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Editorial Results (free)

1. Last Word: TNReady Blinks Again, Gov. Debate Thoughts and Mud Island's Museum -

There was a point Thursday morning during the troubled TNReady testing at some Tennessee school districts when there was a “brief” slow down in the online testing, according to the Tennessee Education commissioner’s office. By noon that had been resolved and more than 250,000 completed tests had been submitted since testing began Monday. One can only imagine what some of the thoughts were in the office during the slow down and the gap between how long the slow down seemed and how long it actually was.

2. Starbucks to Close Stores for Afternoon for Bias Training -

NEW YORK (AP) — Starbucks, trying to tamp down a racially charged uproar over the arrest of two black men at one of its stores in Philadelphia, plans to close more than 8,000 U.S. stores for several hours next month to conduct racial-bias training for its nearly 175,000 workers.

3. Last Word: Mud Island Changes, Zoo Parking and Capitol Hill Revolt On UT Board -

This could be your last chance to see the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island River Park as it has been for about the last 30 years. The park on the southern half of Mud Island opens for the season Saturday. The museum will be open only through July 4 is what is billed as a “limited run” followed by a public engagement process for “reimagining how we tell the story of the Mississippi River in a 21st century way,” according to park general manager Trey Giuntini in a Thursday press release.

4. Haslam Says He Will Sign Sunday Alcohol Sales Bill -

Gov. Bill Haslam is deferring to the will of the Legislature and has indicated he will sign the Sunday wine/liquor sales bill when it reaches his desk, according to spokeswoman Jennifer Donnals.

The General Assembly passed the legislation this week by a 55-35 vote in the House and a 17-11 margin in the Senate.

5. Haslam Indicates He Will Sign Sunday Alcohol Sales Bill -

Gov. Bill Haslam is deferring to the will of the Legislature and has indicated he will sign the Sunday wine/liquor sales bill when it reaches his desk, according to spokeswoman Jennifer Donnals.

The General Assembly passed the legislation this week by a 55-35 vote in the House and a 17-11 margin in the Senate.

6. Religious Leaders Recount Catechism of 1968 Memphis -

Rev. James Lawson, the architect of nonviolent resistance who counseled Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on it, walked in a circle last week around the new “I Am A Man” bronze and stainless steel sculpture. As he walked with his head down, still and video photographers scrambled for the best angle to capture the seminal strategist of the civil rights era, seemingly deep in thought.

7. MLK 50 Years Later -

Bernard Lafayette remembers being in Memphis April 3, 1968, and a dejected Martin Luther King Jr. being roused from his room at the Lorraine Motel to speak at Mason Temple on a rainy night.

8. Prescription for Tragedy -

He has his own GPS, an internal shield that keeps him from driving anywhere near 637 Poplar Ave. Home to the Memphis morgue. That’s where they showed Jerry Davidson his 22-year-old son, Oliver, his eyes closed and his lips purple.

9. Candidates’ Choices -

Polls, phone banking, messaging, yard signs, who is paid and who is a volunteer – all are elements of a campaign. And each is part of an overall strategy.

But most campaigns struggle with a schedule of which events to attend and which to forgo. And in the 2018 campaign season, the number of events is only growing as the May 1 county primary elections near, followed by the county general election and state and federal primaries in August, then the state and federal general elections in November.

10. Last Word: The Ballot, By the River and The 'Good Ship Ineptitude' -

What blooms before spring and after the rains? It is the quest. The quest that must be declared over and over again – in the confidence of homes and the parlors of supporters – across kitchen tables and behind the soundproof doors of conference rooms -- the patios where supporters have gathered and the rented spaces where campaigns are located. Usually with food. Perhaps a corner table or possibly a catered buffet. Maybe just coffee.

11. Powell Says Outlook Strong, Signaling Gradual Rate Hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell told Congress Tuesday that the outlook for the U.S. economy "remains strong" despite the recent stock market turbulence, keeping the central bank on track to gradually raise interest rates.

