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Editorial Results (free)

1. Self-Driving Cars Could Ease Traffic, But Increase Sprawl -

BOSTON (AP) – A new study inspired by Boston's early experiments with self-driving cars finds that the technology could ease congestion, but might also lead to more cars on the road and further encourage urban sprawl.

2. 'Very Unusual' Mistrial in Woman's Burning Death -

BATESVILLE, Miss. (AP) – The jury in the tense murder trial of a Mississippi man charged with setting a 19-year-old friend on fire and leaving her to die handed a bailiff a note: They have reached a verdict.

3. School Board in Tennessee Votes to Keep LGBT Protections -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee county's school board has voted to keep protections for LGBT students and employees in place.

News outlets report Knox County school board members who were to vote Wednesday on a proposal to eliminate specific protections for gender identity and sexual orientation instead passed a substitute motion to keep existing language.

4. Week Ahead: Oct. 9-15 -

Hey, Memphis! The real NBA and college basketball seasons creep closer with teasing events this week and the schedule of fun things to do is highlighted by the second annual Memphis Food & Wine Festival Saturday evening. Here’s toasting to a great week.

5. Last Word: Bonus For the Head Tiger, Brooks Downtown? and Harris Runs -

A $100,000 bonus from the University of Memphis board of trustees for U of M president David Rudd at Wednesday’s trustees meeting. The bonus is from private funds raised by the university foundation. The board also approved a paid parental leave policy – specifically the funding for that policy. And it reviewed scaled-back plans for the $30 million new rec center for students that will incorporate some of the existing rec center.

6. Las Vegas Shooting Brings Tragedy to Families in US, Canada -

A registered nurse from Tennessee who died shielding his wife, a doctor, from gunfire. The only son of a Canadian couple who is now left childless. A popular secretary at a New Mexico High School.

All were among the at least 58 people killed in the mass shooting at a country music festival in Las Vegas, a tragedy that has left behind loved ones in many parts of the country and world.

7. Week Ahead: Oct. 2-9 -

Hey, Memphis! Prepare to rock out this week as the Mempho Music Festival hits Shelby Farms Park and Wilco plays The Orpheum. Plus, Beale Street memorializes one of its own, Memphis legal pros discuss the Confederate monuments issue, and much more in The Week Ahead…

8. Events -

Hattiloo Theatre will perform the Celeste Bedford Walker comedy “Sassy Mamas” Friday, Sept. 29, through Oct. 22 at 37 S. Cooper St. Visit hattiloo.org for show times and tickets.

9. Last Word: Political Tide Comes In, First Tn and Pinnacle Settle and The No Compete -

In East Memphis Thursday afternoon, Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir will formally announce what has been evident for some time – he is running for Shelby County Mayor in 2018 starting with the May Republican primary. The primary field includes Shelby County Commissioner Terry Roland and Juvenile Court Clerk Joy Touliatos. Shelby County Commissioner Sidney Chism is the only declared Democratic mayoral contender as we speak. Look for that to change.

10. Last Word: Pantographs & Catenaries, Grizz Uncertainty and Tuesdays Without Morrie -

After three years off the rails, the first significant indications that the trolleys are about to return. It was just a two-block ride that includes the Memphis Area Transit Authority trolley barn on North Main and one very new trolley. But it is a start through what is a very technical and bureaucratic process involving lots of safety vests, clipboards and video cameras.

11. Last Word: GPAC's Grove, Fairgrounds Tea Leaves and Grizz Money Matters -

The Germantown Performing Arts Center has plans for an open-air performance center to be called “The Grove at GPAC” – the latest consideration in what is becoming a vibrant discussion about the capacity for concerts within Shelby County. And it is also a discussion about concert venues that can do other things like festival and movies.

12. City’s Ire Raised By Stadium Droughts -

For most of the ongoing discussion about a reconfiguration of the Fairgrounds, the Liberty Bowl has been a part of the background. Much of the attention has been on what to do with the Mid-South Coliseum and what new uses or buildings will do to existing parking.

13. Boyd Drops Beale Contract, But Says It Wasn't A Conflict of Interest -

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd ended his company’s fundraising contract with the Beale Street Merchants Association Tuesday, Sept. 19. But he again insisted the contract was not a conflict of interest in his duties as a council member voting on items involving the entertainment district.

