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Editorial Results (free)

1. Where the Jobs Are -

Out of more than 15,000 Shelby County Schools students who took some kind of career and technical education, or CTE, courses in the 2015-2016 academic year, only 1 percent – roughly 150 – completed those classes to get some kind of work certification.

2. NRA endorses Black in Tennessee governor's race GOP primary -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The National Rifle Association has endorsed U.S. Rep. Diane Black in a crowded Republican primary field for Tennessee governor.

3. Commission Overrides Veto on Bolton Appointment -

Shelby County commissioners mustered the eight votes needed Monday, June 18, to override a veto by county mayor Mark Luttrell with one to spare.

4. Last Word: County Budget Compromise, MEM After 5 Years and Elvis -

There is nothing like the end of a term for those holding elected office. That’s what gets most of the credit for the Shelby County commission’s smooth ending to its budget season Monday. A final reading of the revised county property tax rate of $4.05 still awaits. But the commission went a long way toward locking that in with the approval of everything else at the Monday session.

5. County Commission Leaves Only Tax Rate Undone in Budget Season -

Shelby County commissioners took final action Monday, June 18, on every item in its budget season except a final approval of a $4.05 county property tax rate.

The approval of a $1.3 billion county consolidated operating budget and a $90.2 million capital

6. Complaint Targets Tennessee Governor Hopeful's Business Help -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A campaign finance complaint is questioning how a Republican hopeful for governor is getting political help from his businesses, among other concerns about how he's raising money.

7. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Health Care in Tennessee? -

According to Think Tennessee’s State of Our State dashboard, the state ranks near the bottom in the number of adults with heart disease, obesity and diabetes. It also ranks near the bottom of all states for the health of senior citizens, infant mortality, number of adults who smoke, and at the absolute bottom in childhood obesity. Tennesseans are, on the whole, not healthy. What can and should our next political leaders do about it?

8. Last Word: Bird Is The Word, Governors Quartet and Charlie Morris's Secret -

Former Vice President Joe Biden plays the Orpheum Friday evening. Maybe that isn't the right way to put it -- unless there's a drum solo no one is talking about. Free Bird?

I'll take it as further evidence of the new American politics that is evolving and is far from settled at this point. Politicians do paid speaking gigs all the time. And at times it is controversial. But the gigs are usually some kind of speaking fee to make remarks at a corporate function -- not selling individual tickets on line. This is ostensibly to promote Biden's new book and book deals and politicians go way back. But in a lot of cases, those are free events in a book store. When Biden was last here, it was as vice president at the Norfolk Southern intermodal rail yard in Rossville.

9. Longtime Elvis Drummer D.J. Fontana Has Died -

D.J. Fontana, the drummer who helped launch rock ‘n’ roll as Elvis Presley’s sideman, has died at 87, his wife said Thursday.

Karen Fontana told The Associated Press that her husband died in his sleep in Nashville Wednesday night. She said he had been suffering complications from breaking his hip in 2016.

10. TBA Gubernatorial Forum Focuses on Criminal Justice Reform -

Four of the major contenders for Tennessee governor told the annual convention of the Tennessee Bar Association Thursday, June 14, that they each favor keeping the state attorney general a position appointed by the Tennessee Supreme Court.

11. Haslam Says Immigration Issues Have Little to Do With Being Governor -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has been watching the television ads in the Republican primary race for governor – especially the ads about immigration and pledges to help President Donald Trump build a wall at the border with Mexico.

12. Line Between ‘Get Out the Vote,’ ‘Crossover’ Melts In Campaign Heat -

Get Out The Vote – the plan known among politicos by the shorthand GOTV – has slipped across the line that separates it from “crossover” – the sometimes-controversial act of pushing to get those on the other side of the partisan divide to cross political lines and vote for the other party’s nominee.

13. Blackburn’s Scattershot Hits Surprise Targets -

Republican U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn is doubling down against Democratic opponent Phil Bredesen in the race for an open U.S. Senate seat, hammering him as a liberal in the vein of Obama, Clinton, Schumer and Pelosi.

