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Editorial Results (free)

1. It’s Lee’s to Win Unless He Makes a Rookie Mistake -

When Bill Lee drove a tractor through tiny Eagleville last October, hardly anyone noticed. Only a handful of supporters milled around in the parking lot of the Farmers Co-op in southwest Rutherford County that morning where Lee spent a few minutes talking to people inside the store before emerging to ride to another town as part of a statewide tour, a precursor to an RV ride he would take later in the Republican primary race.

2. TruGreen Hires FXI Exec As Next President, CEO -

TruGreen, the Memphis-based lawn care company serving more than 2.3 million customers across the country, has a new driver behind the wheel.

On Tuesday, Aug. 14, the company announced the appointment of John Cowles as president and CEO, effective Sept. 17.

3. TruGreen Hires FXI Exec As Next President, CEO -

TruGreen, the Memphis-based lawn care company serving more than 2.3 million customers across the country, has a new driver behind the wheel.

On Tuesday, Aug. 14, the company announced the appointment of John Cowles as president and CEO, effective Sept. 17.

4. Papa John's Founder: I Should Be Back as Chain's Public Face -

NEW YORK (AP) — The founder of Papa John's says the pizza chain does well with him as its public face, and that it was a mistake for the company to scrub him from its marketing materials after he acknowledged using a racial slur last month.

5. Camp Aims to Build Confidence in Those Who Stutter -

The Orpheum Theatre is partnering with a New York-based nonprofit to bring a two-day camp to Memphis this fall for kids and teens who stutter. “Camp SAY Across the USA: Memphis” is part of a pilot program to extend the programming of the Stuttering Association for the Young (SAY), and will be held at the Halloran Centre for Performing Arts and Education in November.

6. Last Word: Early Voting Goes Bigger, Worst Kept Secret and Christmas on Carr -

By 9:30 p.m. Monday, 599 people were still without power from weekend storms, according to MLGW with crews working into Tuesday. Meanwhile, 4,324 citizens had voted early through Monday at five sites with early voting expanded to all 27 sites Tuesday. There has to be some kind of connection there but at the moment it eludes me. Meanwhile, here is the grid of early voting sites and their hours from the Shelby County Election Commission… grid, get it?

7. Early Voting Schedule Changes Again as Court Order Signed -

UPDATE: The court order governing early voting in advance of the Aug. 2 election day changed again Tuesday, July 10, as Chancellor JoeDae Jenkins amended his Monday order to permit all 27 early voting sites to open Tuesday -- keeping the previous plan to open five of those sites Friday when the 14-day early voting period begins this Friday.

8. Jenkins Orders Changes to Early Voting Roll Out -

The day after Chancellor JoeDae Jenkins ordered a rearrangement of early voting scheduled to begin Friday, the attorney for the Shelby County Election Commission was contemplating an appeal of the ruling.

9. Last Word: The Politics of Summer, Perpetual Motion and Nigerian Email Scams -

Just about the time it is summer by the calendar next week as well as by the ongoing weather, you will start to see a set of one-on-one debates between the Democratic and Republican contenders for Shelby County Mayor – Lee Harris and David Lenoir, respectively.

10. Planning for Funerals -

Ray’s Take: The most expensive funeral ever documented was that of Alexander the Great. The cost of laying him to rest was a whopping $600 million in today’s money.

Rounding out the top five most expensive funerals on record are Ronald Reagan, Kim Jong Il, John F. Kennedy and the Queen Mother. When Reagan was laid to rest, the day was declared a day of mourning that closed down the stock market and gave federal workers the day off. This added to his pricey funeral expenses.

11. Last Word: Primary Results and Analysis, Bike Launch, Gibson's Bankruptcy -

The immediate headline of Tuesday’s county primary elections is Lee Harris and David Lenoir battling in the August county general to see who becomes the next county mayor. But there were lots of other stories in the results. Here's the roundup of that and the other countywide primaries.

12. Mixed Emotions as Vols, Lady Vols Exit Postseason -

Wait till next year. Again. Hope for better. It’s going to be a long offseason for Tennessee basketball.

