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Editorial Results (free)

1. One-Year Turnaround? Grizzlies Vow It Can Be Done -

Mike Conley had no doubt: “With health, we’re a completely different team.” This was a day after the season ended, a 22-60 record next to the Memphis Grizzlies’ name and forever the shorthand explanation of their 2017-2018 NBA journey.

2. New Chef Takes Over at The Brass Door -

A new chef is moving into the kitchen at Downtown’s The Brass Door, taking over for Patrick Reilly, who’s spent the past six months helping to breathe new life into the re-opened Irish pub.

3. After a Lost Season, Grizzlies Turn Toward NBA Draft -

For seven straight years, Exit Interview Day at FedExForum was a mixture of chronicling the season’s successes and speaking to the wish that the playoff run, whenever it ended, could have lasted longer.

4. Religious Leaders Recount Catechism of 1968 Memphis -

Rev. James Lawson, the architect of nonviolent resistance who counseled Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on it, walked in a circle last week around the new “I Am A Man” bronze and stainless steel sculpture. As he walked with his head down, still and video photographers scrambled for the best angle to capture the seminal strategist of the civil rights era, seemingly deep in thought.

5. UTHSC Launches Clinical Trials Network -

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center has launched the Clinical Trials Network of Tennessee.

Operating as a separate subsidiary of the University of Tennessee Research Foundation, the network was created to enable UTHSC clinical research faculty to design, solicit and conduct statewide clinical trials with the overarching goal of providing new therapeutics and medical devices aimed at improving the health of all Tennesseans.

6. UTHSC Launches Clinical Trials Network -

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center has launched the Clinical Trials Network of Tennessee.

Operating as a separate subsidiary of the University of Tennessee Research Foundation, the network was created to enable UTHSC clinical research faculty to design, solicit and conduct statewide clinical trials with the overarching goal of providing new therapeutics and medical devices aimed at improving the health of all Tennesseans.

7. CVS Health Eyes Kidney Patients for Next Expansion Into Care -

WOONSOCKET, R.I. (AP) – CVS Health is now planning to treat kidney failure patients, as the national drugstore chain continues to branch deeper into monitoring and providing care.

The company said Wednesday it will offer home dialysis for patients through its Coram business, and it is working with another unspecified company to develop a new device for that. A CVS spokeswoman declined to name the company or disclose how much CVS is spending on the venture.

8. King's Children See New Movements, Same Challenges 50 Years After Mountaintop -

The bright and multi colored lights at Mason Temple Church of God In Christ gave way for a few minutes Tuesday, April 3, to a single white spotlight on the empty pulpit of the South Memphis church and a recording of part of the speech Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered from the pulpit 50 years ago Tuesday.

9. Perry Leading Fire Museum Forward as Executive Director -

Shannon Perry became executive director of the Fire Museum of Memphis earlier this year, a role that brings her back to the institution she helped launch in the 1990s, when she served as its first curator. As executive director, Perry is the Fire Museum’s only full-time employee, and she handles a range of functions – including its collection, exhibits and facilities, budgets, fundraising, public relations, special events, staff and volunteers – while also working directly with the museum’s board.

10. New Apartments Coming to Broad, Clark Tower Inks Another Tenant -

A multifamily project planned for Broad Avenue could provide the housing element that takes the arts district to the next level.


2542 Broad Ave.
Memphis, TN 38112

11. Caissa Public Strategy Inks Deal in Clark Tower -

Caissa Public Strategy has inked a new deal to occupy 5,086 square feet on the 17th floor of the Clark Tower in East Memphis.

“As our team continues to expand, we needed a space that could meet our growing needs,” said Brian Stephens, CEO of Caissa. “Clark Tower was the right choice for us because of the updated space and central location. We look forward to the continued growth of Caissa and our partnership with the Clark Tower team.”

12. MLK50 Events: A Roundup of Memphis Happenings -

Here's a selection of events in Memphis marking the 50th anniversary of the 1968 sanitation workers' strike and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. April 3 is the 50th anniversary of King’s last speech – the “Mountaintop” speech at Mason Temple, while April 4 is the 50th anniversary of his assassination on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel.

