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Editorial Results (free)

1. Council Moves Toward Alcohol on Main Street -

Memphis City Council members delayed a final vote Tuesday, Nov. 21, on an ordinance that sets out options for the removal of statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis in city parks, but moved forward on a proposal to allow open alcohol containers and consumption on Main Street.

2. Luttrell Says Administration Will Intervene in Commission's Opioid Litigation -

Shelby County Chancellor Jim Kyle left no doubt in his ruling Tuesday, Nov. 14, about who was correct between county mayor Mark Luttrell and the county commission over opioid abuse litigation in Circuit Court.

3. State Elections Coordinator Says Ranked-Choice Voting Not Permissible -

The Tennessee elections coordinator has told Shelby County election officials that it is illegal to use ranked-choice voting in an election because there are no state guidelines and procedures in place for counting second- and third-preference votes.

4. Tennessee Elections Coordinator Says Ranked-Choice Voting Not Permissible -

The Tennessee elections coordinator told Shelby County’s administrator of elections in September that it is illegal to use ranked-choice voting anywhere in the state because there are no state guidelines and procedures for counting the second and third preferences of voters to avoid a runoff election.

5. County Legal Dispute Latest In A Series -

As attorneys for Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s administration and the county commission were in Chancery Court Tuesday, Nov. 7, the Memphis City Council’s attorney, Allan Wade, was being honored for 25 years of service to the city.

6. Last Word: Changes Behind Highland Row, Lee Harris Opens and Ron Olson Moves -

Shelby County Commission chairwoman Heidi Shafer says the commission, through its attorneys, is in ‘the final stages of launching litigation” against big pharma over the opioid problem locally. And in a written statement Thursday she said she believes the litigation “will result in significant recovery for hundreds of millions of dollars that Shelby County has spent trying to heal, save, nurse and otherwise deal with the opioid crisis.” Shafer specifically announced the hiring on a contingency basis of a national law firm.

7. City Lays Out Numerous Paths to Statue Removal -

City officials laid out numerous paths forward in the Confederate monuments controversy Tuesday, Oct. 17, that include closing Health Sciences Park entirely or building a memorial to lynching victims in the park plaza where a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is now the centerpiece.

8. City Lays Out Numerous Options in Confederate Monuments Controversy -

The city administration and Memphis City Council laid out numerous paths forward in the Confederate monuments controversy Tuesday, Oct. 17, that include closing Health Sciences Park entirely or building a memorial to lynching victims in the park plaza where a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is now the centerpiece.

9. Process vs. Protest: Opinions Differ On How to Remove Monuments -

Protest and the legal process live in the same neighborhood. Sometimes they are next-door neighbors with borders that may be in dispute. At others times they are allies. But there is almost always a tension between the two.

10. Monumental Decision -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland may not even get a discussion with the Tennessee Historical Commission Friday, Oct. 13, about moving the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest out of a city park.

11. Harris Talks ‘Radical’ Action on Confederate Monuments to Build Pressure -

City Council attorney Allan Wade says Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration and the council are not “in different places” when it comes to removing Confederate monuments from city parks.

12. City Council Delays Final Vote on Confederate Monuments -

Memphis City Council members delayed a third and final vote on an ordinance that would direct the city administration to remove Confederate monuments in two city parks if the state historical commission doesn’t allow it later this month.

13. U of M Law School Forum Tuesday on Confederate Monuments -

City of Memphis chief legal officer Bruce McMullen and Memphis City Council attorney Allan Wade will talk about the city’s efforts to remove Confederate monuments in city parks Tuesday, Oct. 3, during a panel discussion at the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law.

14. Week Ahead: Oct. 2-9 -

Hey, Memphis! Prepare to rock out this week as the Mempho Music Festival hits Shelby Farms Park and Wilco plays The Orpheum. Plus, Beale Street memorializes one of its own, Memphis legal pros discuss the Confederate monuments issue, and much more in The Week Ahead…

15. Last Word: Haslam Talks, Harding Consolidates and Lenoir Launches -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam had a bit more to say Thursday about a possible run for the U.S. Senate seat Bob Corker is leaving than the “I love my job” quote we chronicled earlier in the week that Corker quickened the pace of with his decision on re-election. Haslam says he is giving a run for the Senate serious consideration. Meanwhile, Peyton Manning is not.