14. Boyd Says He Favors State Funding for Shelby County Pre-K Push -

Republican contender for Tennessee Governor Randy Boyd says he supports the move to expand prekindergarten in Shelby County including the possibility of state funding.

15. 'It's About Time': Trump Pardons Late Boxer Jack Johnson -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump on Thursday granted a rare posthumous pardon to boxing's first black heavyweight champion, clearing Jack Johnson's name more than 100 years after what many see as his racially-charged conviction.

16. Last Word: A New Council Member, Law Without Signature and Corker Down Under -

The Memphis City Council should be back up to full strength by the time Tuesday becomes Wednesday. Filling the Super District 9 seat left vacant by the resignation earlier this month of Philip Spinosa to join the leadership of the Greater Memphis Chamber is on the council’s agenda Tuesday afternoon – the last item on the agenda. But the council usually skips around.

17. Tennessee Governor: Sanctuary Bill to Become Law Sans Signature -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam said Monday he will allow legislation billed as a push against sanctuary cities to become law without his signature, saying it has stirred up irrational fear on both sides.

18. Leaders of Local Pre-K Expansion Say Opposition More About State Funding -

Since three of the four major Republican contenders for Tennessee governor said at a Memphis forum in April that they oppose universal prekindergarten, the forces behind such a plan for Shelby County have been talking with them about their position.

19. Tennessee Candidate: Florida Students Used as Anti-Gun Props -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican candidate for Tennessee governor Bill Lee is claiming that the "liberal media," teachers unions and the "far-left lobby" have used students who survived the deadly Florida school shooting as "props to push their anti-gun agenda," saying he's sickened by it.

20. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Rural Tennessee? -

Like most of America, Tennessee’s metropolitan areas have prospered during the last eight years, while the rural areas have lagged in almost every measure. The state has 19 of its 95 counties classified as “distressed.” What can and should we do to give every Tennessean a chance to succeed?

21. At What Point Does Crying 'Lynching' Trivialize the Word? -

WASHINGTON (AP) – R. Kelly says boycotting his music because of the sexual abuse allegations against him amounts to a "public lynching." Bill Cosby's people say his conviction was a lynching, too. Kanye West, in trying to defend his inflammatory comments about slavery, has been tweeting lynching imagery to assure fans he won't be silenced.

22. Last Word: BSMF Opens, Germantown's New Elementary and Links at St. Jude -

The Beale Street Music Festival opens Friday and the clouds appear right on cue. But that, in and of itself, doesn’t stop the proceedings in Tom Lee Park. Lightning is another matter, of course. Poncho and boots are a part of the Memphis In May identity. And one day there will be a digital map of the park’s terrain that shows the areas that are the mud pits and those that are largely mud proof. That’s for some of you to avoid them and others among you to find them and “celebrate” them.

23. Last Word: Trolleys Roll, Primary Election Day and The Rise of South City -

MATA CEO Gary Rosenfeld likes to joke that the new trolleys are quieter since the transit authority decided to change from using square wheels. Transit humor. They really are quieter. And that may be because MATA wasn’t doing much of anything in the way of maintenance on them four years ago and even less in the way of record keeping when a second trolley car burst into flames causing MATA to shut down everything it ran on rails. So the trolley that rolled out of the MATA barn on North Main Street Monday morning and into service was symbolic of more than getting a trolley or three ready for service. It was about building a new system around the operation of the trolleys.

24. Council Starts Process Of Crosstown Overlay -

Memphis City Council members approved on the second of three readings Tuesday, April 24, a Crosstown historic overlay district similar to the Cooper-Young district it approved two weeks ago.

Councilman Kemp Conrad moved for and the council approved pulling the approval of the Cooper-Young district off the minutes of the body’s most recent meeting until June at the earliest.

25. Editorial: GOP Governor Contenders Botched Pre-K Opposition -

When three of the four major Republican contenders for Tennessee governor came to Memphis recently and each said without hesitation they oppose universal prekindergarten, it got the attention of those at the forum.

