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Editorial Results (free)

1. Weaver Joins Paragon Bank As Senior Loan Officer -

Steve Weaver has been appointed senior vice president, senior loan officer, at Paragon Bank. He brings with him more than 27 years’ experience in the banking industry, most recently at Simmons Bank, where he served as Southwest Tennessee market president and spearheaded the institution’s entry into the Memphis market in 2013.

2. Comptroller: City Obeyed Most Rules in Sale of Parks -

The state Comptroller’s Office has determined the city of Memphis’ Dec. 20, 2017, sale of Health Sciences Park and the easement to Memphis Park to Memphis Greenspace Inc. appropriately followed related laws with the exception of requiring Memphis Greenspace to submit an application so it could gauge the nonprofit’s financial stability.

3. Friedman Talks of Tribalism in Global Digitization -

At the end of his talk this week to a group of 250 at a Greater Memphis Chamber gathering, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman said all he has written about the Middle East and had supported for the region didn’t happen.

4. Last Word: Filing Deadline, Case & Vance In May and Paul Manafort at the Rivermont -

By our count, when the noon Thursday deadline for candidates in the May county primaries has come and gone, there could be -- could be -- four incumbent county commissioners who are effectively re-elected to their seats for another four-year term. And we already know the commission will have at least seven new faces in September. More interesting is that there are only four sets of primaries – all for countywide offices – that have multiple contenders in each primary. That’s out of 23 offices on the primary ballot.

5. Comptroller: City Obeyed Most Rules in Sale of Parks -

The state Comptroller’s Office has determined the city of Memphis’ Dec. 20, 2017, sale of Health Sciences Park and the easement to Memphis Park to Memphis Greenspace Inc. appropriately followed related laws with the exception of requiring Memphis Greenspace to submit an application so it could gauge the nonprofit’s financial stability.

6. Case, Vance Bringing 'Rise of the Rest' Startup Fund to Memphis This May -

The co-founder of America Online is coming to Memphis this May with his investment fund to hear pitches from local startup companies and award $100,000 in seed funding to one of them.

Steve Case, the chairman and CEO of the Washington, D.C.-based venture capital firm Revolution, and venture capitalist and author J.D. Vance are leading the second leg of the current Rise of the Rest bus tour. Rise of the Rest is also the name of the seed fund.

7. Comptroller: City of Memphis Followed Most Rules in Sale of Parks -

The state Comptroller’s Office has determined the city of Memphis’ Dec. 20, 2017, sale of Health Sciences Park and the easement to Memphis Park to Memphis Greenspace Inc. appropriately followed related laws with the exception of requiring Memphis Greenspace to submit an application so it could gauge the nonprofit’s financial stability.

8. Last Word: Shutdown Round Two, The Pastner Charges and 1968 Virtual Reality -

The federal government technically shutdown at midnight in Washington, D.C., Friday for the second time in 17 days. But the House and Senate were still going for a vote on a two-year budget compromise before dawn Friday morning as this is posted.

9. The Metrics Mayor -

At times in the last two years, political supporters of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland have been worried. They agree with what got him elected, his “brilliant at the basics” philosophy that makes basic services and fundamental play-it-safe financial strategies the priority at City Hall.

10. Monument Bills Create State Heritage Battlegrounds -

Legislative battles are looming over a spate of bills designed to hammer Memphis and any other cities accused of violating the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act.

Lawmakers filed several pieces of legislation aimed at punishing local governments in the wake of the Memphis City Council move to topple the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park and two other Confederate monuments in another park by selling the property to a newly created nonprofit organization.

11. Events -

Agape Child & Family Services will hold a career fair Wednesday, Feb. 7, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at its offices, 3160 Directors Row. The nonprofit is hiring for more than 30 open positions. Hiring managers from Agape will be on site for informal interviews, and candidates should bring a current resume. Visit agapemeanslove.org for details and requirements for the open positions.

12. Events -

Novel will host “Edge of the Wind” author James E. Cherry for a discussion and signing Tuesday, Feb. 6, at 6 p.m. at the bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended. Visit novelmemphis.com.