The Vols were seeded No. 3 in the NCAA Tournament’s South Region and were upset by No. 11 seed Loyola-Chicago, 63-62, in the second round in Dallas.

13. The 2018 NBA Draft Might be Deep, But It’s Not Mistake-Proof for Grizzlies -

In one analysis before the 2009 NBA Draft, nbadraftnet.com decided the pro player most comparable to Connecticut big man Hasheem Thabeet was Dikembe Mutombo. Each of them was at least 7-foot-2. Each played basketball. That’s where the similarities ended.

14. Last Word: Forrest and Slavery, The Tariff Blitz and Angus McEachran -

The report on poverty in Memphis over the last 50 years is on its way to a Greater Memphis Chamber breakfast meeting Thursday. And Terri Lee Freeman, the president of the National Civil Rights Museum and Elena Delavega, the University of Memphis lead researcher of the report, say their message is that as goes Memphis in this regard so goes the nation. And if employers start with lower pay at hiring with percentage raises across the board they feed the racial income gap and bonuses do as well.

15. ‘Gym Rat’ Building Another Winning Program -

Tennessee’s basketball team is rolling into March Madness.

Amazing.

The 16th-ranked Vols (22-7, 12-5 SEC) entered this week second in the SEC standings and having clinched a double-bye in the March 7-11 SEC tournament with one regular-season games remaining, Saturday against Georgia at Thompson-Boling Arena (6 p.m. ET, SEC Network).

16. Rev. Billy Graham, Known as 'America's Pastor,' Dies at 99 -

MONTREAT, N.C. (AP) – The Rev. Billy Graham, the magnetic, movie-star-handsome preacher who became a singular force in postwar American religious life, a confidant of presidents and the most widely heard Christian evangelist in history, died Wednesday at 99.

17. Last Word: The Mural Takedown, Corker's Calculation and Beale Crowd Control -

Cue the organ music from the old-fashioned television soap operas: As the weekend began, city public works crews had painted over – either completely or partially – a lot of the Paint Memphis program murals on the west side of Willett near Lamar. That would be the ones city council members complained about and others that no one complained about.

18. ATA Expands Memphis Presence With Cannon & Co. Acquisition -

Regional accounting firm Alexander Thompson Arnold PLLC kicked off the new year with the acquisition of Memphis-based Cannon & Co., strengthening its footprint in the market with an eye on future growth and expansion.

19. UT Defies Expectations, Projected as No. 4, 5 Seed -

You won’t find a lot of star power on Tennessee’s basketball team. You will find a roster of players buying into the system of third-year coach Rick Barnes.

20. Dunavant Awards Will Feature Hardy As Keynote -

As a lifelong Memphian and successful entrepreneur, Carolyn Hardy is all about finding new ways to grow the city.

21. Last Word: Second Snow Day, The Post-King Generation and Cohen's Cadillac -

A second snow day awaits Wednesday on this short week for many but not all of us. And there is some grumbling about the approach to treating roads off the main thoroughfares that may, in this city where a cut-through detour is a real thing and the reason for speed humps, still see a lot of traffic.

22. After Disaster of 2017, New Year Looking Good for Vols -

Vol Nation should celebrate. It’s a new year. It’s got to be better than 2017. Tennessee athletics had a bad year, one of the worst ever. It was rough for fans, alumni and boosters.

23. Smart Homes: Not Just for Tech Geeks Anymore -

NEW YORK (AP) – Internet-connected lights, locks and laundry machines are close to becoming everyday household items, thanks in part to voice-activated speakers such as Amazon's Echo and Google Home.

24. Memphis Sound at 60 -

As Stax Records and Royal Studios both wrap up a year of celebrating their 60th anniversary, The Memphis News looks back at the creators and purveyors of the Memphis sound and its significance, both in its heyday and today.

25. Poll: Tennessee Voters More Moderate Than Some Think -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennesseans are more moderate than their neighbors think they are, and their views of Congress and President Donald Trump have soured some in the past few months, according to a Vanderbilt University poll released Thursday.