14. City Council to Vote on Advancing Gateway, Convention Center Funding -

Memphis City Council members vote Tuesday, Sept. 19 on two resolutions that would advance a total of $21.5 million to the Bicentennial Gateway project as well as Memphis Cook Convention Center renovations, which is also part of the Gateway project.

15. Senate Confirms Dunavant As U.S. Attorney -

The U.S. Senate has confirmed Tipton County prosecutor Mike Dunavant as the new U.S. attorney for the Western District of Tennessee, based in Memphis with offices in Jackson, Tennessee.

16. Events -

The 30th annual Cooper Young Festival is Saturday, Sept. 16, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. the Cooper-Young Historic District. The festival is the largest single-day event in Memphis and serves as a fundraiser for the Cooper Young Business Association. This year’s lineup features 17 musical acts, local merchants and 435 artisans from around the country. Visit cooperyoungfestival.com for details.

17. Skipping School -

The farm field at East Shelby Drive and Sycamore Road is “growing” steel beams, classroom walls and concrete floors. Nearby, the athletic fields of the new $90 million Collierville High School are being traced and laid out at summer’s end next to the framework of the large school.

18. Dunavant Confirmed As U.S. Attorney -

The U.S. Senate has confirmed Tipton County prosecutor Mike Dunavant as the new U.S. Attorney for the Western District of Tennessee, based in Memphis with offices in Jackson, Tennessee.

19. Events -

Fourth Bluff kicks off its fall programming with the first of the weekly Friday Night Dance Parties on Friday, Sept. 16, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The themed, outdoor dance parties continue through November and will feature an illuminated dance floor set up just west of the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, 1 N. Front St. Food vendors will be on site, and beer and wine are available with valid ID. Admission is free and open to all ages. Visit thefourthbluff.com for a schedule.

20. Action on Student Loan Forgiveness Delayed as Rules Revised -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Tens of thousands of former students who say they were swindled by for-profit colleges are being left in limbo as the Trump administration delays action on requests for loan forgiveness, according to court documents obtained by The Associated Press.

21. Lawsuit Targets Searches of Electronic Devices at US Border -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A federal lawsuit filed Wednesday claims the U.S. government's growing practice of searching laptops and cellphones at the border is unconstitutional because electronic devices now carry troves of private personal and business information. The government has vociferously defended its searches as critical to protecting the homeland.

22. MMDC Hires Mitchell to Lead Community Development -

Memphis native Vonesha Mitchell has joined the Memphis Medical District Collaborative as program manager, community development. Mitchell’s new position rolls together several functions, including recruiting retail for vacant and underutilized storefronts, working with U3 Advisors to launch and administer the Hire Local program, developing assistance package and incentive programs, and engaging current and potential businesses in the district to understand opportunities and concerns.

23. Anderson Leaves ASD Bound By More Rules and With Different Role -

When the state-run Achievement School District began in the summer of 2012 there weren’t a lot of rules for how it would operate.

The superintendent of the turnaround model for schools in the bottom 5 percent of schools statewide in terms of student achievement could unilaterally take over any school on the list even if the local school district objected.

24. Last Word: Back From Jury Duty, ASD Changes and Southern Heritage Classic Is Here -

Back from a very short-lived jury duty on a short week for the courts – criminal and civil. Even a slow week at the Criminal Justice Center is a learning experience about not only our criminal justice system but also the Constitutional framework that puts those notices in the U.S. mail and results in several hundred citizens at a time showing up in a jury assembly room after the adventure of trying to find parking Downtown.

25. Anderson Leaving as ASD Superintendent -

Malika Anderson is stepping down as superintendent of the state-run Achievement School District effective at the end of September after being with the turnaround school district for the state’s lowest-performing schools since its inception in 2012 and as superintendent since January 2016.

26. Bluff City High School Another First in Educational Transition -

Following a lull in historic firsts in public education in Shelby County – the launch of the state-run Achievement School District, school consolidation and then the demerger into seven school districts – another historic event took place last month in Hickory Hill that flew well under the radar.

