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Editorial Results (free)

1. Wal-Mart to Add About 10,000 Retail Jobs in the US -

NEW YORK (AP) – Wal-Mart plans to add about 10,000 retail jobs in the U.S. as it opens new stores and expands existing locations. The world's biggest retailer said Tuesday that its plans will also generate about 24,000 construction jobs.

2. GM to Add or Keep 7,000 US Jobs, Make $1B Factory Investment -

DETROIT (AP) – General Motors plans to invest $1 billion in U.S. factories and add thousands of new white-collar jobs, measures that have been in the works for years but were announced Tuesday after criticism from President-elect Donald Trump.

3. Haslam to Unveil Tennessee Transportation Plan Wednesday -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Republican Gov. Bill Haslam is scheduled to unveil his top legislative priority on Wednesday as state lawmakers await details on his plan to boost transportation funding in Tennessee.

4. Memphian One of Two Females Appointed to Key Clerk Roles in Legislature -

They don’t get much press, but they are making history for women working with the General Assembly.

Murfreesboro resident Tammy Letzler is the first female to serve as chief clerk of either house of the General Assembly, following the trailblazing path of House Speaker Beth Harwell. And Memphis native Kim Cox is serving this session as assistant chief clerk, making her the first African-American female to take that role.

5. Brooks Museum Opening New Cafe Jan. 18 -

The team behind Paradox Catering & Consulting will be running the newly created cafe inside the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, 1934 Poplar Ave.

6. Dickey Promoted to Tigers’ Offensive Coordinator -

University of Memphis head coach Mike Norvell has announced three staff promotions, including elevating Darrell Dickey to offensive coordinator.

7. The Real Reason A Company Doesn’t Call Back -

Interviewing for a job is an incredibly personal process – at least for the job seeker. If you’re looking for a new job, you know the frustration when a company doesn’t call you back. It stings like rejection. It can leave you reeling – wondering what’s wrong with you.

8. Graves Named Director Of Downtown YMCA -

Angelic Graves has joined YMCA of Memphis & the Mid-South as executive director of the Louis T. Fogelman Downtown YMCA. Graves, a Chicago native, comes to Memphis from the YMCA of Metro Chicago, where she most recently served as executive director of the South Side YMCA.

9. Rent Like a Champion Eyes Memphis PGA Event -

"Shark Tank" alumni home-rental platform Rent Like A Champion is looking to move into the Memphis market just in time to sign up homeowners and provide private housing for the FedEx St. Jude Classic golf tournament in June.

10. Zipcar Expands Operations in Memphis With ‘Humility’ -

A Boston-based car-sharing company recently teamed up with officials at Christian Brothers University to give their students a little “Humility.”

Humility, of course, refers to the gray four-door Ford Focus parked on CBU’s campus that students will be able to reserve for as little as an hour or for multiple days, through Zipcar, a car-sharing service billed as an alternative to both car ownership and traditional rental facilities.

11. Pro Athletes Have Platform to Discuss Race -

After touring the National Civil Rights Museum Saturday, Jan. 14, before a forum on race and sports, journalist and commentator Marc Spears had an immediate thought as the panel discussed whether racism is becoming institutionalized in America.

12. Last Word: Valero Protest Arrests, Anticipating Trump's Impact & Saving Booksellers -

A busy King holiday weekend that reflects what the week as a whole will probably be like at least politically. The weather is anyone’s guess. A group of about 40 people protested at the entrance to the Valero refinery in South Memphis Monday afternoon and a dozen were arrested by Memphis police.

13. Surge in Traffic Deaths Outpaces Increase in Travel -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Traffic deaths surged about 8 percent in the first nine months of last year, continuing an alarming upward spiral that may be partially explained by more Americans on the roads due to the economic recovery, according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates released Friday.

14. Takata Agrees to Guilty Plea, Will Pay $1B for Hiding Defect -

DETROIT (AP) – Takata Corp. has agreed to plead guilty to a single criminal charge and will pay $1 billion in fines and restitution for a years-long scheme to conceal a deadly defect in its automotive air bag inflators.