16. Historical Commission Leaders Say No October Hearing on Forrest Statue Removal -

The chairman of and legal advisor to the Tennessee Historical Commission said Wednesday, Sept. 27, the commission will not consider the city of Memphis’ petition to remove a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest from a city park at the body’s Oct. 13 meeting.

17. City’s Legal Path to Statue Removal Complex -

The administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is setting the stage for a critical Tennessee Historical Commission hearing next month in its bid to remove a statue of Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard Nathan Bedford Forrest from a city park.

18. Editorial: Beale Street and The Line for City Leaders -

When he was mayor, Willie Herenton had a saying that was his answer to speculation about whether he had crossed a legal line. Like the time when he bought an option on land fronting Union Avenue near AutoZone Park that was being considered as a possible site for a new convention center or hotel.

19. Boyd Drops Beale Contract, But Says It Wasn’t Conflict of Interest -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd ended his company’s fundraising contract with the Beale Street Merchants Association Tuesday, Sept. 19. But he again insisted the contract was not a conflict of interest in his duties as a council member voting on items involving the entertainment district.

20. Last Word: The Brooks Question, Boyd's Answer and Tigers In the Polls -

Art as a real estate consideration. One of the more unusual of many considerations as the Brooks search for a new site – a possible new site, I should add, becomes the city’s favorite topic. So from the CRE vantage point – here are two more possible sites to think about if you haven’t already – Cossitt Library and the Fairgrounds, as well as right where it has been for the last century.

21. Boyd Drops Beale Contract, But Says It Wasn't A Conflict of Interest -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd ended his company’s fundraising contract with the Beale Street Merchants Association Tuesday, Sept. 19. But he again insisted the contract was not a conflict of interest in his duties as a council member voting on items involving the entertainment district.

22. Boyd Maintains No Recusal Stand on Beale Matters -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd said after another conversation with council attorney Allan Wade Monday, Sept. 18, he is maintaining his stand that he has no conflict of interest in voting on Beale Street items that come before the city council and the task force.

23. Monuments Controversy May Mean Long Haul of Lawsuits, Negotiations -

When the Tennessee Historical Commission votes Oct. 13 on a waiver that would permit the city of Memphis to remove Confederate monuments from two city parks, it won’t be anywhere near the last word on the matter.

24. Memphis Moves Closer to Confederate Statue Removal -

The Memphis City Council has passed the first of three votes on a resolution that declares Confederate statues on city-owned property public nuisances and sets up a framework for the city to remove those statues even without approval from the state.

25. City Moves Closer to Confederate Statue Removal -

The Memphis City Council has passed the first of three votes on a resolution that declares “all Confederate statues and artifacts … on City-owned property public nuisances” and also sets up a framework for the city to remove those statues even without approval from the state.

26. Council to Weigh Statues, Funding Projects -

Memphis City Council members have a busy agenda Tuesday, Sept. 5: continued discussion regarding bypassing a Tennessee Historical Commission waiver process to remove Confederate monuments and a recently enacted ban on sewer connections to properties outside the city limits.

27. Confederate Emblems Attacked Statewide -

Germantown aldermen approved a resolution Monday, Aug. 28, to “combat hate, extremism and bigotry” with two of the five aldermen, John Barzizza and Dean Massey, abstaining.

28. Council Mulls Legal Options To Move Park Monuments -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized and maintain public order, or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

29. Council Considers Other Legal Options on Confederate Monuments -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized to maintain public order, or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

30. Council Considers Other Legal Options on Confederate Monuments. -

Memphis City Council members are exploring new options for the Confederate monuments in city parks that include boarding up statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as nuisances, to prevent them from being vandalized, to maintain public order or by citing a provision of the state’s Civil Rights Act.

