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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: Carousel Preview, New Crime Stats and EDGE Does Multi-Family -

The group Friends of the Fairgrounds got together Thursday evening at the Children’s Museum of Memphis and got the first group tour of the Grand Carousel center under construction at CMOM. This is as the museum focuses more on fundraising for the $6 million project that has already raised the money for the restoration of the carousel itself and now sets about the task of paying for the building around it including a banquet hall. Here’s a look from our Facebook page with more to come on CMOM and the Fairgrounds for the Monday edition that will probably go up on line Friday.

2. Unhealthy Motives -

WE DON’T CARE ABOUT HEALTH CARE. WE CARE ABOUT INSURANCE. Like casinos, the insurance business is a bet, you know, like a roll of the dice. And like casinos, the house always wins. An army of actuaries hedges every bet. If you buy life insurance, they’re going to charge you enough to make money before you die. They win. If you buy health insurance, they’re going to charge you enough to make money if you get sick. They win.

3. Jackson Visits City Hall In Push for Career Education -

At the top of the Tuesday, May 9, Memphis City Council session, the council heard from civil rights leader and two-time presidential contender Rev. Jesse Jackson.

4. Jackson Visits City Hall In Push for Career Education -

At the top of the Tuesday, May 9, Memphis City Council session, the council heard from civil rights leader and two-time presidential contender Rev. Jesse Jackson.

5. Clark Tower Wraps Up $8 Million Renovation -

Commercial real estate firm Colliers International has announced the owner of Clark Tower, In-Rel Properties, has finished an $8 million renovation of the iconic East Memphis office building. Details on that and other top deals in this week's Real Estate Recap...

6. The Week Ahead: May 8-14 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! Festival season rolls on this week with plenty of reasons to get outside, celebrate and … well, be festive. Plus, we’ve got details on a couple of great concerts to check out and the (completely unrelated) reason you might hear drumming around Mud Island in The Week Ahead…

7. ASD Loses 29 Employees in ESSA Shift -

The state-run Achievement School District is losing 29 employees including 13 who are involved in running the first schools in Frayser taken over by the district in 2012.

The changes, which include another 16 positions in the central office, are the most significant ever for the ASD, which takes over state schools in the bottom 5 percent in terms of academic achievement.

8. ASD Sheds 29 Employees in ESSA Shift -

The state-run Achievement School District is losing 29 employees including 13 who are involved in the direct running of the first schools in Frayser taken over by the district in 2012.

The changes, which include another 16 positions in the central office, are the most significant change to the district for the bottom 5 percent of public schools in the state in terms of academic achievement.

9. Americans Hang Up on Landlines as Cellphone Homes Dominate -

NEW YORK (AP) – Deborah Braswell, a university administrator in Alabama, is a member of a dwindling group – people with a landline phone at home.

According to a U.S. government study released Thursday, 50.8 percent of homes and apartments had only cellphone service in the latter half of 2016, the first time such households attained a majority in the survey. Braswell and her family are part of the 45.9 percent that still have landline phones. The remaining households have no phone service at all.

10. Neighborhood Preservation Awards $10K to MLK Prep -

Neighborhood Preservation Inc. has awarded Frayser Community Schools, the charter school company that operates Martin Luther King Jr. College Preparatory High School in Frayser, a $10,000 grant to improve the baseball field and other athletic and recreational facilities on the high school’s campus, 1530 Dellwood Ave.

11. Pinch Concept Plan Passes Council’s First Reading -

The concept plan that would guide development of the nine-block area between Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital was approved by the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 25, on the first of three required readings.

12. Pinch Concept Plan Passes Council’s First Reading -

The concept plan that would guide development of the nine-block area between Bass Pro Shops at the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital was approved by the Memphis City Council Tuesday, April 25, on the first of three required readings.

13. Neighborhood Preservation Awards $10K to MLK Prep -

Neighborhood Preservation Inc. has awarded Frayser Community Schools, the charter school company that operates Martin Luther King Jr. College Preparatory High School in Frayser, a $10,000 grant to improve the baseball field and other athletic and recreational facilities on the high school’s campus, 1530 Dellwood Ave.

