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Editorial Results (free)

1. Republican Contenders for Mayor Say City Paying for Monuments Misstep -

The three Republican contenders for Shelby County Mayor believe the city of Memphis acted improperly in removing Confederate monuments from city parks last year and is, in effect, paying the piper for challenging the Tennessee Legislature.

2. GoFundMe Page Seeks to Reimburse Memphis for State Money Withdrawal -

NASHVILLE – A GoFundMe page has been started on Facebook to raise funds to make up a $250,000 budget cut the Tennessee Legislature levied against the city of Memphis for removing Confederate monuments from two city parks late last year.

3. Green Dot Gets $3M Loan For Bluff City High School -

Green Dot Public Schools is preparing for renovations of its Bluff City High School in Hickory Hill with a $3 million loan from Nonprofit Finance Fund and Boston Community Capital.

The loan is for further renovations, including modular buildings for classrooms and staff offices, at the charter school’s campus in what was Solid Rock Christian Church, 4100 Ross Road.

4. Overton Square Adds Two New Restaurants in One Week -

2110 Madison Ave.

Memphis, TN 38104

Lease Amount: 3,790 square feet 

Tenant: Bogard

Tenant’s Agent: Barry Maynard, LRG

Landlord: Loeb Properties Inc.

5. Green Dot Gets $3M Loan For Bluff City High School -

Green Dot Public Schools is preparing for renovations of its Bluff City High School in Hickory Hill with a $3 million loan from Nonprofit Finance Fund and Boston Community Capital.

The loan is for further renovations, including modular buildings for classrooms and staff offices, at the charter school’s campus in what was Solid Rock Christian Church, 4100 Ross Road.

6. Study: South Should Spend on Schools, Train Homegrown Talent -

DURHAM, N.C. (AP) – As teachers in multiple states protest for better pay, a new study warns that the fast-growing South region must invest more in public schools and higher education to ensure its homegrown talent shares in its economic prosperity.

7. House Committee Revives Bill That Would Charge Local Officials -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee bill that would allow local officials to be charged with a felony for passing sanctuary city ordinances or measures that would illegally remove Confederate statues has gotten new life.

8. UTHSC Addiction Center To Host Opioid Forums -

The Center for Addiction Science at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and the Memphis Area Prevention Coalition will present forums April 18 and 19 to educate health care providers, first responders and the public on recognizing and treating opioid use disorder.

9. Perry Leading Fire Museum Forward as Executive Director -

Shannon Perry became executive director of the Fire Museum of Memphis earlier this year, a role that brings her back to the institution she helped launch in the 1990s, when she served as its first curator. As executive director, Perry is the Fire Museum’s only full-time employee, and she handles a range of functions – including its collection, exhibits and facilities, budgets, fundraising, public relations, special events, staff and volunteers – while also working directly with the museum’s board.

10. Former FHN Communications Chief Launches New Venture -

Back in the summer, Memphis-based First Tennessee Bank was listed as the fifth most reputable bank in the nation in a report from the industry-focused news publication “American Banker.”

11. Akbari’s Expungement Bill Moves Toward Passage -

NASHVILLE – Buoyed by the support of Gov. Bill Haslam, legislation making it less expensive for non-violent felons to clear their records is rolling through the General Assembly.

House bill 1862, sponsored by Rep. Raumesh Akbari, is set to be heard April 2 in the full House after clearing the Finance, Ways & Means Committee this week with no debate or opposition.

12. Last Word: Yoga's Return, Strickland on MLK50 and The Broad Water Tower Move -

The two parks where Confederate monuments were removed this past December will feature some new experiences now that spring is here both by the calendar and by all that flowers and clouds that are heavy with rain. Memphis Greenspace, the nonprofit that bought Health Sciences and Memphis Parks from the city at the end of 2017, will roll out its first programming for the two parks next week including a Truth Booth at Memphis Park along with the return of Downtown Yoga. It will be tai chi Tuesdays and yoga Thursdays at Health Sciences Park along with a lunchtime music series.

13. Davy Crockett’s Fine, But Let’s Not Get Carried Away -

The Tennessee General Assembly is making some monumental decisions these days – literally.

