the company plans to close, according to court documents related to its bankruptcy filing last week.

The Shelby County stores to close between Feb. 17 and March 31, according to the list, are in Wolfchase Galleria, 2760 N. Germantown Parkway; Trinity Commons, 714 Germantown Parkway; the Collierville store, 694 W. Poplar Ave.; Whitehaven Plaza, 4082 Elvis Presley Blvd.; Bartlett Towne Center, 6045 Stage Road; and Polo Shops, 7464 Winchester Road. The store in Holiday Plaza Mall in West Memphis is also slated to close.

90. Hagar Donates $25,000 To Blues Hall of Fame -

Sammy Hagar’s Red Rocker Bar & Grill formally opened at Southland Park in West Memphis Friday, Feb. 6, with a ceremony attended by the Red Rocker himself.

The rock-and-roller also donated $25,000 to the Blues Hall of Fame on the other side of the Mississippi River.

91. Weddle-West Approved as Memphis Provost -

Karen Weddle-West have been approved as the new provost of the University of Memphis by Tennessee Board of Regents Chancellor John Morgan.

92. Weddle-West Recommended As Memphis Provost -

Karen Weddle-West has been recommended as the new provost at the University of Memphis by University President David Rudd.

93. Haslam Stumps for Insure Tennessee -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam is stumping for his Insure Tennessee Medicaid expansion proposal with a stop in Frayser Wednesday, Jan. 21, ahead of the Feb. 2 special legislative session on the proposal.

94. The Other Fellow -

Long before his death last year, former U.S. Sen. Howard Baker of Tennessee was aware that other Republicans, including those who worked in his groundbreaking campaigns of the 1960s and 1970s, believed it was no longer possible for a political moderate like him to get elected in Tennessee.

95. Mid-South Community College, Arkansas State Trustees to Meet -

Arkansas State University trustees and Mid-South Community College trustees are both in West Memphis Friday, Jan. 9, for special meetings to discuss making the community college becoming part of the ASU system.

96. Andrew Jackson Home Pushes 7th President's Rock Star Image -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Andrew Jackson: President. Hero. Rockstar.

So reads a billboard welcoming arrivals at the Nashville International Airport, attempting to lure them from the honky-tonks of downtown Broadway to Jackson's historic home called The Hermitage a few miles to the east.

97. Corps of Engineers Begins River Work South of Memphis -

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers began work Monday, Jan. 5, on widening the navigation channel of the Mississippi River south of Memphis.

The work in six bendways on weirs extending from the west bank will close the river to commercial barge tows each day from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. between river mile 637 and 630. The work, which will be in the middle of the river, approximately 600 feet from the banks, is expected to take three months.

98. Cities Across Tennessee Deal With Short-Term Rental Safety, Zoning Issues -

Nashville isn’t the only city struggling with how to handle short-term rental properties.

Just about every jurisdiction in the state has been caught off guard by the explosive rise in the new shared economy, and what that means for decades-old zoning laws.

99. Building the Base -

It was late September, and local officials were deeply engaged with retail giant Target as the company explored investing in an online fulfillment center in Memphis when the discussions turned toward a familiar subject.

100. Community Hospitals Becoming Endangered Species -

The state of Mississippi has 110 hospitals and three-fourths of them are, as you might expect, in rural areas.

“And 56 of them have fewer than 50 beds,” said Mendal Kemp, director of the Center for Rural Health at the Mississippi Hospital Association.