14. Governor’s Supplemental Budget Includes More Transportation Funding -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris calls the governor’s $125 million supplemental budget a “strong foundation” for completing work on the IMPROVE Act.

15. Last Word: Two Science Marches, Bill Lee Kicks Off and Andrew Young on Ben Hooks -

Rainy Sunday in the city with ponchoed partisans of the Porter-Leath Ragin' Cajun gathering and Africa in April overlapping from the riverfront to Danny Thomas Boulevard. In Germantown, it was a soggy but colorful 5k for the Germantown Municipal School District with shades of blue, orange and of course pink, or was it red?, at different parts of the run.

16. Bill O'Reilly Out at Fox News Channel After 20 Years -

NEW YORK (AP) – Fox News Channel's parent company fired Bill O'Reilly on Wednesday following an investigation into harassment allegations, bringing a stunning end to cable television news' most popular program and one that came to define the bravado of his network over 20 years.

17. The Press Box: For Tigers Basketball, No Easy Way Forward -

Questions – and to the extent possible – answers about the reeling University of Memphis basketball program.

Q: Is this as simple as athletic director Tom Bowen and President M. David Rudd making a more than $15 million five-year mistake in hiring Tubby Smith?

18. Lawsons Going to Kansas; Tigers Lose More Players -

Dedric and K.J. Lawson are transferring to the University of Kansas to play for coach Bill Self, The Kansas City Star reported. The brothers, who announced last week they would be leaving the University of Memphis basketball program, will have to sit out next season before being eligible.

19. Civil Rights Activist Owens Calls Out Memphis Lawmaker -

Memphis civil rights activist Bill Owens, who campaigned for Republican Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential race, is criticizing a state legislator who refused to back his political efforts in a statement on the House floor.

20. Memphis Civil Rights Sites Would Benefit From Bill -

Mason Temple Church of God in Christ and the National Civil Rights Museum would get technical assistance toward preservation and interpretation from the National Park Service under a bill sponsored by U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander.

21. Memphis Civil Rights Sites Would Benefit From Bill -

Mason Temple Church of God in Christ and the National Civil Rights Museum would get technical assistance toward preservation and interpretation from the National Park Service under a bill sponsored by U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander.

22. Last Word: Lawsons Exit, LaRose Lessons and No Medicaid Expansion This Year -

The Lawson Brothers exit Tigers basketball seeking a release from the University of Memphis. The statement from Dedric and K.J. Lawson was all sweetness and light and apparently about as sincere as one of those interviews where players and coaches declare that if they will just play hard and put more points on the board than the other team then they should win.

23. Last Word: Police Presence on MLK Day, 'R on R Crime' and Fashion on Flicker -

I’m going to err on the side of caution and say that the helicopter constantly circling over the National Civil Rights Museum Tuesday during the otherwise solemn observance of the anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination could have been one used by one of the television stations. It also could have been a police helicopter and that would fit with the highly visible presence Memphis Police have chosen to take in the last year or so of protest in the city.

24. Last Word: The Catechism of 1968, Downtown Hotels and Earth Day on Auto Row -

What happened 49 years ago this week in our city began long before the first sanitation worker walked off the job or the first “I Am A Man” sign was made. Maybe it was that long arc that explains the timing of what happened here in late March into the first week of April of 1968. For just about half a century now we have thought and thought again about that chronology, reviewed the details. And what we have is a sort of catechism of moments that if they had happened differently, we can’t help thinking, might have produced a different result.

25. House Bill is Back Declaring God As Source of Liberty -

A previously defeated proposal to amend the state constitution to say that God is the source of Tennesseans’ liberties has been resurrected in the House.

The measure sponsored by Republican Rep. Micah Van Huss of Jonesborough had failed on a 3-3 vote in the House Civil Justice Subcommittee earlier this month. But Republican Rep. Martin Daniel of Knoxville made a motion to reconsider the bill, so it is scheduled to be heard again on Wednesday.