26. Bill Cosby Convicted of Drugging and Molesting a Woman -

NORRISTOWN, Pa. (AP) – Bill Cosby was convicted Thursday of drugging and molesting a woman in the first big celebrity trial of the #MeToo era, completing the spectacular late-life downfall of a comedian who broke racial barriers in Hollywood on his way to TV superstardom as America's Dad.

27. Last Word: Last Day of Early Voting, Senate Poll and Legislature Goes to Overtime -

The last day of early voting before the May 1 election day is Thursday. And the turnout count through Wednesday has eclipsed the total early voting turnout in this same set of elections in 2010 and 2014. You can find a list of early voting locations and the hours at www.shelbyvote.com, the website of the Shelby County Election Commission. The winners on election night next Tuesday advance to the August county general election.

28. Council Starts Process Of Crosstown Overlay -

Memphis City Council members approved on the second of three readings Tuesday, April 24, a Crosstown historic overlay district similar to the Cooper-Young district it approved two weeks ago.

Councilman Kemp Conrad moved for and the council approved pulling the approval of the Cooper-Young district off the minutes of the body’s most recent meeting until June at the earliest.

29. Opioid Litigation, FedExForum NonCompete Top Local Law Developments -

Here are some of the legal issues making news in recent months.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery says lawsuits by local prosecutors over the opioid epidemic are complicating his efforts to reach a multistate settlement with drug companies. In response, the prosecutors, who represent about half of Tennessee's counties, say local communities lose out when lawsuits like theirs are rolled into one settlement.

30. Last Word: TNReady Blinks Again, Gov. Debate Thoughts and Mud Island's Museum -

There was a point Thursday morning during the troubled TNReady testing at some Tennessee school districts when there was a “brief” slow down in the online testing, according to the Tennessee Education commissioner’s office. By noon that had been resolved and more than 250,000 completed tests had been submitted since testing began Monday. One can only imagine what some of the thoughts were in the office during the slow down and the gap between how long the slow down seemed and how long it actually was.

31. Last Word: 'Poking The Bear,' National Walk Out Day and McQueen on Capitol Hill -

The state House’s Tuesday action cutting $250k in funding for Memphis from Gov. Bill Haslam’s budget proposal is turning into a cause back here, starting with a GoFundMe page. Elsewhere on social media, you can see the unmistakable outline of a party or parties for the cause beginning to form. This is near the end of session for the Legislature when the budget is the last action before going back to the district to run for re-election. Different timing over here, with multiple crawfish outings leading into Memphis in May.

32. Lee, Boyd, Black Talk Confederate Monuments, Oppose Pre-K Expansion -

Three of the four major contenders for governor in the Aug. 2 Republican primary disagree with the removal of Confederate monuments from city parks but also disagree with the state legislature’s decision to cut $250,000 of city funding in retaliation.

33. Last Word: Failed Test, Trolley Back Story and Violent Crime Down City and County -

The state’s third problem with online student achievement testing in three years is gathering political force in Nashville. And that force is aimed for the most part at testing in general and the role it plays in evaluating teachers and students.

34. Republican Gubernatorial Debate Wednesday Will Air Statewide -

The Greater Memphis Chamber Chairman’s Circle announced Tuesday the organization will co-host the first statewide televised Tennessee gubernatorial debate for Republican candidates on Wednesday, April 18, at 7 p.m. at the Halloran Centre of The Orpheum Theatre, 225 S. Main St.

35. NYC Removes Statue of Doctor Who Experimented on Slaves -

NEW YORK (AP) — A bronze statue of a 19th century doctor who did experimental surgery without anesthesia on enslaved African-American women was removed from Central Park on Tuesday.

New York City's Public Design Commission voted Monday to accept a mayoral panel's recommendation to remove the statue of Dr. J. Marion Sims for relocation to Brooklyn's Green-Wood Cemetery, where Sims is buried, accompanied by signage with historical context.

36. What Statewide Candidates Say About Opioid Crisis, Public Safety -

The spread of opioid abuse claimed over 1,600 lives in Tennessee in 2016, and it is getting worse. Methamphetamine abuse, while not getting the headlines, has increased. Gun violence and murder is increasing. What proposals do our candidates have to help Tennesseans address these public safety issues?