12. Last Word: City Hall Fallout, 8Ball on Room 306 and Clark Tower Update -

A group of students at Maxine Smith STEAM Academy at the Fairgrounds started the school week Monday with a gathering in a circle outside the art deco school building at Central and East Parkway in a student-led memorial for the students killed in Parkland, Florida almost two weeks ago. There was a moment of silence followed by reading the names of the 17 students who died in the massacre.

13. Progress Since Sanitation Strike Questioned 50 Years Later -

There was no “reverse march” this past weekend. But there are signs on the Main Street Mall that trace the route of striking sanitation workers from Clayborn Temple to City Hall 50 years ago.

14. Rye Calls City To Task For Lack Of Progress 50 Years After MLK -

The keynote speaker at the city’s commemoration Saturday, Feb. 24, of the 1968 sanitation workers strike took the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland to task for its treatment of today’s protesters.

15. Rev. Billy Graham, Known as 'America's Pastor,' Dies at 99 -

MONTREAT, N.C. (AP) – The Rev. Billy Graham, the magnetic, movie-star-handsome preacher who became a singular force in postwar American religious life, a confidant of presidents and the most widely heard Christian evangelist in history, died Wednesday at 99.

16. State Democrats Targeting Domestic Abuse With Bills -

Tennessee House Democrats are sponsoring legislation designed to bolster support for domestic violence victims amid a dismissive attitude toward abuse by President Donald Trump.

“We’re all familiar with the situation with Rob Porter and his former spouses showing pictures and reports about domestic violence, and the White House response has not been one that condemns the abuser but instead says we have to be careful with how we ruin someone’s reputation,” said state Rep. Raumesh Akbari during a Tuesday, Feb. 13, press conference. “So I think that shows a complete disregard for taking the complaints and the legitimate concerns of these abused women seriously.”

17. Is Inflation Rising as Investors Fear? 5 Ways to Keep Track -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After nearly a decade of being all but invisible, inflation — or the fear of it — is back.

Tentative signs have emerged that prices could accelerate in coming months. Pay raises may be picking up a bit. Commodities such as oil and aluminum have grown more expensive. Cellphone plans are likely to appear costlier.

18. Big Pay Gains for US Workers Contribute to Wall St. Sell-Off -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Pay raises, the U.S. economy's Achilles' heel in its long recovery from the Great Recession, finally showed signs of accelerating last month – a trend that fanned inflation fears and sent bond yields rising and stocks sinking.

19. Cleveland Indians Dropping Chief Wahoo Logo From Uniforms -

CLEVELAND (AP) – The Cleveland Indians announced Monday they are dropping the Chief Wahoo logo from their uniforms next year, bowing to decades of complaints that the grinning, red-faced caricature used since 1947 is racist.

20. Last Word: Brunch Overload, Grade-Changing Misdemeanor and Sports Rebirth -

What happens when Memphians have been home and/or work bound for about two weeks between a national flu outbreak and snow and ice that hangs tough in below freezing temperatures and the temperature Sunday under sunny skies is almost 60? The correct answer is brunch overload.

21. Last Word: Tax Reform Pay Raises, Minority Business Kinks and Elvis at 83 -

A busy but ultimately slow weekend on the Confederate monuments front as a total of fewer than 100 opponents of the removal of the city’s two most visible monuments actively protested Saturday either on the interstate loop or in the “protest area” by Health Sciences Park.

22. Decade Since Recession: Thriving Cities Leave Others Behind -

As the nation's economy was still reeling from the body blow of the Great Recession, Seattle's was about to take off.

In 2010, Amazon opened a headquarters in the little-known South Lake Union district – and then expanded eight-fold over the next seven years to fill 36 buildings. Everywhere you look, there are signs of a thriving city: Building cranes looming over streets, hotels crammed with business travelers, tony restaurants filled with diners.

23. Frayser Bauhaus -

Memphis' best and most unique example of art deco-international style Bauhaus architecture has been hiding in plain sight in Frayser for nearly 70 years.

Tens of thousands of daily motorists drive past the white, multilevel building at 3590 Thomas St., on the northeast corner of Thomas and Floyd Avenue, where curved windows look out on the highway down the hill and large trees landscape the slope to the street.