26. Lawmakers Blast Haslam Administration for Process Toward JLL Contract -

The Tennessee Department of General Services is set to award a statewide contract for facility management services to Jones Lang LaSalle, a company that already handles 10 percent of state office space and estimates a 15.9 percent savings if all higher education institutes participate.

27. Parkinson Rejects Owens’ Politics in Legislature -

NASHVILLE – Recognition for the Rev. Bill Owens turned into a rebuke on the House floor when a Memphis legislator discovered the activist pastor campaigned for President Donald Trump and urged black voters to leave the Democratic Party.

28. Parkinson Rejects Owens’ Politics After He is Honored -

NASHVILLE – Recognition for the Rev. Bill Owens turned into a rebuke on the House floor when a Memphis legislator discovered the activist pastor campaigned for President Donald Trump and urged black voters to leave the Democratic Party.

29. Arkansas Lawmakers Vote to Remove Lee From King Holiday -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Arkansas lawmakers gave final approval Friday to legislation removing Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from the holiday honoring slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.

30. Workers’ Comp Bureau Gets New Memphis Judge -

Jackson, Tennessee, attorney Deana Seymour is the new Memphis trial judge for the state Court of Workers' Compensation Claims.

31. March 17-23, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1968: 16.1 inches of snow fall on the city of Memphis, cancelling plans for striking city sanitation workers to march with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the front of their ranks from Clayborn Temple to City Hall. King would return to the city to lead the march on March 28, a march that would end before it got to City Hall because of violence. The violent end would prompt King to return to the city to lead another march April 5.

32. Workers' Comp Bureau Gets New Memphis Judge -

Jackson, Tennessee, attorney Deana Seymour is the new Memphis trial judge for the state Court of Workers' Compensation Claims.

33. What a Strange Twist of Events in Hiring of Currie -

John Currie is the new athletics director at the University of Tennessee. Has it sunk in yet? Currie, previously the athletic director at Kansas State, was introduced last week by new UT chancellor Beverly Davenport during a ceremony featuring fans, boosters, coaches and, of course, former Tennessee and NFL quarterback Peyton Manning.

34. 'Heartbeat Bill' Put Off a Year -

NASHVILLE – Legislation outlawing abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected is being postponed until 2018, but a House panel voted Wednesday to restrict abortions after the 20th week, a shift from the 24-week period defining “viability.”

35. New Vols AD Currie Says His Tennessee Experience Should Help -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – New Tennessee athletic director John Currie has some shopping to do.

36. Bill Filed to Strip Lee From King Holiday in Arkansas -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – A proposal filed Tuesday to remove Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday in Arkansas would also require the state to expand what is taught about the civil rights movement and the Civil War in the public schools.

37. Last Word: 'Sun Records,' Ole Miss's Lack of Control and Haslam in 2018 -

I am not going to be one of those people who at this late date in the history of television dramas based on real people points out every departure from reality. The first episode of the CMT television series “Sun Records” Thursday was a scene-setter and introduction of sorts to an ensemble cast with plenty of opportunities to name that place in Memphis. That usually means a pretty complex story line to come and there are more than enough memorable characters in the story of Sun.

38. Daniel’s ‘Milo Bill’ Evolves In Freedom of Speech Debate -

NASHVILLE – A Knoxville lawmaker pushing free speech on college campuses stopped calling his legislation the “Milo bill” after a video resurfaced of now-former Breitbart News columnist Milo Yiannopoulos approving of pedophilia.

39. Last Word: How Do You Get On The List, Sedgwick & Thornwood and Musicals -

Monday was Presidents Day and thus a holiday at City Hall. But for the occupant on City Hall’s top floor it was anything but a holiday. The list Memphis Police made for who has to have a uniformed police officer next to them to go anywhere in City Hall is turning into a controversy over possible surveillance of citizens participating in the last year or so of protests around the city.

40. Lawmakers OK New Board Appointments at 6 Public Universities -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The House and Senate have approved Gov. Bill Haslam's nominations for new boards for six public universities.

The new boards are part of the Republican governor's initiative to spin six four-year public universities out of the Tennessee Board of Regents system. Each board will control budgets, tuition and the selection of university presidents.