31. Final Budget, Tax-Rate Votes Lead Council Agenda -

Memphis City Council members are poised to end their budget season Tuesday, June 6, with a set of votes on four resolutions and six ordinances that are up for third and final reading.

The resolutions and ordinances would approve a roughly $680 million city operating budget and a $77.8 million capital budget, hikes in stormwater and sewer fees and take the city property tax rate from $3.40 to $3.27.

32. City Council Members: Beale Bucks Evolving -

Beale Street’s new $5 weekend night cover charge still has a few details to work out, says Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd.

“We’re not putting a period there, we’re putting a comma because we are taking a pause,” Boyd said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

33. Beale Street Cover Charge Cut, Larger Debate Remains -

The Saturday night summer cover charge on Beale Street is going from $10 to $5 next month. But the discussion about the Beale Street Bucks program is hardly over. And the crowd control measure is certain to raise longer-term questions about who controls the city-owned district.

34. Council Sets Stage for Raise, Keeps Railgarten and Cuts Beale Cover -

Memphis City Council members approved Tuesday, May 23, a 1 percent across the board pay raise for all city employees setting the stage for a final vote on budget matters at the June 6 council session.

35. City Council to Hold Railgarten Hearing May 23; Uses Impasse Panels for First Time -

Memphis City Council members will hold an evidentiary hearing in two weeks to sort out a Midtown restaurant-bar that ran afoul of approvals needed to open with annexes including intermodal containers and an outdoor area.

36. Railgarten’s Case Delayed; Will Go Before City Council -

After a more than four-hour meeting, the Shelby County Board of Adjustment voted Wednesday, April 26, to delay Railgarten’s request to reopen portions of its multiparcel Midtown outdoor entertainment venue, leaving only 2158 Central Ave. and the bottom floor of 2166 Central Ave. open for business.

37. Council Wants Railgarten Permit Delay as OPD Recommends Rejection -

The Memphis City Council wants the Board of Adjustment to delay any decision Wednesday, April 26, on a special permit for Railgarten for a month while the council sorts out what the controversial resident had permission to open and what it didn’t have permission to open.

38. Greensward Compromise Text, Discussion Differ on Cost Split -

At the end of a surprising day at City Hall, Memphis City Council member Worth Morgan was anticipating what might happen in the three weeks until the next council session to the compromise for zoo parking in Overton Park.

39. City Unions Pan Proposed Impasse Changes -

Unions representing city of Memphis employees gave a rough reception Tuesday, Feb. 7, to a proposal to revamp the city’s impasse proceedings for stalled contract talks between the unions and the city administration.

40. Council Rejects 2 Car Lots, Amends DROP Freeze for C-Suite -

Starting a used car lot used to be a lot simpler. In fact it was considered a right – “development by right” – until a change in recent years in the local Unified Development Code.

41. Council Rejects 2 Car Lots, Amends DROP Freeze for C-Suite -

Starting a used car lot used to be a lot simpler. In fact it was considered a right – “development by right” until a change in recent years in the local Unified Development Code.

Now the car lots require a special use permit from the Memphis City Council. And it’s a hard sell.

42. Commission Rejects Move of Confederate Statue From Park -

GATLINBURG, Tenn. (AP) — The Tennessee Historical Commission is blocking a plan by Memphis city leaders to move a statue honoring a Confederate general and early Ku Klux Klan leader out of the downtown area.

43. Luttrell May Veto Ordinance on County Attorney -

Shelby County Commissioners have approved a ballot question for the Nov. 8 elections that would give them the final say if the county mayor moves to fire the county attorney.

But before the vote Monday, Aug. 29, by commissioners, Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell indicated he might veto the referendum, saying he has a “concern” about what would be a limit on the power of mayors with the proposed amendment to the Shelby County charter.

44. CLERB Subpoena Power Remains Issue After Council Vote -

The Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board voted Thursday, Aug. 11, to seek a legal opinion from the Tennessee Attorney General’s office on whether state law permits the board to have direct subpoena power.