27. Cohen Criticizes, Kustoff Commends 6-Month DACA Wind-Down -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen of Memphis termed President Donald Trump’s decision Tuesday, Sept. 5, to wind down the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program over the next six months “heartless, illogical and un-American.”

28. Juvenile Court Judge Calls Federal Oversight and Monitors a ‘Distraction’ -

Five years ago when the U.S. Justice Department concluded years of review with a scathing report about due process and equal treatment issues in Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court, then Judge Curtis Person Jr. and his staff had to make a decision.

29. Council to Weigh Statues, Funding Projects -

Memphis City Council members have a busy agenda Tuesday, Sept. 5: continued discussion regarding bypassing a Tennessee Historical Commission waiver process to remove Confederate monuments and a recently enacted ban on sewer connections to properties outside the city limits.

30. A Different Body of Work Emerges For The Hereafter -

With the cost of traditional casket funerals rising to an average of $9,000 or more, many people are choosing less expensive options like cremation and donating their bodies to science. Numerous “green” options for cremated remains such as biodegradable urns or even using ashes for tree planting, use in rebuilding coral reefs, for stones for jewelry or for tattoos and portraits are gaining popularity.

31. The Week Ahead: Aug. 28-Sept. 3 -

Hey, Memphis! It’s time to celebrate 901 Day – but not before you hit Tiger Lane Thursday for the University of Memphis Tigers’ season-opening football game. Plus, check out “the prince of kosher gospel” in concert and more hot happenings in The Week Ahead...

32. State Panel Sheds New Light on Racial Atrocities -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner has seen what can happen when old wounds are never allowed to heal.

She’s seen it most recently in clashes between neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and white supremacists and those who resisted their hatred in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counter-protester was killed and 19 were injured when a car was intentionally driven into a group of counter protesters. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash that weekend.

33. UTHSC Readies New Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Facility -

UTHSC is putting the final touches on its new $20 million Plough Center for Sterile Drug Delivery Systems, a pharmaceutical manufacturing facility at the site of a former warehouse at 208 S. Dudley St. in the Memphis Medical District.

34. Artist Cat Peña Named Director Of CBU’s Ross Gallery -

Cat Peña, a Memphis-based artist, arts administrator and independent public art consultant, has been named director of the Beverly & Sam Ross Gallery at Christian Brothers University. As an artist, Peña’s work in recent years has centered on public art installations, including “There’s More To Be Proud Of,” a canopy of metallic streamers on display in the Edge District through next February. In addition, she is the founder of Collabortory, a creative platform that expands public art practices through collaborative and social practices.

35. University of Texas in Austin Removes Confederate Statues -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The University of Texas quickly removed statues of Robert E. Lee and other prominent Confederate figures overnight from the main area of the Austin campus, a spokesman said Monday morning, just hours after the school's president ordered they be taken down.

36. Fairgrounds Plan Will Consider Familiar Items -

The Fairgrounds redevelopment plan forming on a fast track will probably look familiar as far as the elements proposed for it.

“We are starting with the premise that we are using the previous planning efforts as insight for how we move forward,” Paul Young, city of Memphis Housing and Community Development director said on the WKNO/Channel 10 program “Behind The Headlines.”

37. Confederate Monuments Controversy Comes to City Hall -

The question of timing in removing two Confederate monuments from city parks arrives at City Hall Tuesday, Aug. 22.

A Memphis City Council resolution that would instruct the city administration to immediately remove and/or sell Confederate monuments in city parks is scheduled for discussion at the 2:15 p.m. executive session and could be added to the council agenda or voted on later at the first council session in September.

38. Last Word: Ouster History, Lake District in Foreclosure and Crosstown -

Five of the seven flags that fly on the southern tip of Mud Island River Park are folded and stored as of Thursday. The Riverfront Development Corporation took down the five flags that have flown over the turf we now call Memphis – before and since it became a city – including a version of the Confederate flag – leaving only the U.S. flag and the Tennessee flag. This was a reaction to the week-long and counting aftermath from the violence in Charlottesville.