41. View From the Hill: Haslam Plan Tilts Broadband Playing Field -

State Reps. Pat Marsh and Art Swann emerged from a meeting underwhelmed by Gov. Bill Haslam’s legislation to spread broadband internet access across Tennessee.

“I thought there would be a lot more to it,” says Marsh, a Shelbyville Republican, calling the proposal “a drop in the bucket” financially but at least a starting point.

42. The Week Ahead: January 31- February 6 -

Good morning, Memphis! It will get up to 49 degrees Saturday, but the Mississippi River water temp will still be frigid when the annual Polar Bear Plunge for Special Olympics splashes off at Mud Island River Park. A busy week starts with Gov. Bill Haslam’s State of the State address today.     

43. Governor Proposes Rural Broadband Expansion for Tennessee -

NASHVILLE – State government will provide private companies with millions of dollars in grants and tax credits to extend broadband internet access while allowing electric co-ops to enter the retail broadband business under legislation Sen. Mark Norris is set to sponsor.

44. Rallings: Valero Protesters ‘Defamed’ King Holiday -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings defended the response of police officers and firefighters to a Monday, Jan. 16, protest that shut down access to the Valero refinery in South Memphis for five hours. And he said the action to protest an oil pipeline to the plant that would cross Arkansas defamed the federal holiday Monday honoring civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

45. New Details of St. Jude Expansion Look to Medical Corridors To The East -

The city’s plans for the Pinch District between the Pyramid and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital are only half of the plan the city will seek expanded uses of the Tourism Development Zone and an expansion of a Tax Increment Financing district for.

46. Rallings: Valero Protesters ‘Defamed’ King Holiday -

Memphis Police Director Michael Rallings defended the response of police officers and firefighters to a Monday, Jan. 16, protest that shut down access to the Valero refinery in South Memphis for five hours. And he said the action to protest an oil pipeline to the plant that would cross Arkansas defamed the federal holiday Monday honoring civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

47. City Offices to Close For King Holiday -

All divisions of city government, except police and fire services, will be closed Monday, Jan. 16, the federal holiday honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. That includes libraries, community centers and aquatic centers. City solid waste collections and Inland Waste garbage and recycling collections for Monday customers will move to Tuesday.

48. Cohen Announces $400,000 Grant for Clayborn Temple -

The National Park Service awarded the city’s Housing and Community Development Division a $400,000 grant Thursday, Jan. 12, for the preservation of Clayborn Temple.

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen said the grant that the city applied for and he endorsed is one of 39 similar projects to receive the federal funding. The grant comes from the African-American Civil Rights Grant Program of the park service. The grants are to highlight sites from the civil rights movement and the African-American experience.

49. Last Word: Humes Next, Top ZIPs in Residential and Payback in the Legislature -

Add Dave & Buster’s to the list of "it" retail hot spots. The restaurant-arcade has inked a lease in Cordova by Wolfchase Galeria with plans to open later this year, probably fourth quarter.

50. Cohen Announces $400,000 Grant for Clayborn Temple -

The National Park Service awarded the city’s Housing and Community Development Division a $400,000 grant Thursday, Jan. 12, for the preservation of Clayborn Temple.

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen said the grant that the city applied for and he endorsed is one of 39 similar projects to receive the federal funding. The grant comes from the African-American Civil Rights Grant Program of the park service. The grants are to highlight sites from the civil rights movement and the African-American experience.

51. City Offices to Close For King Holiday -

All divisions of city government, except police and fire services, will be closed Monday, Jan. 16, the federal holiday honoring Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. That includes libraries, community centers and aquatic centers. City solid waste collections and Inland Waste garbage and recycling collections for Monday customers will move to Tuesday.

52. View From the Hill: Taxing Online Sales Not Such an Easy Fix -

Cumberland Transit owner Allen Doty isn’t sure if a rule requiring major out-of-state retailers to collect Tennessee sales taxes will create more equity for his shop.

But Doty, who has been selling everything from bicycles to kayaks and camping gear for 34 years in Nashville, is definitely tired of people shopping in his store for hours, snapping a picture of shoes they like, then going home and buying them online “just to avoid sales tax.”