26. Last Word: The Run, 70 Million Gallons a Day and More Shipping Containers -

This will be another busy week on the political front with more candidates declaring their intentions in advance of Thanksgiving. Meanwhile, Republican contender for governor Randy Boyd ends his run across the state Tuesday morning on Mud Island – a variation on Lamar Alexander’s walk across the state in the 1978 Republican primary for Governor that remains a part of the state’s political folklore almost 40 years later.

27. Democrats Hope Bredesen Run Will Reinvigorate Party -

Tennessee Democrats are canvassing the state to find candidates at every political level, but their next star is a well-known veteran who has people of all political stripes holding their breath.

Phil Bredesen, the former mayor of Nashville and a two-term governor, could alter the landscape of Tennessee politics if he enters the race for U.S. Senate to fill the void by departing Republican Sen. Bob Corker in 2018.

28. Last Word: Alexander on Trump, Gibson Sells and Chandler Home Sales Numbers -

If you tuned out at half-time in Houston Thursday evening, you may need to examine your committment and give me five sets of wind sprints from East Parkway to the fountain at the other end of Tiger Lane. And no drinking the blue water.

29. Last Word: T.A. Talks Memphis, EDGE Debate and Politics, Lots of Politics -

Grizz season opener at the Forum Wednesday is a win over NOLA 103 – 91. And Tony Allen’s Grizz jersey is retired. The day before, Allen wrote a piece for The Players’ Tribune on the Memphis experience and it is just about the best thing that will happen to you all day. He just walks right off the court and into the soul of this place.

30. Senators Reach Deal on Resuming Payments to Health Insurers -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Key senators reached a breakthrough deal Tuesday on resuming federal payments to health insurers that President Donald Trump has blocked. Insurers had warned that unless the money is quickly restored, premiums will go up.

31. Trump’s Bluster Cascades Through State Politics -

The chaos emanating from President Donald Trump’s administration is changing the landscape of Tennessee politics, setting the stage for upheaval within the dominant Republican Party.

“This is a really big moment for the Tennessee Republican Party,” with the Trump wing or far-right wing “firmly in control,” says Kent Syler, Middle Tennessee State University political science professor.

32. Last Word: A Centennial, Corker Controversy Goes Wider and Ranked Choice Votes -

One of the most influential political figures in the city and state in the last half of the 20th century turned 100 years old MondayLewis Donelson, cofounder and senior counsel at Baker Donelson. A direct descendant of Andrew Jackson, the president from Tennessee who made the mold of the modern Democratic Party, Donelson started out, of course, as a Democrat. But by the 1950s was shaping the modern local and state Republican parties.

33. State Politicians in No Hurry to Fix Health Insurance -

We don’t need no stinkin’ special session on Medicaid expansion.

That’s pretty much the Republican response to House Democratic Leader Craig Fitzhugh’s call for Gov. Bill Haslam to bring lawmakers back to Nashville after the Graham-Cassidy bill failed in Congress.

34. Congress at Crossroads After Another GOP Health Care Failure -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Congress is at a crossroads after Republicans' stinging failure to repeal Barack Obama's health care law. But what's next – more partisan conflict or a pragmatic shift toward cooperation?

35. Graham-Cassidy Bill Withdrawn Amidst Local Protest -

Ahead of an increasingly tentative vote on the latest Republican health care proposal in the U.S. Senate, about 100 critics of the Graham-Cassidy bill rallied Downtown Monday, Sept. 25, to call for U.S. Sens. Bob Corker and Lamar Alexander of Tennessee to vote against the proposal.

36. Republicans Unveil Long-Shot Effort on Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senators on Wednesday rolled out competing plans for the nation's health care system, with a group of GOP senators making a last, long-shot effort to undo Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act and independent Sen. Bernie Sanders proposing universal government-run coverage.

37. Alexander, Corker Look Beyond ‘Skinny Repeal’; Cohen Rant Goes Viral -

Tennessee’s two U.S. senators see the failure of the “skinny repeal” health care bill in the Senate as a missed opportunity.

Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker both supported the measure, along with all but three of the rest of the Republican majority in the Senate. But the bill that would have repealed Obamacare without an immediate replacement and which Republicans senators didn’t want the House to approve and send to President Donald Trump fell short of passage with only 49 votes.

38. Alexander, Corker Look Beyond ‘Skinny Repeal’; Cohen Rant Goes Viral -

Tennessee’s two U.S. senators see the failure of the “skinny repeal” health care bill in the Senate as a missed opportunity.

Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker both supported the measure, along with all but three of the rest of the Republican majority in the Senate. But the bill that would have repealed Obamacare without an immediate replacement and which Republicans senators didn’t want the House to approve and send to President Donald Trump fell short of passage with only 49 votes.

39. Last Word: Repeal Votes, ServiceMaster Exit and Cooper-Young Apartments -

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee was among the seven Republican Senators who voted Wednesday against a bill that would have repealed the Obama administration’s Affordable Care Act without an immediate replacement. U.S. Senator Bob Corker voted for the repeal. The bill failed.

40. Last Word: Harold Ford Jr. on Change, Tourism Turns a Corner and Sim at UTHSC -

Very different outlooks along party lines still in our delegation to Washington over the Senate’s version of Trumpcare.

On the day the Congressional Budget Office estimated the proposal would end health insurance coverage for 22 million Americans, Republican U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander’s reaction:

41. Last Word: Health Care Plan React, Treasury Footprint and Tom Bowen - Take Two -

It’s like they aren’t even looking at the same legislation. That’s one explanation of the very different reviews the Senate health care bill got Thursday as it was unveiled in Washington. Illustrating the contrast, the reactions of Republican U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee and Democratic U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis.

42. Winds of Change -

Humans have been harnessing the power of the wind since the first Egyptians began to use sails to move their boats along the Nile. More than 7,000 years later, wind power capacity in the U.S. alone has surpassed 82 gigawatts, or enough energy to power 20 million homes, making it the largest renewable generation capacity in the country.

43. Mississippi College Board Faces Resistance Over Choice for JSU President -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Some Jackson State University alumni and faculty are fighting William Bynum's nomination to become the president of Mississippi's largest historically black university.

44. U of M Baseball Team Seeking Momentum Before AAC Tournament -

As the University of Memphis finishes out its regular season, there is no guesswork about what the Tigers must do to reach the postseason: win the American Athletic Conference Tournament.

Although the Tigers have beaten Ole Miss twice this season (they were ranked no worse than 11th each time), they have lost 14 of their last 20 games and are in seventh-place in the eight-team AAC with a 6-12 record heading into a three-game weekend series at last-place East Carolina (4-14).

45. Revolution Partners Quietly Growing But Holding On to Client-First Mindset -

A conversation with Revolution Partners CEO Brian Fowler about the wealth management firm he and his team have been quietly growing since its launch in 2014 eventually turns philosophical, to encompass ideas like time, values, how to identify the things that matter.

46. Tennessee Overhauls Approach to Low-Performing Schools Under Plan Sent to Secretary DeVos -

Tennesseans who have been waiting to see which low-performing schools have improved enough to avoid consequences — and which ones are struggling so much that the state might step in — will have to wait longer.

47. Roland Critical of Alexander’s Opposition to Clean Line -

Shelby County Commissioner Terry Roland is critical of U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander’s opposition to including wind energy from a “clean line” in the Tennessee Valley Authority’s energy portfolio.

48. Roland Critical of Alexander’s Opposition to Clean Line -

Shelby County Commissioner Terry Roland is critical of U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander’s opposition to including wind energy from a “clean line” in the Tennessee Valley Authority’s energy portfolio.

49. Hopson, Caldwell Plan for SCS Long-Term -

Five years into historic changes in public education locally, the rapid pace of change is starting to give way to longer-term views and plans.

“This has been the first year since the merger that we actually are in a position to do some strategic investments in our schools,” Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

50. Tigers’ Losing Streak at Four and Counting -

As the season winds down, Tubby Smith’s first Tigers team is making the wrong kind of history. Memphis has lost four straight games, a stretch of losing not endured since the 2004-2005 season.