15. Newly Elected Tennessee Senate Speaker Names Top Staffer -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Newly-elected state Senate Speaker Randy McNally isn't wasting much time in reshaping the leadership of his office.

16. Crosstown Creator Named ‘Communicator of the Year’ -

Crosstown Concourse visionary Todd Richardson has been named the Communicator of the Year by the Memphis chapter of the Public Relations Society of America.

17. Pollard Makes Freshman All-American Team -

University of Memphis running back Tony Pollard was named to the Football Writers Association of America Freshman All-American Team as a kick returner.

18. Methodist Picks Interim EVP of Medical Affairs -

Dr. Guy Reed has been tapped as interim executive vice president of medical affairs for Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare.

19. Tsunami Owner Buys Building, Extends Hours -

After almost two decades in business, one Midtown chef has made his house a home.

Chef Ben Smith, the owner of the popular Cooper-Young mainstay Tsunami, recently purchased the 928 S. Cooper St. building where his restaurant has been located for the past 18 years.

20. Christ Community Health Names New Chief Executive -

Christ Community Health Services has tapped Shantelle Leatherwood as its new CEO.

Leatherwood was the organization's CAO who managed compliance for federal, state and local regulations, acted as the liaison with the Bureau of Primary Care, and oversaw quality improvement and population health.

21. 10 Ways to Refine Your Fundraising Readiness -

Editor’s note: Part two of a two-part series. Are you ready for a successful fundraising year? Are you already involved? Before you go full force in the marketplace – whether with cultivation or solicitation – stop and review your fundraising readiness status.

22. Student Petitions to Save Booksellers -

Support continues to pour in for Booksellers at Laurelwood, Memphis’ largest independent bookstore that announced recently it is set to close next month.

Shoppers immediately flocked to the store, which has hung large closing signs in its windows and begun a liquidation sale. A competitor, Burke’s Book Store, issued a rallying cry – a long statement, to be exact – encouraging the community to do what it can to help keep the store open and to support independent bookstores.

23. Cohen Announces $400,000 Grant for Clayborn Temple -

The National Park Service awarded the city’s Housing and Community Development Division a $400,000 grant Thursday, Jan. 12, for the preservation of Clayborn Temple.

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen said the grant that the city applied for and he endorsed is one of 39 similar projects to receive the federal funding. The grant comes from the African-American Civil Rights Grant Program of the park service. The grants are to highlight sites from the civil rights movement and the African-American experience.

24. Dave & Buster's To Open In Cordova -

The popular restaurant/sports bar/adult arcade Dave & Buster’s will join the likes of Ikea, Nordstrom Rack and Trader Joe’s on the list of popular franchises opening up first-time locations in the Bluff City.

25. January 13-19, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1977: On the front page of The Daily News, the Memphis City Council considers a resolution honoring undercover police officer Joe Hoing for his role in the federal investigation of the Memphis Playgirl strip clubs owned by Art Baldwin of Nashville.
And council members are considering their own investigation to follow up on allegations that Baldwin was paying off some Memphis police officers. “We have prided ourselves on having no organized crime in Memphis,” council member Andy Alissandratos says during the council discussion. “But apparently it has been accused of benefiting from it.”
Hoing worked his way into Baldwin’s organization starting as Baldwin’s driver and becoming a manager of the Memphis nightclubs – he brought in another undercover officer who took his place as Baldwin’s driver.
The investigation of Baldwin would branch off into a federal probe of the administration of then-Tennessee Gov. Ray Blanton for the selling of prison pardons and paroles by those in Blanton’s inner circle. Blanton himself would be convicted and serve jail time for selling liquor licenses.

26. Lausanne Leading Academic Efforts at New School in China -

When Lausanne Collegiate School’s Memphis students return to the West Massey Road campus this fall, the school also will be welcoming students on the other side of the world.