13. Events -

Novel will host “Edge of the Wind” author James E. Cherry for a discussion and signing Tuesday, Feb. 6, at 6 p.m. at the bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended. Visit novelmemphis.com.

14. The Week Ahead: Feb. 5-11, 2018 -

Good morning, Memphis! If you’re looking for a legit reason to “space out” this week, The Orpheum’s got you covered with two out-of-this-world events. Meanwhile, LeMoyne-Owen College honors Black History Month and a pair of local nonprofits celebrate the hope and heart of the city. And that’s just a taste of what’s on tap in The Week Ahead.

15. Here are Seven Memphis Charter Schools in Danger of Closing -

Seven Memphis charter schools could close in 2020 if they don’t improve, based on Shelby County Schools’ first report card comparing its schools.

The district’s newly released school performance scorecard rated seven of its 51 charters below 2 on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the top score. Under a new accountability system for charter schools, those that fall below 2 automatically begin a review process and must improve within two years or face revocation of their charters by the school board.

16. Last Word: Closing the Loophole, Skeleton Hotel Update and Jubilee Conversion -

The state legislator who sponsored the most recent version of the law making it much more difficult to remove Confederate monuments acknowledges that the city of Memphis found a legitimate loophole in the 2016 law he crafted. Republican Steve McDaniel, of Parkers Crossroads, tells our Nashville correspondent Sam Stockard that he has a bill in the House to close the loophole. But it won't undo what happened here. Although there is still a court fight over that taking shape.

17. Digest -

Memphis Toys R Us

To Remain Open

A representative with Toys R Us has confirmed to The Daily News that the retailer’s Memphis location, at 7676 Polo Ground Blvd., won’t close after all.

18. Events -

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson returns to Memphis to present “Ten Things You Should Know About the Universe” Wednesday, Feb. 7, at 7 p.m. at the Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main St. Tyson is returning by popular demand following a sold-out lecture at the Orpheum last year. Tickets start at $39. Visit orpheum-memphis.com.

19. Dreamers Deferred -

You never really get to the point where you can stand at a particular moment in time and forecast with any certainty how your life is going to turn out, how things are going to look or what’s going to be different over a long time horizon. That’s certainly the way it’s been, and still is, for Mauricio Calvo and Memphians like him.

20. McDaniel to Fashion Loophole Bill for State Monuments -

NASHVILLE – The House sponsor of the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act is preparing legislation to close a “loophole” Memphis used to spur removal of Confederate monuments from parks property it sold to a nonprofit group.

21. Last Word: 50 Years Ago, Skeleton Hotel in Court and New Moves on Forrest -

It was 50 years ago Thursday that the event that sparked the 1968 sanitation workers strike happened near Colonial and Sea Isle in East Memphis. City sanitation workers Robert Walker and Echol Cole were killed when the trash compactor on back of their city truck malfunctioned and crushed them.

22. Rotating Forrest Bust Out of Capitol Gains Momentum -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s days in the State Capitol could be numbered. Lt. Gov. Randy McNally, an Oak Ridge Republican, says he could support a move to rotate Forrest’s bust out of the Capitol and make sure Capitol displays are “more reflective of the entire history of Tennessee.”

23. Last Word: Wiretaps in the Wright Case, Target Layoffs and SCS Looks To Move -

Democratic Congressman Steve Cohen of Memphis among those boycotting the State of the Union address Tuesday evening by President Donald Trump. “The president is unworthy of the podium, the position and the power.” Republican Congressman David Kustoff of Germantown among those not boycotting SOTU. “Just one year after president Trump took the oath of office, our economy is the strongest it has been in decades. … We passed historic tax reform and we bolstered our military and support our veterans. Last year, the president kept his promises and tonight, he told the American people that he is not done.”

24. Ford Outlines Budget Process As Memphis’ New CFO -

Shirley Ford has been named chief financial officer for the city of Memphis. Ford, who was selected to be CFO by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and confirmed by the City Council, has served as the city’s comptroller since 2014. She has more than 30 years of financial, accounting and managerial experience. In addition, she is a certified public accountant and a certified municipal finance officer as designated by the state comptroller.

25. Permanent Presence -

Nia Zalamea was supposed to be an English professor until realizing that the English major at the University of Virginia involved more work than she wanted or would be able to handle.