45. CLERB Board Seeks State Legal Opinion On Subpoena Power -

The Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board voted Thursday, Aug. 11, to seek a legal opinion from the Tennessee Attorney General’s office on whether state law permits the board to have direct subpoena power.

46. Council Mends CLERB Rules, Questions Future Role -

One of the last major acts of the Memphis City Council that left office at the end of 2015 was passage of an ordinance that reconstituted the Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board.

The November 2015 passage was applauded by groups including the Mid-South Peace & Justice Center and Memphis United as giving the nearly 20-year-old board more teeth in investigating allegations of police conduct.

47. CLERB Powers Amended Again, Charter Amendment Possible -

Memphis City Council members took another try Tuesday, Aug. 9, at giving the Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board subpoena power in investigating allegations of police misconduct, not quite a year after its first try.

48. Council Takes Final Vote On Residency Referendum -

Memphis City Council members take a final vote Tuesday, Aug. 9, on an addition to the Nov. 8 ballot that would ask city voters to approve new residency requirements for future city employees.

The referendum ordinance is a proposal to require all city employees hired after a certain date to live in the city of Memphis. The current requirement is that city employees must live within Shelby County.

49. To Zoo. Zooed. Zooing. -

YOU’VE BEEN ZOOED. That headline is indicative of the last few months. In fact, it’s the indicative present perfect usage of the new verb this city has created.

50. Pat Summitt's Fight Against Alzheimer's Disease Continues -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Pat Summitt's fight against Alzheimer's disease continues, and has even gained momentum since her death.

The former Tennessee women's basketball coach made sure of that through her efforts the last five years. As soon as she announced her diagnosis in 2011, Summitt vowed to take an active role in leading the battle against the disease that would eventually kill her.

51. Council Likely to Vote On Pinch Plan in 90 Days -

A plan for the redevelopment of the Pinch area is essentially complete and Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration is rounding up grant funds and other financing for elements of the plan, according to Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd.

52. Council Likely to Vote On Pinch Plan in 90 Days -

A plan for the redevelopment of the Pinch area is essentially complete and Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration is rounding up grant funds and other financing for elements of the plan, according to Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd.

53. Greensward Partisans Turn Out Two Weeks Ahead of Council Votes on Settlement -

The Overton Park Greensward wasn’t on the Memphis City Council’s agenda Tuesday, July 5. But there were plenty of partisan from the controversy in council chambers in what was a rehearsal for a council vote in two weeks on a settlement of the park’s parking problem.

54. Council Members Express Doubts About Solidifying Overton Park Boundaries -

Two months after the Memphis City Council approved a resolution giving the Memphis Zoo control of two-thirds of the Overton Park Greensward, the votes are still there to set park boundaries in stone.

55. Greensward Talks Getting Complex -

A week ago, the board of the Overton Park Conservancy had a visitor at its meeting – Richard Smith, the Memphis Zoo’s representative in the ongoing private mediation talks between the conservancy and the zoo.

56. Lawsuit Seeks to Void City Decision on Greensward -

A lawsuit filed in Shelby County Chancery Court Tuesday, April 5, seeks to void the March 1 Memphis City Council vote that gave the Memphis Zoo undisputed control of most of the Overton Park Greensward.

57. Lawsuit Seeks to Void City Decision on Greensward -

A lawsuit filed in Shelby County Chancery Court Tuesday, April 5, seeks to void the March 1 Memphis City Council vote that gave the Memphis Zoo undisputed control of most of the Overton Park Greensward.

58. Potential Revenue Loss Stirs Deannexation Options -

As a potentially damaging deannexation bill moves to the state Senate for a possible vote soon, city officials are considering options to combat the expected loss of revenue should the bill pass.

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland estimates the state deannexation law could cost City Hall $27.7 million on the low end but as much as $80 million if all Memphis annexations dating back to 1998 were negated by voters in those areas.