13. Editorial: 50 Years After King's Death, What Have We Learned? -

When sanitation workers Echol Cole and Robert Walker were crushed by a garbage truck compactor on Feb. 1, 1968, it sparked a 64-day strike that reverberated throughout Memphis and beyond.

14. Caissa Public Strategy Inks Deal in Clark Tower -

Caissa Public Strategy has inked a new deal to occupy 5,086 square feet on the 17th floor of the Clark Tower in East Memphis.

“As our team continues to expand, we needed a space that could meet our growing needs,” said Brian Stephens, CEO of Caissa. “Clark Tower was the right choice for us because of the updated space and central location. We look forward to the continued growth of Caissa and our partnership with the Clark Tower team.”

15. The Doctor is In: White House Physician Nominated to Lead VA -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump fired Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin and nominated White House doctor Ronny Jackson to replace him following a bruising ethics scandal and a mounting rebellion within the agency.

16. Strickland Talks of Work To Be Done 50 Years After Strike -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says the hardest part of growing black-owned business, and thereby black wealth in the city, is increasing the number of minority-owned firms in certain sectors.

17. Two New Food Concepts Coming to Crosstown Concourse -

Crosstown Concourse is set to add a pair of new food concepts to its tenant mix this summer. Global Cafe, an international food hall where a mix of cuisines will be prepared by three immigrant food entrepreneurs and their staff, and Lucy J’s Bakery, which specializes in custom event cakes and fresh baked goods, will open in part of the space now occupied by Curb Market.

18. UTHSC Adds Infectious Disease Institute -

Dr. Colleen Jonsson, director of the Regional Biocontainment Laboratory at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, will be taking her work in infectious disease research to a new level as director of a new institute at UTHSC.

19. The Right To Be Wrong -

“Fundraising is known for its abundance of failures and few successes.” We can’t recall who said this, but we know it is true. Yet many people think otherwise. Plans are created; goals are set. Most are focused on “incremental growth.”

20. For Real -

REAL NEED. REAL EFFORT. “A billion here, a billion there, and pretty soon you’re talking about real money.”

The late, great Illinois Sen. Everett Dirksen – father-in-law to the late, great Tennessee Sen. Howard Baker – purportedly said that regarding government spending in a “Tonight Show” appearance in the ’60s.

21. Children’s Central -

The first career choice a child has in mind isn’t always the right one. Stephanie Butler, who today is the new executive director of the Children’s Museum of Memphis, thought she wanted to be a doctor.

22. New Memphis Coach Penny Hardaway Vows Return to Glory Days -

They came in large numbers and they came early. The University of Memphis opened Tuesday’s press conference to the public and the basketball program’s staunchest supporters showed up at the gleaming new Laurie-Walton practice facility for the tip-off of the Penny Hardaway Era.

23. Events -

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art hosts its final community engagement session to gather feedback on its Downtown relocation Tuesday, March 20, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Memphis fire headquarters (the site of Brooks’ future home), 65 S. Front St. Museum officials are seeking input as they begin the process of selecting an architect and creating a vision for the new space. Free and open to the public, but RSVPs requested via the Facebook event. See facebook.com/brooksmuseum for details.

24. (Re)building Your Leadership One Person at a Time -

A special column for emerging nonprofits and those who are “struggling.”

What do you do if you are a nonprofit board chair or executive director, and you know in your heart of hearts that your current board can’t do what needs to be done? 

25. Events -

The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development brings its apprenticeship listening tour to Memphis Monday, March 19, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. in Southwest Tennessee Community College’s Bert Bornblum Library art gallery, 5983 Macon Cove. The goal of the tour is to determine the current state and future of area apprenticeship programs. Visit tn.gov/ecd/apprenticeship-tour.html for details and to RSVP.

26. Events -

Memphis Brooks Museum of Art hosts its final community engagement session to gather feedback on its Downtown relocation Tuesday, March 20, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Memphis fire headquarters (the site of Brooks’ future home), 65 S. Front St. Museum officials are seeking input on several topics as they begin the process of selecting an architect and creating a vision for the new space. Free and open to the public, but RSVPs requested via the Facebook event. See facebook.com/brooksmuseum for details.

