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Editorial Results (free)

1. How Memphis Can Learn from Detroit: Creating an Inclusive Comeback Story -

The City of Detroit intends to create the most inclusive comeback story America has ever told.

Detroit is the largest African-American majority city in the country with a population over 400,000. Memphis is the second largest.

2. University District Set To Begin 1st Phase Of TIF Fund Improvements -

It’s been about two years since the Highland Strip TIF was first created by local development officials to improve public infrastructure in the area surrounding the University of Memphis.

But, since a TIF, or tax increment financing, funds work by allocating a portion of new property taxes generated by a development over period of time, it’s taken some time for the money from new developments along the Strip to add up.

3. Last Word: Bigger Goodlett, Collierville's Dilemma and Ronnie Grisanti's at Regalia -

Shelby County Schools officials breaking ground Monday evening on the new Goodlett Elementary School to open a year from now on the grounds of the current Goodlett Elementary at 3001 S. Goodlett. The bigger Goodlett will allow for nearby Knight Road Elementary to close and its students to attend the new Goodlett. GOODLETT.

4. Improved Facility Slated for Whitehaven Cheer Nonprofit -

A nonprofit that teaches gymnastics, dance and cheerleading to kids in the Whitehaven, Levi and Mitchell communities is seeking a forgivable loan to fix up its practice facility.

Regina Tappan, director of the Memphis Area Youth Association (MAYA), has applied for a three-year, $20,000 Inner City Economic Development (ICED) loan from the Economic Development Growth Engine (EDGE) of Memphis and Shelby County.

5. Heat Wave -

After what was a banner year in many ways for Memphis commercial real estate in 2017, projections for this year were bullish. But at the halfway point of 2018, have expectations in the area risen with the temperatures or have they begun to dry out under the sweltering summer heat? 

6. Clean Memphis Celebrates 10 Years Of Fighting Litter, Blight in Community -

Clean Memphis founder and executive director Janet Boscarino considers her nonprofit’s work to make Memphis greener, cleaner and environmentally sustainable over the past 10 years a gift because of the many neighborhood connections she’s made.

7. Helping Hands -

Most mornings it’s not uncommon to see dozens of homeless Memphians lined up outside Hospitality Hub’s Downtown location, hoping to get selected for the nonprofit’s Work Local program, which offers $50 and a meal in exchange for five hours of work cleaning up around the city.

8. Parkside Proposal -

The developers of the proposed Parkside at Shelby Farms project have applied for a tax-increment financing (TIF) designation to fund nearly $72 million in public infrastructure improvements to the area, including the construction of Shelby Farms Parkway.

9. Inner Fortitude -

Amid a teacher shortage attributed partly to economic opportunities luring away candidates, local educators are creating urban teaching programs and adopting new recruitment strategies.

Rhodes College is launching a master’s program in urban education in June and is offering a $10,000 scholarship to each student. If the student receives a Stafford federal loan of $15,000 and commits to teaching at a “high-need” school, the degree essentially will be free.

10. Schwartz Advocates Holistic Health Through Community -

When you think about the person who has the most impact on your overall health, is it your doctor who you occasionally see for a fixed period of time – or is it a close friend, parent or spouse?

11. Last Word: Graceland Responds, The Hustle's First Season and Memphis Rent -

Sun Studio getting a fresh coat of paint Tuesday as city road crews were redoing some lines on Downtown streets including turning arrows in the left curb lane that always need pointing out to visitors baffled by the Memphis enigma that is one-way streets.

12. Novel Approach -

The smallest of the city’s 17 public libraries is also one of its most used. The Frayser Branch library is a brick-and-glass rectangle on a half-acre at 3712 Argonne St. With some modest columns and shrubs, a few planters and cinderblock lattice work, it is shoe-horned into the side of a hill in a residential neighborhood a block from the commercial corridor of North Watkins Road still dominated by churches.

13. Building Memphis From the Core -

When I delivered this year’s State of the City speech to the Kiwanis Club of Memphis at its meeting at the University Club, long planted at the corner of Lamar and Central, it would’ve been easy to think that the ground on which we stood had been part of Memphis from its very start.