Xiamen #1 Lausanne International School, a partnership between Lausanne and Xiamen #1 School in Xiamen, China, is scheduled to open in August. The joint campus will use Lausanne’s International Baccalaureate teaching program to educate 1,200 students, most of whom will originate from Xiamen or elsewhere in mainland China.

27. Charter School Path More Complex With Local, Federal Changes -

A year into a compact between Shelby County Schools and charter school operators, the task of coming up with more-specific rules around the relationship is still ahead.

At the end of 2016, the Shelby County Schools board accepted a first set of recommendations from a charter advisory committee. The distinction between accepting the report and approving it reflects the ongoing discussion about what rules to impose where there currently aren’t any, as well as what rules the school system can impose given state government’s role in the process.

28. Rhodes College’s Presidential Transition Reflects Larger Changes in Education -

Rhodes College president Bill Troutt kept it simple last month when he introduced Marjorie Hass as the next president of the liberal arts college.

“You have chosen well,” he told the school’s board of trustees.

29. Editorial: Increase the State Gas Tax And Prevent Poaching -

Lamar Avenue to the Mississippi state line is arguably one of the most significant 5-mile stretches of road in the country.

That’s what state Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville said seven months ago as he and Tennessee transportation commissioner John Schroer gathered with local leaders by the side of the road to announce all were behind an application for $180 million in federal funding for Lamar.

30. Rerouting Regulations -

With every new administration comes some degree of uncertainty when it comes to federal regulations.

But after an especially unpredictable campaign season, all eyes are now on the president-elect to see what he’ll do next. 

31. Testing Wearable Sensors as 'Check Engine' Light for Health -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A next step for smart watches and fitness trackers? Wearable gadgets gave a Stanford University professor an early warning that he was getting sick before he ever felt any symptoms of Lyme disease.

32. Transcripts Show Fed Divided in 2011 Over Bond Purchases -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Newly released transcripts show Federal Reserve officials were sharply divided in 2011 over whether the central bank should launch a program aimed at pushing long-term interest rates lower to spur economic growth.

33. Congress Takes First Steps to Dismantle Health Care Law -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Congressional Republicans are taking the first steps toward dismantling President Barack Obama's health care law, facing pressure from President-elect Donald Trump to move quickly on a replacement.

34. Christ Community Health Names New Chief Executive -

Christ Community Health Services has tapped Shantelle Leatherwood as its new CEO.

Leatherwood was the organization’s CAO who managed compliance for federal, state and local regulations, acted as the liaison with the Bureau of Primary Care, and oversaw quality improvement and population health.

35. Cohen Announces $400,000 Grant for Clayborn Temple -

The National Park Service awarded the city’s Housing and Community Development Division a $400,000 grant Thursday, Jan. 12, for the preservation of Clayborn Temple.

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen said the grant that the city applied for and he endorsed is one of 39 similar projects to receive the federal funding. The grant comes from the African-American Civil Rights Grant Program of the park service. The grants are to highlight sites from the civil rights movement and the African-American experience.

36. Saving More – Can It Be Done? -

Ray’s Take When you’re busy focusing on living your life, it’s easy to fall into spending habits that aren’t exactly consistent with your long-term goals. Marketing departments hire some very smart people who can get you to buy things that you didn’t even know you wanted!

37. Ossei-Anto Lifts Up Memphis Kids -

After graduating from the University of Notre Dame, Theo Ossei-Anto knew he wanted to make a difference in education – but he says coming to Memphis was an unexpected adventure.

“It’s an amazing place,” he reflects. “I have learned so much about teaching here. I love my kids and have become very committed to them.”

38. Tennessee Lawmakers Act on Balanced Budget Convention to Curb ‘Crippling’ National Debt -

Saying they can avoid a “runaway” convention for “crazy or radical ideas,” Republican state legislators are filing legislation calling for a convention of states in Nashville to adopt a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

39. Strickland: Core Services Strategy Sustaining Momentum -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland said his core services or “brilliant at the basics” strategy is working a year into his four-year term of office. But he told the Memphis Kiwanis Club Wednesday, Jan. 11, that the strategy will take some time and patience toward what he termed a “renaissance.”