37. Candidates for Governor Give Millions to Their Own Campaigns -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee candidates for governor are raising millions of dollars in contributions, but the big money is coming from the contenders themselves.

A state campaign finance disclosure report filed this week shows that Republicans Diane Black and Bill Lee had the most in contributions this quarter – each around $3.3 million.

38. A Memphis Parable -

HOWARD AND BILL. One of my first columns was this very Memphis story. It’s time to tell it again. 

In the ’60s, Howard Robertson was a black postal carrier moonlighting as a waiter at the capital of white money dining in Memphis, Justine’s, housed in an antebellum mansion. Bill Loeb was a successful white businessman, owner of ubiquitous laundry branches about town, and the brother of Henry Loeb, mayor during the 1968 sanitation strike. Loeb lived in a home literally bordering the Memphis Country Club. Robertson lived in the other Memphis those of us who grew up white then never really acknowledged.

39. Last Word: Play Ball, Porch & Parlor and A New Bus System -

If you go to enough political gatherings you start to see parallels. Sometimes you see things that aren’t there but that’s another story. Many political gatherings begin with the pledge of allegiance and a prayer as well. Sometimes the pledge isn’t enough and there is someone there to sing the National Anthem.

40. Three Incumbents Unopposed at August Primary Ballot Deadline -

Three incumbent Democratic state House members in the Shelby County delegation to the Tennessee Legislature were effectively re-elected Thursday, April 5, at the noon deadline for candidates in the Aug. 2 state and federal primaries to file their qualifying petitions.

41. Medical Pot Bill Dies in Committee, But Senate Sponsor Promises Return -

Legislation decriminalizing medical marijuana in Tennessee is effectively dead for the year after its Senate sponsor, Nashville Republican Sen. Steve Dickerson, withdrew the bill from a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday, April 3.

42. Three Incumbents Unopposed at August Primary Ballot Filing Deadline -

Three incumbent Democratic state House members in the Shelby County delegation to the Tennessee Legislature were effectively re-elected Thursday, April 5, at the noon deadline for candidates in the Aug. 2 state and federal primaries to file their qualifying petitions.

43. Last Word: MLK50s Big Day, Hotel Changes and Murica on Capitol Hill -

The peak of the MLK50 events came Wednesday with a chill but some sunshine and lots to consider. Understand -- this isn’t over. There are still a few more events to go through the weekend and even into next week. If nothing else, a lot more Memphians and visitors got a good look at most of South Main in the best way possible – on foot. And if the Beale Street District ever expands east to Danny Thomas, the intersection there makes a really good place for a party.

44. King's Children See New Movements, Same Challenges 50 Years After Mountaintop -

The bright and multi colored lights at Mason Temple Church of God In Christ gave way for a few minutes Tuesday, April 3, to a single white spotlight on the empty pulpit of the South Memphis church and a recording of part of the speech Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered from the pulpit 50 years ago Tuesday.

45. Don't Like Medical Marijuana Bill? Just Wait for Next Version -

Legislation decriminalizing medical marijuana in Tennessee could return to its original form, setting up a state commission to oversee use of the drug to treat debilitating illnesses. Any such move also could bring lobbyists back into the fold after they dropped support of the bill when its sponsor, Rep. Jeremy Faison, abruptly changed the bill and left onlookers flabbergasted.

46. In-State Immigrant Tuition Bill Dead in Tennessee -

A bill to offer in-state tuition for Tennessee public college students whose parents brought or kept them in the country illegally has stalled because House leadership won’t let it go forward, the sponsor said Wednesday.

47. MLK50 Events: A Roundup of Memphis Happenings -

Here's a selection of events in Memphis marking the 50th anniversary of the 1968 sanitation workers' strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. April 3 is the 50th anniversary of King’s last speech – the “Mountaintop” speech at Mason Temple, while April 4 is the 50th anniversary of his assassination on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

48. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

49. In-State Immigrant Tuition Bill Halted in Tennessee in House -

A bill to offer in-state tuition for Tennessee public college students whose parents brought or kept them in the country illegally has stalled because House leadership won’t let it go forward, the sponsor said Wednesday.