Her calling, instead, turned out to be in the field of applied sciences. In subjects like biology and biochemistry. Couple that with her family’s long-running mission efforts and an interest in bringing health care to the underserved, and the result is – well, the thing on which Zalamea, who today is a general surgeon in Memphis with UT Methodist Physicians, spends most of her time outside of the 9-to-5.

26. Nashville Court Orders Second Attempt at Mediation on Monuments -

The Nashville chancellor who Monday ordered a hold on selling or transferring ownership of Confederate monuments removed from two Memphis parks followed up the next day with an order that all sides in the dispute enter mediation.

27. Last Word: Credit Hours & Tn Promise, Opioid Differences and Nikki's Hot Rebrand -

A very busy Monday and I feel like some of this is may be fueled by some of us just now getting completely over the flu or someone close who has the flu for the first time in the New Year. Whatever the case, Monday came with a curtain call of sorts by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, a court order on the Confederate monuments, year-end stats on crime in Memphis and countywide… a PILOT here, a building permit or three there.

28. Court Holds Up Sale or Transfer Of Confederate Monuments -

UPDATE: Chancellor Ellen Hobbs Lyle issued a second court order Tuesday, Jan. 30, that orders all sides in the litigation to enter into mediation on possible new locations for the removed monuments.

29. Lee, Boyd Pushing For Technical Education -

Bill Lee led with his master plumber’s license last week as he toured Moore Tech. “I’m running for governor, too, by the way,” the Republican primary contender from Williamson County said as he talked with those attending classes and their instructors.

30. The Week Ahead: Jan. 29-Feb. 4 -

Good morning, Memphis! Proceedings related to the city’s removal of Confederate statues from two parks get underway, just one of many events on a busy Monday. Check our rundown of all the happenings you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

31. Memphis Greenspace Plans Upgrades to City Parks -

Memphis Greenspace Inc. has announced a spring activation strategy for its current park portfolio of Memphis Park and Health Sciences Park.

32. Last Word: Eureka Education, Confederate Monuments in Court and Dillon Brooks -

Supermarkets are hard. That is the tag line in every discussion about getting a supermarket or grocery store for a given part of town that doesn’t have one. And once a new supermarket goes up somewhere else, there is inevitably word that a competitor or two is going to build nearby. The discussion always includes the mandatory recitation of the 3 to 4 percent profit margin stores operate on, which even knowledgeable critics of the decisions about where to locate and not to locate stores acknowledge is accurate.

33. Last Word: Risks by Race, ASD Changes in Frayser and Binghampton Style -

African-American children are more likely to die after surgery than white children, according to a new study by researchers at UTHSC and Le Bonheur. The researchers found that in every category that goes into determining the chance of dying, the risk for white children was overestimated and underestimated for black children. And the dynamics of the risk work differently by race. The conclusion is race-specific models on the issue work better than non race specific models.

34. ASD Proposes Shifting Memphis Middle School to Charter Group -

After years of dwindling enrollment, the only middle school in Memphis that’s run directly by Tennessee’s turnaround district could be switching hands.

The proposed change would keep Westside Achievement Middle School in the state-run Achievement School District but take it out of the district’s direct management. The plan would be to move Westside to Frayser Community Schools, a Memphis-based charter network that already operates two ASD schools.

35. Humane Society Names Davis 2018 Board President -

Ted Davis has been named 2018 president of the board of directors for the Humane Society of Memphis and Shelby County. Davis, who is a wealth adviser for Regions Bank, joined the humane society board in December 2015. His first priority was a campaign inspiring adopters to become donors, which led him to being the Paw Prints Gala committee chair in 2017.

36. Last Word: Shutdown Over?, Glen Farms Plans and Billy Richmond - Wing Guru -

The federal government shutdown for many of us outside the Beltway amounted to a message on a website saying the agency we were looking up was closed Monday. And Monday was the third and final day of the most recent shutdown. But the immigration policy known as DACA – Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals – is the issue to be explored by Congress in the three weeks that the continuing resolution covers. It’s an issue that there has been plenty of local discussion about

37. Boyd Says Reprisals For Removal Of Monuments Possible -

The city is bracing for some kind of backlash in the Tennessee Legislature for the December sale of two city parks to a private nonprofit and the removal of Confederate monuments in those parks.