40. CBU’s Mike Nienaber Enjoys the Wins, Survives the Losses -

Mike Nienaber has won a lot of college basketball games. Recently, he bagged No. 300 as the coach at Christian Brothers University. Before that, he won 242 games for Bethel College in McKenzie, Tenn.

41. Clayborn Temple Restoration Gets $400,000 Federal Grant -

The National Park Service awarded the city’s Housing and Community Development Division a $400,000 grant Thursday, Jan. 12, for the preservation of Clayborn Temple.

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen said the grant that the city applied for and he endorsed is one of 39 similar projects to receive the federal funding. The grant comes from the African-American Civil Rights Grant Program of the park service. The grants are to highlight sites from the civil rights movements and the African-American experience.

42. Last Word: Charter Schools Views, Capitol Hill Round Up & Explaining The Cold War -

Double trouble Wednesday in Oklahoma. The Grizz lose to the Thunder 103-95 in OKC. They are on their way to Houston for a Friday game before returning home Sunday for the MLK game against the Chicago Bulls at the Forum. Meanwhile Tigers lose to Tulsa Wednesday, also in Oklahoma, 81-71. They are back at the Forum Saturday to play South Florida.

43. Trump Leaving His Global Business – To Be Run By His Sons -

NEW YORK (AP) – Breaking with presidential precedent, Donald Trump said Wednesday he will continue to profit from his global business empire after he enters the White House this month.

44. View From the Hill: Taxing Online Sales Not Such an Easy Fix -

Cumberland Transit owner Allen Doty isn’t sure if a rule requiring major out-of-state retailers to collect Tennessee sales taxes will create more equity for his shop.

But Doty, who has been selling everything from bicycles to kayaks and camping gear for 34 years in Nashville, is definitely tired of people shopping in his store for hours, snapping a picture of shoes they like, then going home and buying them online “just to avoid sales tax.”

45. Adapt To Survive -

According to Charles Darwin, it’s not the strongest or the most intelligent who will survive, but those who can best manage change. In my experience, that’s a true assessment not only for human beings, but also for businesses, regardless of the focus of the business.

46. NAACP Panel Hears Differing Local Views On Charter Schools -

It took awhile for an NAACP panel holding hearings on charter schools and their impact on education to wade into the complexity of charters in Memphis.

The panel for the national civil rights organization heard Tuesday, Jan. 10, that charters have become an effort to privatize schools the way prisons were privatized in the 1990s. They also heard that charters don’t “cherry-pick” the best students but help equalize access to a better education. And the seven members of the panel heard that charters have a place, but that there should be more thought given to where they fit long term, and their financial impact on public school districts.

47. Rallings Finds Voice on Violent Crime -

Michael Rallings is just about at the one-year mark in his tenure as Memphis Police director and he has found his voice.

Much of what Rallings is saying a year into the job is about the city’s problem with violent crime, homicides in particular.

48. Tennessee Acts on Balanced Budget Convention to Curb ‘Crippling’ National Debt -

Saying they can avoid a “runaway” convention for “crazy or radical ideas,” Republican state legislators are filing legislation calling for a convention of states in Nashville to adopt a balanced budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

49. Tsunami Owner Buys Building, Extends Hours -

After almost two decades in business, one Midtown chef has made his house a home. Chef Ben Smith, the owner of the popular Cooper-Young mainstay Tsunami, recently purchased the 928 S. Cooper St. building where his restaurant has been located for the past 18 years.

50. IRS to Delay Tax Refunds for Millions of Low-Income Families -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The IRS is delaying tax refunds for more than 40 million low-income families this year as the agency steps up efforts to fight identity theft and fraud.

The delays will affect families claiming the earned income tax credit and the additional child tax credit. These tax breaks are geared to benefit the working poor, and many families claim both.

51. Tigers’ Pollard on FWAA’s Freshman All-American Team -

University of Memphis running back Tony Pollard was named to the Football Writers Association of America Freshman All-American Team as a kick returner.