14. ULI Brings ‘Neighborhood Playbook’ Team To Memphis -

A trio of community developers and planners hope to bring their “playbook” on grassroots urban design and revitalization to Memphis in the next installment of Planning Matters, a series of public events sponsored by ULI Memphis and University of Memphis Design Collaborative.

15. Moore Named Executive Director of Explore Bike Share -

Trey Moore has been named executive director of Explore Bike Share, the Memphis nonprofit that is preparing to launch a local bike-share system with 600 bicycles and 60 stations. Moore, who is returning to Memphis from Atlanta, Georgia, will lead Explore Bike Share’s staff in operations, fund development and community engagement activities in partnership with the organization’s board of directors.
As executive director, he also is committed to bicycling as a sustainable transportation option with access to as many Memphians as possible, and will help promote a bike-friendly culture in Memphis while encouraging exercise and healthy lifestyles.

16. Coalition Taps Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

17. Coalition Signs on With Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

18. Wiping Slate Clean: Now Less About Who Can Afford It -

The scales of justice in Tennessee are slowly tipping back toward the poor – and not so poor – helping them regain traction lost to often-minor transgressions.

Change is taking place in court battles and in the Republican-controlled Legislature, believe it or not.

19. CBU Finds Crosstown Concourse Right Fit for Graduate Program, More -

Christian Brothers University already had a relatively new Healthcare Master of Business Administration program. Leasing 4,000 square feet of space at Crosstown Concourse, which opened in August, provided an opportunity to merge the two and also feed into the school’s larger goal.

20. City Lays Out Numerous Options in Confederate Monuments Controversy -

The city administration and Memphis City Council laid out numerous paths forward in the Confederate monuments controversy Tuesday, Oct. 17, that include closing Health Sciences Park entirely or building a memorial to lynching victims in the park plaza where a statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is now the centerpiece.

21. The Week Ahead: Sept. 11-18 -

Hey, Memphis! This week we’re gearing up for the Cooper Young Festival and a packed house at the Tigers vs. UCLA game. Plus, Uptown Funk heads Downtown and The Joker hits East Memphis. Here’s what else you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

22. Rhodes’ Wigginton Shaping Campus Culture in New Role -

Rhodes College has appointed Russell Wigginton vice president of student life and dean of students. In his newly created role, he will provide leadership for student success and help shape the campus culture for a diverse and inclusive student body.

23. MEMFix Sets Date for Eighth Installment -

Urban infill projects in core sections of the city are not only transforming surrounding areas, but also how Memphians view the city’s neglected assets.

Looking to build off of the momentum of such successful rehabilitation projects, MEMFix has set its sights on the intersection of Madison Avenue and Cleveland Street, where it will host its next event on Oct. 13 from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

24. Fairgrounds Crosses Liberty Bowl Playbook -

As the city starts anew the planning process for a more active Fairgrounds with more attractions, city council members want the Liberty Bowl to be more active as well.

The council approved Tuesday, Aug. 8, a new five-year contract with the University of Memphis for Tigers football home games. And the council will probably consider similar contracts later this month for the use of the Liberty Bowl by the AutoZone Liberty Bowl and Southern Heritage Classic.

25. Council Approves 5-Year Pact with University for Liberty Bowl Lease -

Just in time for an Aug. 31 football season opener, the University of Memphis has a new five year contract with the city of Memphis for the use of the Liberty Bowl and surrounding Fairgrounds area.

26. Binghampton, Frayser Retail Projects Look To Lift Communities -

They say retail is a numbers game, and for some communities, when those numbers don’t add up they can get left behind by developers.

That’s why the Binghampton Gateway and Frayser Gateway – a pair of retail projects in different areas and stages of development – hope to send a message that overlooked communities have more to offer than just numbers.

27. Last Word: ICE Raids, Who's Buying Afton Grove and Malco Powerhouse Plans -

A protest Sunday evening at the Prescott Place Apartments after federal ICE agents – Immigration and Customs Enforcement – took people into custody there and at Emerald Ridge and Corner Park apartments Sunday morning. The group of organizations protesting the federal action – Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, Cosecha and SURJ Memphis -- say Memphis Police assisted in the immigration operation. Memphis Police deny they were involved in any way. No estimate from ICE on how many people were detained.