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd says state officials could retaliate by refusing to approve the city’s request for an expansion of the Downtown Tourism Development Zone.

38. Some Express Interest in Monuments Removed From City Parks -

The private nonprofit that had the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments removed from city parks in December says it has fielded numerous offers to take the statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest, Jefferson Davis and a bust of Confederate Capt. Harvey Mathes in Memphis Park where the Davis statue stood.

39. Medicaid Expansion Splits Tenn. Governor Hopefuls in Health Forum -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A health care forum Friday illustrated the partisan split in the Tennessee governor's race over Medicaid expansion, with Democrats ranking it their top priority and Republicans opposing it or espousing other priorities.

40. Around Memphis | January 22, 2018 -

Here’s a look at recent Memphis-related news from around the web…

Doubting MLK During a Strike in Memphis
Conor Friedersdorf, The Atlantic

41. Last Word: The Snow Split, Amazon Post-Mortem and Intermodal Comeback -

A split verdict on Snow Day 4. Some school systems and colleges and universities are out again Friday, others are not and still others are opening later in the day. Shelby County Schools, which is out, says it has 13 extra days built into its schedule for just such an event or events – that is 13 days extra beyond the 180 days the state requires as the bare minimum for a school year.

42. Greenspace Nonprofit Details Offers For Confederate Monuments -

The private nonprofit group that had the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments removed from city parks in December says it has had numerous offers to take the statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as well as a bust of Confederate Captain Harvey Mathes in the same park where the Davis statue stood.

43. Around Memphis: Jan. 15, 2018 -

Here’s a look at Memphis-related news from around the web...

Stan Bronson Passes Away Tuesday: ‘Most Durable Batboy’ served the Tigers baseball program for 56 seasons
GoTigersGo.com

44. Shot Fired From Memphis Ignites Civil War Rematch -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest died in 1877, but 140 years later some people just can’t let their hero or the Old South go away.

In fact, the state Legislature is set to reignite the Civil War – to some degree – in 2018. We hope no gunshots are fired.

45. The Lane Ahead -

His first vision, Trey Moore says, was to become a “film and video type guy.” He had graduated Southaven High School, earned a communications degree at Memphis State, but didn’t have designs on going all-Hollywood.

46. Tennessee Lawmakers Head Into Session With Elections Looming -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee lawmakers return Tuesday for a session colored by upcoming elections and Gov. Bill Haslam's final lap before he hits his term limits.

This year, the Republican-led General Assembly likely won't face a monthslong fight over one topic, like the roads-funding package with gas tax hikes and other tax breaks that Haslam ushered into law in 2017.

47. McMullen: Legislative Session Influenced Timing in Monuments Removal -

Several nonprofits approached the city administration about buying Health Sciences and Memphis parks before the Memphis City Council approved the sale of each to Memphis Greenspace last month for $1,000 each. And some of them said no.

48. Weekend Monuments Protests, Response Suggest Shift -

Memphis Branch NAACP president Deidre Malone may have had the most concise description of what has changed since the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments came down Dec. 20.

“What we want happened. The monuments are down,” Malone said Friday, Jan. 5, as the NAACP and other groups called on Memphians to ignore plans for protests in the city the next day by groups opposed to the removal of the monuments.

49. We’re No. 1! -

While tax law changes have some worried about the impact on charitable giving in 2018, Community Foundation of Greater Memphis president Robert Fockler points to Memphis’s historical standing as a generous city and his foundation’s own growth as reasons he is not worried as the calendar flips to a new year.

50. Mayor Says Memphis 'Will Be Prepared' for Statue Protests -

If opponents of the removal of the city’s two most visible Civil War monuments follow through on plans for a Memphis protest Jan. 6, Mayor Jim Strickland said city government will be ready.

