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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Filing Deadline, Case & Vance In May and Paul Manafort at the Rivermont -

By our count, when the noon Thursday deadline for candidates in the May county primaries has come and gone, there could be -- could be -- four incumbent county commissioners who are effectively re-elected to their seats for another four-year term. And we already know the commission will have at least seven new faces in September. More interesting is that there are only four sets of primaries – all for countywide offices – that have multiple contenders in each primary. That’s out of 23 offices on the primary ballot.

2. Agency-By-Agency Highlights of Trump's 2019 Budget -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Here are highlights from President Donald Trump's budget for fiscal year 2019...

___

DEFENSE

Trump's budget for 2019 shows the administration's concern about the threat from North Korea and its missile program.

3. Last Word: Shutdown Round Two, The Pastner Charges and 1968 Virtual Reality -

The federal government technically shutdown at midnight in Washington, D.C., Friday for the second time in 17 days. But the House and Senate were still going for a vote on a two-year budget compromise before dawn Friday morning as this is posted.

4. The Metrics Mayor -

At times in the last two years, political supporters of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland have been worried. They agree with what got him elected, his “brilliant at the basics” philosophy that makes basic services and fundamental play-it-safe financial strategies the priority at City Hall.

5. Monument Bills Create State Heritage Battlegrounds -

Legislative battles are looming over a spate of bills designed to hammer Memphis and any other cities accused of violating the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act.

Lawmakers filed several pieces of legislation aimed at punishing local governments in the wake of the Memphis City Council move to topple the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park and two other Confederate monuments in another park by selling the property to a newly created nonprofit organization.

6. Customer-Focused Government Not Always a Pleaser -

Gov. Bill Haslam is fond of saying government should run more like a business, and during his eighth and final State of the State address he invoked the term “customer-focused” at least twice in a victory lap.

7. Council Debate on MLGW Rates Reveals Trust Issues -

It began after the Tom Lee storm last Memorial Day weekend – a burst of sudden, intense winds that knocked out power to 188,000 homes and businesses as well as toppling the circa-1950s obelisk memorial to Tom Lee Downtown.

8. Last Word: Closing the Loophole, Skeleton Hotel Update and Jubilee Conversion -

The state legislator who sponsored the most recent version of the law making it much more difficult to remove Confederate monuments acknowledges that the city of Memphis found a legitimate loophole in the 2016 law he crafted. Republican Steve McDaniel, of Parkers Crossroads, tells our Nashville correspondent Sam Stockard that he has a bill in the House to close the loophole. But it won't undo what happened here. Although there is still a court fight over that taking shape.

9. McDaniel to Fashion Loophole Bill for State Monuments -

NASHVILLE – The House sponsor of the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act is preparing legislation to close a “loophole” Memphis used to spur removal of Confederate monuments from parks property it sold to a nonprofit group.

10. Nashville Court Orders Second Attempt at Mediation on Monuments -

The Nashville chancellor who Monday ordered a hold on selling or transferring ownership of Confederate monuments removed from two Memphis parks followed up the next day with an order that all sides in the dispute enter mediation.

11. Last Word: Credit Hours & Tn Promise, Opioid Differences and Nikki's Hot Rebrand -

A very busy Monday and I feel like some of this is may be fueled by some of us just now getting completely over the flu or someone close who has the flu for the first time in the New Year. Whatever the case, Monday came with a curtain call of sorts by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, a court order on the Confederate monuments, year-end stats on crime in Memphis and countywide… a PILOT here, a building permit or three there.

12. The Week Ahead: Jan. 29-Feb. 4 -

Good morning, Memphis! Proceedings related to the city’s removal of Confederate statues from two parks get underway, just one of many events on a busy Monday. Check our rundown of all the happenings you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

13. Last Word: Eureka Education, Confederate Monuments in Court and Dillon Brooks -

Supermarkets are hard. That is the tag line in every discussion about getting a supermarket or grocery store for a given part of town that doesn’t have one. And once a new supermarket goes up somewhere else, there is inevitably word that a competitor or two is going to build nearby. The discussion always includes the mandatory recitation of the 3 to 4 percent profit margin stores operate on, which even knowledgeable critics of the decisions about where to locate and not to locate stores acknowledge is accurate.