24. Mayor’s Critics Have Their Own Plans for Strike Anniversary -

When the 1968 sanitation workers strike ended in April 1968, Cleophus Smith didn’t feel like the formal city recognition and a minimal pay raise he and other sanitation workers had gained was something to be celebrated.

25. Net Neutrality Fans Speak Up as FCC Set to Strike Down Rules -

NEW YORK (AP) – Net neutrality is a simple concept but a dense and often technical issue normally discussed in tech and telecom circles. Now it's hit the mainstream.

This week, the Federal Communications Commission plans to vote on gutting Obama-era rules meant to stop broadband companies such as Comcast, AT&T and Verizon from exercising more control over what people watch and see on the internet.

26. Trump Signs Proclamation to Scale Back 2 National Monuments -

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – President Donald Trump signed a proclamation Monday to scale back two sprawling national monuments in Utah, pledging to "reverse federal overreach and restore the rights of this land to your citizens."

27. Last Word: Lake District Recycling, The New First and The AAC 'Glass Ceiling' -

The U.S. Senate vote on a tax reform plan is now set for 10 a.m. our time Friday morning following more debate in D.C. that began Thursday as the trigger provision to raise tax rates if economic growth from the proposed tax cuts doesn't materialize was ruled out of order by the Senate parliamentarian. This was the provision on which the support of U.S. Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee hinged. And Corker is leading a group of deficit hawks whose block of votes is considered crucial in what happens to a proposal that was being reshaped as midnight approached. Here's Politico with comments from Corker as of late Thursday

28. Is There Room for Common-Sense Gun Legislation? -

The Tennessee chapter of Moms Demand Action picks its battles judiciously. Once labeled as a bunch of anti-gun extremists, the group is anything but, spokeswoman Kat McRitchie says.

“We seek common ground. We work with legislators on both sides of the aisle. We’re nonpartisan,” McRitchie explains. “We’re simply looking for common-sense gun solutions, which the majority of Americans support.”

29. Last Word: 'Coach Killer', Collierville's Industrial Growth and Ice Cream & Soup -

Lots of discussion the day after his firing about David Fizdale’s value off the court for the city and just where that fits with whether the Grizz win or lose and who is held responsible when they lose too much. Losing too much is what the Grizz front office said caused the change and not Marc Gasol being a “coach-killer” to quote Grizz GM Chris Wallace. And this is not just a Memphis discussion. LeBron James on the Fizdale firing via CBSSports. This was before James got ejected from a game Tuesday evening for the first time in his career.

30. Titans Willing to Let Davis Learn on the Job -

One of the most anticipated aspects of this Tennessee Titans season was how much of an impact rookie wide receiver Corey Davis could have.

31. Grizzlies Reeling, Lose Fifth Straight to Portland -

The Grizzlies’ fifth straight loss, and their eighth in the last 10 games, had its share of ugliness. Being outrebounded by Portland 60-35 was ugly. Shooting 38.4 percent and 26.7 percent from 3-point range (8 of 30) was hardly a thing of beauty.

32. Last Word: Fairgrounds Surprises, Aquarium Reprise and Six Open Commission Seats -

There are lots of renderings and blueprints floating around this city of ours these days. Land opening up, locations changing, possibilities revealed, new uses for old places and old places giving way to new. So it’s not surprising to see some smaller changes that are nevertheless highly visible. Thus comes word with the new week that Spin City, the corner tenant at Poplar and Highland in Poplar Plaza, will close with the new year and Spaghetti Warehouse, on Huling Downtown, will close later this month in the week before Thanksgiving.

33. The Ties That Bind -

When Big River Crossing was about to open a year ago, Doug Carpenter was asked often where the Tennessee-Arkansas state line is over the Mississippi River.