51. Moore Named Executive Director of Explore Bike Share -

Trey Moore has been named executive director of Explore Bike Share, the Memphis nonprofit that is preparing to launch a local bike-share system with 600 bicycles and 60 stations. Moore, who is returning to Memphis from Atlanta, Georgia, will lead Explore Bike Share’s staff in operations, fund development and community engagement activities in partnership with the organization’s board of directors.
As executive director, he also is committed to bicycling as a sustainable transportation option with access to as many Memphians as possible, and will help promote a bike-friendly culture in Memphis while encouraging exercise and healthy lifestyles.

52. City, County Governments on Different Paths -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and the city council members are half way through their four-year terms of office with the new year.

53. Democrats Look to Cooperate on Key Issues -

With the state’s budget projected to be tight and lawmakers lining up to run for re-election in 2018, the coming legislative session isn’t expected to yield many surprises.

But the 110th General Assembly still has a long row to hoe as the session starts Jan. 9 with new legislative offices and committee rooms in the renovated Cordell Hull Building in downtown Nashville.

54. Last Word: Falling Through Cracks, Germantown's Moratorium and Iowa's Defense -

The dean of the college of medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center talks about the death of his son a decade ago. That, he tells Michael Waddell in this powerful story, has been a driving force in his search for a way to bridge the gaps between treating substance abuse and treating the mental illness that can also be at play along with addiction. Dr. David Stern is proposing a new pilot program whose goal is to bridge the gaps and save lives.

55. Memphis Sound at 60 -

As Stax Records and Royal Studios both wrap up a year of celebrating their 60th anniversary, The Memphis News looks back at the creators and purveyors of the Memphis sound and its significance, both in its heyday and today.

56. Forrest Down -

It’s hard to know where the equestrian statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is when there aren’t lights on it.

That was the case Wednesday, Dec. 20, as the spotlights normally illuminating the likeness of the Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan grand wizard were doused.

57. Robertson Reignites United Way’s Iconic Brand -

“All the women in my family are natural-born leaders,” Lori Spicer Robertson says as she leans forward in her desk chair. “To me, that was the norm – just what you did.”

58. Memphis Habitat Unveils New Housing Development Plans, Fundraising Goal -

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Memphis has unveiled plans for its newest housing development: a 32-lot subdivision called Cedar Heights in South Memphis’ Castalia Heights neighborhood. The Wednesday, Dec. 13, announcement was part of a larger slate of goals and events to celebrate the local chapter’s 35th anniversary.

59. Memphis Habitat Unveils New Housing Development, Fundraising Goal -

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Memphis has unveiled plans for its newest housing development: a 32-lot subdivision called Cedar Heights in South Memphis’ Castalia Heights neighborhood. The Wednesday, Dec. 13, announcement was part of a larger slate of goals and events to celebrate the local chapter’s 35th anniversary.

60. Legislators Not Shy in Pushing ‘Model’ Bills -

The group that brought Tennessee the voter photo ID law could be on the brink of spawning another kink on the voting process, one that cross-checks jury service with voter rolls.

At the behest of the American Civil Rights Union, legislators across the nation who belong to the American Legislative Exchange Council could be sponsoring bills in the next couple of years requiring local election commissions to take a closer look at people who miss jury duty.

61. Last Word: Grizz Troubles Deepen, Germantown Kroger Enigma and The Strikers -

Tigers over Great Danes Tuesday at the Forum 67 – 58. The Grizz are in Washington Wednesday to play the Wizards and some of the attention around the Grizz is shifting away from what happens on the court. What would you call the place that the Grizz are at this mile marker past Grit & Grind? It is more than a losing streak, says Don Wade in his Press Box column.

62. Leaps and Bounds -

Memphis’ health care industry was packed with activity in 2017, everything from a slew of new hires and personnel changes to new facility openings, major research announcements and expansions.

63. New Memphis Promotes Dakin to Pilot ‘Launch’ Initiative -

Frankie Dakin has been promoted to director of strategic initiatives at New Memphis, a role in which he’ll pilot the organization’s new Launch: Campus to Career program. The initiative, which builds on New Memphis’ Summer Experience, connects college students with professional opportunities and networks to inspire them to launch careers in Memphis. Dakin will lead the program, encouraging area students to find and prepare for internships with local employers.