50. Davy Crockett’s Fine, But Let’s Not Get Carried Away -

The Tennessee General Assembly is making some monumental decisions these days – literally.

Not only is the Legislature prepared to put a statue of Tennessee folk hero Davy Crockett in front of the State Capitol, replacing obscure Nashville politician Edward Carmack, it’s also likely to erect a monument, or memorial, to unborn children in the ongoing battle against abortion.

51. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Infrastructure Investment? -

Is investment in public infrastructure important? And should Tennessee have more dedicated revenue sources to pay for construction and maintenance of infrastructure across the state, or is the existing tax structure – primarily the state tax on fuel, and wheel taxes – sufficient to pay for what Tennessee needs to sustain and grow its economy?

52. Last Word: SCS Plans For $15, IRIS Matinees and The Hard Hit Fund -

“From a financial standpoint, we need our fans back and we need them back now.” University of Memphis president David Rudd breaking the university’s silence on the basketball coaching change that was made formal Tuesday with the announcement that Penny Hardaway is indeed the new coach. And Hardaway had a lot to say that Tigers fans and Memphians wanted to hear.

53. Dean: ‘It’s Kind of Our Turn’ in Governor’s Race -

Democratic contender for governor Karl Dean is pushing hard the idea that Democrats can win one of the two statewide races on the Tennessee ballot this year.

54. Feds Award $570K For Civil Rights History Projects -

The U.S. Department of the Interior and the National Park Service announced $570,000 in funding Monday, March 12, for three projects that focus on the history of the civil rights movement in Memphis.

55. A Look Back At UT’s History In NCAA Tourney -

Basketball coach Rick Barnes was fired by Texas in late March of 2015 when he refused to fire members of his coaching staff.

56. Last Word: The Memphis Hub Modernization, Gun Protests and MLK 50 Plans -

Back in January, the FedEx board approved a $3.2 billion package that had pay raises, bonuses and similar items that have become the corporate reaction to federal tax reform that set a lower rate of taxation for companies that repatriate money they have overseas. There was a mention of $1.5 billion for the Indianapolis hub and unspecified plans for the Memphis hub to come later. And later was yesterday in a pretty modest announcement at Signature Air given the scope of what FedEx has planned for its Super Hub here.

57. Feds Award $570K For Civil Rights History Projects -

The U.S. Department of the Interior and the National Park Service announced $570,000 in funding Monday, March 12, for three projects that focus on the history of the civil rights movement in Memphis.

58. Civil War Re-Enactor Outflanked On Statues, Medicaid Expansion -

When state Rep. Steve McDaniel was a youngster he often read the historical marker at the intersection of Highway 22 and Wildersville Road detailing Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s first West Tennessee raid in the Battle of Parker’s Crossroads.

59. Last Word: Rising River, Driving The Dream and Harwell Advances Medical Pot -

The Mississippi River at Memphis should reach flood stage at any moment. As Last Word was going up online Wednesday evening the National Weather Service at Memphis put the river level here at 33.52 feet. Flood stage at Memphis is 34 feet. The river is forecast to crest some time next week at 38 feet, four feet over flood stage. Keep in mind that in April 2011, the river at Memphis crested 10 feet higher, at 48 feet on the Memphis river gauge – which turned to be the one on the support beams of the bridge over Beale Street at Riverside Drive. That was the second highest river level at Memphis ever recorded.

60. Governor Hopefuls Largely OK With TennCare Work Requirements -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee's candidates for governor said Tuesday that they are largely supportive of proposed TennCare work requirements, but some of them expressed concerns about possible costs and bureaucracy.

61. Medical Marijuana Legislation Moves Ahead -

NASHVILLE – Bolstered by House Speaker Beth Harwell’s tie-breaking vote, Rep. Jeremy Faison’s medical marijuana legislation took an important step Tuesday, Feb. 27, in the General Assembly.