39. Last Word: Monuments Pace Quickens, Campaigning on Opioids and High Heels -

The financial services company that is a crucial tenant for the Bakery project between the Medical District and Downtown is Orion, which would move to the space in and around the old Wonder Break bakery building on Monroe from its Bartlett HQ.

40. Crosstown High School Gets $2.5 Million XQ Institute Grant -

A year from opening, organizers of Crosstown High School have secured a $2.5 million, five-year grant from a national education reform group focused specifically on high schools.

“It puts us in a much greater financial position,” said Chris Terrill, Crosstown High executive director. “But more important than the financial revenue is the connection we make to the XQ network of people.”

41. Ken Hause Cooks Up Strategy To Enhance L’Ecole Culinaire -

L'Ecole Culinaire-Memphis has added Ken Hause its campus director. In his new role, Hause is responsible for overseeing operations of the Memphis campus, including ensuring a rich student experience that leads to employment in the culinary field, while enhancing the school’s reputation for educational excellence, compliance and operational performance.

42. Last Word: Night in the Park, Hattiloo Goes Bigger & Cohen on the Republican Soul -

A gathering in Health Science Park a little before 11:30 Monday evening by a group of protesters who Facebooked that their intent was to take down the statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest. Memphis Police showed up quickly and the police supervisor told those around the statue that the park is a private park and that no one can be in the park after 8 p.m. No arrests but the police did ask for identification from those in the park.

43. Hattiloo Plots a Bigger Stage for Its Audience -

The founder of Hattiloo Theatre says the black theater company is ready to become more regional and professional in its approach and influence. “Now it’s time for Hattiloo to become a major regional theater,” said Ekundayo Bandele before an opening-night performance of “Ruined.”

44. The Week Ahead: Aug. 14-20 -

Hello, Memphis! School was the big opening last week, but this week it’s the majestic Crosstown Concourse, the 1.5 million-square-foot tower on Cleveland Street at North Parkway. It is hosting a six-hour extravaganza of tours, music, food and the arts. Check out the details, plus more Elvis Week events and other need-to-know happenings in The Week Ahead...

45. MEMFix Sets Date for Eighth Installment -

Urban infill projects in core sections of the city are not only transforming surrounding areas, but also how Memphians view the city’s neglected assets.

Looking to build off of the momentum of such successful rehabilitation projects, MEMFix has set its sights on the intersection of Madison Avenue and Cleveland Street, where it will host its next event on Oct. 13 from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

46. Last Word: Megasite Prospect, Crosstown Opening Plans and New Chandler Numbers -

Tennessee is pursuing the new $1.6 billion assembly plant Toyota and Mazda announced just last week to turn out 300,000 vehicles a year and there is that regional megasite in nearby Haywood County that isn’t being used. Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he wants to add the joint facility to the state’s auto industry.

47. Council Reviews New Beale Hotel, U of M Stadium Contract -

Memphis City Council members take up a hotel on Beale Street and a new lease with the University of Memphis to use Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium at their Tuesday, Aug. 8, session.

The council votes on the proposed hotel project at 404 Beale St. by KNM Development Group.

48. Hacker Who Helped Stop Global Cyberattack Arrested in US -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – Marcus Hutchins, a young British researcher credited with derailing a global cyberattack in May, was arrested for allegedly creating and distributing malicious software designed to collect bank-account passwords, U.S. authorities said Thursday.

49. New Academic Year Brings Changes, Familiar Issues -

The school year for most students in Shelby County begins Monday, Aug. 7. But teachers and school administrators mentally remain at least a few weeks ahead, if not more – a permanent condition for educators.

50. City Reopens Fairgrounds Planning Process -

About two weeks after unveiling a concept plan for Memphis riverfront development, Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration has reactivated a dormant city move to redevelop the Mid-South Fairgrounds.

51. Strickland Reopens Fairgrounds Redevelopment Planning -

By the end of the year, the administration of Mayor Jim Strickland plans to have a specific enough plan for Fairgrounds redevelopment to take an application for a Tourism Development Zone to state officials for approval.

52. Wilkins Launches MEMPOWER For Black Political Empowerment in Memphis -

Ricky E. Wilkins says he’s not upset about his 2014 loss in the Democratic congressional primary. He calls his loss to incumbent U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen “an education.”