28. Binghampton, Frayser Retail Projects Could Lift Respective Neighborhoods -

They say retail is a numbers game, and for some communities, when those numbers don’t add up they can get left behind by developers.

That’s why the Binghampton Gateway and Frayser Gateway – a pair of retail projects in different areas and stages of development – hope to send a message that overlooked communities have more to offer than just numbers.

29. Scene Change -

The sprawling mixed-use complex opening next month on North Cleveland in Midtown is a high-profile example of where Memphis’ art community finds itself at the halfway mark in 2017.

When Crosstown Concourse opens there Aug. 19, it won’t just represent a new beginning that turns a former Sears distribution center into a 1.5-million-square-foot community mainstay. With tenants like Crosstown Arts moving in, the development is also a representation of how the city’s arts landscape is changing this year.

30. Blight More Than Out-of-State LLCs -

The prominent role investors play in buying single-family homes in Memphis to rent them out is part of the city’s significant problem with blight.

But there are some property owners who live here who don’t even know that their loved one who died recently made them a property owner.

31. Bruster’s Ice Cream To Open on Highland Strip -

The Highland Strip will soon be home to a tasty new tenant.

Bruster’s Real Ice Cream plans to move into the 1,300-square-foot space at 571 Highland St., with construction set to begin soon and an expected opening date late this year, according to Loeb Properties Inc.

32. Bruster’s Highlights Highland Strip Growth -

When a small record shop called Pop-I’s opened in late 1960s, it helped spark the transformation of a mundane neighborhood shopping center near the University of Memphis into a popular entertainment destination for students.

33. Former MAA veteran wants to use expertise to build a better city -

After wrapping up a successful career spanning three decades with an empty nest on the horizon, most people are ready to ride off into the sunset and enjoy a relaxing retirement, but James Maclin was never like most people.

34. The Buying And Selling Of Memphis -

Even before he went to federal prison for 25 years on a racketeering conviction in 1995, Danny Owens had a real estate portfolio. The strip-club kingpin who defined the industry in Memphis across a 20-year period owned the old Memphian movie theater and made possible its 1986 sale to Playhouse on the Square by donating $160,000 toward its purchase.

35. Shaffer Named Executive Director Of Rebranded BLDG Memphis -

John Paul Shaffer recently was named executive director of BLDG Memphis, the rebranded entity that brings the Community Development Council of Greater Memphis and Livable Mem-phis under a single organizational identity.
In his new role, Shaffer’s job is to guide the organization in its mission of supporting neighborhood revitalization through a network of organizations and individuals working in the community development space – which BLDG Memphis does primarily through organizational capacity building, community education and engagement, and public policy and advocacy – as well as to promote the new brand. 

36. Last Word: Derailed, The View From Pyramid Harbor and New History -

“Do Not Occupy” notices posted Thursday afternoon on most but not all of the newly-opened Railgarten complex on Central Avenue east of Cooper in Midtown. Local code officers acted after questions about whether the owners of the complex had approval for intermodal containers being used as part of the structure. The restaurant part of the structure in what was once an ice house remains open. There was already a lot of grumbling from neighbors about the music volume and late hours as well as parking for the development

37. SCS’ Ramírez Reflects on Time in Memphis -

Every day, Shelby County educators must perform a delicate balancing act. On one hand, they must raise expectations and ensure that more of their students are college-ready. On the other, they must take into account the many barriers to academic success these kids face – things like poverty, poor nutrition, unsafe neighborhoods and a lack of transportation.

38. Israel to Lead Greenline Group As Organization’s Focus Shifts -

Andrew Israel recently was named executive director of the Greater Memphis Greenline as the organization shifts its focus to promoting healthy lifestyles and increasing the use of trails, parks and green spaces.
As executive director, Israel is the strategic leader and the chief relationship officer for GMG. Along with creating programs and opportunities to enhance and expand the use of green spaces, GMG works at the grassroots level with neighborhood organizations and individuals to help promote their activities and expand the resources that are available. 

39. Another Country -

On the road into the C.H. Nash Museum at Chucalissa in southwest Memphis, there is a sign you might not notice on your way to the museum and archaeological site.