51. Memphis Baseball Team Opens vs. UT and Ready for Rebound Season -

The extended forecast is promising, sunny with high temperatures in the 60s. University of Memphis baseball coach Daron Schoenrock not only is hoping the forecast for opening weekend at FedExPark vs. the University of Tennessee holds, but that clear skies and warming temps are signs of things to come this season.

52. Full Text of Gov. Bill Haslam's State of the State Address -

Here is the full text of Gov. Bill Haslam's annual State of the State address as prepared for delivery to a joint convention of the Tennessee General Assembly on Monday.

Speaker Harwell, Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speakers Pro Tem Tracy and Johnson, Members of the 110th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers, General Slatery, Commissioners, Friends, Guests, fellow Tennesseans, and for the seventh year in a row, the woman voted best first lady in the land, Crissy. My kids even made it this year.

53. Tubby Smith and Tigers Not Fretting the Style Points -

In a challenging season with too few legitimate Division 1 players for the rotation and nobody tall enough to truly count as a rim protector, coach Tubby Smith would not call the Tigers’ 57-50 victory over East Carolina last weekend “ugly.” No matter that it was the perfect word – at least under other circumstances.

54. View From the Hill: Taxing Online Sales Not Such an Easy Fix -

Cumberland Transit owner Allen Doty isn’t sure if a rule requiring major out-of-state retailers to collect Tennessee sales taxes will create more equity for his shop.

But Doty, who has been selling everything from bicycles to kayaks and camping gear for 34 years in Nashville, is definitely tired of people shopping in his store for hours, snapping a picture of shoes they like, then going home and buying them online “just to avoid sales tax.”

55. January 6-12, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1978: The Sex Pistols play Taliesyn Ballroom in Midtown – the second of seven stops on the original band’s one and only U.S. tour – with Memphis punk trip Quo Jr. opening. The British band’s reputation prompts Memphis authorities to look over the setting for the show as well as go see the performance for themselves.
The ballroom, an annex to the Nineteenth Century Club on Union Avenue, is a short-lived live music venue that already has hosted REO Speedwagon’s first Memphis show.
Mid-South Concerts founder Bob Kelley originally plans a show with no seats until police and fire officials insist there must be seats. The late change means more tickets have been sold for the show then there are seats and some ticketholders are locked out initially.
The Sex Pistols play a full set with police officials watching, ultimately concluding there isn’t anything particularly inflammatory or illegal about the band, whose best known song is “God Save The Queen.” Eight days after the Memphis show, the band plays its final date in San Francisco – and the Sex Pistols break up.

56. Trump’s Turn -

If the election of Donald Trump was a mystery, there are even more questions about what will he do once he takes office Jan. 20. The clues may or may not be in the conduct of his campaign.

“Donald Trump campaigned without being tied to the traditional parameters of conservative-liberal dialogue that we’ve come to know over the past 20 or 30 years,” said Memphis attorney John Ryder, who is legal counsel to the Republican National Committee. “The hopeful part about that is that allows him to move past those divisions and enter new territory.”

57. Preparations Underway for New Vintage901 Festival -

For foodies and lovers of memorable culinary experiences like Stephanie Ferreira, the community around it all tends to be talked about with as much passion sometimes as the food and drink.

Like all tribes, foodies like Ferreira – who runs her family’s small event planning and floral businesses and who also has founded the new wine, food and music festival Vintage901 – speak a common language. They also share an interest in enjoying and enlightening themselves and each other about their passion.

58. Presidential Election Tops Busy Year for Memphis Voters -

2016 was an eventful election year in Shelby County, ending with the most popular voting cycle in Shelby County politics: the U.S. presidential general election in November. Slightly more than 60 percent of the county’s voters cast a ballot either during early voting in October or on the Nov. 8 Election Day.

59. Outsourcing: Savings, But No Specifics -

The Haslam administration is forging ahead with plans to nab a statewide facilities services contractor after an outside analysis backed up a study showing estimated cost savings of more than $35 million a year at Tennessee universities.