62. Governor Hopeful's Group to Manage Minor League Ballclub -

GREENEVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A company owned by Tennessee candidate for governor Randy Boyd will manage day-to-day operations of another minor league baseball team.

63. Corker Mum On Possible Senate Return Run -

When Shelby County Republican party leaders gathered Saturday, Feb. 26, for their annual Lincoln Day Gala, the local party’s largest fundraiser, much of the attention was on the elected official who delivered the shortest speech of the night.

64. CRE Owners Look To Reap Rewards Of New Tax Cuts -

The start of the year enjoyed a flurry of commercial real estate sales and building permits, on the heels of federal tax cuts passed late last year that are expected to benefit CRE owners and possibly impact the number of new projects and sales announced this year.

65. Election Methods, Murals Dominate City Council Session -

Memphis City Council members doubled down Tuesday, Feb. 20, on calling for a cover-up of six murals near Lamar Avenue. And the council’s attorney said ranked-choice, or instant-runoff voting, isn’t needed in Memphis.

66. Election Methods and Murals Dominate Light Council Day -

Memphis City Council members doubled down Tuesday, Feb. 20, on calling for a cover-up of six murals near Lamar Avenue. And the council’s attorney said ranked-choice or instant-runoff voting isn’t needed in Memphis.

67. 2 Mississippi Students Arrested After Social Media Threats -

OLIVE BRANCH, Miss. (AP) — Two north Mississippi high school students have been arrested on charges that they threatened violence on social media.

DeSoto County Sheriff Bill Rasco tells local media the juveniles were arrested Saturday after school and law enforcement officials became aware Friday of material posted on Snapchat.

68. Last Word: Looking In The Lookout, Women in Business and The Race for Governor -

What would bring a Memphian on his own to The Lookout – the restaurant and bar at the top of the Pyramid? The view, of course. So after the obligatory walk outside to the views south along the riverfront and west across the river, I settled in Sunday for the view from within. I lined up with both of the tree stumps in the round fish tank in the center of the Pyramid’s apex, a steampunk frog watching from above.

69. FBI Says It Failed to Investigate Tip on Florida Suspect -

PARKLAND, Fla. (AP) — The FBI received a tip last month that the suspect in the Florida school shooting had a "desire to kill" and access to guns and could be plotting an attack, but agents failed to investigate, the agency said Friday. Florida Gov. Rick Scott called for the FBI's director to resign because of the missteps.

70. Last Word: Post Parkland, May County Primary Ballot and Friedman on the Mid East -

In the wake of the Parkland, Florida school massacre, local school systems here are talking about their preparations for such instances. And for those who don’t have a child in schools currently, it is something of a commentary about the times many of our children live in. The Shelby County Schools statement Thursday includes the following safety measures already in place:

71. Diane Black, Husband Lobbying Against Medical Marijuana -

Medical marijuana legislation sponsored by state Rep. Jeremy Faison is hitting a hurdle with gubernatorial candidate U.S. Rep. Diane Black opposing it and her husband trying to kill the measure.

72. Rhodes’ Hass Defends Liberal Arts Education -

The president of Rhodes College says trade schools, associate degrees and certification in specific skills can’t be the city’s only economic driver.

“I think we can all agree that we do not and cannot foresee an economy in which the trades are the only drivers,” said Rhodes president Marjorie Hass on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

73. Last Word: Shutdown Round Two, The Pastner Charges and 1968 Virtual Reality -

The federal government technically shutdown at midnight in Washington, D.C., Friday for the second time in 17 days. But the House and Senate were still going for a vote on a two-year budget compromise before dawn Friday morning as this is posted.

74. The Metrics Mayor -

At times in the last two years, political supporters of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland have been worried. They agree with what got him elected, his “brilliant at the basics” philosophy that makes basic services and fundamental play-it-safe financial strategies the priority at City Hall.

75. Monument Bills Create State Heritage Battlegrounds -

Legislative battles are looming over a spate of bills designed to hammer Memphis and any other cities accused of violating the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act.