53. Last Word: The Elvis Tradition, Cordova Brewery and Parkside Path -

For about three decades now, there has been a cultural and political tradition around the birthday of Elvis Presley. It used to be a proclamation by the Shelby County Mayor and the Memphis Mayor on the steps of Graceland with a birthday cake.

54. Dobbs Had a Great Run, But Manning is Still No. 1 -

Tennessee senior Joshua Dobbs has created a quarterback controversy. Dobbs finished his college career Dec. 30 when UT beat Nebraska 38-24 in the Music City Bowl in Nashville. He accounted for 409 total yards – 291 passing and 118 yards rushing – and was chosen the game’s MVP.

55. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some of Those Who Died in 2016 -

Death claimed transcendent political figures in 2016, including Cuba's revolutionary leader and Thailand's longtime king, but also took away royals of a different sort: kings of pop music, from Prince and David Bowie to George Michael.

56. Last Word: New Rhodes President, Billy Hyman and the Fast Track -

The biggest political betting pool of the post-election season ends Tuesday as President elect Donald Trump said Monday by Twitter that he would name his nominee for Secretary of State Tuesday morning.

57. Pfizer Fined for Hiking Epilepsy Drug Price 2,600 Pct in UK -

LONDON (AP) – British regulators fined U.S. drugmaker Pfizer and distributor Flynn Pharma a record 89.4 million pounds ($112.7 million) Wednesday for increasing the cost of an epilepsy drug by as much as 2,600 percent.

58. Outsourcing: Savings, But No Specifics -

The Haslam administration is forging ahead with plans to nab a statewide facilities services contractor after an outside analysis backed up a study showing estimated cost savings of more than $35 million a year at Tennessee universities.

59. Haslam to Kick Off Annual Public Budget Hearings Next Week -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam is kicking off his annual public budget hearings next week as he gets ready to put together his annual spending plan for the state of Tennessee.

60. Tennessee Promise Draws Criticism Amid Rising Tuition -

MTSU student Emily Webb cobbled together enough money to pay for her first year and a half of expenses. 

But in the last year she had to borrow $5,000 to keep alive her dream of earning a degree from Middle Tennessee State University as tuition and living costs have increased each year.

61. Haslam Appoints 8 to New University of Memphis Board -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has appointed eight business leaders, including a former University of Memphis interim president and the CEO of J.C. Penney Co., to the newly formed governing board of the University of Memphis.

62. Mayor Starts Post-Protest Community Meetings -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will kick off a series of community meetings Oct. 25 in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests in July and August.

63. Mayor Starts Post-Protest Community Meetings -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland will kick off a series of community meetings Oct. 25 in the wake of the Black Lives Matter protests in July and August.

64. Civil Rights Milestones Among Tennessee Items Facing Cuts -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Major milestones in the civil rights movements for minorities and women are among a slew of Tennessee historical events, names and places that would no longer be required learning under a proposed overhaul of the social studies curriculum.

65. Last Word: $60 Million, Frozen Graceland and Wreck It Ralph's Return -

The federal government’s problem with a law the Tennessee Legislature passed earlier this year is serious -- $60-million serious.

And Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, in Hickory Hill Thursday, said he’s working on a compromise that would have the Legislature undo what it did this year when the new legislative session begins in January.

66. Thrill-Ride Accidents Spark New Demands for Regulation -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – In some parts of the U.S., the thrill rides that hurl kids upside down, whirl them around or send them shooting down slides are checked out by state inspectors before customers climb on. But in other places, they are not required to get the once-over.

67. Last Word: Early Vote Turnout Numbers, The Starbucks Factor and New Blue Collar -

Monday is the day. So is Thursday. Thursday is election day and Monday is the first day you can turn left on Union Avenue onto McLean Boulevard.

One comes with stickers. The other is simply an absence of tickets for making an illegal left turn.

68. Somerville Leaders Raise $1.1 Million for UT Martin Center -

SOMERVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Leaders in Fayette County have raised $1.1 million for the development of an educational outreach center in Somerville that will be operated by the University of Tennessee at Martin.