Not only is the Legislature prepared to put a statue of Tennessee folk hero Davy Crockett in front of the State Capitol, replacing obscure Nashville politician Edward Carmack, it’s also likely to erect a monument, or memorial, to unborn children in the ongoing battle against abortion.

14. Last Word: Graceland Responds, The Hustle's First Season and Memphis Rent -

Sun Studio getting a fresh coat of paint Tuesday as city road crews were redoing some lines on Downtown streets including turning arrows in the left curb lane that always need pointing out to visitors baffled by the Memphis enigma that is one-way streets.

15. McCann Launches Nonprofit Eating Disorders Association -

Teri Hardister McCann, founder and executive director of Fairhaven Treatment Center for Eating Disorders, has launched the Mid-South Eating Disorders Association, a nonprofit organization for treatment providers seeking to build community, access educational opportunities, and build awareness of treatment options for eating disorders. McCann serves as the founding president of MSEDA.

16. Tenn.'s Road, Infrastructure Systems Problem Shared Across State -

Though we often complain about our government, we count on it every day, in large ways and small.

An example of a small way … potholes. Which don’t seem like a small issue after they cause your tire(s) to blow out.

17. Serving Seniors -

Memphis Jewish Home and Rehab broke ground last month on a $7.5 million rehab wing. The addition will include 16 private treatment rooms, a new dining area, an aqua therapy pool, an indoor walking path and space for more exercise equipment.

18. CSE’s Martin Helping Students Find Their Voice -

Katie Martin’s required coursework in her dual degree master’s program at the University of Texas in Austin had the Texas native walking the length of a specific dichotomy every day.

19. Bill Making It a Felony for Unauthorized Monument Action Dies for the Session -

NASHVILLE – One of several bills considered retribution against the city of Memphis for the removal of Confederate statues died in a House committee today amid questions about its constitutionality.

20. Good Shepherd Pharmacy Continues Growth with new Chief Medical Officer -

Whenever Dr. Amara Elochukwu discharges a patient and sends them away with medications, she always worries after they leave if they’ll actually be able to afford the drugs.

If they can’t, she often wonders, what’s the point? Why even prescribe them? That concern explains why Dr. Elochukwu is in the process of joining Good Shepherd Pharmacy in Memphis on a part-time basis as the pharmacy’s first chief medical officer.

21. Here are the Four Candidates to be the Next Achievement School District Superintendent -

Four candidates are in the running to become the next leader of Tennessee’s state-run turnaround district, including one who is based in Memphis.

The state Department of Education released to Chalkbeat on Wednesday the list of candidates to lead the Achievement School District. Three candidates are from outside of the state, and all four are men with experience in charters, turnaround work, or state departments of education.

22. Digest -

Memphis Grizzlies Suffer 15th Consecutive Loss

The Grizzlies lost their 15th straight game, 119-110 at Chicago, on Wednesday, March 7.

The team has not won since defeating the Phoenix Suns at FedExForum on Jan. 29.

23. Civil War Re-Enactor Outflanked On Statues, Medicaid Expansion -

When state Rep. Steve McDaniel was a youngster he often read the historical marker at the intersection of Highway 22 and Wildersville Road detailing Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s first West Tennessee raid in the Battle of Parker’s Crossroads.

24. Monuments Bill Would Establish Felony Charge for Some Votes -

NASHVILLE – A state legislator is set to seek the attorney general’s advice on legislation enabling the state to charge local elected officials with a felony for “knowingly” casting votes in conflict with state law.

25. Trey Carter Honored Among Top 35 Millennial Influencers -

Patrick “Trey” Carter III has been named one of the Top 35 Millennial Influencers in the Country by the Next Big Thing Movement, a global network of more than 20,000 young professionals and creatives. Carter, president of Olympic Career Training Institute and an active community volunteer, is the only Tennessean to be included on the list. He will be honored Saturday, March 10, at NBTM’s Forward Conference in New York City alongside other influencers, including “The Daily Show” host Trevor Noah, Teen Vogue editor Elaine Welteroth and YouTube vlogger Tyler Oakley.