59. Council Tallies Damage in 'Day of Bad News' -

Memphis City Council member Berlin Boyd summed up City Hall’s attitude Tuesday, March 15, during the council’s executive session. “Today is the day of bad news,” he said after a briefing from Mayor Jim Strickland on the deannexation bill approved the night before by the Tennessee House.
That was followed by more details on the estimated $60 million it will cost to replace the entire radio system for local first responders from the radios to the towers used to transmit their signals.

60. Shameful Performance -

SHAME ON US. This week, the Memphis City Council ran over a whole room of citizens and a whole city and parked right on top of something they care about.

Every council member should be ashamed.

61. City Council Comment Limits Raise Questions -

Most Memphis City Council members don’t want to stop comments from the public during council sessions. But several do want a better explanation of how the comments work, what their role is and what kind of comments won’t be tolerated.

62. City Considers Seeking Delay In Warren and Tulane Apartments Move Out -

There is a move at City Hall to call for a delay in the relocation of tenants out of Warren and Tulane apartments, the two apartment complexes owned by Global Ministries Foundation, that have failed two federal inspections.

63. Memphis Zoo CEO: Mediation, Court Action Can Coexist in Greensward Dispute -

The Memphis Zoo’s move to Chancery Court next week in the Overton Park greensward controversy does not damage the mediation process between the zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy.

That’s what zoo president and CEO Chuck Brady said as attorneys on both sides of the controversy prepare to make their cases in court.

64. Zoo Goes To Court Over Greensward -

The Memphis Zoo has gone to Chancery Court seeking undisputed legal control of the northern section of the Overton Park greensward.

Attorneys for the zoo filed the suit Thursday, Jan. 21, seeking a declaratory judgment in the dispute with the Overton Park Conservancy.

65. Who’s In Charge? -

IT MIGHT BE RIGHT, BUT IT’S FLAT WRONG. A week or so ago, 27 trees disappeared from Overton Park’s greensward – a fancy word for yours and my yard since Overton Park belongs to us.

66. Strickland Proposes Mediation in Greensward Controversy -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland is asking leaders of the Memphis Zoo and the Overton Park Conservancy to enter voluntary mediation over parking in the Overton Park Greensward.

67. Last Word: Tri-State's Deal With First Tennessee, Matt Barnes' Fine and The Grind -

It sounds strange to refer to this as a holiday weekend – the anniversary of the birth of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Holidays suggest something different than the rededication to purpose so many of us stress as our definition of this day honoring the memory of a leader whose life made it difficult to imagine what our society would be like without his presence.
That we feel compelled to express the meaning of the day through actions and a recommitment to principles buffeted by reality reflects a hope that we wish to retain as first-hand memories of King’s life fade and his legacy endures.

68. Memphis Zoo Removes Trees From Overton Park Greensward -

When the Overton Park Conservancy’s staff noticed 27 trees had been removed from the north end of the park’s greensward Monday, they immediately called Memphis Police.

The conservancy then began calling the other institutions in the park and found the Memphis Zoo had removed the trees donated to and planted by the conservancy four years ago.

69. Memphis Zoo Removes Trees From Overton Park Greensward -

When the Overton Park Conservancy’s staff noticed 27 trees had been removed from the north end of the park’s greensward Monday, they immediately called Memphis Police.

The conservancy then began calling the other institutions in the park and found the Memphis Zoo had removed the trees donated to and planted by the conservancy four years ago.

70. Greensward Controversy Revived With New Year’s Eve Legal Opinion -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says a New Year’s Eve legal opinion on the use of the Overton Park greensward does not speak for his administration.

71. New Beale Street Lease Gets Last-Minute Council Amendment -

One last amendment was filed before the city’s new Beale Street lease was a done deal Tuesday, Dec. 15. But as the Memphis City Council approved the agreement with the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority, the widow of the Beale Street Development Corp.’s former director pushed her claim that the city still hasn’t settled the old 52-year lease with the BSDC that the new authority replaces.

72. Current City Council Marks End of Term -

Memphis City Council members mark the end of an eight-year era Tuesday, Dec. 15, when the body holds its last meeting of 2015.