27. Events -

Circuit Playhouse will present “James and the Giant Peach” Friday, March 16, through April 8 at 51 S. Cooper St. Visit playhouseonthesquare.org for times and tickets.

28. The 2018 NBA Draft Might be Deep, But It’s Not Mistake-Proof for Grizzlies -

In one analysis before the 2009 NBA Draft, nbadraftnet.com decided the pro player most comparable to Connecticut big man Hasheem Thabeet was Dikembe Mutombo. Each of them was at least 7-foot-2. Each played basketball. That’s where the similarities ended.

29. Good Shepherd Pharmacy Continues Growth with new Chief Medical Officer -

Whenever Dr. Amara Elochukwu discharges a patient and sends them away with medications, she always worries after they leave if they’ll actually be able to afford the drugs.

If they can’t, she often wonders, what’s the point? Why even prescribe them? That concern explains why Dr. Elochukwu is in the process of joining Good Shepherd Pharmacy in Memphis on a part-time basis as the pharmacy’s first chief medical officer.

30. Gorillas in the Living Room -

IMPROVING THE VIEW. There are very large gorillas in our living room.

It seems these things are never seen when such a sight would spoil the vision at hand – except, of course, by those who see the reality of unpleasant things. Never mentioned in polite conversation – except, of course, by those who discuss unpleasant things. Avoided at all costs by those charged with promoting civic accomplishment – except by those who measure the cost of unpleasant things.

31. Trey Carter Honored Among Top 35 Millennial Influencers -

Patrick “Trey” Carter III has been named one of the Top 35 Millennial Influencers in the Country by the Next Big Thing Movement, a global network of more than 20,000 young professionals and creatives. Carter, president of Olympic Career Training Institute and an active community volunteer, is the only Tennessean to be included on the list. He will be honored Saturday, March 10, at NBTM’s Forward Conference in New York City alongside other influencers, including “The Daily Show” host Trevor Noah, Teen Vogue editor Elaine Welteroth and YouTube vlogger Tyler Oakley.

32. Navigating The Fundraising Priority Maze -

If you have worked with a nonprofit, you may have experienced getting lost in what we call the “fundraising priority maze.” Here’s what it looks like.

You know you need to raise money for your organization. Everybody else has a different idea about how much money is needed and how the funds will be used. You – as an executive director, college president or fundraising professional – feel as if you are encountering dead ends and detours when trying to accomplish what you believe is a simple task. That task: Define the organization’s priorities.

33. Kroger Joins Other Big Retailers, Tightens Gun Restrictions -

NEW YORK (AP) – Kroger will no longer sell guns to anyone under 21 at the stores it owns, becoming the third major retailer this week to put restrictions in place that are stronger than federal laws.

34. Donors Give $2 Million To Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital -

Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital has established the Trish Ring Endowment for Child Health and Well-Being, thanks to a $2 million gift from Trish and Carl Ring.

35. At All-Star Break, Grizzlies’ Reality Not What Anyone Envisioned -

The start of training camp was less than 24 hours away. With seven straight playoff appearances behind them, the Grizzlies had a track record of substance. True, they would be without half of the Core Four, Zach Randolph and Tony Allen having been allowed to walk and sign elsewhere.

36. SCO Reports 100 Percent Optometry Board Passage -

Every student in the Southern College of Optometry’s most recent graduating class passed the National Board optometry exam, making the Memphis college the only one in the nation with 100 percent passage rate.

37. CVS Health Eyes Data, Wage Boosts With $1.5B Tax Benefit -

CVS Health's fourth-quarter earnings nearly doubled, fueled by a $1.5 billion tax benefit that will help the drugstore chain expand its growing role in customer care.

The company said Thursday that it will use the break it gets from the recently completed federal tax overhaul to raise starting pay for its hourly workers and pare debt ahead of its planned, $69 billion acquisition of the insurer Aetna.