60. Last Word: Fire Recovery, Justice Department Work Begins and Rocky Top Angst -

The death toll in the East Tennessee wildfires goes to 10 Thursday as the recovery effort moves beyond a search for those missing. The count of buildings burned in Sevier County is estimated at more than 700 – 300 just in Gatlinburg. And 47 people are injured by the latest count. The count of those who died in the fires includes confirmation that Jon and Janet Summer of Memphis are among the dead recovered so far.

61. Last Word: Early Vote Numbers, Crime Q&A and School Suspensions in Memphis -

The last weekend of early voting is done and now we get the early vote surge through Thursday, which is the last day for early voting at the 21 polling places across Shelby County.

Through this past Friday, 161,239 early votes had been cast in Shelby County. That compares to 156,645 to the same point in 2008 and 151,809 in 2012.

62. Facing $60M Penalty, Tennessee Repeals Underage DUI Law -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee lawmakers on Wednesday repealed an underage drunken driving law that threatened to cost the state $60 million in road money by running afoul of federal zero-tolerance standards.

63. The Fading Accuracy of Political Polling -

Joe Carr says he couldn’t believe the deficit when U.S. Rep. Diane Black trounced him in the August election to recapture Tennessee’s 6th Congressional District seat.

64. Memphis Film Prize, On Location Name Winners -

Two local film competitions have named this year’s winning submissions.

The judges of the 17th annual On Location: MEMPHIS International Film & Music Festival announced its winners on Sunday, Aug. 14.

65. Outnumbered Democrats Hope To Ride Anti-Trumpmentum -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari identified herself with the “Fighting 26,” also known as the Tennessee House Democratic Caucus, when she took the podium to support Hillary Clinton at Philadelphia’s Democratic National Convention.

66. Last Word: Convention Bounces, Changing Schools and Blue Collar Changes -

Before the balloons dropped Thursday and a Katy Perry soundtrack brought the Democratic National Convention to an end, state Representative Raumesh Akbari of Memphis spoke at the convention on its final day.

67. Scramble in the 8th District -

You might call it the calm before the storm. The Aug. 4 election, for which early voting starts July 15, is calmer than usual for the election cycle before a November presidential general election – the only election that more than half of Shelby County voters regularly show up for.

68. Show Time -

For the first time in years, the Peabody Place mall was packed. On June 3, hundreds of ServiceMaster employees and a handful of business and government leaders ushered in One ServiceMaster Center, a multimillion-dollar headquarters for Memphis’ fourth-largest public company.

69. Last Word: Verdell Smith and Lifeline, Strickland's First 5 Months and Tennessine -

Lots of blue lights in Cordova Thursday evening as the Memphis Police Department remembers Officer Verdell Smith, who died in Saturday’s Downtown rampage in the line of duty. His funeral is Friday.

70. 2014 Abortion Amendment Recount Ordered -

Almost two years after Tennessee voters approved an amendment to the Tennessee Constitution limiting abortion access, a federal judge in Nashville has ordered a recount of the vote – not a new vote but a recounting of the 2014 election returns.

71. Memphis Baseball Trusting Young Pitchers -

University of Memphis baseball coach Daron Schoenrock looks at his freshmen pitchers and sees talent and promise, even if at times this season “the moments have been a little big for them.”

72. Green Sword -

First it was a rumor – there would be a move by the Memphis City Council aimed at putting a quick end to the long-simmering Overton Park Greensward controversy.

It would come quickly and just before the start of the third spring of protests against the Memphis Zoo's use of the northern part of the Greensward for overflow parking.

73. Clinton Visits Churches, Trump Rallies In Millington -

Democratic presidential front runner Hillary Clinton made surprise appearances at two Memphis churches Sunday, Feb. 28, the day after Republican presidential front runner Donald Trump drew a crowd of 10,000 less than 12 hours earlier in Millington.

74. Numbers Show Memphis’ Commercial Real Estate Market Stable in 2015 -

Across all sectors, the Memphis market was stable in 2015.