64. WA -

Good morning, Memphis! Dust off your robes and lightsabers, because the latest “Star Wars” movie hits theaters this week. Of course, there’s plenty more to keep you busy in the coming days. Here’s what you need to know about in The Week Ahead – no Jedi powers required.

65. Week Ahead -

Good morning, Memphis! Dust off your robes and lightsabers, because the latest “Star Wars” movie hits theaters this week. Of course, there’s plenty more to keep you busy in the coming days. Here’s what you need to know about in The Week Ahead – no Jedi powers required.

66. The Week Ahead: Dec. 11-17 -

Good morning, Memphis! Dust off your robes and lightsabers, because the latest "Star Wars" movie hits theaters this week. Of course, there's plenty more to keep you busy in the coming days. Here's what you need to know about in The Week Ahead - no Jedi powers required.

67. Out-of-Town Investors Buy Gibson Guitar Factory -

145 Lt. George W. Lee Ave., Memphis, TN 38103: Investment firms in New York and Miami have purchased the Gibson Guitar Factory property in Downtown Memphis and an additional warehouse Gibson Brands Inc. owns in Nashville.

68. Events -

Tennessee Shakespeare Company will stage Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot” Thursday, Dec. 7, through Dec. 17 at Dixon Gallery & Gardens’ Winegardner Auditorium, 4339 Park Ave. Visit tnshakespeare.org for showtimes and tickets.

69. Events -

The 16th annual Toy Truck toy drive for Porter-Leath will be open Wednesday through Friday, Dec. 6-8, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Bud Davis Cadillac, 5433 Poplar Ave., and Saturday, Dec. 9, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at WMC Action News 5, 1960 Union Ave. The drive collects new, unwrapped toys that promote early childhood learning (dolls, puzzles, balls, blocks, etc.) and cash, check and credit card donations to benefit children 6 weeks to 5 years old served by Porter-Leath’s preschool program. Visit porterleath.org.

70. Events -

The UniverSoul Circus Big Top Christmas visits Memphis Tuesday through Sunday, Dec. 5-10, at Hickory Ridge Mall, 6075 Winchester Road. The Christmas-themed circus production features contortionists, motocross stunts, dancers, animal acts and more. Tickets start at $16. Visit universoulcircus.com for details and showtimes.

71. Coalition Taps Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

72. Events -

Starry Nights at Shelby Farms Park hosts Run, Walk, Bike Night Monday, Dec. 4, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the park, 6903 Great View Drive N. Starry Nights will be closed to cars; Hyde Lake Wheel House will be open for bike rentals. Admission is $5. Visit shelbyfarmspark.org for a list of Mistletoe Village activities and other details.

73. Events -

The St. Jude Memphis Marathon Weekend races take place Saturday, Dec. 2, starting at Second Street and Monroe Avenue. Race registration is closed, but spectators are welcome to bring signs and cheer for runners. Some streets will be closed or have limited traffic access during the race. Visit stjudemarathon.org for a street closure list and other details.

74. Will Pre-K Put the City of Memphis Back in the Education Business? -

For the first time since the city of Memphis ceased funding schools after the historic merger of city and county districts, it’s looking to get back into education – by putting dollars into pre-K classrooms.

75. Coalition Signs on With Green & Healthy Homes Initiative -

Leaders from Memphis and Shelby County and representatives from nearly 25 partner organizations signed an agreement Thursday morning, Nov. 30, at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library in East Memphis to work together on Tennessee’s first Green & Healthy Homes Initiative (GHHI) led by the Baltimore-based organization.

76. Flap Over Botched ACT Test Leads Tennessee to Consider SAT -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A disagreement over ACT scores withheld from students at a Tennessee high school could lead state officials to consider moving to a rival assessment test.

Knox County Mayor Tim Burchett and state Senate Speaker Randy McNally were among officials who met with ACT officials Tuesday in an unsuccessful attempt to persuade them to validate the scores of 409 Bearden High School students who took the test last month.

77. Human-Trafficking Group Gets First Leader -

Not long after starting her new job Oct. 1 as the first executive director of Thistle & Bee, a social enterprise focused on helping women who’ve survived sex trafficking and prostitution, Jordan Boss was allowed to ride along one night with a Memphis Police Department detective.