38. SCO Reports 100 Percent Optometry Board Passage -

Every student in the Southern College of Optometry’s most recent graduating class passed the National Board optometry exam, making the Memphis college the only one in the nation with 100 percent passage rate.

39. Martin Meets Latest Challenge With ‘Umph’ -

It has been said that the difference between try and triumph is that little “umph.” If there was ever anyone that shows just what a difference that makes, it is Jay Martin, president of Juice Plus. He puts that “umph” in everything he does.

40. Customer-Focused Government Not Always a Pleaser -

Gov. Bill Haslam is fond of saying government should run more like a business, and during his eighth and final State of the State address he invoked the term “customer-focused” at least twice in a victory lap.

41. Nasdaq Vice President Talks Up Blockchain in Memphis -

The guest speaker at this month’s Economic Club of Memphis luncheon discussed blockchain technology, a subject that has filtered into the mainstream conversation. Presenting the topic to a roomful of bankers and business leaders also gave it additional prominence at a time when blockchain-related news has been multiplying.

42. In the Snow -

SNOW IN A WARM CITY. I looked out the window as the snowfall of a few weeks ago ended. The tires that brought the paper made the only marks on the street. The quiet, the way snow muffles everything, blankets the morning as surely as the snow.

43. Moment of Silence Set to Honor Memphis Sanitation Workers -

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) – Rain was falling in Memphis, Tennessee, when two sanitation workers picking up trash sought shelter in the back of a city garbage truck on Feb. 1, 1968.

The poorly-maintained truck's compactor malfunctioned, crushing Echol Cole and Robert Walker to death.

44. Citing Lack of Funds, Memphis Health Care Org Closes, New Group Steps In -

Knoxville-based Cherokee Health Systems has stepped in to continue operating the clinics of Memphis’ Resurrection Health, which closed its doors on Dec. 31 in part because of funding running out.

The Memphis-based health care organization had already agreed to merge with Cherokee in 2016. The closure, and Cherokee taking over operations, was a result partly of Congress in December approving a three-month continuing resolution that included less than half of the previous financial support that was available. According to a letter Resurrection distributed to supporters, an attempt at securing more federal funds for clinical care through other partnerships also fell through.

45. Atlanta Development Proposal Just Happens to be Amazon-Sized -

ATLANTA (AP) – As Atlanta vies for Amazon's second headquarters, a developer just happens to be proposing a $5 billion downtown project with 9.3 million square feet (87 million square meters) of office space – more than three times the amount in the Empire State Building.

46. New Titans Head Coach To Lean on Teamwork, Respect -

Mike Vrabel admits he has much to learn about the ins and outs of being a head coach in the National Football League.

After all, it’s a big leap from being a one-year defensive coordinator for the Houston Texans – linebackers coach before that – to having one of the 32 head coaching jobs in the NFL.

47. Amazon Opens Store With No Cashiers, Lines or Registers -

SEATTLE (AP) – No cashiers, no lines, no registers – this is how Amazon sees the future of in-store shopping.

The online retailer opened its Amazon Go concept to the public Monday, selling milk, potato chips and other items typically found at a convenience store. Amazon employees have been testing the store, which is at the bottom floor of the company's Seattle headquarters, for about a year.

48. Using Kids as Chips -

THIS ISN’T A GAME, KIDS AREN’T CHIPS. As I write this, 9 million low-income kids in America are at risk of losing their insurance, primarily because they aren’t the kids of Congress.

49. Titans Fire Coach Mike Mularkey After Playoff Win -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Titans believe the potential reward from quarterback Marcus Mariota working with his third head coach in his fourth NFL season outweighs the risk of change.

50. Medical Credit Cards Can Mean Aches and Pains for Patients -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Few people look forward to a trip to the doctor or dentist, especially if they're not sure how they will pay for it.

Some choose to use a special kind of credit card offered by medical professionals to pay for care at certain locations or networks. Often pitched by office assistants, they can seem like a quick fix for pricey procedures not covered by insurance including dental work, cosmetic surgery or laser vision correction.

51. Stumble Bravely Into Innovation -

I met many people who have been put in charge of their organization’s innovation program because of their past performance record. They were product managers, engineers, database architects, IT professionals, HR specialists or marketers by training. Suffice to say, they have proven to be capable and trustworthy in the past with a given initiative. 