14. Last Word: Risks by Race, ASD Changes in Frayser and Binghampton Style -

African-American children are more likely to die after surgery than white children, according to a new study by researchers at UTHSC and Le Bonheur. The researchers found that in every category that goes into determining the chance of dying, the risk for white children was overestimated and underestimated for black children. And the dynamics of the risk work differently by race. The conclusion is race-specific models on the issue work better than non race specific models.

15. Last Word: Shutdown Over?, Glen Farms Plans and Billy Richmond - Wing Guru -

The federal government shutdown for many of us outside the Beltway amounted to a message on a website saying the agency we were looking up was closed Monday. And Monday was the third and final day of the most recent shutdown. But the immigration policy known as DACA – Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals – is the issue to be explored by Congress in the three weeks that the continuing resolution covers. It’s an issue that there has been plenty of local discussion about

16. Last Word: Brunch Overload, Grade-Changing Misdemeanor and Sports Rebirth -

What happens when Memphians have been home and/or work bound for about two weeks between a national flu outbreak and snow and ice that hangs tough in below freezing temperatures and the temperature Sunday under sunny skies is almost 60? The correct answer is brunch overload.

17. Some Express Interest in Monuments Removed From City Parks -

The private nonprofit that had the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments removed from city parks in December says it has fielded numerous offers to take the statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest, Jefferson Davis and a bust of Confederate Capt. Harvey Mathes in Memphis Park where the Davis statue stood.

18. Last Word: The Snow Split, Amazon Post-Mortem and Intermodal Comeback -

A split verdict on Snow Day 4. Some school systems and colleges and universities are out again Friday, others are not and still others are opening later in the day. Shelby County Schools, which is out, says it has 13 extra days built into its schedule for just such an event or events – that is 13 days extra beyond the 180 days the state requires as the bare minimum for a school year.

19. Greenspace Nonprofit Details Offers For Confederate Monuments -

The private nonprofit group that had the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments removed from city parks in December says it has had numerous offers to take the statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as well as a bust of Confederate Captain Harvey Mathes in the same park where the Davis statue stood.

20. Shot Fired From Memphis Ignites Civil War Rematch -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest died in 1877, but 140 years later some people just can’t let their hero or the Old South go away.

In fact, the state Legislature is set to reignite the Civil War – to some degree – in 2018. We hope no gunshots are fired.

21. Tennessee Lawmakers Head Into Session With Elections Looming -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee lawmakers return Tuesday for a session colored by upcoming elections and Gov. Bill Haslam's final lap before he hits his term limits.

This year, the Republican-led General Assembly likely won't face a monthslong fight over one topic, like the roads-funding package with gas tax hikes and other tax breaks that Haslam ushered into law in 2017.

22. Last Word: Tax Reform Pay Raises, Minority Business Kinks and Elvis at 83 -

A busy but ultimately slow weekend on the Confederate monuments front as a total of fewer than 100 opponents of the removal of the city’s two most visible monuments actively protested Saturday either on the interstate loop or in the “protest area” by Health Sciences Park.

23. Memphis Experts See Economic Growth Building Off 2017 Into 2018 -

With resolutions made and the new year now, another annual exercise rises to the forefront – predictions on what Memphis and its economy can expect in 2018.

If 2017 taught us anything, it’s that there’s so much we won’t be able to even remotely see coming, from Memphis bidding to become the potential home for Amazon’s second headquarters to action finally being taken on the Confederate monuments in city parks and so much more.

24. Mayor Says Memphis 'Will Be Prepared' for Statue Protests -

If opponents of the removal of the city’s two most visible Civil War monuments follow through on plans for a Memphis protest Jan. 6, Mayor Jim Strickland said city government will be ready.

25. City, County Governments on Different Paths -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and the city council members are half way through their four-year terms of office with the new year.

26. Democrats Look to Cooperate on Key Issues -

With the state’s budget projected to be tight and lawmakers lining up to run for re-election in 2018, the coming legislative session isn’t expected to yield many surprises.

But the 110th General Assembly still has a long row to hoe as the session starts Jan. 9 with new legislative offices and committee rooms in the renovated Cordell Hull Building in downtown Nashville.

27. Last Word: The Day After, Frayser Bauhaus and Gasol & Fizdale -

Less than 24 hours after the Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park was taken down and away, Memphians were taking selfies with what’s left of the very considerable base in the background. And this is only going to become more prevalent when the weather improves and you will probably see folks out there who have some very different views on the removal of the statues.