52. Methodist Picks Interim EVP Of Medical Affairs -

Dr. Guy Reed has been tapped as interim executive vice president of medical affairs for Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare.

53. Making Friends As An Adult -

The title of this column sounds a little strange at first glance. But if you’ve ever tried to make friends as an adult, you know this is a big deal. And it’s not just because it’s important to have friends. The friends you have as an adult can have a major impact on your career.

54. Seek ROI in Sales Promotions -

It’s a common practice in business to set up a booth at the same trade show every year out of habit as part of your sales promotion strategy. Businesses show up, set up the same table display, and use the same fishbowl to collect many of the same business cards as they did in prior years. 

55. Nonprofits Find a Winner in Grit. Grind. Give. -

The national #GivingTuesday movement had started in 2012 in New York on the first Tuesday after Thanksgiving. It was, and remains, a global giving effort riding the power of social media as a way to respond to Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

56. Ugwueke Takes Reins as Methodist Healthcare CEO -

Michael Ugwueke’s first day on the job as CEO of Methodist Le Bonheur Healthcare, a post he assumed Jan. 1, included a round of meeting the troops.

The new chief executive of the Methodist organization visited all six of its hospitals, meeting employees and front-line staff and sharing his appreciation that they were there on New Year’s Day, a holiday for many people.

57. Blight Fight Takes Root Near Carnes Elementary -

Some of Mary Baker’s friends like to joke that she will eventually reclaim the whole city of Memphis, but just one lot at a time. “I say, what’s wrong with that?” Baker replied.

58. Last Word: Opening Day in Nashville, Parking Pass or Parking Space and Ell Persons -

Lots of formalities Tuesday in Nashville where the 2017 session of the Tennessee Legislature begins. And that’s what this first week back will be about on the floors of the state House and the state Senate. Away from the floors, the real business of speculation and vote counting and drafting language is already well underway.

59. American Home Shield Hosts Tuesday Job Fair -

American Home Shield is about to fill 200 full-time jobs at its Memphis call center and is holding a job fair Tuesday, Jan. 10, for applicants.

The job fair from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. is at the call center, 6399 Shelby View Drive, suite 104.

60. Fed's Powell Sees Only Isolated Signs of Financial Excess -

A Federal Reserve governor is saying record-low interest rates have so far produced only isolated signs of excess in the economy but that the central bank must remain vigilant.

Jerome Powell says low rates helped pull the country from the Great Recession and toward a healthy job market. But he also says rates that stay low for a long time can lead to excessive risk-taking, as seen in the dot-com and housing bubbles of the last two decades. He made the remarks Saturday at an American Finance Association meeting in Chicago.

61. Online Shoppers Help Holiday Spending; Department Stores Lag -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Holiday spending got a boost in 2016, according to one analysis, as more people opted to shop by phone or computer – though department stores and clothing retailers still lagged.

62. Manning, Spurrier Enter College Football Hall of Fame -

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) – Peyton Manning and his Southeastern Conference nemesis, former Florida coach Steve Spurrier, will go into the College Football Hall of Fame together.

The rest of the new Hall of Fame class of 13 players and coaches announced Monday includes Southern California Heisman Trophy winner Matt Leinart, San Diego State running back Marshall Faulk and Danny Ford, who coached Clemson to its only national championship.

63. Define Your Giving Priorities in 2017 -

Editor’s note: Part one of a two-part series. As 2016 came to a close there was an avalanche of well-crafted requests to give to nonprofits. These came in the U.S. mail and via email. They were on TV, radio, Facebook, Twitter, everywhere!

64. Becoming A Partner of Choice -

A talk by Johnson & Johnson executives Janette Edelstein, director external innovation, and Chris Ryan, director innovation sourcing.

65. Commuter Program Works With Employers to Alleviate Transit Troubles -

Despite a reinvestment in the development of urban centers across the United States, the average American commute time is still increasing, which is placing a strain on both commuters and their employers.