69. Editorial: Why Now? The Problem That Brought Us To The Bridge -

For 50 years, Memphis has had a different protest tradition.

Some of it is a function of Memphis being an NAACP town. Some of it is the city’s role as a staging ground and base of operations for the civil rights movement in North Mississippi.

70. Chamber Names Simmons Director of Public Policy -

Haley Simmons has joined the Greater Memphis Chamber as the director of public policy, a new position in the chamber’s community development department. In this role, Simmons will be focused on enhancing the chamber’s advocacy efforts to inform and engage its members on important policy issues, and he’ll also be responsible for growing the chamber’s role in education initiatives.

71. Last Word: Blight Fight Second Stage, Hickory Hill Schools and Brexit React -

If you had never seen blight and wanted to see it in order to define it, there are several places in Memphis that could give you the on sight definition you were seeking. At the top of that list would probably be Frayser.

72. Former Methodist Fayette Becoming UT Martin Campus -

One year after Methodist Healthcare donated the former Methodist Fayette Hospital to the city of Somerville, major progress has been made toward transforming the campus into a center for higher learning.

73. University of Memphis Moves Toward Own Board in a Year -

For decades, University of Memphis alumni and supporters have run hot and lukewarm on two topics – an on-campus arena and a board for the university independent of the Tennessee Board of Regents.

74. UT’s Legislative Spanking Could Have Been Worse -

In a state where many people bleed orange, the University of Tennessee found itself in an unusual position during the 2016 legislative session: fighting for its life.

The folks representing Rocky Top, typically a sacred cow, had to battle for respect after emails surfaced from UT-Knoxville’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion urging teachers to use gender-neutral pronouns for transgender students and to downplay Christmas during holiday parties.

75. Outsourcing Savings Estimates Strain ‘Credulity’ -

Terry Cowles flashes a photo of ceiling lamp fixtures on the screen and tells state legislators a vendor’s state Capitol team used its electrical training to remove, repair and reinstall fixtures, saving taxpayers $15,500.

76. Last Word: South of Crump, Council Day and Haslam on the Fed's Bathroom Memo -

Neon is coming back to E. H. Crump Boulevard and the momentum of development continues to move further south to the Crump border with South Memphis.

Ghost River Brewing Co. is making plans for a tap room that opens this fall as part of its existing brewery at South Main and Crump.

77. Last Word: Mud Island Money, Elvis Mystery and Beyond Barbecue -

It looks like the dry rub will be in order for Memphis in May's barbecue weekend with a shower or two keeping the dust down in Tom Lee Park Wednesday.

If you can see it through the smoke, Mud Island might strike a first-tme observer as a marked contrast to all of the activity in Tom Lee Park that goes right up to the bluff's edge.

78. Kyles' Services May 6 At Mason Temple -

Retired Monumental Baptist Church pastor and Memphis civil rights leader Samuel Billy Kyles will be remembered Friday, May 6, with a community celebration of his life at Mason Temple Church of God In Christ, 930 Mason St.

79. Kyles Services Friday At Mason Temple -

Retired Monumental Baptist Church pastor and Memphis civil rights leader Samuel Billy Kyles will be remembered Friday, May 6, with a community celebration of his life at Mason Temple Church of God In Christ, 930 Mason St.

80. Kyles Played Big Role in Civil Rights Movement -

The world knows him through his story of standing near Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in 1968 just seconds before King was assassinated.

81. Last Word: The Friendly Church on the Parkway and Paxton Lynch's Mom -

He came to Memphis in the late 1950s from Chicago as the first pastor of Monumental Baptist Church, the “friendly church on the parkway” in a city that was anything but friendly to the causes of Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles.

82. Civil Rights Veteran Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles Dies At Age 81 -

Civil rights movement icon Rev. Samuel Billy Kyles died Tuesday, April 26, after a long illness at the age of 81.

83. Bridging a Divide -

The Mid-South is united by more than the Mississippi River, but that’s what it took to get the region’s mayors in the same room.

In the aftermath of the 2011 Mississippi River flood, damage stretched from Millington’s naval base to Memphis’ Beale Street. Leaders of the affected municipalities had to come together to apply for FEMA grants and plot their way out of devastation.