His marketing firm DCA has overseen publicity for the crossing from concept through construction, so he has learned much about the history of the Harahan Bridge and the mighty river below it. But the stateline wasn't marked

34. Ultra-Personal Therapy: Gene Tumor Boards Guide Cancer Care -

SAN DIEGO (AP) – Doctors were just guessing a decade ago when they gave Alison Cairnes' husband a new drug they hoped would shrink his lung tumors. Now she takes it, but the choice was no guesswork. Sophisticated gene tests suggested it would fight her gastric cancer, and they were right.

35. Here Comes Earnings Season: Brace for a Slowdown in Growth -

NEW YORK (AP) – Earnings reporting season is getting underway, and Wall Street is getting ready to be underwhelmed.

Profit growth likely slowed sharply in the summer for U.S. companies after hurricanes and other natural disasters caused big damage. Analysts are forecasting weaker earnings for several areas of the market from a year ago, a sharp turnaround from earlier this year, when earnings were soaring by more than 10 percent and helping to drive the stock market to record heights.

36. Connecting The Pieces -

The Pinch District – a Downtown mini-neighborhood of only a few blocks sandwiched between the Memphis Cook Convention Center, Uptown, The Pyramid and the campus of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital – has been a neglected donut hole of development for years, as investments have poured into other areas of Downtown around it.

37. Trying to Get Sober? NIH Offers Tool to Help Find Good Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The phone calls come – from fellow scientists and desperate strangers – with a single question for the alcohol chief at the National Institutes of Health: Where can my loved one find good care to get sober?

38. Leaders to Discuss Pinch District Progress -

Nearly a year ago state and local officials joined representatives of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital on the hospital’s campus to announce $37 million in state and local funding into public infrastructure around the hospital.

39. Trump, GOP Tax Plan Would Cut Rates for Many Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans are proposing a far-reaching, $5 trillion plan Wednesday that would cut taxes for corporations and potentially for individuals, simplify the tax system and nearly double the standard deduction used by most Americans.

40. GOP Eyes Popular Tax Breaks to Finance Overhaul -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Republicans straining to find about $1 trillion to finance sweeping tax cuts are homing in on two popular deductions that are woven into the nation's fiscal fabric – the mortgage interest deduction that millions of homeowners prize and the deduction for state and local taxes popular in Democratic strongholds.

41. Frayser Landfill Expansion Voted Down -

The proposed expansion of a construction landfill in Frayser was unanimously shot down by the Shelby County Land Use Board Thursday, Sept. 14, to the cheers of dozens of concerned residents and students from the nearby Memphis Business Academy who showed up to voice their opposition.

42. Ryan: Deporting Young Immigrants Not in Nation's Interest -

WASHINGTON (AP) – House Speaker Paul Ryan on Wednesday said that deporting hundreds of thousands of young immigrants brought into the country illegally is "not in our nation's interest," as he and President Donald Trump prepared to huddle with top Democrats to try to hash out a legislative fix.

43. Republicans Unveil Long-Shot Effort on Health Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Senators on Wednesday rolled out competing plans for the nation's health care system, with a group of GOP senators making a last, long-shot effort to undo Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act and independent Sen. Bernie Sanders proposing universal government-run coverage.

44. Intriguing Story Playing Out Off The Football Field -

Anybody got an extra billion dollars lying around? If so, you can own one-third share of an NFL franchise plus a handful of other assorted business ventures.

That’s the situation involving the Tennessee Titans as they head into what could be a very eventful season. Susie Adams Smith, one of three children of the late franchise founder Bud Adams, is attempting to divest herself of one-third interest in KSA Industries, the business conglomerate built by her father.

45. Pay Attention To Signs It’s Time to Go -

Often as job seekers, we struggle with the idea of when to leave. We may feel that it makes no sense to leave one good job for another. This can make sense in certain situations. However, when the writing is on the wall, it’s best to pay attention.

46. First Day of School Begins With Greetings, Hopes -

The school year began Monday, Aug. 7, with some parents registering children on the first day, other children finding their way back into academic routines on their own and Shelby County Schools leaders awaiting the release of achievement test scores from the state that will set a new baseline for where students are academically.

47. Tensions of Density -

With hundreds of units already announced and all signs indicating there are more to come, the Midtown apartment market is primed to explode.