An arrow pointing east is the way to Memphis. The western arrow reads Chucalissa.

40. Growing Pains -

In many ways, Citizens to Preserve Overton Park v. Volpe in 1971 shaped the way Midtown Memphis looks today, so it’s only fitting that the park continues to inspire citizens to fight for what they feel is right.

41. Medical District Begins Buy Local Program -

Nine hospitals and universities within the Memphis Medical District are inviting Memphis-based innovators, entrepreneurs and existing companies to help solve operational challenges within their supply chain.

42. Last Word: Mud Island Round 3, Newsmakers Notes and North Midtown -

Cue the organ. You know, the one from those old soap operas or radio dramas. And prepare for the latest episode of Island of Mud. When last we looked in on Mud Island River Park, the city had two finalists to redevelop all or a part of the southern half of the island that is really a peninsula.

43. New Type of Subdivision to Replace Foote Homes -

Memphis’ last traditional public housing complex is coming down and a new kind of subdivision will rise in its place.

The Land Use Control Board formally accepted the site plan for the South City development at its Thursday, Sept. 8, meeting. With the help of a $30 million federal Choice Neighborhoods grant, the Memphis Housing Authority plans to raze the 420 units of Foote Homes that date back to the 1940s to make way for Memphis’ first sustainable subdivision.

44. Memphis Property Hub Using Micro-Level Data to Drive Solutions -

The effects of blight, like boarded-up windows and overgrown lawns, are clear to see. While the methods used to track blight are less apparent, an effort is underway to streamline property data so that government agencies and community development groups can tailor solutions at a neighborhood level.

45. BBB Names Crowder Director Of Business Development -

Carol Crowder has joined the Better Business Bureau of the Mid-South as director of business development, responsible for increasing the number of BBB-accredited businesses and growing revenue throughout the 28 counties that BBB of the Mid-South serves. She also will work with accredited areas to help them take advantage of BBB services to help them promote and grow their businesses. Crowder has more than 20 years’ experience in sales, marketing and operations. She previously served as an associate director for ALSAC/St. Jude. 

46. Williams Hired for Memphis Blight-Fighting Fellowship -

The city of Memphis and University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law recently hired Brittany J. Williams as the city’s first Neighborhood Preservation Fellow. In that role, Williams will represent the city in Environmental Court lawsuits against property owners who have vacant, abandoned or dilapidated properties that violate city codes.

47. Young Brings Data Focus to City Planning -

Want to gaze into the future? Hop into Paul Young’s Infiniti and ride around Downtown for an hour. “These three blocks will be something of a spine for the neighborhood,” he says, as a light rain falls on the windshield. “We envision five- or six-story buildings with restaurants and retail at street level, commercial and residential up top.”

48. Demolition Begins On Raleigh Springs Mall Property -

With the business end of a Volvo crawler excavator, Memphis City Council member Bill Morrison kicked off the start of demolition Saturday, May 7, at the Raleigh Springs Mall.

49. Raleigh Mall Demolition Begins Saturday -

The city begins demolition of the Sears Auto Center Saturday, May 7, at the Raleigh Springs Mall even though the city is still in court with the owners of the main mall building itself in eminent domain proceedings.

50. Before Successes, Loeb Started from Zero – Twice -

Barreling down Madison Avenue in a black corduroy blazer and a pert, pink pocket square, Bob Loeb seems distracted. Then I realize: he’s editing. Move that tree, put a mural there. Tear that down, build that up.

51. Memphis’ Shrinking Population Cause for Concern -

Even as Memphis has grown larger through annexing surrounding communities, its population has steadily dwindled due to outmigration to the surrounding suburbs. Inner-city struggles will become more pronounced if this region’s wealthiest tax base continues that outward pattern, national experts say.

52. City Ready to Develop Master Plan for Pinch District -

The Pinch District, one of Memphis’ oldest neighborhoods, is getting its time in the spotlight.

The Downtown Memphis Commission, the city of Memphis Division of Housing & Community Development and the city-county Division of Planning & Development are coming together to develop the Pinch’s first master plan in to bring the area up to date with mixed-use buildings and streetscape improvements.