84. Spence Wilson To Keynote Dunavant Awards May 11 -

Spence Wilson, chairman of the board of Kemmons Wilson Companies, is the keynote speaker for the annual Bobby Dunavant Public Servant Awards to be held May 11 at the Holiday Inn University of Memphis.

85. Last Word: Basketball Intervention, Medical Inventory and Memphis in the 1960s -

Five games left for the Grizzlies to win three and then get to play more in the NBA playoffs. And what seemed to be a foregone conclusion is now not such a sure thing based on the Grizz performance in Sunday’s 119-107 loss to the Orlando Magic in Orlando.

86. GOP Lawmaker Questions Haslam's Secret $30M Development Deal -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A state senator on Tuesday questioned fellow Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to earmark $30 million for an undisclosed economic development project in Tennessee.

87. The Week Ahead: March 28-April 3 -

Alright, Memphis, are you sure you found all your Easter eggs? Before you make one more sweep of the yard, check out this week’s roundup of local happenings – from the sweet sounds of “Zelda” to what’s being dubbed a “Mini-MEMFix” in East Memphis…

88. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

89. Bills To Freeze Tuition At Colleges, Universities Defeated -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Bills that would have frozen tuition rates at Tennessee's public colleges and universities have been defeated.

Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey, R-Blountville, said at the beginning of the session Wednesday that he was in favor of the idea. The University of Tennessee in particular was a vocal opponent, complaining that steep tuition hikes were the result of dramatic decreases in state funding and increasing education costs.

90. Free Speech Bill Withdrawn After Islamic State Comments -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Republican lawmaker on Thursday defended his comments that free speech rights on Tennessee college campuses should apply to everyone – even recruiters for the Islamic State group.

91. Last Word: Putt and 1969, Fred Smith on Amazon and Ramsey's Departure -

George Howard Putt died in prison sometime last year state prison officials disclosed Wednesday -- far from the brief time he spent in Memphis but never far from the carnage he left behind in the Memphis of 1969.
The bodies of the first two of the five people killed by Putt between Aug. 14 and Sept. 11, 1969 were discovered just days after the murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others in Los Angeles by the Manson family dominated national news coverage. Less than a year earlier the Boston Strangler movie was in theaters, creating a sensation about the murders committed by serial killer Albert DeSalvo in Boston just a few years earlier.
Bernalyn and Roy Dumas were strangled by Putt in their home in Cooper-Young and Putt mutilated her body in a way that police homicide detectives still wouldn’t talk about decades later. The bodies were found in separate rooms.
Even with no details other than the names of the victims, the city was quickly spooked by the double murder. So when the body of Leila Jackson was found short of two weeks later, the city’s reaction was a palpable fear in which anyone unknown was to be avoided. Memphians didn’t tarry after work. They went home and bolted the doors.
It got worse as more victims turned up with little in common other than four of the five were women. They were of varying ages. Some were strangled and some were stabbed.
Just about any magazine rack of the day include true crime magazines that by the late 1960s were beginning to look very dated in their lurid noir-like covers teasing the most sensational crime narratives of the day.
They were an intentional contrast to the cover images of youth in bright colors in natural settings in other magazines heralding a new future and youth culture.
The murders in a Southern city, whose 1969 conservatism is hard to describe nearly 50 years later, quickly grabbed the covers of the true crime magazines. And the images they offered spoke to the scenic reality where Putt roamed even as the murders continued.
Apartment buildings and boarding houses were the settings for some of the murders but not all.
Glenda Sue Harden
was last seen walking to her car parked on the Cobblestones from the insurance office she worked at nearby. Her body was found in Martin Luther King/Riverside Park hidden under a piece of plywood.
At one of the murder scenes, police found an ice pick stuck in the side of the building with a stocking tied around it.
Putt’s last victim, in an apartment building on Bellevue, screamed as she was stabbed repeatedly and others in the building gave chase with police close behind, arresting Putt near the new and unopened section of the interstate that runs west of Bellevue.
Putt tried to force his way into another apartment nearby but the women inside kept him on the other side of the door.
The killer that panicked an entire city was a skinny utterly forgettable guy in his 20s with sideburns and glasses who appeared to have rarely roamed beyond a community of neighborhood bars, boarding houses and old apartment buildings in the Midtown and Medical Center areas.
It turns out he came to Memphis after walking away from a prison farm in Mississippi and into a Memphis that was slowly but surely changing. And the world that Putt encountered would soon vanish in large part.
Overton Square’s incarnation was about a year away. A new bridge was about to be built across the Mississippi River as part of Interstate 40 which was to go through Overton Park just south of the north-south leg of the interstate where Putt was captured.
Originally sentenced to death, Putt’s sentence was commuted when the U.S. Supreme Court banned the death penalty in the early 1970s.
He was serving a 497-year sentence when he died at the Turney Center Wednesday in Only, Tennessee.
Putt never sought parole and never gave any explanation for why he killed five people in less than a month and his apparently random selection of victims.