53. Commission Tries to Stop Charter School Plan -

Shelby County commissioners called on a charter school that planned to open in Memphis but instead wants to set up shop in Bartlett to stick by its original plan or put off opening Gateway University Charter School next week.

54. County Commission Calls For Halt to Gateway Charter Plans in Bartlett -

Shelby County Commissioners called on a charter school that planned to open in Memphis but instead is setting up shop in Bartlett to stick by its original plan or put off the opening of the Gateway University Charter School next week.

55. Last Word: 'Secular Stagnationists', CRE's Big Year in Memphis and Lakeland Prep -

Protests over the weekend in Martyr’s Park and at the federal prison facility in Mason, Tennessee for those rounded up in the ICE – Immigration and Customs Enforcement -- raids here in Memphis that began a week ago. Latino Memphis is also offering legal advice to those who believe they may be caught up in the new push. There are also several efforts to support families that find mothers and/or fathers in federal custody in the sweeps. And over the weekend, Memphis Police issued an arrest warrant for a bounty hunter who turned up on YouTube video in an apartment complex with a large Latino tenant base wearing some kind of badge and vest.

56. AIA Tennessee Convention Takes on Edge District -

More than 300 architects who are attending the American Institute of Architects of Tennessee annual convention in Memphis will take on a project of how to make the Edge District, which lies between the Memphis Medical District and Downtown, more livable.

57. Last Word: The Old Auto Inspection Station, Beale Field Trip and Re-Democrating -

Memphis Mayor Willie Herenton has a different version of his 2016 plan to build two youth development centers for juvenile offenders to go to instead of detention at the Wilder Youth Development Center in Somerville. About a year ago, Herenton had tentative plans for two of the New Path centers in Shelby County that would be centers where the offenders could live.

58. Haslam Appoints District Attorney in West Tennessee -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Gov. Bill Haslam has appointed Jody S. Pickens as district attorney for a West Tennessee judicial district.

Haslam's office said in a statement Friday that Pickens will replace Jerry Woodall, who is retiring as the top prosecutor in the state's 26th Judicial District, on Aug. 1. The position will be up for election next year.

59. ‘Fed Up’ Campaign Warns Of Tougher Gun Penalties -

The Memphis Shelby Crime Commission and the city of Memphis have launched a marketing campaign to warn would-be offenders about tougher state penalties and possible federal prosecution for violent criminals possessing a gun.

60. Last Word: ICE Raids, Who's Buying Afton Grove and Malco Powerhouse Plans -

A protest Sunday evening at the Prescott Place Apartments after federal ICE agents – Immigration and Customs Enforcement – took people into custody there and at Emerald Ridge and Corner Park apartments Sunday morning. The group of organizations protesting the federal action – Memphis Coalition of Concerned Citizens, Cosecha and SURJ Memphis -- say Memphis Police assisted in the immigration operation. Memphis Police deny they were involved in any way. No estimate from ICE on how many people were detained.

61. Developers Lay Out Latest Plans for Proposed Midtown Gated Community -

In a quiet room inside of his Midtown architecture firm, Lee Askew of ANF Architects presented the latest incarnation of his plans to turn the former Red Cross building at the corner of Central Avenue and Mansfield Street into a 12-unit luxury gated community.

62. Scene Change -

The sprawling mixed-use complex opening next month on North Cleveland in Midtown is a high-profile example of where Memphis’ art community finds itself at the halfway mark in 2017.

When Crosstown Concourse opens there Aug. 19, it won’t just represent a new beginning that turns a former Sears distribution center into a 1.5-million-square-foot community mainstay. With tenants like Crosstown Arts moving in, the development is also a representation of how the city’s arts landscape is changing this year.

63. Justices Uphold Refugee Ban But Say Grandparents Still OK -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court says the Trump administration can strictly enforce its ban on refugees, but is leaving in place a weakened travel ban that includes grandparents among relatives who can help visitors from six mostly Muslim countries get into the U.S.

64. Last Word: Rachel Heck, Beale Street's Cover and The Old Peabody -

The “fifth wave” of judicial appointments by President Donald Trump, as The White House termed them, are already causing some political ripples here primarily from state Senator Mark Norris’s appointment to the federal bench.