53. Fertile Ground -

Residents of the Memphis Medical District have begun filing in to the Premier Palace ballroom on Madison Avenue, along with area stakeholders, planners and other attendees who have business interests in the area.

54. Dodging a Disaster With Volkswagen? -

Next month will mark five years since the first Passat rolled off the assembly line at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant. Most anniversaries are a cause for celebration.

But as Chattanoogans blow out the candles on this particular milestone they’ll be hoping that Volkswagen’s diesel emissions troubles will soon be extinguished, too, and that the new SUV model they’ll start producing this year will help VW emerge from the crisis a better and stronger company than before.

55. Roadmap to Attacking Blight Awaits City and County Approval -

Blighted properties, overgrown lots and abandoned buildings are not unique to Memphis. But Memphis is the only city with a blight elimination charter that affirms cross-sector commitment to uproot the causes of blight and prevent further decline.

56. Last Word: Monday Vote, Beale's Search and Longview Heights -

Look for the state Senate to vote on the deannexation bill Monday in Nashville. At least that’s the date on the Senate calendar.

That could change as a member of the Shelby County legislative delegation has at last asked the Tennessee Attorney General for a legal opinion on the proposal. But it’s not a straight-up question about whether the proposal is constitutional. It’s a question about the specific characterization of past Memphis annexations as “egregious” – what has come to be the key legal term in this considerable political controversy.

57. Last Word: Cubits Anyone, The G-Word and The TV News Crime Block -

How long is a cubit? After a day in which many of you got about four to five inches of rain and more to come Thursday, it seems an appropriate and timely question.
And yes, there is a cubit conversion chart on line for converting that and other really old units of measurement no longer in use like the mina, drachma or the synodic month.
So the average cubit, which is supposed to be the length of a forearm, is 18 inches or a foot and a half. That’s 0.4572 of a meter, which might as well be an ancient unit of measurement.
Someone had to say it.
According to biblehub.com – I’m not making up websites – the book of Genesis sets God’s instructions to Noah as an arc with the dimensions of 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits tall. And it was to be made out of gopher wood and covered inside and out with pitch.
The New Living Translation and Holman Christian Standard Bibles convert that to an arc 450 feet long, 75 feet wide and 45 feet high.

58. Klondike Wants Plan To Stave Off Gentrification -

With multimillion-dollar investments growing up around it in the Crosstown and Uptown neighborhoods, the Klondike/Smokey City Community Development Corp. is working with the University of Memphis on a grassroots action plan to stave off gentrification.

59. Trailblazer -

Carolyn Chism Hardy is a trailblazer, a success story, an advocate for the poor and middle class, and now she’s one of the most influential people in the private sector.

60. Last Word: Tiger Turmoil, Choosing Hotels and Grasshopper In The Committee Room -

When there is turmoil in the world of University of Memphis sports, it is almost impossible to hide and the turmoil inevitably surfaces toward a much faster end game than the city’s mercurial and lively politics. And then there is the period of mourning and regret -- unless the coach's name is John Calipari.
So consider these events all in the space of an overcast Tuesday afternoon.
University of Memphis cheerleaders in Overton Square and on Highland Avenue, near the campus, waving pompoms and signs urging Memphians on the drive home to support Tigers basketball.
Just before the rush hour, the university’s athletic department put out a statement that may have been intended to quell speculation about the future of Tigers basketball coach Josh Pastner but which was so enigmatic that it probably did just the opposite.
You be the judge:
“We continue to receive inquiries concerning the future of Tiger basketball.
Tom Bowen
, UofM Athletic Director, the athletic senior leadership team and the Office of the President will conduct a post-season review of the men’s basketball program, as is customary with all UofM sports teams.
We urge Tiger Nation to support this team through the end of the basketball season with special attention given to the final three home games at FedExForum.”
And late Tuesday evening, the Memphis Rebounders sent an email appeal urging a strong turnout for the Wednesday UCF game at FedExForum which is also on ESPN.
“If business or family obligations prevent you from attending, please give the tickets to family, friends or me,” wrote Harold Byrd of the Rebounders, “as we have multiple requests from many who can’t afford season tickets.”