28. Last Word: The Take Down, Wamp Stumps For Revolution and The Mock NBA Draft -

“It was a dark and stormy night…” I actually considered using that line in what was a busy Wednesday evening around this town. The city council has an exceedingly rare extended council session from a Tuesday recessed session and at the last minute drops in a substitute ordinance on Confederate monuments. I’m listening to all of this at my desk over the city’s completely inadequate website system or whatever you call it that doesn’t involve profanity.

29. Fall Creek Falls: Sound Plan or Political Payback -

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! Now go find a job. That’s the message the state of Tennessee is sending nearly 60 employees at Fall Creek Falls State Park this joyous holiday season.

30. Conyers Resigns From Congress Amid Harassment Allegations -

DETROIT (AP) – Besieged by allegations of sexual harassment, Democratic Rep. John Conyers resigned from Congress on Tuesday, bringing an abrupt end to the civil rights leader's nearly 53-year career on Capitol Hill.

31. Grab a Gun, Go See Your State Representative -

When legislative leaders started to allow guns in the Legislative Plaza nearly two years ago, the Sierra Club’s Scott Banbury had his daughter take pictures of him wearing his holstered Ruger and lobbyist ID card to put on lawmakers’ desks with the question: “Is this what you want?”

32. Last Word: Fairgrounds Surprises, Aquarium Reprise and Six Open Commission Seats -

There are lots of renderings and blueprints floating around this city of ours these days. Land opening up, locations changing, possibilities revealed, new uses for old places and old places giving way to new. So it’s not surprising to see some smaller changes that are nevertheless highly visible. Thus comes word with the new week that Spin City, the corner tenant at Poplar and Highland in Poplar Plaza, will close with the new year and Spaghetti Warehouse, on Huling Downtown, will close later this month in the week before Thanksgiving.

33. City Announces 10-Member Zoo Parking Advisory Team -

A 10-member city advisory panel will be part of the process for settling on a specific design for expansion and reconfiguration of Memphis Zoo parking in Overton Park.

The city administration announced Thursday, Oct. 5, the names of 10 people to the panel, which will first offer feedback on the preliminary work of designers and then select a concept plan.

34. City Announces 10-Member Zoo Parking Advisory Team -

A 10-member city advisory panel will be part of the process for settling on a specific design for expansion and reconfiguration of parking for the Memphis Zoo in Overton Park.

The city administration announced Thursday, Oct. 5, the names of 10 people to the panel, which will first offer feedback on the preliminary work of designers and then select a concept plan.

35. U of M Law School Forum Tuesday on Confederate Monuments -

City of Memphis chief legal officer Bruce McMullen and Memphis City Council attorney Allan Wade will talk about the city’s efforts to remove Confederate monuments in city parks Tuesday, Oct. 3, during a panel discussion at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law.

36. City Adds Longer Hours At Community Centers -

The city of Memphis is extending the hours of operation at the city’s 24 community centers to keep them open until 8 p.m. on weekdays and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends.

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said the extended hours are to allow for more participation in athletic and community programs offered at the centers.

37. Council Delays One Downtown Advance, Approves Another -

Memphis City Council members Tuesday, Sept. 19, delayed for two weeks a vote on a $10 million advance to start renovation design work on the Memphis Cook Convention Center, seeking more specific information. City chief operating officer Doug McGowen said he would provide the council with a timeline and specific work to be done.

38. Last Word: Game Day, Corker at Southwind on Taxes and Trump and Hotel Stats -

The game is on rain or shine at the Liberty Bowl Thursday. And the start of the Tigers football season could be a very soggy start with remnants of Hurricane Harvey arriving. So while tailgating on Tiger Lane may involve umbrellas, none are allowed in the Liberty Bowl itself. Ponchos it is for your face time on CBS Thursday evening.

39. Outsourcing by Any Other Name Still Not So Sweet -

Outsourcing is starting to become a four-letter word in state government.

Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration told lawmakers during a summer study session it’s giving up on privatization of state parks, including a plan to hire a company to raze the inn at Fall Creek Falls and build a new one, at a cost of more than $22 million, then take over the keys and the profits.

40. Tennessee Governor to Drop Privatization Push at State Parks -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam's administration is dropping efforts to outsource management of Tennessee's state parks and will let his successor decide whether to renew the privatization attempt.

41. State Panel Sheds New Light on Racial Atrocities -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner has seen what can happen when old wounds are never allowed to heal.