65. Early Release Halted for Germantown Man Convicted of Killing Mississippi Cop -

OXFORD, Miss. (AP) – The head of Mississippi's prison system has decided not to release an inmate convicted in the 2006 killing of a University of Mississippi police officer.

The Mississippi Department of Corrections notified victims, law enforcement agencies and court officials Thursday that Daniel Cummings, 31, would be released from prison July 28 after serving less than half of a 20-year sentence, The Oxford Eagle reported .

66. Herwig Engineers With a Sense of Responsibility -

“I always liked building things and working with my hands,” Josh Herwig muses, holding out a prototype of the medical device he’s designed and engineered.

Now chief technology officer of SOMAVAC Medical Solutions, Herwig continuously gravitated toward science. Talking with a visitor to the SOMAVAC offices (housed within the Memphis Bioworks Foundation building, in the Medical District), Herwig recalls the steps that brought him here. The son of a particle physicist – his father has worked at Oak Ridge and Argonne National Laboratories – Herwig grew up fascinated by the possibilities and magic of science.

67. Legislature Losing Some Powerful, Familiar Members -

A shakeup in leadership is looming for the state Legislature, though it may portend more of a change in personalities than party strength.

In the House, longtime Rep. Craig Fitzhugh, the affable Democrat from Ripley in West Tennessee, is preparing for a 2018 gubernatorial run, a move that would knock him out of his House seat, at least temporarily, and the position as Democratic Caucus leader.

68. Last Word: Beale on Beale, The City Council and 1968 and Dr. David Stern on UTHSC -

The city’s Beale Street Task Force is going to have its next meeting on Beale Street and City Council chairman Berlin Boyd reminded council members Tuesday that if they join the task force on Beale to remember that it is Saturday night at 11 p.m. – not 11 a.m., a more normal hour for such proceedings.

69. Memphis, Shelby County Home Sales Still Rising -

Though last month saw the first dip in average home sales prices in nine months, the number of home sales in June continued to increase.

The average sales price dropped slightly to $178,572, a 1 percent decrease from a year ago, according to real estate information company Chandler Reports, chandlerreports.com. However, the total number of home sales reached 1,852 for the month, up 9 percent from 1,692 a year ago. Additionally, the volume of home sales rose to $331 million, up 8 percent from $305 million last year.

70. Dunavant Elected President of Tennessee Prosecutors Group -

COVINGTON, Tenn. (AP) – Prosecutor Mike Dunavant has been elected president of the Tennessee District Attorneys General Conference.

71. Bruster’s Ice Cream To Open on Highland Strip -

The Highland Strip will soon be home to a tasty new tenant.

Bruster’s Real Ice Cream plans to move into the 1,300-square-foot space at 571 Highland St., with construction set to begin soon and an expected opening date late this year, according to Loeb Properties Inc.

72. Bruster’s Highlights Highland Strip Growth -

When a small record shop called Pop-I’s opened in late 1960s, it helped spark the transformation of a mundane neighborhood shopping center near the University of Memphis into a popular entertainment destination for students.

73. Events -

The Collierville Chamber of Commerce will host a Small-Business Lunch & Learn Thursday, June 29, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the University of Memphis Collierville Center, 215 W. Poplar Ave. Courtney Orians, coordinator of external activities at the U of M, will discuss personality types in the workplace. Cost is free for members and $15 for nonmembers. Visit colliervillechamber.com for registration details.

74. Analysis: Mississippi LGBT Law Faces More Court Scrutiny -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi is in for a long court fight over constitutional questions about its law dealing with religious objections to same-sex marriage.

Legislators in 2016 passed House Bill 1523 , called the "Protecting Freedom of Conscience from Government Discrimination Act."

75. $37 Million UTHSC Medical Simulation Facility Changing How Students Learn -

While learning on the job is pretty common in most professions, when it comes to health care the stakes are much higher, which is why the University of Tennessee Health Science Center decided to invest in new a $37 million medical simulation facility that will offer students unprecedented access to hands-on training.