Lawmakers filed several pieces of legislation aimed at punishing local governments in the wake of the Memphis City Council move to topple the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park and two other Confederate monuments in another park by selling the property to a newly created nonprofit organization.

76. Governor’s Race Mixes Political Culture With Nuts-and-Bolts Policy -

As most of the other major contenders for Tennessee governor were on the same stage in Nashville last week, Republican Diane Black was in East Memphis meeting with a group of 15 local homebuilders. It was one in a set of meetings with small groups of potential supporters Black held in and around Memphis.

77. Last Word: Closing the Loophole, Skeleton Hotel Update and Jubilee Conversion -

The state legislator who sponsored the most recent version of the law making it much more difficult to remove Confederate monuments acknowledges that the city of Memphis found a legitimate loophole in the 2016 law he crafted. Republican Steve McDaniel, of Parkers Crossroads, tells our Nashville correspondent Sam Stockard that he has a bill in the House to close the loophole. But it won't undo what happened here. Although there is still a court fight over that taking shape.

78. McDaniel to Fashion Loophole Bill for State Monuments -

NASHVILLE – The House sponsor of the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act is preparing legislation to close a “loophole” Memphis used to spur removal of Confederate monuments from parks property it sold to a nonprofit group.

79. Tenn. Governor Candidates Talk Transparency, Medicaid and Megasite -

Five of the seven major contenders in the 2018 Tennessee governor’s race called for more transparency in government but said there are questions about when to disclose information about companies seeking to locate or expand in Tennessee.

80. Last Word: 50 Years Ago, Skeleton Hotel in Court and New Moves on Forrest -

It was 50 years ago Thursday that the event that sparked the 1968 sanitation workers strike happened near Colonial and Sea Isle in East Memphis. City sanitation workers Robert Walker and Echol Cole were killed when the trash compactor on back of their city truck malfunctioned and crushed them.

81. Rotating Forrest Bust Out of Capitol Gains Momentum -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s days in the State Capitol could be numbered. Lt. Gov. Randy McNally, an Oak Ridge Republican, says he could support a move to rotate Forrest’s bust out of the Capitol and make sure Capitol displays are “more reflective of the entire history of Tennessee.”

82. Last Word: Wiretaps in the Wright Case, Target Layoffs and SCS Looks To Move -

Democratic Congressman Steve Cohen of Memphis among those boycotting the State of the Union address Tuesday evening by President Donald Trump. “The president is unworthy of the podium, the position and the power.” Republican Congressman David Kustoff of Germantown among those not boycotting SOTU. “Just one year after president Trump took the oath of office, our economy is the strongest it has been in decades. … We passed historic tax reform and we bolstered our military and support our veterans. Last year, the president kept his promises and tonight, he told the American people that he is not done.”

83. Federal Judge Wants Opioid Lawsuits To End In Settlement -

The goal is impressive: Hammer out a legal deal that starts guiding the nation out of an epidemic of opioid addiction.

How and when that can happen, if at all, is the subject of talks scheduled to begin Wednesday in a federal courthouse in Cleveland.

84. Dunavant Awards Will Feature Hardy As Keynote -

As a lifelong Memphian and successful entrepreneur, Carolyn Hardy is all about finding new ways to grow the city.

85. Last Word: Risks by Race, ASD Changes in Frayser and Binghampton Style -

African-American children are more likely to die after surgery than white children, according to a new study by researchers at UTHSC and Le Bonheur. The researchers found that in every category that goes into determining the chance of dying, the risk for white children was overestimated and underestimated for black children. And the dynamics of the risk work differently by race. The conclusion is race-specific models on the issue work better than non race specific models.

86. Immigrant Tuition Splits Tennessee Governor's Field in Forum -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Candidates for governor in Tennessee largely agreed on broad issues facing education during the race's first televised forum Tuesday, except for a partisan split on in-state tuition for immigrants whose parents brought or kept them in the country illegally.

87. Medicaid Expansion Splits Tenn. Governor Hopefuls in Health Forum -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A health care forum Friday illustrated the partisan split in the Tennessee governor's race over Medicaid expansion, with Democrats ranking it their top priority and Republicans opposing it or espousing other priorities.