61. The Week Ahead: Feb. 12, 2016 -

How was your weekend, Memphis? Here’s our weekly rundown of local happenings you need to know about, from circus clowns to Republican senators…

Both U.S. Senators representing Tennessee will be in Memphis Saturday for the Shelby County Republican Party’s annual Lincoln Day Gala, historically the local party’s largest annual fundraising event.
Sen. Bob Corker is the keynote speaker with Sen. Lamar Alexander as a special guest.
The Lincoln Day gatherings are county-by-county events across the state that can extend far beyond the shadow of Presidents Day: A few of the Lincoln Day dinners have been known to find a place on the calendar in April.
This is the 41st Lincoln Day event in Shelby County, which puts the local event’s origins squarely in the aftermath of the Watergate scandal, a low-point for Republican fortunes nationally after the state’s modern Republican party was formed and prospered in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
The event always comes with a large helping of local candidates testing the political waters among the dinner tables between podium speeches.
This year, the Shelby County event is sure to feature partisans from the various Republican presidential campaigns because of its place on the February calendar during the early voting period before the March 1 election day.

62. Editorial: A Call for More Conservancies -

When you look at the physical changes currently underway at Shelby Farms Park, it can be easy to miss the rise of conservancies as forces that are changing the landscape of our city.

63. Last Word: The Big Fizzle, John Jay Hooker's Exit And "A Great Sports Town" -

Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it – isn’t that how the saying goes?
In our case, it might be better to say everybody talks about the television weather coverage but nobody does anything about it.
As we all know now, Memphis dodged the “blizzard” warning artfully and passive-aggressively teased by several television stations who shall go un-named here because they know who they are and you do too.
That’s because they spent much of the day of "the blizzard that wasn’t" whining about the reaction from viewers who complained about the hype and then the promos the stations ran the day of the big fizzle.
We didn’t get much in the way of snow in Memphis, but we got a couple of feet of hype.

64. Graffiti Green Light -

Brandon Marshall is a full-time artist, making a living painting commissioned murals for clients. He’s also well-versed in the graffiti world of Memphis, a small but determined group of artists who tag properties around the city.

65. The Week Ahead: Dec. 28, 2015 -

How was your (hopefully long) weekend, Memphis? This week, more than most, is a time of change – of renewal, of turning the page, starting over. And of course, a time to ask the annual question: What are we going to do on New Year’s Eve?

66. A List of Mayor-Elect Jim Strickland’s Appointments So Far -

Memphis Mayor elect Jim Strickland still has some appointments to make, but he is methodically filling key positions in his administration ahead of taking office Jan. 1.

67. Home Values Point to a Sharp Wealth Divide Within US Cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's still possible in Boston for a mail carrier, an accountant and a Harvard-trained psychiatrist — basically, the crowd from "Cheers" — to live as neighbors.

That finding by the real estate brokerage Redfin makes the capital of Massachusetts a rarity at a time when neighborhoods in most U.S. cities are increasingly isolated from each other by income and home values.

68. Billions And Billions Of Grins -

GOOD NEWS IS GROWING. Really. I only have 500 words here and what my friend Andy Cates had to say last week is worth far more, several billion dollars worth actually, and what St. Jude had to say at the end of the week adds billions more.

69. I Choose Memphis: Amy Grow -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Amy Grow

Job title and company: International Paper, Communications Department, Meetings & Events

70. Mix It Up -

Memphis’ development eye is turning inward and upward as mixed-use projects are becoming more common than ever before.

Usually a mode of survival for densely packed cities, residential, office, retail and even manufacturing are cohabitating in single mixed-use buildings or lots as a way to recoup Memphis’ sprawl. Downtown and Midtown are being combed for infill and adaptive reuse possibilities as millennials are moving to the urban core in droves.

71. Groups Want More Memphians to Discover River’s Front Yard -

Once upon a time it was called the “promenade.” In 1828, two years after the city of Memphis was incorporated, the city’s founders and their successors put it in writing.

The statement – signed by the men who owned 5,000 acres where the Wolf and Mississippi rivers meet – read: “In relation to the piece of ground laid off and called the Promenade, said proprietors say that it was their original intention, is now and forever will be that the same should be public ground for use only as the word imports.”