26. Forrest Slave Market Site to Get New Marker In April -

A new historical marker to be unveiled April 4 on the southwest corner of Adams Avenue and B.B. King Boulevard will note what the existing 63-year old marker doesn’t – that it was not only an early home of Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard Nathan Bedford Forrest. It was also the site of the slave market that Forrest owned and operated for six years.

27. What’s a Volanthropist? A Dolunteer? -

More and more of us live a “mobile” lifestyle, using our devices for everything from grocery shopping to bill paying. Yet there is often a disconnect between mobile life and nonprofit life.

28. Members of Congress Lay Wreath at Site of King Assassination -

MEMPHIS – About a dozen Democrats and Republicans prayed and sang "Amazing Grace" during a solemn ceremony Friday at the site where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated nearly 50 years ago, marking the start of a three-day congressional "pilgrimage" to sites with ties to the civil rights era in the South.

29. S2N Offers Free Website For Local Nonprofit -

Branding and digital agency S2N will provide a free, mobile-responsive website to a local nonprofit organization in celebration of the agency’s 10-year anniversary.

Beginning Monday, Feb. 26, any nonprofit interested in participating in the giveaway should submit their community mission, along with an explanation of how a new website would help further their mission, to www.s2ndesign.com/non-profit-website-giveaway.

30. Child Services Meetings In Shelby County March 8 -

As part of an ongoing effort to raise the quality of child care services, the Tennessee Department of Human Services is planning eight focus group meetings across the state, two held each day in Shelby, Davidson, Knox and Hamilton counties.

31. Child Care Services Meetings In Shelby County March 8 -

As part of an ongoing effort to raise the quality of child care services, the Tennessee Department of Human Services is planning eight focus group meetings across the state, two held each day in Shelby, Davidson, Knox and Hamilton counties.

32. S2N Offers Free Website For Local Nonprofit -

Branding and digital agency S2N will provide a free, mobile-responsive website to a local nonprofit organization in celebration of the agency’s 10-year anniversary.

Beginning Monday, Feb. 26, any nonprofit interested in participating in the giveaway should submit their community mission, along with an explanation of how a new website would help further their mission, to www.s2ndesign.com/non-profit-website-giveaway.

33. Weaver Joins Paragon Bank As Senior Loan Officer -

Steve Weaver has been appointed senior vice president, senior loan officer, at Paragon Bank. He brings with him more than 27 years’ experience in the banking industry, most recently at Simmons Bank, where he served as Southwest Tennessee market president and spearheaded the institution’s entry into the Memphis market in 2013.

34. Comptroller: City Obeyed Most Rules in Sale of Parks -

The state Comptroller’s Office has determined the city of Memphis’ Dec. 20, 2017, sale of Health Sciences Park and the easement to Memphis Park to Memphis Greenspace Inc. appropriately followed related laws with the exception of requiring Memphis Greenspace to submit an application so it could gauge the nonprofit’s financial stability.

35. Friedman Talks of Tribalism in Global Digitization -

At the end of his talk this week to a group of 250 at a Greater Memphis Chamber gathering, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman said all he has written about the Middle East and had supported for the region didn’t happen.

36. Last Word: Filing Deadline, Case & Vance In May and Paul Manafort at the Rivermont -

By our count, when the noon Thursday deadline for candidates in the May county primaries has come and gone, there could be -- could be -- four incumbent county commissioners who are effectively re-elected to their seats for another four-year term. And we already know the commission will have at least seven new faces in September. More interesting is that there are only four sets of primaries – all for countywide offices – that have multiple contenders in each primary. That’s out of 23 offices on the primary ballot.

37. Comptroller: City Obeyed Most Rules in Sale of Parks -

The state Comptroller’s Office has determined the city of Memphis’ Dec. 20, 2017, sale of Health Sciences Park and the easement to Memphis Park to Memphis Greenspace Inc. appropriately followed related laws with the exception of requiring Memphis Greenspace to submit an application so it could gauge the nonprofit’s financial stability.