52. TruGreen to Hire 15,000 Before Spring Season -

Memphis-based TruGreen, the nation's leading lawn care company, is actively searching for qualified candidates to fill 15,000 positions nationwide.

In preparation for its busy spring season, TruGreen is accepting applications for a variety of seasonal and full-time positions, including sales, lawn specialists, management, finance, IT, customer service and call center representatives, the company announced.

53. Crosstown High Preps For August Opening -

The first class of freshmen students has been selected for the fall semester of Crosstown High, a new public charter school opening this August. The school, which will welcome 600 students by 2021, will be located on the first, fourth and fifth floors of the new community-driven, mixed-use Crosstown Concourse redevelopment.

54. TruGreen Seeking to Hire Workers Before Spring -

Memphis-based TruGreen, the nation’s leading lawn care company, is actively searching for qualified candidates to fill 15,000 positions nationwide.

In preparation for its busy spring season, TruGreen is accepting applications for a variety of seasonal and full-time positions, including sales, lawn specialists, management, finance, IT, customer service and call center representatives, the company announced.

55. The Lane Ahead -

His first vision, Trey Moore says, was to become a “film and video type guy.” He had graduated Southaven High School, earned a communications degree at Memphis State, but didn’t have designs on going all-Hollywood.

56. The Power Of Leadership -

Editor’s note: Part one of a three-part series. Volunteers play a key role in the life of nonprofits. They serve as board members, provide services and advocacy, and donate theirprofessional services. In the area of fundraising, the important role of volunteers cannot be overstated.

57. Splinter Creek Brings Eco-Living to Oxford -

OXFORD, Miss. (AP) — Splinter Creek housing development in Taylor, Miss. is gaining regional attention.

The owners, a mother-daughter team made up of Ellen Leakes and her daughters Elizabeth Keckler and Blair Wunderlich, were recently named one of Southern Living Magazine's Top Southern Tastemakers for 2018. The development, nestled right outside of Taylor, Miss., is a 650-acre plot of land with space for up to 26 homes, where structures are designed to take their cues from nature.

58. Buckman Names Staples VP of Water Division -

Christine Staples, a 20-year veteran of Ecolab’s corporate leadership team, is the new global vice president of the water division of Memphis-based Buckman.

59. IP Transfers Consumer Packaging Division -

Memphis-based International Paper announced Tuesday, Jan. 2, it has completed the transfer of its North America Consumer Packaging business to Graphic Packaging of Atlanta, Georgia.

The $1.8 billion deal was announced in October with terms including IP buying a 20.5 percent ownership interest in the subsidiary of Graphic Packaging. That interest represents the bulk of the dollar figure for the transaction.

60. Developers Seek OK For Collierville Subdivision -

Developer Husni Dweik of Aspen LLC has submitted plans for an 18-lot residential subdivision to the Collierville Planning Commission.

61. Buckman Names Staples VP of Water Division -

Christine Staples, a 20-year veteran of Ecolab’s corporate leadership team, is the new global vice president of the water division of Memphis-based Buckman.

62. IP Transfers North American Consumer Packaging Division -

Memphis-based International Paper announced Tuesday, Jan. 2, it has completed the transfer of its North America Consumer Packaging business to Graphic Packaging of Atlanta, Georgia.

The $1.8 billion deal was announced in October with terms including IP buying a 20.5 percent ownership interest in the subsidiary of Graphic Packaging. That interest represents the bulk of the dollar figure for the transaction.

63. Moore Named Executive Director of Explore Bike Share -

Trey Moore has been named executive director of Explore Bike Share, the Memphis nonprofit that is preparing to launch a local bike-share system with 600 bicycles and 60 stations. Moore, who is returning to Memphis from Atlanta, Georgia, will lead Explore Bike Share’s staff in operations, fund development and community engagement activities in partnership with the organization’s board of directors.
As executive director, he also is committed to bicycling as a sustainable transportation option with access to as many Memphians as possible, and will help promote a bike-friendly culture in Memphis while encouraging exercise and healthy lifestyles.