That’s according to the latest data from Integra Realty Resources, a national appraisal and advisory firm. At its annual Viewpoint local market presentation Wednesday, Feb. 24, local Integra leaders spoke on the industrial sector’s banner year, multifamily’s expansion cycle, what’s next for an office market without any remaining Class A space, and growth in the retail sector.

75. The Moving Election -

The Trump balloons were a late arrival to the Shelby County Republican party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, the local party’s largest annual fundraiser.

They were an unsubtle accent in a room of 500 people where unabashed hand-to-hand campaigning kept the buzz of conversation at a steady level for most of the evening.

76. Scalia's Memphis Visits Reflected Outspoken Supreme Court Justice -

Prior to his death Saturday in Texas at 79, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia a few times in recent years brought to Memphis the intellectual combativeness and pugnacious brand of jurisprudence for which he’s long been known and for which he will be remembered.

77. Scalia's Memphis Visits Reflected Outspoken Supreme Court Justice -

Prior to his death Saturday in Texas at 79, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia a few times in recent years brought to Memphis the intellectual combativeness and pugnacious brand of jurisprudence for which he’s long been known and for which he will be remembered.

78. The Week Ahead: Feb. 12, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from circus clowns to Republican senators…

Both U.S. Senators representing Tennessee will be in Memphis Saturday for the Shelby County Republican Party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, historically the local party’s largest annual fundraising event.
Sen. Bob Corker is the keynote speaker with Sen. Lamar Alexander as a special guest.
The Lincoln Day gatherings are county-by-county events across the state that can extend far beyond the shadow of Presidents Day: A few of the Lincoln Day dinners have been known to find a place on the calendar in April.
This is the 41st Lincoln Day event in Shelby County, which puts the local event’s origins squarely in the aftermath of the Watergate scandal, a low-point for Republican fortunes nationally after the state’s modern Republican party was formed and prospered in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
The event always comes with a large helping of local candidates testing the political waters among the dinner tables between podium speeches.
This year, the Shelby County event is sure to feature partisans from the various Republican presidential campaigns because of its place on the February calendar during the early voting period before the March 1 election day.

79. Tennessee Startups Chasing Greater Opportunities -

When it comes to launching startup companies, Tennessee is best described as “early stage.”

The less than $200 million in venture capital invested in Tennessee businesses in 2014 is a rounding error compared to the $30 billion invested in California. And when the final tally for 2015 comes out later this month, the disparity won’t be much smaller.

80. A Look at This Year’s Volunteer Squad -

Here’s a glimpse at the Vols’ roster, and what’s happened through the first eight games (in order of scoring).

Kevin Punter Jr.

Junior guard, 6-2, 190, Bronx, N.Y./State Fair (Mo.) Community College. 22.9 ppg, 3.3 rpg, 35.1 mpg

81. Scotts LawnService to Merge With TruGreen -

Memphis-based TruGreen Holdings Inc. is merging in a joint venture with the Scotts LawnService division of Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. of Marysville, Ohio.

82. Mallory Alexander Signs Pact With Old Dominion -

Memphis-based Mallory Alexander International Logistics LLC will handle all ocean freight forwarding, back office and operational services for Old Dominion Freight Line Inc.

83. Mallory Alexander Signs Pact with Old Dominion -

Memphis-based Mallory Alexander International Logistics LLC will handle all ocean freight forwarding, back office and operational services for Old Dominion Freight Line Inc.

84. Former Tennessee Rep., GOP Operative Decry Dark Money -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A former Democratic congressman and a prominent Republican political operative on Tuesday called for ending untraceable spending for and against candidates in Tennessee and around the country.

85. Lew Sticking With Plan to Put Woman on $10 Bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew is sticking with his plan to replace Alexander Hamilton on the $10 bill with a woman.

86. Southern Heritage Defined Differently Across Tennessee -

Tennessee’s loyalty was divided in the Civil War, and 150 years later, little is changed as the debate over Confederate symbols arises in the wake of the racist-fueled South Carolina church massacre.

87. TruGreen Selects East Memphis for New Headquarters -

TruGreen is moving more than 300 Memphis-area employees and its corporate headquarters to a 65,000-square-foot space at the Forum II office building in East Memphis, the company announced Friday.