38. Case, Vance Bringing 'Rise of the Rest' Startup Fund to Memphis This May -

The co-founder of America Online is coming to Memphis this May with his investment fund to hear pitches from local startup companies and award $100,000 in seed funding to one of them.

Steve Case, the chairman and CEO of the Washington, D.C.-based venture capital firm Revolution, and venture capitalist and author J.D. Vance are leading the second leg of the current Rise of the Rest bus tour. Rise of the Rest is also the name of the seed fund.

39. Comptroller: City of Memphis Followed Most Rules in Sale of Parks -

The state Comptroller’s Office has determined the city of Memphis’ Dec. 20, 2017, sale of Health Sciences Park and the easement to Memphis Park to Memphis Greenspace Inc. appropriately followed related laws with the exception of requiring Memphis Greenspace to submit an application so it could gauge the nonprofit’s financial stability.

40. Last Word: Shutdown Round Two, The Pastner Charges and 1968 Virtual Reality -

The federal government technically shutdown at midnight in Washington, D.C., Friday for the second time in 17 days. But the House and Senate were still going for a vote on a two-year budget compromise before dawn Friday morning as this is posted.

41. The Metrics Mayor -

At times in the last two years, political supporters of Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland have been worried. They agree with what got him elected, his “brilliant at the basics” philosophy that makes basic services and fundamental play-it-safe financial strategies the priority at City Hall.

42. Monument Bills Create State Heritage Battlegrounds -

Legislative battles are looming over a spate of bills designed to hammer Memphis and any other cities accused of violating the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act.

Lawmakers filed several pieces of legislation aimed at punishing local governments in the wake of the Memphis City Council move to topple the Nathan Bedford Forrest statue in Health Sciences Park and two other Confederate monuments in another park by selling the property to a newly created nonprofit organization.

43. Events -

Agape Child & Family Services will hold a career fair Wednesday, Feb. 7, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at its offices, 3160 Directors Row. The nonprofit is hiring for more than 30 open positions. Hiring managers from Agape will be on site for informal interviews, and candidates should bring a current resume. Visit agapemeanslove.org for details and requirements for the open positions.

44. Events -

Novel will host “Edge of the Wind” author James E. Cherry for a discussion and signing Tuesday, Feb. 6, at 6 p.m. at the bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended. Visit novelmemphis.com.

45. Events -

Novel will host “Edge of the Wind” author James E. Cherry for a discussion and signing Tuesday, Feb. 6, at 6 p.m. at the bookstore, 387 Perkins Road Extended. Visit novelmemphis.com.

46. The Week Ahead: Feb. 5-11, 2018 -

Good morning, Memphis! If you’re looking for a legit reason to “space out” this week, The Orpheum’s got you covered with two out-of-this-world events. Meanwhile, LeMoyne-Owen College honors Black History Month and a pair of local nonprofits celebrate the hope and heart of the city. And that’s just a taste of what’s on tap in The Week Ahead.

47. Here are Seven Memphis Charter Schools in Danger of Closing -

Seven Memphis charter schools could close in 2020 if they don’t improve, based on Shelby County Schools’ first report card comparing its schools.

The district’s newly released school performance scorecard rated seven of its 51 charters below 2 on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being the top score. Under a new accountability system for charter schools, those that fall below 2 automatically begin a review process and must improve within two years or face revocation of their charters by the school board.

48. Last Word: Closing the Loophole, Skeleton Hotel Update and Jubilee Conversion -

The state legislator who sponsored the most recent version of the law making it much more difficult to remove Confederate monuments acknowledges that the city of Memphis found a legitimate loophole in the 2016 law he crafted. Republican Steve McDaniel, of Parkers Crossroads, tells our Nashville correspondent Sam Stockard that he has a bill in the House to close the loophole. But it won't undo what happened here. Although there is still a court fight over that taking shape.

49. Digest -

Memphis Toys R Us

To Remain Open

A representative with Toys R Us has confirmed to The Daily News that the retailer’s Memphis location, at 7676 Polo Ground Blvd., won’t close after all.