64. Decade Since Recession: Thriving Cities Leave Others Behind -

As the nation's economy was still reeling from the body blow of the Great Recession, Seattle's was about to take off.

In 2010, Amazon opened a headquarters in the little-known South Lake Union district – and then expanded eight-fold over the next seven years to fill 36 buildings. Everywhere you look, there are signs of a thriving city: Building cranes looming over streets, hotels crammed with business travelers, tony restaurants filled with diners.

65. In a Milestone Year, Gene Therapy Finds a Place in Medicine -

After decades of hope and high promise, this was the year scientists really showed they could doctor DNA to successfully treat diseases. Gene therapies to treat cancer and even pull off the biblical-sounding feat of helping the blind to see were approved by U.S. regulators, establishing gene manipulation as a new mode of medicine.

66. Final Goodbye: Roll Call of Some Who Died in 2017 -

They made music that inspired legions of fans. Rock 'n' roll founding fathers Chuck Berry and Fats Domino, rockers Tom Petty and Gregg Allman, grunge icon Chris Cornell, country superstar Glen Campbell and jazz great Al Jarreau were among the notable figures who died in 2017, leaving a void in virtually every genre of music.

67. Doubting Your Job’s Impact? Take a Ride -

The new year often brings thoughts of change, of starting something new, something different. Perhaps you have grown a little jaded about what you do now and feel that tug to reinvent yourself.

Maybe you’ve lost some of that enthusiasm, that passion, and long to recapture that magic that once made you bound out of bed in the morning excited about what the day would hold. Maybe what you really need is a ride on the Polar Express.

68. Attorney Wooten Joins Evans Petree as Shareholder -

Attorney William Allen Wooten has joined Evans Petree PC as a shareholder, working in the firm’s Memphis office as well as its new location at the current Wooten Law Firm in Covington, Tennessee.

69. Striking a Chord, NIH Taps the Brain to Find How Music Heals -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Like a friendly Pied Piper, the violinist keeps up a toe-tapping beat as dancers weave through busy hospital hallways and into the chemotherapy unit, patients looking up in surprised delight. Upstairs, a cellist plays an Irish folk tune for a patient in intensive care.

70. UTHSC’s New Police HQ To Serve Entire Medical District -

With multiple multimillion-dollar projects sprouting up not only on the University of Tennessee Health Science Center campus but throughout the Memphis Medical District as a whole, one project hopes to tie them all together – UTHSC’s $20 million security investment.

71. Black Theater Museum Plan Gets Good Reviews at City Hall -

For about five months, Hattiloo Theatre founder Ekundayo Bandele had been working on the idea he proposed Tuesday, Dec. 19, to establish the National Black Theater Museum inside the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art building in Overton Park.

72. To Be or Not to Be: Tennessee Shakespeare Company Expanding With New Facility -

Dan McCleary is the founder of the Tennessee Shakespeare Company. But that hasn’t obscured his view of reality, of the fact that many people were first introduced to Shakespeare in a high school classroom in a less than engaging way.

73. Put Managed IT Services on Your Holiday Wish List -

Business owners of all sizes have to tackle technology systems and infrastructure at some level. This can be daunting, time consuming and expensive if you’re not an IT expert. In fact, a recent survey by Alinean Inc., an ROI consultancy, found that the average small business spends 6.9 percent of its annual revenue on IT compared with larger companies, which only spend 3.2 percent of revenue on the same services. 

74. Something In The Water -

The Society of Entrepreneurs in Memphis held a book signing and panel discussion at Novel bookstore last week for the society’s book, “There’s Something in the Water.” The book commemorates the 25th anniversary of the society and profiles the entrepreneurial accomplishments of each member.

75. Reconnecting Memphis -

Last August, GiVE 365 members toured the Memphis Oral School for the Deaf. The Germantown-based nonprofit had received a $4,100 grant toward its mission of helping children from birth through age 6.

76. Explore Bike Share Accepting Input for Station Locations -

Explore Bike Share, a nonprofit that is implementing a 600-bicycle bike-share system in Memphis next spring, has launched an interactive, crowdsourced bike-share station siting map.