66. Lynching Centennial Observance Nears in May -

Leaders of an effort to mark the sites of 32 lynchings in Shelby County have hired a project director for the upcoming centennial of the 1917 lynching of Ell Persons.

John Ashworth recently led efforts in Brownsville, Tennessee, to remember Elbert Williams, the organizer of an NAACP chapter in Haywood County. Williams was murdered in 1940 and his body found in the Hatchie River. He was ordered buried the same day his body was found.

67. Grizzlies Back up Dramatic Win over Warriors by Beating Utah -

Two nights earlier the Grizzlies had pulled off a historic comeback at Golden State. When they erased the Warriors’ 19-point lead at the start of the fourth quarter and rallied to win it, 128-119 in overtime, they broke a 662-game streak (regular season) of NBA of teams losing when trailing by 19 or more points after three quarters.

68. Last Word: The Elvis Tradition, Cordova Brewery and Parkside Path -

For about three decades now, there has been a cultural and political tradition around the birthday of Elvis Presley. It used to be a proclamation by the Shelby County Mayor and the Memphis Mayor on the steps of Graceland with a birthday cake.

69. Obama's Final Jobs Report: Big Pay Gain, Slower Hiring -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Americans' paychecks rose in December at the fastest pace in more than seven years as steady hiring and low unemployment led some businesses to pay more to attract and keep workers.

70. The Week Ahead: January 10-16 -

Good morning, Memphis! Just as the weather here can go from frigid to balmy in a matter of days, the mulching of Christmas trees clashes with the Boys of Summer this week. Plus, the Tennessee General Assembly kicks off its new session, and Paradiso is “Singin’ in the Rain.” Here’s what else you need to know in The Week Ahead…   

71. New Cordova-Area Brewery Coming Soon -

The fact that Ben Pugh and Richie EsQuivel decided to name the brewery they’re developing in Cordova “Meddlesome Brewing Co.” gives at least some indication of the nature of their personalities.

72. Homeless Alliance Seeks Help With Annual Count -

The Community Alliance for the Homeless is seeking volunteers to help with its annual point-in-time count, to be held Jan. 25.

The annual count, which is required nationally by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, provides a snapshot of homelessness in Memphis and Shelby County. It also helps measure the progress of efforts to end homelessness.

73. Meet Downtown YMCA's New Executive Director -

The Fogelman Downtown YMCA will welcome its new executive director, Angelic Graves, at a meet and greet Friday, Jan. 6, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Prior to joining the historic Fogelman YMCA, located at 245 Madison Ave., Graves worked at the YMCA of Metropolitan Chicago for 16 years.

74. Tigers’ Cheyenne Creighton Earns AAC Weekly Honor -

University of Memphis forward Cheyenne Creighton has been named to the American Athletic Conference Weekly Honor Roll for the third time this season. Creighton recorded 26 points and 13 rebounds, both career highs, in the win over Vanderbilt on Dec. 28 and scored 15 points in the overtime setback to Temple in the conference opener.

75. Zoo Parking Space Dimensions Emerge as Issue in Greensward Compromise -

Some members of the city’s Overton Park Parking Committee want to talk about changing one of the key ground rules for reconfiguring and expanding the Memphis Zoo’s parking area.

And the zoo’s representative on the committee that met Thursday, Jan. 5, is adamant that the requirement for parking spaces to be 10 feet by 20 feet should remain as it is.

76. January 6-12, 2017: This week in Memphis history -

1978: The Sex Pistols play Taliesyn Ballroom in Midtown – the second of seven stops on the original band’s one and only U.S. tour – with Memphis punk trip Quo Jr. opening. The British band’s reputation prompts Memphis authorities to look over the setting for the show as well as go see the performance for themselves.
The ballroom, an annex to the Nineteenth Century Club on Union Avenue, is a short-lived live music venue that already has hosted REO Speedwagon’s first Memphis show.
Mid-South Concerts founder Bob Kelley originally plans a show with no seats until police and fire officials insist there must be seats. The late change means more tickets have been sold for the show then there are seats and some ticketholders are locked out initially.
The Sex Pistols play a full set with police officials watching, ultimately concluding there isn’t anything particularly inflammatory or illegal about the band, whose best known song is “God Save The Queen.” Eight days after the Memphis show, the band plays its final date in San Francisco – and the Sex Pistols break up.