92. Bipartisan Skeptics Doubt Haslam’s Outsourcing Plan -

Poor timing and questionable numbers: That’s how legislators are viewing a business justification plan for outsourcing facilities management across Tennessee.

The Office of Customer Focused Government tells state senators, if all departments opt in, the state could save $35.8 million by the second year of a contract under study for building operations and services – without laying off state workers or cutting pay and benefits.

93. Michael Brown’s Attorney Keynotes NAACP Luncheon -

The attorney for the families of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown is the featured speaker at the Memphis Branch NAACP’s annual Freedom Fund Luncheon.

Benjamin J. Crump, who also serves as the president of the National Bar Association, will speak at the March 29 event, to be held at the Memphis Cook Convention Center, 255 N. Main St.

94. Last Word: Rain & Votes, Setting Madison's Boundaries and The Rise of Renters -

Here comes the rain. Not a Beatles tune but close enough with the word late Tuesday that George Martin – to my mind at least, the closest thing to a fifth Beatle – has died.
Rolling Stone’s story and many links within to their coverage of Martin over the decades.

95. Michael Brown’s Attorney to Keynote NAACP Luncheon -

The attorney for the families of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown is the featured speaker at the Memphis Branch NAACP’s annual Freedom Fund Luncheon.

96. Stop Trump Efforts Intensify As Election Day Arrives -

It’s hard to gauge how far it is going. But the “Stop Trump” effort among local and state Republicans includes trying to talk Democrats into crossing over and voting in Tuesday’s Tennessee Republican presidential primary.

97. Last Word: Timing and Numbers, Old Dominick Takes Shape and Zip Lines To Spring -

Political opportunity is defined by timing.
Witness a look at the early voting turnout numbers in advance of Tuesday’s election day.

More than half of the more than 43,000 Shelby County voters who cast early ballots voted Monday and Tuesday – the last two days of an early voting period that began Feb. 10 – way back there when Martin O’Malley was the third Democratic presidential contender and Jeb Bush was considered a force to be reckoned with in the Republican primaries.

98. Work Begins On Brewery Development -

502 Tennessee St.
Memphis, TN 38103

Permit Amount: $4.5 million

Application Date: Feb. 18, 2016

Tenant: Brewery Master Tenant LLC

Architect: LRK Architects

Contractor: Montgomery Martin Contractors

99. Hinds Joins Martin Tate Law Firm -

Rebecca Hinds has joined Martin, Tate, Morrow & Marston P.C. as an associate attorney in the firm’s litigation section. In this role, Hinds represents clients in civil and commercial litigation matters, including business law, transportation liability, construction disputes, breach-of-contract matters and employment law. She also helps commercial clients obtain tax incentives and advises individuals and businesses in the drafting and negotiation of contracts. 

100. Complex path to higher-ed reform -

Only half a year after taking on the presidency of Motlow State Community College, Anthony Kinkel is trying to keep his eye on the pea.

The task of running one of the state’s fastest-growing community colleges is becoming increasingly complex, and it has nothing to do with thousands more students enrolling to take advantage of free tuition through the Tennessee Promise scholarship program.