But when it comes to development, it’s no secret that Midtown residents can be fiercely protective.

48. Marching Band to NFL: Vanderbilt Doctor’s Unlikely Path -

When the NFL sought a worthy selection for the first chief medical officer in league history, it turned its eyes to Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

In hiring Dr. Allen Sills earlier this year, the league brought on a whirlwind of intelligence and energy with a lengthy curriculum vitae.

49. Victorian Village Gets New Signage, Design Guidelines -

The signs that have started popping up around the Victorian Village neighborhood welcome passersby to the historic community, with an announcement greeting visitors in large and prominent letters.

Three of the signs have been posted so far. One more is still on the way. All of them include a silhouette of the neighborhood – with its historic mansions and older properties – set against a sunrise.

50. Summer in the City -

Saturday night on Beale Street is more than a catch phrase for businesses there.

It is chapters in old, out-of-print books like Lt. George W. Lee’s “Where The Blues Began” that you can only see in the Memphis-Shelby County Room of the Central Library. You can’t check the book out because of its rarity and age. But you can also find references to the lore of Saturday nights on Beale Street on plaques in the entertainment district that current patrons walk past without even noticing.

51. Tennessee Weighs Commission to Examine Jim Crow Brutality -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Charlie Morris vividly recalls his brother's murder.

Jesse Lee Bond was a sharecropper in Shelby County. Suspicious because his harvests never seemed to cover his debts, in the spring of 1939, Bond asked the local general store for a receipt of his seed purchases.

52. RedRover Adds Will Cook As Design Architect -

RedRover Sales & Marketing has added three new employees in recent months, including design architect Will Cook, who has more than 10 years of graphic design experience and comes to RedRover from The Commercial Appeal and Savant Learning Systems. In his new role, Cook primarily designs print and web collateral for RedRover’s clients while also assisting the sales and marketing teams in other ways, including participating in sales meetings and calls.

53. 3-Attorney Panel to Review Mackin's Allegations Against Shelby County Schools -

A panel of three attorneys, including former U.S. Attorney Ed Stanton are investigating allegations of a cover-up, sexual harassment, theft and widespread grade tampering made last week by former Trezevant High School principal Ronnie Mackin.

54. Walmart Touts Investment in People, Technology as Advantages -

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) – Walmart CEO Doug McMillon touted the company's investments in people and technology, but also said the company may have reached an employment peak and urged employees not to be afraid of automation.

55. Last Word: Your Neighbor Has Power, City Budget Wrap Take One and BBQ -

We are at the point in our storm recovery where the novelty and sense of adventure have reached the end of their very short lives in areas where the power is still out. And the restoration of that service is at a point where you now have people on one side of a street with power and those on the other side may still be in the dark and the heat.

56. Wal-Mart Works to Close Gap Between Itself and Amazon -

HOBOKEN, N.J. (AP) – Even after an online spending spree, it may be hard for Wal-Mart to escape the Amazon in the room.

Wal-Mart's acquisition of Jet.com and brands that appeal to younger shoppers have given it an e-commerce boost as it works to close the gap between itself and the online leader. The world's largest retailer is betting on essentials like cereal and diapers, and has adjusted its shipping strategy to better compete with Amazon's Prime program.

57. Older Americans Want Medicare to Pay for Long-Term Care -

WASHINGTON (AP) – A growing number of Americans age 40 and older think Medicare should cover the costs of long-term care for older adults, according to a poll conducted by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

58. United to Offer Bumped Flyers Up to $10,000 After Video Flap -

DALLAS (AP) – United Airlines says it will raise the limit – to $10,000 – on payments to customers who give up seats on oversold flights and will increase training for employees as it deals with fallout from the video of a passenger being violently dragged from his seat.

59. RegionSmart Summit Seeks to Increase Economic Vitality in the Mid-South -

More than 300 community leaders and officials will be on hand for the second annual RegionSmart Summit, which will be held Thursday, April 27, at the Halloran Centre for Performing Arts & Education.