77. Editorial: Trump, Your Vote And The Next Four Years -

So it begins – Donald Trump’s four-year term of office. It’s an office that comes with a lot of power and responsibility. It also comes with checks and balances at just about every turn. And around the first turn is Congress.

78. Trump’s Turn -

If the election of Donald Trump was a mystery, there are even more questions about what will he do once he takes office Jan. 20. The clues may or may not be in the conduct of his campaign.

“Donald Trump campaigned without being tied to the traditional parameters of conservative-liberal dialogue that we’ve come to know over the past 20 or 30 years,” said Memphis attorney John Ryder, who is legal counsel to the Republican National Committee. “The hopeful part about that is that allows him to move past those divisions and enter new territory.”

79. Last Word: Booksellers Options, New Parking Spaces and The Memphis Open -

Somewhere in the back of our minds, I think most of us knew there were probably some circumstances under which Booksellers at Laurelwood might remain open. And as it turns out there are some terms the owner is talking about just past the post-New Year’s shock of work that the store will close in February.

80. Zoo Parking Space Dimensions Emerge as Issue In Greensward Compromise -

Some members of the city’s Overton Park Parking Committee want to at least talk about changing one of the key ground rules for the rearrangement and expansion of the Memphis Zoo’s parking area.

And the zoo’s representative on the committee that met Thursday, Jan. 5, is just as adamant that the requirement for parking spaces to be 10 feet by 20 feet should remain as it is.

81. Haslam Seeks Elusive Comfort Level on Road Funding Increases -

JACKSON, Tenn. (AP) – With just over three weeks remaining until he presents his annual Tennessee spending plan to lawmakers, Gov. Bill Haslam is still trying to find what he calls a comfort level with lawmakers on his efforts to boost transportation funding.

82. Elvis' Home-Away-From-Home Could Be Razed for Car Wash -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – As a teenager growing up in the 1950s, Steve North would look for the pink Cadillac outside a stone house on the outskirts of Nashville. If the car was there, Elvis was in the building.

83. Miss. Governor Wants School Funding Change -

Gov. Phil Bryant says it’s time to update Mississippi’s school funding formula.

Bryant says the current school funding formula is “a 1992 model,” although it was put into law in 1997. He says the state wouldn’t put Highway Patrol troopers in cars made in 1992.

84. Downtown YMCA Welcomes New Executive Director -

[UPDATE: Due to inclement weather Friday, the meet-and-greet has been moved to Tuesday, Jan. 10.] The Fogelman Downtown YMCA will welcome its new executive director, Angelic Graves, at a meet and greet Tuesday, Jan. 10, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

85. Tigers’ Cheyenne Creighton Earns AAC Weekly Honor -

University of Memphis forward Cheyenne Creighton has been named to the American Athletic Conference Weekly Honor Roll for the third time this season. Creighton recorded 26 points and 13 rebounds, both career highs, in the win over Vanderbilt on Dec. 28 and scored 15 points in the overtime setback to Temple in the conference opener.

86. Data-Driven Marketing Will be King (Again) in 2017 -

Earlier this month I had the opportunity to participate in a CMO Summit with over 100 senior-level brand marketers from around the country to discuss the looming issues we would all be facing in 2017, and how the use of data and analytics might be an integral part of the marketing solutions. 

87. 2016 – What Can We Learn From the Big Events? -

Ray’s Take One of the most important disciplines in financial planning is the annual review. A time to look at what worked, what didn’t, what needs adjusting and what we learned. As we look back on 2016, we can learn some financial lessons from the big events of the year.

88. Jones Picks Bad Time to Lead UT Football Program -

There was a time in University of Tennessee football history when a nine-win season and a victory over Nebraska in a bowl would guarantee a coach something just this side of a lifetime contract.

