» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'State Systems' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:1387
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:1
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. County Commission Leaves Only Tax Rate Undone in Budget Season -

Shelby County commissioners took final action Monday, June 18, on every item in its budget season except a final approval of a $4.05 county property tax rate.

The approval of a $1.3 billion county consolidated operating budget and a $90.2 million capital

2. Harris and Lenoir Clash in First General Election Mayoral Debate -

The two contenders for Shelby County mayor on the Aug. 2 ballot differed Wednesday, June 13, on leadership experience and whether county government has been breaking ground on important issues or has taken too long to act on those issues.

3. Last Word: The Politics of Summer, Perpetual Motion and Nigerian Email Scams -

Just about the time it is summer by the calendar next week as well as by the ongoing weather, you will start to see a set of one-on-one debates between the Democratic and Republican contenders for Shelby County Mayor – Lee Harris and David Lenoir, respectively.

4. Luttrell, Jones: County Budget Talks Center on Property Tax Allocation -

Shelby County government’s budget season turns on the county’s property tax rate. It’s not about decreasing the current $4.11 rate to $4.05, as proposed by Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell. It’s about how the $4.05 rate would be allocated among various county uses.

5. U of M Professors Awarded $1.9 Million NIH Grant -

Two University of Memphis professors have received a $1.9 million grant for a collaborative brain imaging and big data project. The grant was awarded by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, part of the National Institutes of Health.

6. EMS Ready To Double Footprint In Bartlett -

After holding on to an adjacent parcel of land for more than a decade next to its facility in Bartlett, medical device manufacturer Engineered Medical Systems LLC is gearing up for a major expansion of its facility. The company is investing $10.5 million in a move that will create 40 new jobs.

7. County Commission Asked to Fill SCS Budget Gap -

With the Shelby County Schools system’s $1 billion budget delivered to Shelby County commissioners Wednesday, May 30, county government’s consolidated budget started to come into focus.

8. Last Word: SCS Budget Travels, Carlisle on One Beale and Hickman's Comeback -

Shelby County Schools officials are Downtown Wednesday to formally present the school system’s budget proposal to the Shelby County Commission. The budget committee hearing Wednesday morning won’t see any decision just yet. But the school system’s ask of county government is a big part of the commission getting to a more complete view of county government’s budget since north of $400 million of the county’s $1.3 billion consolidated budget is funding for public education across seven school districts in the county.

9. US Raises Concerns About Illnesses Tied to Synthetic Pot -

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) – U.S. health officials are urging states to regulate marijuana oil extracts after investigating a rash of illnesses tied to the products in Utah.

In a report released Thursday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that synthetic products falsely labeled as cannabidiol, or CBD, sickened as many as 52 people from October through January.

10. St. Jude Global to Extend Hospital’s Reach -

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is hoping the announcement of its St. Jude Global initiative Thursday, May 24, is just the beginning of many new partnerships to come. The hospital is investing more than $100 million to expand its reach and advance the survival rate of children with pediatric cancer and blood disorders around the world.

11. Middle Tennessee State, Chinese Group Eye Ginseng Institute -

MURFREESBORO, Tenn. (AP) – Middle Tennessee State University says it has struck an agreement with its research partner in China to for a joint ginseng institute.

An MTSU news release Tuesday says the institute will study, develop and promote Tennessee-grown herbal products to sell in Asia and other emerging markets.

12. Hopson’s Schools Budget Features $12.7M Gap for County to Consider -

The school year that ends Thursday, May 24, marks five years since the historic change in public education kicked off in August 2013.

First was the one-year merger of city and county schools, followed by the demerger into seven public school systems within Shelby County.

13. Hopson's Schools Budget Features $12.9 Million Gap For County To Consider -

The school year that ends Thursday, May 24, marks five school years since the historic change in public education kicked off in August 2013 with the one-year merger of city and county schools followed by the demerger into seven public school systems within the county.

14. Last Word: A New Council Member, Law Without Signature and Corker Down Under -

The Memphis City Council should be back up to full strength by the time Tuesday becomes Wednesday. Filling the Super District 9 seat left vacant by the resignation earlier this month of Philip Spinosa to join the leadership of the Greater Memphis Chamber is on the council’s agenda Tuesday afternoon – the last item on the agenda. But the council usually skips around.

15. Cellphone Pics Expose New Front in Public-Records Debate -

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Pics or it didn't happen? Good luck with that on the public records trail.

From Mountain City to Memphis and Clarksville to Chattanooga, local government agencies follow conflicting, contradictory – and completely arbitrary – rules on whether residents can take cellphone pictures of the records they helped pay to create.

16. Medical Device Maker Investing $10.5M in Bartlett Expansion -

A Bartlett-based medical device manufacturer is expanding with a $10.5 million investment that will create 40 jobs.

Engineered Medical Systems LLC plans to add 57,000 square feet of manufacturing and office space to its existing 47,500-square-foot facility at 3325 Appling Road, where it makes surgical instruments, implants and other specialty medical devices.

17. UTHSC, LeMoyne-Owen Partner To Help Students Earn Nursing Degrees -

With an expected nursing shortage of more than 1 million registered nurses by 2022, local colleges like the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and LeMoyne-Owen College are partnering to help students along the career pathway.