72. Bolding is Only Tennessean to Teach at 2015 NeighborWorks Institute -

Tim Bolding, executive director of United Housing Inc., is the only Tennessean selected to teach at NeighborWorks America’s 2015 NeighborWorks Training Institute. Bolding has taught coursework at the training institutes, which focus on providing high-quality training to nonprofit housing professionals, for more than 10 years.

73. Memphis Mayoral Debate Participants Announced -

The field is set for an upcoming televised Memphis mayoral debate scheduled for the eve of early voting.

The four mayoral contenders who will participate in the Sept. 17 debate, sponsored by The Daily News and Urban Land Institute Memphis, are incumbent Mayor A C Wharton, city council members Harold Collins and Jim Strickland and Memphis Police Association president Mike Williams.

74. Affordable Homes in an Unaffordable Market -

The gold rush of residential development throughout Middle Tennessee conceals what some in the region say is a growing crisis in affordable housing.

New homes and condos come on to the market every day, and even more are under construction or still in the planning stage, but those homes are often on the higher end of the price scale.

75. Building Green in a Red-Hot Market -

Counting cranes has become a Nashville pastime, and the perks of all that development are clear – a robust economy, vibrant real estate market and more jobs.

Naturally, there is concern among some residents that all of the construction and increased population could harm the area’s environment, water and air quality and green space.

76. Passion for Architecture Fuels Looney Ricks Kiss' Norcross -

Rob Norcross, a principal at Memphis architecture, planning and design firm Looney Ricks Kiss, has increasingly enmeshed himself into public service, holding positions on several key boards or committees.

77. Frayser Community Fair Scheduled for Saturday -

NeighborWorks America’s national NeighborWorks Week puts redevelopment, empowerment and civic pride at center stage with a variety of events, including a Frayser community fair this Saturday.

“We wanted to have a fair that connected neighbors and neighborhoods to resources,” said Amy Schaftlein, director of development at United Housing Inc.

78. Making the Connection -

Archie Willis III had just earned his master’s degree in business at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill when he returned to Memphis in 1981 to help his father, A.W. Willis Jr., redevelop the Adler Hotel Annex.

79. Greenprint Guru -

When John Michels was a kid going to nature camps with his family and hiking with his brother and cousins, he was taking the first steps along his career path.

“We’d sort of learn how to survive in the woods and build shelters, learn about ecosystems,” Michels said of his days growing up in New Jersey, and then later trips to upstate New York by Lake George. “I started doing a lot of hiking in the Adirondack Mountains.

80. Foote Homes Effort Gets Rebrand, New Details -

With Bass Pro Shops formally opening this week, the next big project on City Hall’s drawing board is a remake of Foote Homes.

The ambitious plan to demolish and rebuild the city’s last large public housing project, using it as a catalyst for redevelopment of the much larger south Downtown into South Memphis area, has been on the books longer than The Pyramid. That’s if you start the timeline with the demolition of the first large housing project, LeMoyne Gardens, in the late 1990s.

81. Heritage Trail Redevelopment Plan Resurfaces -

A long-delayed city plan to remake a large swath of Downtown’s southern end appears to be making a comeback.

Memphis Housing and Community Development director Robert Lipscomb said Tuesday that the city expects to receive good news on the Heritage Trail development plan sometime this year.

82. Bike Fest Leaders Rally for Positive Change -

It is rewarding when people who seemingly have nothing in common, of being worlds apart, find common ground. And it is nothing short of inspirational when what they build on that common ground makes life better for all of us.

83. Foote Homes Targeted by Federal Jobs Training Grant -

With a HUD official in town last week bearing word of a $3 million job training grant for public housing residents, city leaders remained focused on what Memphis Mayor A C Wharton Jr. calls “the big one.”

84. Taking Action -

The windows on the old Executive Inn on Airways Boulevard where Brooks Road dead ends had been busted out for several years, leaving the curtains in its long-empty rooms fluttering in the wind.

But in January, demolition crews began ripping away at the blighted property at 3222 Airways, providing relief to residents and business owners whose own property values suffered because of the neglected property in that corner of Whitehaven.

85. I Choose Memphis: Hannah Zachary -

“I Choose Memphis” spotlights Memphians who are passionate about calling this community home. New Memphis Institute provides the profiles.