But not right now.

89. Ode to Joy: Football Becomes Fun Again for Titans -

Optimism, joy and even satisfaction – emotions largely missing for several seasons – were evident as the Tennessee Titans closed out the 2016 season and emptied their lockers at St. Thomas Sports Park.

90. Dobbs Had a Great Run, But Manning is Still No. 1 -

Tennessee senior Joshua Dobbs has created a quarterback controversy. Dobbs finished his college career Dec. 30 when UT beat Nebraska 38-24 in the Music City Bowl in Nashville. He accounted for 409 total yards – 291 passing and 118 yards rushing – and was chosen the game’s MVP.

91. Americans Have Good Shot to Ace Memphis Open -

This year’s Memphis Open field includes three Americans ranked in the top 35, two former past champions, and the certainty that Japan’s Kei Nishikori will not win a fifth straight title.

92. Scenarios Emerge to Keep Booksellers at Laurelwood Going -

For sale: One beloved, 32-year-old independent bookstore. Asking price? $800,000. That’s what Booksellers at Laurelwood owner Neil Van Uum says he’d accept to unload the store, days after announcing its impending closure and a liquidation sale that begins on Friday, Jan. 6.

93. Comedian Michael Jr. Bringing Clean Humor to Memphis Church -

Comedian Michael Jr. is talking about a trip to the mall and seeing a guy wearing a T-shirt that reads: “If you don’t speak English, leave the country.”

Pause … “It was written in English,” Michael Jr. says on stage, and the laughs start to tumble like dominoes. “So I went up to him and said, ‘You’re dumb.’ But I said it in Spanish.”

94. Convention Center Hotel Plan Hinges on Financing -

For years the Memphis convention and tourism industry has known which comes first in the chicken-and-egg argument about drawing more convention business. More hotel rooms with meeting space take top priority in an environment where there is just enough political will for a $60 million renovation of the Memphis Cook Convention Center but not enough to build and finance a new convention center.

95. Homeless Alliance Seeks Help With Annual Count -

The Community Alliance for the Homeless is seeking volunteers to help with its annual point-in-time count, to be held Jan. 25.

The annual count, which is required nationally by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, provides a snapshot of homelessness in Memphis and Shelby County. It also helps measure the progress of efforts to end homelessness.

96. Bucket List Now Guiding The Way -

I found myself earlier this week Googling “travel bucket lists.” I was helping my wife, Stacey, research bucket lists related to her fourth novel that was set to come out the next day. Her book, “This is 35,” follows a character who has become famous in part because of her bucket lists.

97. Growth Accelerates Need for Tennessee Road Projects -

Tennessee’s lieutenant governor-in-waiting predicts Gov. Bill Haslam will propose a modest fuel-tax increase in early 2017 to bolster the state’s road and bridge construction program.

Republican Sen. Randy McNally of Oak Ridge, the Senate’s outgoing Budget Committee chairman and likely next Senate speaker, says his “reading of the tea leaves” projects Haslam asking legislators to raise gas and diesel taxes but equalize the rates, which are separated by 3 cents per gallon.

98. Tennessee Lawmakers Could Raise, Lower Taxes This Session -

The 110th General Assembly is set to convene on Jan. 10 with unfinished business from previous sessions likely to dominate debate.

Here’s a look at some of the hottest topics expected to arise.

99. Comcast Wants to Tackle Bad Home Internet -

LAS VEGAS (AP) – Comcast is hoping to make Wi-Fi in the home faster through an updated router – the machine that serves as data traffic cops for Wi-Fi networks.

Although home internet speeds have gotten faster, laptops and phones on Wi-Fi might still feel sluggish because older routers can't transmit data as fast.

100. Agency Orders TransUnion, Equifax to Pay $23M for False Ads -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal regulators have ordered credit-reporting agencies TransUnion and Equifax to pay about $23 million for falsely advertising that the credit scores they sell consumers are the same ones lenders use to make credit decisions.