88. Nomination Deadline For Dunavant Awards Feb. 1 -

Memphis is lucky to have an abundance of residents with a passion for public service and it is time once again to honor their commitment to improving this community.

Each year the Rotary Club of Memphis East recognizes the importance of public service by hosting the Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

89. Dunavant Awards Spotlight Public Servants -

Being a public servant often is thankless job, but each year the Rotary Club of Memphis East recognizes the importance of public service to the community by hosting the Dunavant Public Servant Awards.

90. Shot Fired From Memphis Ignites Civil War Rematch -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest died in 1877, but 140 years later some people just can’t let their hero or the Old South go away.

In fact, the state Legislature is set to reignite the Civil War – to some degree – in 2018. We hope no gunshots are fired.

91. Getting Shovel Ready -

Candidates for various state-level offices up for grabs in the 2018 elections used the Southwest Tennessee Development District’s annual legislative luncheon in Jackson, Tennessee, last week to share their West Tennessee-centric campaign promises.

92. Last Word: Tax Reform Pay Raises, Minority Business Kinks and Elvis at 83 -

A busy but ultimately slow weekend on the Confederate monuments front as a total of fewer than 100 opponents of the removal of the city’s two most visible monuments actively protested Saturday either on the interstate loop or in the “protest area” by Health Sciences Park.

93. Memphis Experts See Economic Growth Building Off 2017 Into 2018 -

With resolutions made and the new year now, another annual exercise rises to the forefront – predictions on what Memphis and its economy can expect in 2018.

If 2017 taught us anything, it’s that there’s so much we won’t be able to even remotely see coming, from Memphis bidding to become the potential home for Amazon’s second headquarters to action finally being taken on the Confederate monuments in city parks and so much more.

94. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some Who Died in 2017 -

They made music that inspired legions of fans. Rock 'n' roll founding fathers Chuck Berry and Fats Domino, rockers Tom Petty and Gregg Allman, grunge icon Chris Cornell, country superstar Glen Campbell and jazz great Al Jarreau were among the notable figures who died in 2017, leaving a void in virtually every genre of music.

95. His Way: Tubby Smith Figured Out Who He Was Long Ago and He’s Not Changing -

When his visitor was about to leave, Orlando Tubby Smith had one more story. About a time his father had given him an assignment on the family farm in Maryland. 

Tubby was one of 17 children. He had older siblings and younger siblings. He also, at age 12 or 13, already had a sense for what it was to lead and manage.

96. Black Steps Down as US House Budget Chair Amid Governor Bid -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – U.S. Rep. Diane Black announced Wednesday that she is stepping down as House Budget Committee chairwoman, but will remain in Congress as she runs for governor of Tennessee.

97. Democrats Look to Cooperate on Key Issues -

With the state’s budget projected to be tight and lawmakers lining up to run for re-election in 2018, the coming legislative session isn’t expected to yield many surprises.

But the 110th General Assembly still has a long row to hoe as the session starts Jan. 9 with new legislative offices and committee rooms in the renovated Cordell Hull Building in downtown Nashville.

98. Panel Finds Juvenile Court Standards Lacking -

There is a lack of guidance from the state to juvenile courts across the state and a lack of consistency among those courts in how they deal with juveniles, according to a 25-page report issued this month by a joint ad hoc Tennessee Blue Ribbon Task Force of the Tennessee Legislature.

99. Memphis Sound at 60 -

As Stax Records and Royal Studios both wrap up a year of celebrating their 60th anniversary, The Memphis News looks back at the creators and purveyors of the Memphis sound and its significance, both in its heyday and today.

100. Last Word: The Take Down, Wamp Stumps For Revolution and The Mock NBA Draft -

“It was a dark and stormy night…” I actually considered using that line in what was a busy Wednesday evening around this town. The city council has an exceedingly rare extended council session from a Tuesday recessed session and at the last minute drops in a substitute ordinance on Confederate monuments. I’m listening to all of this at my desk over the city’s completely inadequate website system or whatever you call it that doesn’t involve profanity.