60. Nearing 100 Days, Trump Says His Presidency is 'Different' -

WASHINGTON (AP) – For nearly 100 days, President Donald Trump has rattled Washington and been chastened by its institutions.

He's startled world leaders with his unpredictability and tough talk, but won their praise for a surprise strike on Syria.

61. Last Word: Two Science Marches, Bill Lee Kicks Off and Andrew Young on Ben Hooks -

Rainy Sunday in the city with ponchoed partisans of the Porter-Leath Ragin' Cajun gathering and Africa in April overlapping from the riverfront to Danny Thomas Boulevard. In Germantown, it was a soggy but colorful 5k for the Germantown Municipal School District with shades of blue, orange and of course pink, or was it red?, at different parts of the run.

62. Lenoir Calls for Property Tax Cut Beyond New Certified Tax Rate From Reappraisal -

Shelby County Trustee David Lenoir says there should be a cut in the county property tax rate beyond the new certified property tax rate to be set as a result of the 2017 countywide property reappraisal.

63. Transit Options Vital to Regions, Expert Says -

Establishing mode share in a region – the percentage of travelers using a certain a mode of transportation – is one the first and most important baselines for a region to establish on the way to improving transportation as a whole.

64. Early Voting in District 95 Primaries Begins Friday -

Early voting opens Friday, April 7, in the special primary elections for state House District 95 as other elections – including some 2018 races – already show plenty of signs of political life.

65. Car Sales Keep Falling, But Buyers Pay More for Trucks, SUVs -

DETROIT (AP) – Passenger car sales continued to plummet last month and were a drag for many automakers, even with offers of some very juicy discounts.

For now, the auto industry isn't worried because it's making solid money selling reams of SUVs and trucks to consumers who are loading them up with expensive features. But some analysts see the large inventories of cars as a looming problem.

66. Genetic Code -

While the anachronistic farmer trope may be a common pop-culture perception, these stewards of the land have in fact been on the cutting edge of technology for thousands of years.

And every milestone since the Neolithic period, from the first plows to today’s automated tractors, has allowed farmers to increase their yields and support a perpetually growing population.

67. Wolfchase At 20 -

For the shopping mall – that quintessential staple of American retail, the biggest of big boxes, a sprawling, multilevel marvel of commercial magnificence – these are most certainly interesting times.

68. Clayborn Temple Restoration Approaches One-Year Mark -

Box lunches and stained glass were the order of the day as developers of Clayborn Temple hosted the Rotary Club last month at the landmark Downtown church.

It was one in a series of events Frank Smith and Rob Thompson have hosted at the AME Church since they reopened its doors last October to explore uses for it and start a fuller renovation in time for the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the spring of 2018.

69. Last Word: Bar Louie's Corner, Chucalissa and Shark Tank for Ag -

The key corner at the intersection of Madison Avenue and North Cooper Street is the southwest corner where since the opening of a renovated Overton Square several years ago Bar Louie has had the corner. And the restaurant chain wants to keep the corner although its landlord wants to make a change. That’s the bottom line in bankruptcy reorganization court documents filed in February.

70. Council Approves Impasse Changes on First Reading -

As opponents of the City Hall escort list protested outside Tuesday, Feb. 21, a different protest was taking place inside the Memphis City Council chambers.

City employees opposed to proposed changes in the city’s impasse ordinance carried signs in the chambers reading “You Think Crime is High Now, Repeal Impasse.”

71. Council Approves First Reading of Impasse Changes -

As opponents of the City Hall escort list protested outside Tuesday, Feb. 21, a different protest was taking place inside the Memphis City Council chambers.

City employees opposed to proposed changes in the city’s impasse ordinance carried signs in the chambers reading “You Think Crime is High Now, Repeal Impasse.”

72. View From the Hill: ‘Moral Mondays’ Draw Crowds, But Are Lawmakers Listening? -

Johnny and Julie Erwin don’t look like typical protesters, but the senior couple joined the “moral Mondays” ruckus recently at the State Capitol, Johnny wearing his Air Force cap and Julie holding a list of social legislation they oppose.