50. Events -

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson returns to Memphis to present “Ten Things You Should Know About the Universe” Wednesday, Feb. 7, at 7 p.m. at the Orpheum Theatre, 203 S. Main St. Tyson is returning by popular demand following a sold-out lecture at the Orpheum last year. Tickets start at $39. Visit orpheum-memphis.com.

51. Dreamers Deferred -

You never really get to the point where you can stand at a particular moment in time and forecast with any certainty how your life is going to turn out, how things are going to look or what’s going to be different over a long time horizon. That’s certainly the way it’s been, and still is, for Mauricio Calvo and Memphians like him.

52. McDaniel to Fashion Loophole Bill for State Monuments -

NASHVILLE – The House sponsor of the Tennessee Heritage Protection Act is preparing legislation to close a “loophole” Memphis used to spur removal of Confederate monuments from parks property it sold to a nonprofit group.

53. Last Word: 50 Years Ago, Skeleton Hotel in Court and New Moves on Forrest -

It was 50 years ago Thursday that the event that sparked the 1968 sanitation workers strike happened near Colonial and Sea Isle in East Memphis. City sanitation workers Robert Walker and Echol Cole were killed when the trash compactor on back of their city truck malfunctioned and crushed them.

54. Rotating Forrest Bust Out of Capitol Gains Momentum -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s days in the State Capitol could be numbered. Lt. Gov. Randy McNally, an Oak Ridge Republican, says he could support a move to rotate Forrest’s bust out of the Capitol and make sure Capitol displays are “more reflective of the entire history of Tennessee.”

55. Last Word: Wiretaps in the Wright Case, Target Layoffs and SCS Looks To Move -

Democratic Congressman Steve Cohen of Memphis among those boycotting the State of the Union address Tuesday evening by President Donald Trump. “The president is unworthy of the podium, the position and the power.” Republican Congressman David Kustoff of Germantown among those not boycotting SOTU. “Just one year after president Trump took the oath of office, our economy is the strongest it has been in decades. … We passed historic tax reform and we bolstered our military and support our veterans. Last year, the president kept his promises and tonight, he told the American people that he is not done.”

56. Ford Outlines Budget Process As Memphis’ New CFO -

Shirley Ford has been named chief financial officer for the city of Memphis. Ford, who was selected to be CFO by Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and confirmed by the City Council, has served as the city’s comptroller since 2014. She has more than 30 years of financial, accounting and managerial experience. In addition, she is a certified public accountant and a certified municipal finance officer as designated by the state comptroller.

57. Permanent Presence -

Nia Zalamea was supposed to be an English professor until realizing that the English major at the University of Virginia involved more work than she wanted or would be able to handle.

Her calling, instead, turned out to be in the field of applied sciences. In subjects like biology and biochemistry. Couple that with her family’s long-running mission efforts and an interest in bringing health care to the underserved, and the result is – well, the thing on which Zalamea, who today is a general surgeon in Memphis with UT Methodist Physicians, spends most of her time outside of the 9-to-5.

58. Nashville Court Orders Second Attempt at Mediation on Monuments -

The Nashville chancellor who Monday ordered a hold on selling or transferring ownership of Confederate monuments removed from two Memphis parks followed up the next day with an order that all sides in the dispute enter mediation.

59. Last Word: Credit Hours & Tn Promise, Opioid Differences and Nikki's Hot Rebrand -

A very busy Monday and I feel like some of this is may be fueled by some of us just now getting completely over the flu or someone close who has the flu for the first time in the New Year. Whatever the case, Monday came with a curtain call of sorts by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, a court order on the Confederate monuments, year-end stats on crime in Memphis and countywide… a PILOT here, a building permit or three there.

60. Court Holds Up Sale or Transfer Of Confederate Monuments -

UPDATE: Chancellor Ellen Hobbs Lyle issued a second court order Tuesday, Jan. 30, that orders all sides in the litigation to enter into mediation on possible new locations for the removed monuments.

61. Lee, Boyd Pushing For Technical Education -

Bill Lee led with his master plumber’s license last week as he toured Moore Tech. “I’m running for governor, too, by the way,” the Republican primary contender from Williamson County said as he talked with those attending classes and their instructors.