It is also the last session of the current council’s four-year term of office. With the end of the term, six of the 13 members will be leaving office.

73. The Week Ahead: Dec. 7, 2015 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from gift shopping at the Memphis Indie Holiday Market to the latest Beale Street developments ...

74. Willis Leaving Beale Authority, Lease Transfer Vote Moves to December -

Developer Archie Willis is leaving as chairman of the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority.

Willis announced his resignation from the panel Thursday, Nov. 12, at the end of the authority’s monthly meeting, its seventh since it was created in April.

75. Commission Cancels Veto Override Meeting -

Shelby County Commissioners were set to meet in special session Thursday, Nov. 12, before calling off those plans less than 24 hours later.

The session was to consider overriding Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell’s veto of their plan to hire their own attorney.

76. Questions Remain About Effectiveness of CLERB Ordinance -

Before the Memphis City Council gave final approval Tuesday, Nov. 3, to a reconstituted Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board, councilman Alan Crone had a question that wouldn’t go away.

77. Beale Authority Ready To Issue RFP In November -

Members of the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority board voted Thursday, Oct. 15, to put out a request for proposal Nov. 2 seeking a company to manage the district on a day-to-day basis.

The request, which gives applicants a detailed idea of what is involved, is being fine-tuned from a draft reviewed last week.

78. Beale Authority Ready To Issue Manager RFP In November -

The timeline is tight. But with the city of Memphis elections done, the Beale Street Tourism Development Authority is ready to move on several fronts before the end of the year to take control of the entertainment district and hire a day-to-day property manager.

79. Council Stirs Raleigh Springs Mall Project -

The city’s Raleigh Springs Mall project moved just a bit at the last Memphis City Council meeting before Thursday’s city elections.

At its Tuesday, Oct. 6, meeting, the council approved a resolution that sets the stage for a public hearing on the Memphis Housing Authority’s plan to convert the mall into a “town center.”

80. Retirees Could Shore Up Memphis Police Ranks -

Memphis City Council members are exploring the idea of encouraging retired police officers to get back in uniform on a regular basis as reserve officers to keep the force from slipping to less than 2,000 officers.

81. Council Explores Retirees Return To Police Ranks -

Memphis City Council members are exploring the idea of encouraging already-retired police officers to get back in uniform as reserve officers to keep the police force from slipping to less than 2,000 officers.

82. Council to Vote on One Beale, Redistricting and CLERB -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Aug. 4, on the $160 million One Beale planned development at Beale Street and Riverside Drive.

The council vote is the last major public sector hurdle for the project by the Carlisle Corp.

83. Council Redisricting Plan Raises Possibility of Unintentional District Shifts -

Memphis City Council members are reviewing a proposed redrawing of their district lines that would move 9,522 Memphians into different council districts a month and a half before early voting opens for the Oct. 8 Memphis elections.

84. Memphis Police Oversight Ordinance Back on Track After Wharton Backtracks -

Two days after an aide in Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.’s administration said the mayor was against any changes to the 1994 city ordinance governing a Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board, Wharton himself said he is for the proposed changes.

85. Police Review Board With Teeth Hits Familiar Wall -

When Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton created the Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board in 1994, it was under pressure from critics who said police couldn’t objectively discipline their own.

But Herenton, who had his own doubts about police objectivity, also believed the board was a hollow gesture. Its powers to investigate allegations of police misconduct would always be limited by civil service procedures, due process safeguards and the legal process in general.

86. Wharton Says No Major Changes To CLERB -

The administration of Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. came out Monday, July 27, against any significant changes to the city’s Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board after a nearly six year effort to revive the long-dormant body.

87. Redistricting Controversy Shares Political Stage With Council Restructure -

At one point Tuesday, July 21, during the Memphis City Council’s discussion of the complexities and controversies of drawing new district lines, council attorney Allan Wade’s review of events reached the year 1967.

88. Council Redistricting Discussion Yields to Talk of Council Changes -

A discussion among Memphis City Council members about redistricting Tuesday, July 21, turned into the idea of changing the structure of the council to single-member districts and discarding the multi-member super districts the council has had since 1995.