73. Council Waits on Answers About City Hall List -

Memphis City Council members had protesters outside City Hall and in council chambers Tuesday, Feb. 21, on different causes.

City employees opposed to proposed changes in the city’s impasse ordinance carried signs in council chambers reading “You Think Crime Is High Now Repeal Impasse.”

74. Customers Avoid New Wells Fargo Accounts After Sales Scandal -

NEW YORK (AP) – Customers are still turning their backs on Wells Fargo after a scandal over sales practices, with the bank saying Friday the number of new checking accounts people opened was down 31 percent in January from a year earlier.

75. Grizz Hit All-Star Break With Loss, But Their Goals Are Within Reach -

After he had answered the obligatory questions about the Grizzlies’ ugly 95-91 loss to the New Orleans Pelicans in the last game before the All-Star break, coach David Fizdale spoke to the big picture: “We’re in good position.”

76. Last Word: Lovell's Fall, Critical Focus Debut and Super Lice -

That didn’t last long – the political career of state Representative Mark Lovell. About six weeks into a two-year term of office six months after he upset veteran Republican state Rep. Curry Todd, Lovell resigned Tuesday in Nashville. But the Legislature probably isn’t done with him yet. Even if it turns out the Legislature is done in terms of dealing with him directly, it will probably be talking about him for longer than the six weeks he was a legislator.

77. Lovell Resigns Tennessee House Seat, Democrats Seek Probe -

NASHVILLE – House Democrats are calling for a probe into the sudden resignation of first-term Rep. Mark Lovell, who denies being involved in sexual misconduct as he leaves the state Legislature after just one month.

78. Protests Define New Interest In Activism -

Usually when the Shelby County Commission’s committee room is filled, it is with those from various county government divisions making presentations during budget season. Or it might be filled with representatives from several organizations seeking or getting county grants.

79. Fed Leaves Key Rate Unchanged at a Time of Uncertainty -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Federal Reserve has left its key interest rate unchanged at a time of solid economic gains but also heightened uncertainty surrounding the new Trump administration.

80. Governor Defends Big Proposals for Statewide Infrastructure -

NASHVILLE – Protesters overshadowed Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s State of the State address Monday night, chanting in the Capitol in opposition to a spate of executive orders from President Donald Trump.

81. City Graduates First Companies Through New Business Accelerator -

The city of Memphis’ inaugural minority business accelerator has graduated its first participants – seven companies whose businesses touch everything from event planning to construction – but in some respects the work is only now just beginning.

82. Turning the Page -

When a bookstore decides to close its doors for good, the moment isn't always so immediate or possessive of the clean finality that comes with shutting a book at the end of the story.

In the case of The Booksellers at Laurelwood, it is a long goodbye. These final weeks of a liquidation sale that will stretch into February – the culmination of a decision that the store’s finances have become untenable – have meant the slow unwinding of a 32-year-old bookstore that’s closing up shop the same way you fall asleep, fall in love, get old – gradually, then all of a sudden.

83. Freshman Bone Gives Vols Hope for Quicker Rebuild -

Tennessee coach Rick Barnes isn’t ready to proclaim Jordan Bone a rising star in SEC basketball, but he sure saw promising signs from his freshman point guard last Saturday night in Nashville.

84. Pew Survey: Officers More Reluctant to Use Force, Make Stops -

ATLANTA (AP) – The so-called "Ferguson effect" – officers backing off of policing out of fear that their actions will be questioned after the fact – has been talked about but never really quantified. A new study suggests the effect is a reality, with three-quarters of officers surveyed saying they are hesitant to use force, even when appropriate, and are less willing to stop and question suspicious people.

85. Titaned Up: Success Found In Big Moves, Smallest Details -

Most critics of last year’s Tennessee Titans saw unsettled ownership, a revolving door of coaches and a lack of talent at key positions.

Jon Robinson saw weeds.

86. Arrests, Metal Barriers, Lawsuits All Played Role in Greensward Parking Compromise -

Spring at City Hall is budget season and it can be stormy for a new mayor, not to mention a city council with six new members. But that wasn’t the case in 2016.