Name: Hannah Zachary

Job & company: Manager, Community Relations, AutoZone

86. Love Song to a City -

As the story goes, Al Green wrote the lyrics to “Let’s Stay Together” in about five minutes. In 1972, the song – which spans just three minutes and 13 seconds – reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

87. Alternative Ending -

The city of Memphis secured $6.7 million in federal funding last week to improve and rehab public housing.

Meanwhile, the city’s application for a much larger federal grant to demolish the city’s last large public housing development was making the rounds at the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development.

88. Bank of Bartlett Buys Germantown Property -

1870 Kirby Parkway
Germantown, TN 38138
Sale Amount: $4.1 million

Sale Date: Dec. 29, 2014
Buyer: Bank of Bartlett
Seller: Spence Ray
Details: Bank of Bartlett has bought back a site on Kirby Parkway in Germantown for $4.1 million.

89. Harris Goes to Nashville -

At his last Memphis City Council session, Lee Harris reflected this week on his three years on the council and the group of politicians he joined.

90. Loeb Acquires Newby’s Restaurant Space -

Memphis-based Loeb Properties has acquired one of the most venerable locations on the Highland strip.

Loeb purchased the long-time home of club and restaurant Newby’s at 535 and 539 Highland St. from Paragon Bank. A purchase price was not disclosed Friday, Jan. 2.

91. Spillyards Leads Community Advisors Launch -

Greg Spillyards has joined the brokerage team at Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors to launch the firm’s Community Advisors service line.

Community Advisors is focused on the Memphis city core, with a goal to provide real estate advisory services to assist in the revitalization of the city’s underserved areas with passion, creativity and entrepreneurship, and with service to those already living and leading in their neighborhoods.

92. Rogero Talks ‘Smart Growth,’ Democratic Politics -

Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero became the first woman to hold that office when she won the election in 2011.

She’s been actively involved in a number of local issues since her election, from urban-core revitalization and business recruitment to broader social issues such as marriage equality.

93. University of Tennessee Students Help Design Nashville’s Future -

Nashville may be a city on the rise, attracting new residents by the droves. But it’s also a laboratory for students at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville’s College of Architecture and Design, where they are designing the communities of the future in partnership with the Nashville Civic Design Center.

94. Reshaping a City, One Lot at a Time -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

95. Many Seek New Homes Near Cities But are Priced Out -

WASHINGTON (AP) – City living has been a blessing for Tim Nelson.

The Phoenix lawyer moved downtown a few months ago into a new $389,000 home with a warehouse-style floor plan, a Jacuzzi tub and kitchen counters made of Caesarstone quartz. His favorite coffee spot is three blocks away. When the Arizona Diamondbacks play on Friday nights, he can watch postgame fireworks from his deck.

96. A Funder’s View of Sustainability -

Editor’s Note: This column will appear Tuesdays through April in honor of Sustainability Month for Memphis and Shelby County.

As the Mid-South’s philanthropic partner since 1969, the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis is clearly here to stay. That’s why we are interested in initiatives that make our area more livable and connected right now and for future generations.

97. Heritage Trail Likely to Continue Despite Rejection -

The plan to demolish the last large public housing development in Memphis and use the demolition as a catalyst for a larger redevelopment of the surrounding area did not make the final cut with federal housing officials in Washington.

98. Crosstown Funding Comes With Questions -

The Memphis City Council’s approval of $15 million in city funding for the Crosstown redevelopment project last December was supposed to be the last piece of a $180 million funding puzzle for the mammoth undertaking.

99. City Sprouts -

The vacant homes and lots on Jennette Place near Walker Avenue and Mississippi Boulevard in South Memphis began germinating like an urban form of kudzu. They appeared like an invasive species in this proud neighborhood, spreading quickly, choking the life from viable properties and growing into a scourge that at one point seemed impossible to eradicate.

100. Empowering Programs -

On a recent Thursday night in January, 10 young girls enjoyed assorted cheeses, crab cakes, fruits and desserts at Napa Café in East Memphis.

While the girls, all members of Girls Inc. of Memphis, loved the food, it was their discussions with female employees from CB Richard Ellis Memphis that nourished their imaginations and ambitions.