89. Carpenter: Police Internal Affairs Records Should Be Open -

When advocates of a beefed-up Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board for Memphis called for police internal affairs to open its records of misconduct investigations to the review board, it wasn’t a new idea.

90. Beale Authority Prepares to Negotiate Lease With Memphis Leaders -

The Beale Street Tourism Development Authority is at what Downtown Memphis Commission president Paul Morris describes as an “awkward interim stage.”

91. Civilian Review Board Debate Flares Before Council Delay -

After years of give and take, negotiations over legal terms and the rise of police misconduct as a national issue, it appeared the Memphis City Council was ready Tuesday, July 7, to take a final vote on new rules for the long-dormant Civilian Law Enforcement Review Board.

92. Council Approves Pinch Moratorium, Delays Vote On Civilian Police Review Board -

Memphis City Council members approved a 120-day moratorium Tuesday, July 7, on new building permits in the Pinch district as they also approved a planned development in the Downtown district.

The moratorium proposed by council member Berlin Boyd allows the council to grant waivers on a case-by-case basis during the four-month period. During the fourth months, the Memphis-Shelby County Office of Planning and Development will come up with some suggested guidelines for future development of the district that borders the reactivated Pyramid.

93. Council Approves Pinch Moratorium, Delays Vote On Civilian Police Review Board -

Memphis City Council members approved a 120-day moratorium Tuesday, July 7, on new building permits in the Pinch district as they also approved a planned development in the Downtown district.

The moratorium proposed by council member Berlin Boyd allows the council to grant waivers on a case-by-case basis during the four-month period. During the fourth months, the Memphis-Shelby County Office of Planning and Development will come up with some suggested guidelines for future development of the district that borders the reactivated Pyramid.

94. Council Approves Pinch Moratorium, Delays Vote On Civilian Police Review Board -

Memphis City Council members approved a 120-day moratorium Tuesday, July 7, on new building permits in the Pinch district as they also approved a planned development in the Downtown district.

The moratorium proposed by council member Berlin Boyd allows the council to grant waivers on a case-by-case basis during the four-month period. During the fourth months, the Memphis-Shelby County Office of Planning and Development will come up with some suggested guidelines for future development of the district that borders the reactivated Pyramid.

95. Council Approves Forrest Move -

Memphis City Council members approved unanimously Tuesday, July 7, a resolution that begins the process of moving the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest as well as the graves of Forrest and his wife, Mary Ann, in the base of the monument.

96. County Commission Friction Continues Beyond Budget Season -

Put Shelby County government’s budget season in the books for another year.

But the deliberations that ended Monday, July 6, with a stable county property tax rate and county government staying within its $6 million budget surplus weren’t quite as smooth as those decisions might suggest.

97. Memphis City Council to Vote on Forrest Statue Removal -

[Update: Adds specifics of City Council's proposal on Nathan Bedford Forrest. The council will vote on the Forrest statue removal today.] With the city budget season done, Memphis City Council members turn their attention Tuesday, July 7, to development in the Pinch district, the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest and redrawing council district lines.

98. Memphis City Council’s Distrust of Wharton Boils to Surface -

If it wasn’t obvious in five previous budget seasons, Memphis City Council members made the point clearer Tuesday, June 16, just before they delayed final city budget votes for another week.

They don’t trust the numbers and explanations they are getting from Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. as they try to rearrange his $656.5 million budget that was proposed in April.

99. Memphis City Council Delays Budget Votes Until June 23 -

Memphis City Council members put off final budget votes Tuesday, June 16, after trying for several hours to rearrange Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr.'s budget proposal.

But council members, already skeptical about the administration’s line items and dollar figures, became increasingly frustrated as their calculations of available funding didn’t match the administration’s math.

100. Council Approves Permit for Downtown Hotel -

Memphis City Council members on Tuesday, April 7, approved a special-use permit for a new boutique hotel conversion of the Scimitar Building on the southeast corner of Third Street and Madison Avenue.