62. The Week Ahead: Jan. 29-Feb. 4 -

Good morning, Memphis! Proceedings related to the city’s removal of Confederate statues from two parks get underway, just one of many events on a busy Monday. Check our rundown of all the happenings you need to know about in The Week Ahead…

63. Memphis Greenspace Plans Upgrades to City Parks -

Memphis Greenspace Inc. has announced a spring activation strategy for its current park portfolio of Memphis Park and Health Sciences Park.

64. Last Word: Eureka Education, Confederate Monuments in Court and Dillon Brooks -

Supermarkets are hard. That is the tag line in every discussion about getting a supermarket or grocery store for a given part of town that doesn’t have one. And once a new supermarket goes up somewhere else, there is inevitably word that a competitor or two is going to build nearby. The discussion always includes the mandatory recitation of the 3 to 4 percent profit margin stores operate on, which even knowledgeable critics of the decisions about where to locate and not to locate stores acknowledge is accurate.

65. Last Word: Risks by Race, ASD Changes in Frayser and Binghampton Style -

African-American children are more likely to die after surgery than white children, according to a new study by researchers at UTHSC and Le Bonheur. The researchers found that in every category that goes into determining the chance of dying, the risk for white children was overestimated and underestimated for black children. And the dynamics of the risk work differently by race. The conclusion is race-specific models on the issue work better than non race specific models.

66. ASD Proposes Shifting Memphis Middle School to Charter Group -

After years of dwindling enrollment, the only middle school in Memphis that’s run directly by Tennessee’s turnaround district could be switching hands.

The proposed change would keep Westside Achievement Middle School in the state-run Achievement School District but take it out of the district’s direct management. The plan would be to move Westside to Frayser Community Schools, a Memphis-based charter network that already operates two ASD schools.

67. Humane Society Names Davis 2018 Board President -

Ted Davis has been named 2018 president of the board of directors for the Humane Society of Memphis and Shelby County. Davis, who is a wealth adviser for Regions Bank, joined the humane society board in December 2015. His first priority was a campaign inspiring adopters to become donors, which led him to being the Paw Prints Gala committee chair in 2017.

68. Last Word: Shutdown Over?, Glen Farms Plans and Billy Richmond - Wing Guru -

The federal government shutdown for many of us outside the Beltway amounted to a message on a website saying the agency we were looking up was closed Monday. And Monday was the third and final day of the most recent shutdown. But the immigration policy known as DACA – Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals – is the issue to be explored by Congress in the three weeks that the continuing resolution covers. It’s an issue that there has been plenty of local discussion about

69. Boyd Says Reprisals For Removal Of Monuments Possible -

The city is bracing for some kind of backlash in the Tennessee Legislature for the December sale of two city parks to a private nonprofit and the removal of Confederate monuments in those parks.

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd says state officials could retaliate by refusing to approve the city’s request for an expansion of the Downtown Tourism Development Zone.

70. Some Express Interest in Monuments Removed From City Parks -

The private nonprofit that had the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments removed from city parks in December says it has fielded numerous offers to take the statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest, Jefferson Davis and a bust of Confederate Capt. Harvey Mathes in Memphis Park where the Davis statue stood.

71. Medicaid Expansion Splits Tenn. Governor Hopefuls in Health Forum -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A health care forum Friday illustrated the partisan split in the Tennessee governor's race over Medicaid expansion, with Democrats ranking it their top priority and Republicans opposing it or espousing other priorities.

72. Around Memphis | January 22, 2018 -

Here’s a look at recent Memphis-related news from around the web…

Doubting MLK During a Strike in Memphis
Conor Friedersdorf, The Atlantic

73. Last Word: The Snow Split, Amazon Post-Mortem and Intermodal Comeback -

A split verdict on Snow Day 4. Some school systems and colleges and universities are out again Friday, others are not and still others are opening later in the day. Shelby County Schools, which is out, says it has 13 extra days built into its schedule for just such an event or events – that is 13 days extra beyond the 180 days the state requires as the bare minimum for a school year.