She’s seen it most recently in clashes between neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and white supremacists and those who resisted their hatred in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counter-protester was killed and 19 were injured when a car was intentionally driven into a group of counter protesters. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash that weekend.

42. Council Mulls Legal Options To Move Park Monuments -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized and maintain public order, or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

43. Council Considers Other Legal Options on Confederate Monuments -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized to maintain public order, or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

44. Council Considers Other Legal Options on Confederate Monuments. -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized, to maintain public order or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

45. Confederate Monuments Controversy Comes to City Hall -

The question of timing in removing two Confederate monuments from city parks arrives at City Hall Tuesday, Aug. 22.

A Memphis City Council resolution that would instruct the city administration to immediately remove and/or sell Confederate monuments in city parks is scheduled for discussion at the 2:15 p.m. executive session and could be added to the council agenda or voted on later at the first council session in September.

46. City Council To Take Up Monument Removal Resolution -

Memphis City Council members will discuss and possibly vote Tuesday, Aug. 22, on a resolution that directs the city to act on the “immediate removal and/or sale of Nathan Bedford Forrest statue from Health Sciences Park and statue of Jefferson Davis and related artifacts from Memphis Park.”

47. Editorial: Make the System Take Down Monuments -

Instead of changing the names of its Confederate-themed parks, Memphis should have been going directly after its Confederate monuments in 2013, before the Tennessee Legislature enacted procedures that seem designed to draw out the process for as long as possible.

48. Monument Effort Reflects Differing Strategies -

The call to remove Confederate monuments in Memphis city parks is increasingly meeting with local officials pointing toward Nashville and state officials. And local activists are pointing to a clock.

49. American Paper Optics, St. Jude Promote Safe Solar Eclipse -

In anticipation of the historic solar eclipse Aug. 21, Bartlett-based American Paper Optics (APO) is partnering with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital to educate the public on safe solar eclipse viewing.

50. UrbanArt Commission Will See Tighter City Guidelines -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd put his move to abolish the UrbanArt Commission on hold Tuesday, July 25, in favor of tighter oversight of the UAC’s public art program, which totals 1 percent of city expenditures on capital projects.

51. UrbanArt Commission to See Tighter City Guidelines -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd put his move to abolish the UrbanArt Commission on hold Tuesday, July 25, in favor of tighter oversight of the UAC’s public art program, which totals 1 percent of city expenditures on capital projects.

52. Legislature’s End Game on Guns: No Rules at All? -

If you think the state Legislature is full of gun nuts, Rep. Micah Van Huss begs to differ.

“No, not at all,” Van Huss says when asked if the General Assembly is too pro-gun. “I don’t think they’re pro-gun enough. In fact, … I think our laws in Tennessee infringe on our constitutional rights. There are now 16 states – we’ve added two or three this year – that allow constitutional carry. So, we’re falling behind.”

53. Last Word: Ransomware, Memphis Charitable Giving and The Race for Governor -

The ransomware problem got so serious Wednesday that trading in FedEx stock was stopped briefly during the afternoon. The virus was specifically aimed at TNT Express operations. Here’s a more detailed story via Bloomberg on what happened.

54. Council Urges County to Keep Juvenile Court Agreement -

Memphis City Council members approved a resolution Tuesday, June 20, urging county government leaders to keep in place the memorandum of agreement with the Justice Department governing conditions and due process measures at Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court.

55. Ole Miss Buys Baptist Hospital in $22 Million Deal -

2301 S. Lamar Blvd.
Oxford, MS 38655

Sale Amount: $22 million

Sale Date: June 15, 2017

56. City Council Approves DROP Freeze, Delays Stormwater and Sewer Fee Votes -

The city has its third voluntary freeze on retirements in two years with a Tuesday, June 20, vote by the Memphis City Council. But it came after lots of council debate about whether the freeze might have the opposite overall effect of stabilizing the Memphis Police force at the top for future growth in the ranks below or whether it will prompt the middle ranks to exit quicker if they can’t rise in the ranks.

57. Law Could Allow Guns at Nashville Bus Hub Used By Schools -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Police and security guards keep watch as thousands of children zigzag through Nashville's downtown bus hub each morning and afternoon, catching buses between home and school.

58. Tennessee Governor Signs NRA-Backed Metal Detector Gun Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Many Tennessee city and county buildings, parks and buses will either have to buy metal detectors, hire security guards and check people's bags, or let handgun permit holders bring in their guns, under a law signed Friday by Gov. Bill Haslam.