The site gives Memphians the opportunity to digitally pin and share spots where they would like to see one or more of the 60 initial bike-share stations that will be installed in early spring.

77. Battle Over Arlington ER Facility to Resume in 2018 -

A pitched battle in the town of Arlington between major Memphis health care institutions and state officials is set to pick back up in 2018.

State officials in late summer will hear an appeal filed by Baptist Memorial Health Care Corp. over a denial in August of its application to build an emergency room facility in the Memphis suburb. That denial followed an earlier rejection by the Tennessee Health Services and Development Agency of a slightly different version of the same request in April.

78. As Health Premiums Rise, Small Businesses Seek Alternatives -

NEW YORK (AP) – As small business owners learn what their 2018 health insurance costs will be, some are considering providing different types of coverage for their employees.

Companies are receiving notices of premium and coverage changes for 2018. The changes vary, depending on factors including the state where a company is located, how many employees it has and how comprehensive its insurance is. But many owners are seeing rate increases of double-digit percentages, finding dramatically reduced coverage, or both. Health insurance consultants expect more owners to rethink their strategies beyond 2018 and choose alternatives like paying for claims themselves or adding health services that can lower costs.

79. Reminded Again -

WE NEED ADVICE, FROM OURSELVES. When I closed up my parents’ home some 30 years ago, I found myself in my old room, going through my desk drawers one more time. In the back of one, I found something I’d missed – a magnifying glass with a loose handle.

80. 50 Years Later -

Almost 50 years to the day after he died in a plane crash while on tour, the image and sound of soul singer Otis Redding remains vital and relevant – and heard.

81. Last Word: Visions of Black Helicopters, 'Extreme Body Rot' and Mall Nostalgia -

A happy council day at City Hall to you and yours. I know this is probably a new and foreign tradition to most of you – the twice a month Memphis City Council meetings every other Tuesday. Or maybe you just don't think of the sessions in that way. This time of the year can be pretty mellow – a lull before what is really the biggest season at City Hall – budget season in the spring. But the council will be pretty busy Tuesday.

82. Q&A: $69B Aetna Bid Pushes CVS Deeper Into Consumers' Lives -

A drugstore chain that used to hawk cigarettes behind the front counter now wants to offer nutrition advice and work with your doctor to keep you healthy.

CVS Health says it wants to use its roughly $69 billion acquisition of the insurer Aetna to dive deeper into managing customer health, with its nearly 10,000 stores becoming "front doors" for care. The companies plan to expand the health services offered through CVS locations and get more involved in helping patients stay on their medicines or manage their chronic conditions.

83. Apocalypse Not -

Much has been said about the so-called “Retail Apocalypse,” a frightening term that conjures images of a desolate landscape littered with boarded-up malls and shopping centers representing the death of American capitalism. 

84. Thaddeus Young Charting Own Course on the NBA Court and Off -

When Thaddeus Young returns to Memphis, he needs to make extra time. When he walks out of the tunnel to get in his pre-game shooting about an hour before tip-off, everyone from FedExForum ushers to fans to Grizzlies personnel want a moment to say hi and shake hands.

85. Developers Eyeing 117-Lot Subdivision Near New Elementary School in Germantown -

Looking to capitalize on its proximity to Germantown’s new elementary school site, developers have submitted an application to planning officials for 117-lot subdivision near the southwest corner of Forest Hill-Irene Road and Poplar Pike.

86. Hall Joins Arc Mid-South As a Case Manager -

De’Borah Hall recently joined The Arc Mid-South as a case manager, bringing with her nearly 15 years of experience in human resources. In her new role, Hall visits The Arc’s clients, who have intellectual and developmental disabilities, in their homes to determine if the organization’s direct support professionals are providing appropriate services, such as bathing, feeding and light housekeeping. The visits also help her evaluate staff members and determine if additional training or disciplinary measures are needed.

87. Trustee’s Office Promotes Financial Education and Counseling -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will tell you that the myriad financial education programs and initiatives his office is involved with – covering everything from helping improve consumer credit to financial counseling – are what he sees as part of his job as the “banker for the county.”