74. Greenspace Nonprofit Details Offers For Confederate Monuments -

The private nonprofit group that had the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments removed from city parks in December says it has had numerous offers to take the statues of Nathan Bedford Forrest and Jefferson Davis as well as a bust of Confederate Captain Harvey Mathes in the same park where the Davis statue stood.

75. Around Memphis: Jan. 15, 2018 -

Here’s a look at Memphis-related news from around the web...

Stan Bronson Passes Away Tuesday: ‘Most Durable Batboy’ served the Tigers baseball program for 56 seasons
GoTigersGo.com

76. Shot Fired From Memphis Ignites Civil War Rematch -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest died in 1877, but 140 years later some people just can’t let their hero or the Old South go away.

In fact, the state Legislature is set to reignite the Civil War – to some degree – in 2018. We hope no gunshots are fired.

77. The Lane Ahead -

His first vision, Trey Moore says, was to become a “film and video type guy.” He had graduated Southaven High School, earned a communications degree at Memphis State, but didn’t have designs on going all-Hollywood.

78. Tennessee Lawmakers Head Into Session With Elections Looming -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Tennessee lawmakers return Tuesday for a session colored by upcoming elections and Gov. Bill Haslam's final lap before he hits his term limits.

This year, the Republican-led General Assembly likely won't face a monthslong fight over one topic, like the roads-funding package with gas tax hikes and other tax breaks that Haslam ushered into law in 2017.

79. McMullen: Legislative Session Influenced Timing in Monuments Removal -

Several nonprofits approached the city administration about buying Health Sciences and Memphis parks before the Memphis City Council approved the sale of each to Memphis Greenspace last month for $1,000 each. And some of them said no.

80. Weekend Monuments Protests, Response Suggest Shift -

Memphis Branch NAACP president Deidre Malone may have had the most concise description of what has changed since the city’s two most visible Confederate monuments came down Dec. 20.

“What we want happened. The monuments are down,” Malone said Friday, Jan. 5, as the NAACP and other groups called on Memphians to ignore plans for protests in the city the next day by groups opposed to the removal of the monuments.

81. We’re No. 1! -

While tax law changes have some worried about the impact on charitable giving in 2018, Community Foundation of Greater Memphis president Robert Fockler points to Memphis’s historical standing as a generous city and his foundation’s own growth as reasons he is not worried as the calendar flips to a new year.

82. Mayor Says Memphis 'Will Be Prepared' for Statue Protests -

If opponents of the removal of the city’s two most visible Civil War monuments follow through on plans for a Memphis protest Jan. 6, Mayor Jim Strickland said city government will be ready.

83. Moore Named Executive Director of Explore Bike Share -

Trey Moore has been named executive director of Explore Bike Share, the Memphis nonprofit that is preparing to launch a local bike-share system with 600 bicycles and 60 stations. Moore, who is returning to Memphis from Atlanta, Georgia, will lead Explore Bike Share’s staff in operations, fund development and community engagement activities in partnership with the organization’s board of directors.
As executive director, he also is committed to bicycling as a sustainable transportation option with access to as many Memphians as possible, and will help promote a bike-friendly culture in Memphis while encouraging exercise and healthy lifestyles.

84. City, County Governments on Different Paths -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland and the city council members are half way through their four-year terms of office with the new year.

85. Democrats Look to Cooperate on Key Issues -

With the state’s budget projected to be tight and lawmakers lining up to run for re-election in 2018, the coming legislative session isn’t expected to yield many surprises.

But the 110th General Assembly still has a long row to hoe as the session starts Jan. 9 with new legislative offices and committee rooms in the renovated Cordell Hull Building in downtown Nashville.

86. Last Word: Falling Through Cracks, Germantown's Moratorium and Iowa's Defense -

The dean of the college of medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center talks about the death of his son a decade ago. That, he tells Michael Waddell in this powerful story, has been a driving force in his search for a way to bridge the gaps between treating substance abuse and treating the mental illness that can also be at play along with addiction. Dr. David Stern is proposing a new pilot program whose goal is to bridge the gaps and save lives.

87. Memphis Sound at 60 -

As Stax Records and Royal Studios both wrap up a year of celebrating their 60th anniversary, The Memphis News looks back at the creators and purveyors of the Memphis sound and its significance, both in its heyday and today.