59. Unwilling Private Sector Gives Park Workers a Victory -

Two state parks are celebrating victories in an atmosphere of uncertainty created by the governor’s penchant for privatizing state functions.

Fall Creek Falls drew no bidders for a $20 million plan to hire a vendor who would tear down its inn, construct a new one and take over operations for 10 years. Henry Horton State Park, meanwhile, is set for $10 million in improvements this coming fiscal year, including upgrades to its hospitality facilities, plus a new visitors center, rather than a proposal to raze its inn and not rebuild.

60. Last Word: "A Downward Spiral", Outdoors Pop-Up and Haslam in Raleigh -

At the end of another day of alarming news and denials from the White House, U.S. Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee used a new phrase that has significance in a cycle of action and reaction and more action in which many of us gauge reaction by whether the person speaking has an R or a D after their name. The lines are that clearly drawn.

61. Privatization Opposition Renewed as No Bids Come in for Falls Creek Falls Project -

The lack of bidders for a $20 million inn reconstruction project at Fall Creek Falls could spur legislative hearings this summer on parks funding and privatization amid growing lawmaker concern about the governor’s outsourcing plans.

62. Tennessee State Park Outsourcing Push Draws No Bidders -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A push by Gov. Bill Haslam's administration to outsource hospitality services at a Tennessee state park has drawn no bidders.

Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation spokeswoman Kim Schofinski told the Chattanooga Times Free Press (http://bit.ly/2r5WzL9 ) on Wednesday that no one bid on the proposal at Fall Creek Falls State Park, located on the Upper Cumberland Plateau in Van Buren and Bledsoe counties.

63. Last Word: RiverPlay, New City Property Tax Rate and House Republican Rift -

The Memphis In May International Festival arrives Friday with the Beale Street Music Festival and hopefully with warmer temperatures than the Thursday chill. Meanwhile, RiverPlay, the conversion of Riverside Drive between Jefferson and Court to a pop-up park linking up Memphis and Mississippi River Parks, makes its debut Friday afternoon.

64. Tennessee House Passes Gun-Lawsuit Bill -

Legislation making it easier for cities to be sued over gun restrictions eased through the state House Wednesday, May 3, even though it would allow those filing lawsuits to claim triple attorney fees.

65. Last Word: Three Gs React, More CA Changes and the Forrest Controversy Defined -

The day after Germantown leaders offered his school system $25 million for Germantown Elementary, Middle and High Schools, SCS superintendent Dorsey Hopson was fielding calls from parents of students at the schools – the “three Gs” as they are known.

66. Lawmakers Still Seek Answers as Outsourcing Contract Gets Underway -

A majority of Tennessee’s legislators, including several Shelby County lawmakers, are asking the state to hold up on a facilities management outsourcing contract with Jones Lang LaSalle.

Seventy-five of the General Assembly’s 132 members, 17 in the Senate and 58 in the House, have signed a letter to Terry Cowles, director of the Office of Customer Focused Government, asking the office to slow down on outsourcing so it can “study and understand the effect” on public services, the economy and state employees.

67. Last Word: Rain, Rain... Cooper-Young Holding Pattern and Haslam on IMPROVE -

Trees down, power out, Redbirds' Saturday game called early with no fireworks, flooding in some parts of the Mid-South region. So this means Beale Street Music Festival weekend will be clear as a bell, right? Ponchos and boots ready just in case, as well as light sabres.

68. The Week Ahead: April 24-30 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! Those potholes and rough patches of broken asphalt you dodge on your morning commute may be in line for repair pretty soon, and there’s a full list of entertaining and informative events to attend in the coming days, including the annual RegionSmart Summit. Here’s what you need to know about the Week Ahead...

69. University of Memphis, UTHSC May Soon Face Outsourcing Decisions -

Forty-one state lawmakers signed a letter requesting the state put a hold on its outsourcing plans until the General Assembly can scrutinize its effect on state workers and services.

The state is set to sign a contract April 28 with Chicago-based JLL for facilities management work that could be used by universities and departments statewide. Even local government jobs could be doled out to the contractor.

70. Big River Crossing Wins Architecture Award -

The Big River Crossing on the Harahan Bridge has been honored with an American Architecture Award, the nation’s highest public award for new architecture.