88. CBU Finds Crosstown Concourse Right Fit for Graduate Program, More -

Christian Brothers University already had a relatively new Healthcare Master of Business Administration program. Leasing 4,000 square feet of space at Crosstown Concourse, which opened in August, provided an opportunity to merge the two and also feed into the school’s larger goal.

89. Museum of the Bible, Built by Hobby Lobby Owner, Opens in DC -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Eight years ago, Hobby Lobby president Steve Green found a new way to express his Christian faith. His family's $4 billion arts and craft chain was already known for closing stores on Sundays, waging a Supreme Court fight over birth control and donating tens of millions of dollars to religious groups.

90. Butch Jones Out as Tennessee’s Football Coach -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee began the season in the Top 25 and is ending it with a coaching change. The Volunteers fired Butch Jones on Saturday, Nov. 11, as they enter their final two regular-season games searching for their first Southeastern Conference victory, a stunning fall for a team that had won bowl games each of the last three seasons.

91. Butch Jones Out as Tennessee's Football Coach -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee began the season in the Top 25 and is ending it with a coaching change.

The Volunteers fired Butch Jones on Saturday as they enter their final two regular-season games searching for their first Southeastern Conference victory, a stunning fall for a team that had won bowl games each of the last three seasons.

92. First Tennessee’s Walker Leading Push To Infuse Diversity Throughout Bank -

Memphis-based First Tennessee Bank is already the biggest bank in the state and award-winning for its work atmosphere. But the company isn’t resting on its laurels, instead forging ahead with unique strategies to better reflect the communities it is serving through a top-down, baked-in approach to ensuring diversity at every level of the organization.

93. Department Stores: Macy's Sales Fall, Kohl's Profit Drops -

NEW YORK (AP) — Macy's sales fell as it had a hard time pulling shoppers through its doors and Kohl's reported a drop in quarterly profit Thursday, underscoring just how challenging the holiday shopping season will be for department store chains.

94. Nashville City Council Approves Financing for MLS Stadium -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Nashville's bid to land an expansion franchise from Major League Soccer now has $275 million in financing approved to build a new stadium, giving Music City a major boost weeks before a final decision from the league.

95. West Cancer Center Adds Integrative Oncology Division -

West Cancer Center has added an integrative oncology division headed by Dr. Sylvia Richey, who has been a dedicated medical oncologist with the center for more than 12 years.

96. BankTennessee Launches New Investment Division -

Collierville-based BankTennessee has launched an investment and wealth services division.

The bank has also tapped Gena Wolbrecht, a former Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) arbitrator, to lead the division, which is called BTN Wealth Services, as program manager.

97. Changing the Dream -

In driveways and on playgrounds all across America, kids limited only by what their imaginations can conjure launch basketballs toward hoops. Hanging in the balance are the fate of fictitious NCAA Tournament title games and NBA Finals Game 7s.

98. Montgomery Martin Builds an Urban Renaissance -

Montgomery Martin has Memphis grit on his feet. He’s spent the afternoon walking through the Tennessee Brewery building, a 125-year-old South Bluff structure being reimagined and renovated with the help of Montgomery Martin Contractors. In other cities, an aging giant like the Brewery might be seen as condemned – too daunting to be granted new life. But Martin says, “We’re not afraid of old buildings – we figure out how to get it done.” And, he adds, “all this is coming together to draw people back into the city.”

99. Help Someone Else Fly Solo -

Legendary aviator Amelia Earhart once acknowledged, “Mostly, my flying has been solo, but the preparation for it wasn’t.” She was speaking about her husband, and their mutual help and encouragement, their consistent working together toward shared goals. In a real sense, he was the wind beneath her wings. Like Amelia Earhart, when you are the leader, the innovator, the entrepreneur, you often fly solo, but you didn’t get to that place alone.

100. Breakthrough Eye Surgery Patient Rehabs in Memphis -

The first patient in the United States to receive an implanted miniature telescope following cataract surgery will receive rehabilitation from an assistant professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy in the University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s College of Health Professions.