78. Kail, DeSaussure File In May County Primaries -

Attorney Danny Kail has filed in the May 1 Republican primary for Shelby County clerk and incumbent Republican Criminal Court Clerk Richard DeSaussure has filed for re-election.

79. Last Word: Change at the Top, Real Estate Action on Bellevue and Produce History -

Welcome back to the work week and however much this is a grind, you are probably having a better work week than David Fizdale who suddenly got the ax from the Grizz front office Monday afternoon. This was not altogether unexpected following a vocal post-game dissent from Marc Gasol after Big Spain came out of what wound up being a Sunday loss to Brooklyn in the fourth quarter – the latest in a string of losses after a strong start to the season by the Grizz.

80. Honor The People In Your Life -

It’s here – the Christmas season. You cannot hide. It’s everywhere! How will you choose to participate?

Will you remember the “reason for the season”? Will you remember to express joy for the “light of the world”? Will you get caught up in expectations that cannot be fulfilled? Will you try to hide from it all? We have an idea: Honor the people in your life with a gift to a nonprofit.

81. Wiping Slate Clean: Now Less About Who Can Afford It -

The scales of justice in Tennessee are slowly tipping back toward the poor – and not so poor – helping them regain traction lost to often-minor transgressions.

Change is taking place in court battles and in the Republican-controlled Legislature, believe it or not.

82. Expanding Its Reach -

His was a story as tragic as it is familiar. E. Young had immediate family members in a gang. More than one gang tried to recruit him. His parents were in no way equipped to raise him.

When he moved in with an aunt, Phyllis Brown, he was by his own words “angry, depressed.”

83. Fired Testing Company Seeks $25.3M for Work on TNReady’s Bumpy Rollout -

Tennessee officials won’t talk about the state’s ongoing dispute with the testing company it fired last year, but the company’s president is.

Henry Scherich says Tennessee owes Measurement Inc. $25.3 million for services associated with TNReady, the state’s new standardized test for its public schools. That’s nearly a quarter of the company’s five-year, $108 million contract with the state, which Tennessee officials canceled after technical problems roiled the test’s 2016 rollout.

84. Remington College Adds Dental Assisting Diploma -

Remington College’s Memphis campus has added a dental assisting diploma program to its offer-ings.

The curriculum covers topics such as oral anatomy, oral radiology and specific dental procedures, according to Remington College. I

85. Memphis Doctor Chosen As ‘Family Physician of Year’ -

Memphis-based family care physician Dr. Susan Nelson has been chosen as the recipient of the Tennessee Academy of Family Physicians’ 2017 Family Physician of the Year Award.

86. Last Word: Lawyering Up, No More Beale Street Cover and Pastner Probe -

Committee day for the Shelby County Commission on Wednesday has now come to include a special meeting to vote on something. And that something amounts to doubling down on the move by commission chairwoman Heidi Shafer to lawyer up on the issue of opioid abuse and the role big pharma has played in the problem. The special meeting comes two days after Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell sued Shafer in Chancery Court claiming she violated the county charter by unilaterally making that decision last week.

87. Memphis Doctor Chosen as ‘Family Physician of Year’ -

Memphis-based family care physician Dr. Susan Nelson has been chosen as the recipient of the Tennessee Academy of Family Physicians’ 2017 Family Physician of the Year Award.

88. Remington College Memphis Adds Dental Assisting Diploma -

Remington College’s Memphis campus has added a dental assisting diploma program to its offerings.

The curriculum covers topics such as oral anatomy, oral radiology and specific dental procedures, according to Remington College. In addition, students get hands-on training in skills that could qualify them for an entry-level position as a dental assistant.

89. Univ. of Memphis’ Lambuth Campus Thriving, With More Growth Expected -

The university, and the history, might have been lost. Six years ago, with the after-effects of a slowed economy still making an impact, Lambuth University in Jackson, Tennessee, was forced to shut down.