76. Ole Miss Buys Baptist Hospital in $22 Million Deal -

2301 S. Lamar Blvd.
Oxford, MS 38655

Sale Amount: $22 million

Sale Date: June 15, 2017

77. Supreme Court Pushes Redskins' Name Fight Back to Society -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Washington Redskins aren't in the clear with their team name just yet, even after the Supreme Court ruled Monday that the government can't block trademarks on the basis that they're offensive.

78. County Seeks End to DOJ Memorandum -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said the move by him and Shelby County Sheriff Bill Oldham and Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael to end a 5-year-old memorandum of understanding with the U.S. Justice Department over conditions at Juvenile Court indicated “significant progress,” but not that all of the problems at Juvenile Court are resolved.

79. County Leaders Seek End to Juvenile Court Memorandum With Justice Department -

The Shelby County government institutions that signed off on a 2012 agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice to overhaul Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court want to end what is left of the memorandum of understanding.

80. Last Word: Bar-Kays & ConFunkShun, Suburban Politics and Tom Bowen's 5 Years -

The Bar-Kays and ConFunkShun -- there’s a double shot of the deepest funk from the 1970s and 1980s. And they are together again Friday at the Cannon Center for the Juneteenth Urban Music Festival. It is also Larry Dodson’s last hometown show fronting The Bar-Kays.

81. Century Mark -

During a visit to Memphis in April, Andrew Young was talking with reporters about his lengthy public history – being part of Dr. Martin Luther King’s inner circle, a congressman, mayor of Atlanta, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. It was as he talked about King’s death in Memphis that Young, without any prompting, talked about a trio of Memphis attorneys – Benjamin Hooks, Russell Sugarmon and A. W. Willis – that were the key to his and King’s efforts to get things done in Memphis and the surrounding region.

82. The End of the Valedictorian? Schools Rethink Class Rankings -

LANCASTER, N.Y. (AP) – At many American high schools, the graduation-day tradition of crowning a valedictorian is becoming a thing of the past.

The ranking of students from No. 1 on down, based on grade-point averages, has been fading steadily for about the past decade. In its place are honors that recognize everyone who scores at a certain threshold – using Latin honors, for example. This year, one school in Tennessee had 48 valedictorians.

83. Medicaid Cuts Could Hit Rural Children Hardest -

As Congress fiddles with an Obamacare replacement, one likely to cut billions in Medicaid spending, health care experts warn a decrease in funding could be hard on Tennessee.

During a recent forum in Jackson, Andy Schneider of the Georgetown Center on Children and Families reported that 50 percent of Tennessee’s children in small towns and rural areas are covered by Medicaid, a higher percentage than the rest of the nation, and more than in Tennessee’s urban areas where 39 percent have Medicaid.

84. Tipton County DA Dunavant Nominated as US Attorney -

President Donald Trump has nominated District Attorney General Mike Dunavant of Tipton County as the new U.S. attorney for West Tennessee. And he could be close to nominating a new federal district judge for West Tennessee as well.

85. Tipton DA Dunavant Nominated As U.S. Attorney For Western District -

President Donald Trump has nominated District Attorney General Mike Dunavant of Tipton County as the new U.S. Attorney for West Tennessee.

86. Seay Leading Raleigh UPP In Parental Coaching Efforts -

The ACE Awareness Foundation’s fourth Universal Parenting Place recently opened at Christ Community Health Services in Raleigh, with Tara Seay serving as site director/parenting coach. Seay is a licensed professional counselor–mental health service provider.
In her new role at the Raleigh UPP, she’ll provide parents and caregivers with individual therapy and give clinical insight in group therapy programs. In addition, she will develop new programs over time to cater to the needs of the population that we serve in the Raleigh area.

87. Methodist Stays Busy With Wave of Construction Projects -

This year is proving to be another busy one for executives at Methodist Healthcare like Richard Kelley.

88. Rhea Joins SWTCC As First Mental Health Counselor -

Julia Rhea has joined Southwest Tennessee Community College as the institution’s first mental health counselor. The newly created position is part of Southwest’s new Social and Emotional Support Process, one of numerous changes developed over the past six months under the guidance of the Maryland-based education reform group Achieving the Dream, all geared toward redesigning and improving the student experience.