Presented by the Chicago Athenaeum Museum of Architecture and Design and the European Centre for Architecture, Art, Design and Urban Studies, the juried award singled out the bridge’s night lighting by Philips Lighting Inc. for its basic task of ensuring visibility on the walkway while also decorating the bridge in different ways to coincide with local and national events, holidays and civic causes.

71. Collierville Ordinance Targets Refuse on Trails -

The town of Collierville has a new ordinance aimed at stopping residents from dropping leaves and other refuse on greenbelt trails.

The ordinance approved last month by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen gives residents a first-time warning via a door hanger if town crews find residential debris on public land. The second offense comes with a $50 fine for every day the debris is left on the public space.

72. Collierville Ordinance Targets Residential Refuse on Trails -

The town of Collierville has a new ordinance aimed at stopping residents from dumping leaves and other refuse onto greenbelt trails.

The ordinance approved last month by the Board of Mayor and Aldermen gives residents a first-time warning via a door hanger if town crews find residential debris on public land. The second offense comes with a $50 fine for every day the debris is left on the public space.

73. Last Word: Police Presence on MLK Day, 'R on R Crime' and Fashion on Flicker -

I’m going to err on the side of caution and say that the helicopter constantly circling over the National Civil Rights Museum Tuesday during the otherwise solemn observance of the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination could have been one used by one of the television stations. It also could have been a police helicopter and that would fit with the highly visible presence Memphis Police have chosen to take in the last year or so of protest in the city.

74. Democrats Put Squeeze on Republicans To Defeat Outsourcing of State Assets -

Legislative Democrats are calling on Republicans to join them in passing a slate of bills to combat Gov. Bill Haslam’s outsourcing plans for everything from state parks to facilities management at universities.

75. NYC Parks Commissioner Joins RegionSmart -

The second installment of the RegionSmart Summit speaker series features the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation Commissioner Mitchell J. Silver, an internationally recognized, award-winning planner with over 30 years of experience.

76. Democrats Put Squeeze on Republicans to Defeat Outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats are calling on Republicans to join them in passing a slate of bills to combat Gov. Bill Haslam’s outsourcing plans for everything from state parks to facilities management at universities.

77. Last Word: The CA Marks A Year, Bike Lanes and Nicole Miller for Fashion Week -

The city of Memphis is in a two-front legal fight in federal court over alleged surveillance of protesters that landed several dozen of them on the City Hall list – according to each of the two lawsuits filed this past month.

78. Norris’ Broadband Bill Clears State Senate Hurdle -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris’ broadband internet access bill is rolling through the General Assembly.

79. Bill to Ban Outsourcing Sails Through Committee -

A Senate panel approved legislation Monday prohibiting the outsourcing of jobs at state parks less than a week after the State Building Commission renewed plans for rebuilding and privatizing the inn at Fall Creek Falls.

80. Last Word: Tri-State Inks Move to Midtown, Main and Gayoso and 'Wise Trek' -

The open land across Union Avenue from AutoZone Park remains just that as some of it has changed hands again. Vision Hospitality buying the land that had been the location of the Greyhound bus station at Union and Hernando. Vision Memphis LLC sold to Vision Hospitality of Knoxville for $4 million, according to a warrant deed we reviewed Monday.

81. Inn Construction, Private Management Plan Draw Ire of State Sen. Lee Harris -

State Sen. Lee Harris is criticizing Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision to renew an outsourcing plan for development and operations at Fall Creek Falls State Park, calling it a move to bolster profits for a private company.

82. Trump's Budget: Build Up Military, Build the Wall -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump unveiled a $1.15 trillion budget Thursday, proposing a far-reaching overhaul of federal spending that would slash many domestic programs to finance a big increase for the military and make a down payment on a U.S.-Mexico border wall.

83. The Week Ahead: March 14-20 -

Hey, Memphis! Despite the cold snap, spring is just a week away. Get outside and celebrate at Cooper-Young’s St. Patrick’s Day parade, or do a little garden shopping at the Spring Fling Garden Show. Check out what else is on our to-do list in The Week Ahead…

84. View From the Hill: Outsourcing Win More About Turf Than Trends -

As Fall Creek Falls folks celebrate a state decision to postpone park privatization, the question is whether public opposition or failure to follow long-standing state protocol led to the plug-pulling.

85. Fall Creek Falls Park Contract Postponed Indefinitely -

NASHVILLE – The state is putting an indefinite hold on a proposed contract for a private company to redevelop and operate Fall Creek Falls State Park.