88. Forrest Down -

It’s hard to know where the equestrian statue of Nathan Bedford Forrest is when there aren’t lights on it.

That was the case Wednesday, Dec. 20, as the spotlights normally illuminating the likeness of the Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan grand wizard were doused.

89. Robertson Reignites United Way’s Iconic Brand -

“All the women in my family are natural-born leaders,” Lori Spicer Robertson says as she leans forward in her desk chair. “To me, that was the norm – just what you did.”

90. Memphis Habitat Unveils New Housing Development Plans, Fundraising Goal -

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Memphis has unveiled plans for its newest housing development: a 32-lot subdivision called Cedar Heights in South Memphis’ Castalia Heights neighborhood. The Wednesday, Dec. 13, announcement was part of a larger slate of goals and events to celebrate the local chapter’s 35th anniversary.

91. Memphis Habitat Unveils New Housing Development, Fundraising Goal -

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Memphis has unveiled plans for its newest housing development: a 32-lot subdivision called Cedar Heights in South Memphis’ Castalia Heights neighborhood. The Wednesday, Dec. 13, announcement was part of a larger slate of goals and events to celebrate the local chapter’s 35th anniversary.

92. Legislators Not Shy in Pushing ‘Model’ Bills -

The group that brought Tennessee the voter photo ID law could be on the brink of spawning another kink on the voting process, one that cross-checks jury service with voter rolls.

At the behest of the American Civil Rights Union, legislators across the nation who belong to the American Legislative Exchange Council could be sponsoring bills in the next couple of years requiring local election commissions to take a closer look at people who miss jury duty.

93. Last Word: Grizz Troubles Deepen, Germantown Kroger Enigma and The Strikers -

Tigers over Great Danes Tuesday at the Forum 67 – 58. The Grizz are in Washington Wednesday to play the Wizards and some of the attention around the Grizz is shifting away from what happens on the court. What would you call the place that the Grizz are at this mile marker past Grit & Grind? It is more than a losing streak, says Don Wade in his Press Box column.

94. Leaps and Bounds -

Memphis’ health care industry was packed with activity in 2017, everything from a slew of new hires and personnel changes to new facility openings, major research announcements and expansions.

95. New Memphis Promotes Dakin to Pilot ‘Launch’ Initiative -

Frankie Dakin has been promoted to director of strategic initiatives at New Memphis, a role in which he’ll pilot the organization’s new Launch: Campus to Career program. The initiative, which builds on New Memphis’ Summer Experience, connects college students with professional opportunities and networks to inspire them to launch careers in Memphis. Dakin will lead the program, encouraging area students to find and prepare for internships with local employers.

96. WA -

Good morning, Memphis! Dust off your robes and lightsabers, because the latest “Star Wars” movie hits theaters this week. Of course, there’s plenty more to keep you busy in the coming days. Here’s what you need to know about in The Week Ahead – no Jedi powers required.

97. Week Ahead -

Good morning, Memphis! Dust off your robes and lightsabers, because the latest “Star Wars” movie hits theaters this week. Of course, there’s plenty more to keep you busy in the coming days. Here’s what you need to know about in The Week Ahead – no Jedi powers required.

98. The Week Ahead: Dec. 11-17 -

Good morning, Memphis! Dust off your robes and lightsabers, because the latest "Star Wars" movie hits theaters this week. Of course, there's plenty more to keep you busy in the coming days. Here's what you need to know about in The Week Ahead - no Jedi powers required.

99. Out-of-Town Investors Buy Gibson Guitar Factory -

145 Lt. George W. Lee Ave., Memphis, TN 38103: Investment firms in New York and Miami have purchased the Gibson Guitar Factory property in Downtown Memphis and an additional warehouse Gibson Brands Inc. owns in Nashville.

100. Events -

Tennessee Shakespeare Company will stage Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot” Thursday, Dec. 7, through Dec. 17 at Dixon Gallery & Gardens’ Winegardner Auditorium, 4339 Park Ave. Visit tnshakespeare.org for showtimes and tickets.