The new headquarters, which will eventually house up to 400 of TruGreen’s corporate associates, will be part of the three-building Forum Office Complex, situated at the intersection of Kirby Parkway and Poplar Avenue.

88. TruGreen Inches Closer to New Memphis Headquarters -

TruGreen will move its 300 Memphis-area employees to a new corporate headquarters by the end of 2015, a move that will solidify the company’s spot in the Memphis business landscape.

“We are very close,” said Amy Simpson, spokesperson for TruGreen, adding that the company has “narrowed it down to a few places.”

89. Preserving East Tennessee's Endangered Buildings -

When preservation comes up in conversation, it brings to mind crumbling Victorian mansions or maybe an old Woolworth’s sitting idle downtown.

That’s definitely been the case in and around Knoxville, and it’s a mindset that Knox Heritage and the East Tennessee Preservation Alliance (ETPA) are working hard to break.

90. New State Chair Wants All-GOP Legislature -

With more than six years of experience in the House of Representatives, Knoxville Republican Ryan Haynes is leaving the post to take on a new job: Tennessee Republican Party chairman.

91. Daily News Names Managing Editor -

Jane A. Donahoe has joined The Daily News Publishing Co. as managing editor. In her new role, she oversees award-winning coverage of business and government news for both The Daily News and The Memphis News.

92. Nashville’s Most Romantic Restaurants -

Romance means something different for everyone, but most people can agree that if there is low lighting, soft music, a charming companion and something delicious to eat, you’ve already got the makings of one outstanding evening.

93. Ford Jr. to Headline Dunavant Award Event -

Former U.S. Rep. Harold Ford Jr. will be the keynote speaker for the March 25 Dunavant Public Servants Awards luncheon hosted by the Rotary Club of Memphis East.

The awards, now in their 12th year, honor one elected official and one non-elected public official within Shelby County who demonstrate the qualities and characteristics of longtime Probate Court Clerk Bobby Dunavant.

94. Spillyards Leads Community Advisors Launch -

Greg Spillyards has joined the brokerage team at Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors to launch the firm’s Community Advisors service line.

Community Advisors is focused on the Memphis city core, with a goal to provide real estate advisory services to assist in the revitalization of the city’s underserved areas with passion, creativity and entrepreneurship, and with service to those already living and leading in their neighborhoods.

95. Master Plan -

Progress is usually expensive and seldom convenient. But the alternative?

Regression, at an ultimately higher cost, and eventually the realization that an opportunity slipped by.

Such was the mindset as University of Tennessee Health Science Center leaders launched a campus master plan designed to enhance UTHSC’s position as an urban academic medical center at the core of a larger revitalization of the Memphis Medical Center District.

96. Contrasting Ballot -

The midterm election saw contrasting issues and candidates, particularly in Tennessee where an incumbent governor and U.S. senator were both re-elected while four amendments to the state Constitution were passed.

97. For-Profit Programs Face 'Gainful Employment' Rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For-profit colleges with graduates unable to pay back their student loans could soon face scrutiny by the federal government.

Schools with career-oriented programs that fail to comply with the new rule announced Thursday by the Obama administration stand to lose access to federal student-aid programs.

98. Editorial: Senate Race Shows Landscape is Changing -

What the race on the November ballot for the U.S. Senate says about our current political environment goes beyond whatever the results will be.

To us, it says our politics is changing. The deck is being shuffled and there are new players at the table. There are also new potential players watching the game.

99. University School of Nashville Kicks Off Centennial -

It was the summer of 1915, and a young Nashville educator had the audacity to suggest that a basement schoolroom on the grounds of the George Peabody College for Teachers might serve as a model for preparatory schools.

100. Haslam Touts State Constitutional Amendments -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam intends to vote for all four of the proposed amendments to the state Constitution on the Nov. 4 ballot, he said during a stop in Memphis Monday, Oct. 6.

Haslam was in Memphis to campaign specifically for the amendment that would require approval from the Tennessee Legislature of appellate court judges nominated by the governor. Amendment 2 would also leave in place judicial retention elections.