The Department of General Services is postponing the request for proposals process from vendors for a contract to oversee construction of a new inn at the park and to run its hospitality services after the $22 million project is complete.

86. State Democrats Introduce Bill of Rights, Looking For Every Win They Can Get -

NASHVILLE – House Democrats introduced a People’s Bill of Rights in the State Capitol Monday, Feb. 27, a comprehensive legislative package to ensure rights of Tennesseans affecting everything from jobs to criminal justice to education.

87. Collierville Replaces Backstops on Baseball Fields -

Collierville Parks maintenance crews finished replacing backstops at the town’s four baseball diamonds last week, just in time for the start of baseball season.

The town replaced the 30-foot-high backstops itself rather than hiring a private company to undertake the weeklong process for each one. The 25-year-old backstops were changed out using lift trucks from the Collierville Public Services Department’s Fleet Services Division.

88. View From the Hill: Outsourcing, Rates Worry Park Fans -

Dunlap resident Kathy Gilbert opposes privatization of Fall Creek Falls on a number of fronts.

If a vendor comes in to run the state park, as planned by Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration, she’s worried about the possible loss of jobs or pay and benefits by state employees, the funneling of revenue to private investors and the raising of rates at the state park’s lodge when it’s rebuilt, potentially making it less affordable for families to visit.

89. Haslam Tax Plan Would Secure Funds for Road, Infrastructure Projects -

NASHVILLE – Memphis legislators are weighing Gov. Bill Haslam’s proposal to raise fuel taxes and slightly cut the grocery tax, while assessing the impact on local governments of a Hall income tax reduction and a major business tax reduction that is proposed.

90. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

91. Riverside Ice Rink To Open Dec. 10 -

A city ice skating rink by the Mississippi River opens Saturday, Dec. 10.

The Fourth Bluff Ice Rink, located in Mississippi River Park next to the Tennessee Welcome Center, is open to the public into January for a $10 admission, which includes skate rental.

92. Riverside Ice Rink To Open Dec. 10 -

A city ice skating rink by the Mississippi River opens Saturday, Dec. 10.

The Fourth Bluff Ice Rink, located in Mississippi River Park next to the Tennessee Welcome Center, is open to the public into January for a $10 admission, which includes skate rental.

93. Last Word: Mud Island Round 3, Newsmakers Notes and North Midtown -

Cue the organ. You know, the one from those old soap operas or radio dramas. And prepare for the latest episode of Island of Mud. When last we looked in on Mud Island River Park, the city had two finalists to redevelop all or a part of the southern half of the island that is really a peninsula.

94. Last Word: Haslam on Trump, Midtown Apartment Blitz and Beyond Parks -

Trump vs. Clinton or Giants vs. Packers? America Chooses.

While there is so much discussion – and rightfully so – about the unprecedented direction this Presidential campaign as a whole has taken in so many ways, the speed of the conduct of the campaign and news cycle reaction has also become a factor. Many of you are probably reading this at a point in which the reaction to what happened over 90 minutes before 10 p.m. on a Sunday night has already made parts of the debate irrelevant or old news.

95. Tennessee Black Caucus: Don't Cut Civil Rights Milestones -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Black Caucus of State Legislators on Friday called for a public response to help keep civil rights milestones in Tennessee history from being removed from the social studies standards for public schools.

96. The Week Ahead: October 10-16 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! Get ready for an eclectic mix of fairs, food and festivals to keep you entertained this week. Check out details on those and other need-to-know happenings in The Week Ahead…

97. Civil Rights Milestones Among Tennessee Items Facing Cuts -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Major milestones in the civil rights movements for minorities and women are among a slew of Tennessee historical events, names and places that would no longer be required learning under a proposed overhaul of the social studies curriculum.

98. Logistical Nightmare -

Lamar Avenue is a $300 million problem. Rush hour on Lamar turns into several hours, and for the hundreds of distribution centers located near the corridor, just-in-time delivery is nearly impossible in the face of miles of congested traffic.

99. Thrill-Ride Accidents Spark New Demands for Regulation -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over.

100. Senator Seeks Reconvening of Congress Over Zika Virus -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The Latest on the Zika virus in Florida (all Eastern times):

4 p.m.

U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson is asking Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to reconvene Congress so lawmakers can pass an emergency spending bill to fight the spread of the Zika virus.