The real spring political storm was the Overton Park Greensward – specifically overflow parking from the Memphis Zoo on the greenspace south of the zoo.

87. Empty Seats -

Shelby County Commissioner David Reaves can still see it clearly: “Take the whole map of the county and lay a grid on it. Then I’d like you to say, ‘Where’s the population? Where’s the projection?’ And then let’s strategically place schools all over the county based upon that and make them all of equal offerings.”

88. Growing Pains -

In many ways, Citizens to Preserve Overton Park v. Volpe in 1971 shaped the way Midtown Memphis looks today, so it’s only fitting that the park continues to inspire citizens to fight for what they feel is right.

89. It’s Not All About You On Website -

Today, 97 percent of consumers search for products and services online. However, many companies don’t have a website that keeps the goals of their users in mind. Likewise, many websites are designed without forethought into when users are accessing the site and for what purpose, resulting in a lack of mobile optimization or call-to-action tools, according to the Score Association.

90. Last Word: Football Comes Back, Snuff on Front Street and Pot Is Short of Seven -

I have a question that some of you may not care for? Is football making a comeback in this basketball town for a more prominent place in the conflicted and diverse hothouse that is Memphis culture?

91. Something Missing in Jones’ ‘Infallible’ System -

By now, Tennessee fans have taken enough deep breaths to come to grips with losing to Vanderbilt. They don’t like it, mind you, but they’ve accepted it. As for Butch Jones, what now?

I’ll leave it to others to gauge the heat of Jones’ seat as we weave through the postseason and into next year. Suffice it to say, the honeymoon is over.

92. Distracted To Death -

When the Tennessee Highway Patrol began using a tractor-trailer on the interstate to catch people texting while driving, the troopers knew their view from above would help their cause. From that higher vantage point, they could see drivers holding their phones in their laps and typing.

93. Six-Point Plan to Help Vols Coach Stick Around Longer -

On that day in December 2012 when Butch Jones was introduced as Tennessee’s head football coach, he told Vol Nation that he had a template for fixing everything.

He said: “The plan is infallible if the players buy in.”

94. The Role Of Conscious Corporations -

Denial of a human-centric world and its impact on the planet since the industrial revolution is no longer an acceptable worldview.

In March, we reached the point of no return, the point where most credible international scientists agree that damage will be unprecedented and relentless. As we have surpassed global CO2 concentrations at 400 parts per million (PPM), let’s make this alarm a time for changing the purpose of business.

95. Election Fallout: What a Trump Or Clinton Presidency Means for State -

Donald Trump is going to win easily in Tennessee.

Everyone, most of all the campaigns for both Trump and Hillary Clinton, accept this fact, as evidenced by the lack of campaign time spent in the state – and most of the South, for that matter – during this contentious campaign cycle.

96. Target Plays Up Value for the Holiday Season -

NEW YORK (AP) – From a Broadway-style marketing campaign to more exclusive toys, Target wants to lure shoppers during the final critical months of the year. More importantly, though, it needs to convince shoppers that it's the place for deals.

97. Freedom Awards Explore New History -

In the sanctuary of Mississippi Boulevard Christian Church last week, with former Mississippi Gov. William Winter and some students who racially integrated Memphis public schools in 1961, Swin Cash talked about memories of her last season as a professional athlete.

98. Big River -

Jim Jackson had it planned. At the third annual Arkansas Delta Flatlander bicycle ride, the 100-kilometer bike ride would become what it was intended to be – a ride across the Mississippi River from West Memphis to Memphis across the northern side of the Harahan Bridge.

99. When to Walk Away -

As strange as I know it sounds, I think of looking for a job a little bit like dating. Unless you are a reality TV show contestant, you’ve probably never gone on a first date hoping the other person would marry you. You’re there to get to know them and to decide whether or not to have a second date.

100. Town Hall Meetings Reflect Shift in Protest Discussions -

Almost three months after Black Lives Matter movement protestors shut down the Hernando DeSoto Bridge and as a result, opened talks with the administration of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland, some of the civic discussion has moved to economic issues.