90. Goodin Joins Hagwood Adelman As Memphis Managing Attorney -

Michael T. Goodin has joined Hagwood Adelman Tipton PC as managing attorney of the Memphis office. In that role, he provides legal services to HAT’s clients in matters such as medical malpractice and senior housing litigation for health care providers along the continuum of care, including skilled nursing, assisted living, behavioral health, home health and hospice litigation. In addition, he assists in supervising the attorney and paraprofessional teams.

91. Mickell Lowery Uses Lessons From Council Race in Commission Bid -

Two years to the month after he conceded defeat in his first political outing, Mickell Lowery is returning to the local political arena – albeit a different part of the arena.

Lowery is running in the May Democratic primary for Shelby County Commission District 8, the seat held by Democrat Walter Bailey, who is term-limited and cannot seek re-election in 2018.

92. Memphis Leaders Await Final Reports for Possible Coliseum Renovation -

As Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland’s administration considers final details for a Fairgrounds redevelopment plan, he and his staff are waiting on a complete analysis of the condition of the Mid-South Coliseum.

93. Pettit Joins Food Bank As Chief Development Officer -

Attorney Peter Pettit has joined Mid-South Food Bank as chief development officer following his recent retirement as a partner in the Memphis office of Bass, Berry & Sims PLC. In his new role, Pettit works closely with food bank leaders to develop strategies and relationships with major gift donors, and specifically is working to complete the $12.5 million “Hunger to Hope” capital campaign.

94. Last Word: 'Seismic Shift,' Mason Village and Running A Store From A Cloud -

It doesn’t take a lot of imagination to drive through the old town part of Cordova near its one-time train station and see the potential. Now word of a new restaurant opening later this month in what is known as Farley House. The old town is an interesting mix of new development and old development including an iconic country Baptist church that not too long ago turned 100 years old. And then there is the trail head for the Shelby Farms Greenline that runs near the train station.

95. Steele Joins Southern Growth Studio’s Anthropology Team -

April Steele has joined Southern Growth Studio as a business anthropologist, responsible for collecting and analyzing data to evaluate existing and potential products and services. Steele’s hire comes as the Memphis-based innovation consulting firm grows its applied anthropology practice. Using qualitative social research methods like ethnography, the anthropology team steers the innovation process, conducting primary research to distill and communicate key insights to clients.

96. Events -

Living Beyond Breast Cancer will host its “Sharing Wisdom, Sharing Strength” national conference Friday through Sunday, Oct. 6-8, at The Peabody hotel, 149 Union Ave. The conference, held in partnership with the Memphis Breast Cancer Consortium and the Common Table Health Alliance, will convene national experts, survivors and caregivers for a weekend of information, yoga and support. Limited walk-up registrations available. Visit lbbc.org for details.

97. Events -

Living Beyond Breast Cancer will host its “Sharing Wisdom, Sharing Strength” national conference Friday through Sunday, Oct. 6-8, at The Peabody hotel, 149 Union Ave. The conference, held in partnership with the Memphis Breast Cancer Consortium and the Common Table Health Alliance, will convene national experts, survivors and caregivers for a weekend of information, yoga and support. Limited walk-up registrations available. Visit lbbc.org for details.

98. Last Word: Bonus For the Head Tiger, Brooks Downtown? and Harris Runs -

A $100,000 bonus from the University of Memphis board of trustees for U of M president David Rudd at Wednesday’s trustees meeting. The bonus is from private funds raised by the university foundation. The board also approved a paid parental leave policy – specifically the funding for that policy. And it reviewed scaled-back plans for the $30 million new rec center for students that will incorporate some of the existing rec center.

99. Profound Effect -

The life of a college basketball walk-on tends to be an uneven equation. All those hours of practice, day after day after day. In return, precious minutes on game nights. Well, every few weeks.

In the case of Jonathan Wilfong, a Memphis University School grad who walked on at Southern Methodist University, he played 11 minutes his entire freshman season and 22 as a sophomore. He got a little more run the next two years, including a 16-minute stint when SMU smashed the University of Memphis 103-62 as Wilfong scored four points.

100. Taylor Joins JA As VP of Development -

Latoria Taylor has been named vice president of development for Junior Achievement of Memphis and the Mid-South. She oversees all fundraising and marketing efforts for the nonprofit, which is dedicated to teaching children “how business works” and inspiring them to own their economic success.