89. States Struggle With Oversight of Online Charter Schools -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – As U.S. children flock to virtual charter schools, states are struggling to catch up and develop rules to make sure the students get a real education and schools get the right funding.

90. The Buying And Selling Of Memphis -

Even before he went to federal prison for 25 years on a racketeering conviction in 1995, Danny Owens had a real estate portfolio. The strip-club kingpin who defined the industry in Memphis across a 20-year period owned the old Memphian movie theater and made possible its 1986 sale to Playhouse on the Square by donating $160,000 toward its purchase.

91. Last Word: Centennial, Hackett Retires -- Sort Of and Baseball Dreams -

Monday marks 100 years since a mob took Ell Persons off a train and to the Macon Road Bridge across the Wolf River and burned him alive. It was the lynching that gave birth to the Memphis Branch NAACP one month later. The national NAACP field office investigator who came to Memphis at great personal peril to investigate Person’s death was none other than James Weldon Johnson, the man who also composed “Lift Every Voice and Sing.”

92. Last Word: "A Downward Spiral", Outdoors Pop-Up and Haslam in Raleigh -

At the end of another day of alarming news and denials from the White House, U.S. Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee used a new phrase that has significance in a cycle of action and reaction and more action in which many of us gauge reaction by whether the person speaking has an R or a D after their name. The lines are that clearly drawn.

93. Who are the Lawyers and Judges Debating Trump Travel Ban? -

SEATTLE (AP) – Two lawyers with broad experience before the U.S. Supreme Court argued for and against President Donald Trump's travel ban Monday before a panel of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Three judges appointed by President Bill Clinton heard the case over the executive order that targets six predominantly Muslim countries.

94. Travel Ban Judges Scrutinize Trump's Muslim Statements -

SEATTLE (AP) – Federal judges on Monday peppered a lawyer for President Donald Trump with questions about whether the administration's travel ban discriminates against Muslims and zeroed in on the president's campaign statements, the second time in a week the rhetoric has faced judicial scrutiny.

95. Haslam: Achievement School District Still Needed, But Changes Near -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says there is a continuing need for the state-run Achievement School District. But the school district for the bottom 5 percent of schools in the state, in terms of academic achievement, is being “streamlined,” Haslam said last week during a visit to the Aspire Coleman Elementary School in Raleigh.

96. AP-NORC Poll: Most Americans Feel Fine About School Choice -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Even as fierce political battles rage in Washington over school choice, most Americans know little about charter schools or private school voucher programs. Still, more Americans feel positively than negatively about expanding those programs, according to a new poll released Friday.

97. The Week Ahead: May 15-21 -

Happy Monday, Memphis! This week, Downtown welcomes barbecue teams from around the world coming to compete in the Super Bowl of Swine. Plus, we’ve got details on the remembrance of a somber moment in Memphis history; a reading festival for kids of all ages; and more you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

98. Last Word: Weekend Sonic Boom, CLERB's Response and Irvin Salky -

Yes, those were the United States Navy Blue Angels buzzing Downtown Thursday afternoon in advance of their appearance at the Memphis Airshow Saturday and Sunday in Millington. That sound you heard after the flyover wasn’t a sonic boom. I don’t think they have those anymore. It was the sound of a really busy weekend following close behind.

99. Tennessee Senate Approves $37B Budget -

The state Senate approved a $37 billion budget Monday complete with the governor’s IMPROVE Act package of fuel tax increases and tax reductions.

Senators passed the measure 28-2 and sent it to the governor despite opposition led by Democratic Sen. Lee Harris of Memphis, who argued the body would be breaking the Copeland cap, a law prohibiting the spending of revenue that exceeds the state economy’s growth rate.

100. Hamilton Named Development Director At Wolf River Conservancy -

Kelsey Hamilton has been promoted to director of development at the Wolf River Conservancy. Hamilton joined the conservancy in October 2014 as associate director of development.

In her new role, she works to ensure that fundraising goals are met at the conservancy, an accredited land trust that has protected over 16,000 acres of the Wolf River watershed since its founding in 1985. Specifically, she oversees annual giving, membership, corporate giving and events, and works alongside chief development officer Barbara Kabakoff to assist with the capital campaign for the Wolf River Greenway project.