18. Lack of Paper Trail a Concern Amid Fears of Election Hacking -

ATLANTA (AP) – As the midterm congressional primaries heat up amid fears of Russian hacking, roughly 1 in 5 Americans will be casting ballots on machines that do not produce a paper record of their votes.

19. Emergency 911 Technology Struggles to Keep Up With the Times -

ROSWELL, Ga. (AP) – High school students hiding from the gunman in Parkland, Florida, were forced to whisper in calls to 911 for fear of tipping off their location. Others texted friends and family who then relayed information to emergency dispatchers over the phone.

20. Bill Gates Gives $44M to Influence State Education Plans -

SEATTLE (AP) – Billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates saw an opportunity with a new federal education law that has widespread repercussions for American classrooms.

21. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Rural Tennessee? -

Like most of America, Tennessee’s metropolitan areas have prospered during the last eight years, while the rural areas have lagged in almost every measure. The state has 19 of its 95 counties classified as “distressed.” What can and should we do to give every Tennessean a chance to succeed?

22. Lawmakers: Drug Distributors Missed Suspicious Opioid Sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Lawmakers of both parties accused wholesale pharmaceutical distributors on Tuesday of missing signs of suspicious activity that resulted in hundreds of millions of prescription opioid pills being shipped to West Virginia, a state disproportionately ravaged by deaths caused by the addictive drugs.

23. Luttrell Proposes Adjusting Down County Property Tax Rate -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell is proposing a rollback of the $4.11 county property tax rate to $4.05 in his last budget proposal to the Shelby County Commission.

Luttrell will formally present the $1.3 billion consolidated county government budget to commissioners at Wednesday, May 9, committee sessions. The proposal, known as the budget book, was delivered to individual commissioners Monday.

24. Harris, Lenoir to Battle for County Mayor -

Republican David Lenoir and Democrat Lee Harris will meet in the Aug. 2 county general election to decide who will be the next Shelby County mayor. Lenoir and Harris won their respective primaries easily Tuesday, May 1, 2018.

25. Tenn. Legislature Breaks TNReady Gridlock, Adjourns Session -

NASHVILLE – The House and Senate broke gridlock Wednesday night on problems stemming from the results of troubled TNReady testing by passing legislation saying no “adverse action” would be taken against teachers, students or schools for poor test scores.

26. TNReady Causes Gridlock in Tenn. Legislature -

NASHVILLE – The day after Republican House leaders called for a review of the state’s TNReady testing vendor, the House of Representatives and Senate got stuck on the impact of botched testing this spring and the potential for incorrect student scores affecting teacher evaluations.

27. TNReady Causes Gridlock in State Legislature -

NASHVILLE – The day after Republican House leaders called for a review of the state’s TNReady testing vendor, the House of Representatives and Senate got stuck on the impact of botched testing this spring and the potential for incorrect student scores affecting teacher evaluations.

28. Griffin Moves to Helm of Changing ASD -

Sharon Griffin wasn’t having any of the idea that she will be in competition with Shelby County Schools when she becomes the new leader of the state-run Achievement School District.

29. Schools’ Success Too Dependent on Weak Vendor -

The “debacle” called TNReady, a standardized test ruling the lives of students, teachers and administrators, is the predictable result of brain drain – not by students but by Tennessee’s leaders.

30. I-Zone Chief Griffin Named Head of State-Run School District -

The chief of schools for Shelby County Schools who was the founding director of Innovation Zone Schools is the new leader of the state-run Achievement School District.

Sharon Griffin was named Tuesday, April 24, as head of the turnaround district for some of the state’s lowest performing schools academically by Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam and Tennessee Education Commission Candice McQueen.

31. Excavator Blamed for Island-Wide Blackout in Puerto Rico -

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — An island-wide blackout hit Puerto Rico on Wednesday as the U.S. territory struggles to repair an increasingly unstable power grid nearly seven months after Hurricane Maria. Officials said an excavator accidentally downed a transmission line.

32. SCS Leaders Question TNReady Credibility -

Shelby County Schools board members are questioning the credibility of state student achievement testing after the third major problem with online testing in three years.

“I believe this was intentional,” school board member Stephanie Love said Tuesday, April 17, at a board work session, noting that the test results are used to evaluate teachers as well as students and schools. “We are the largest poor school district in the state of Tennessee. If something continues to happen, it is intentional.”

33. Last Word: Failed Test, Trolley Back Story and Violent Crime Down City and County -

The state’s third problem with online student achievement testing in three years is gathering political force in Nashville. And that force is aimed for the most part at testing in general and the role it plays in evaluating teachers and students.

34. SCS Leaders Question Credibility of TNReady Testing -

Shelby County Schools board members say they question the credibility of state student achievement testing after the third major problem with online testing in three years.

“I believe this was intentional,” school board member Stephanie Love said Tuesday, April 17, at a board work session, noting that the test results are used to evaluate teachers as well as students and schools. “We are the largest poor school district in the state of Tennessee. … If something continues to happen, it is intentional.”

35. Surveyors Confirm 11 Tornadoes in Arkansas From Storms -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Survey teams with the National Weather Service have confirmed 11 tornadoes so far from the severe storms that hit Arkansas on Friday and Saturday.

The two strongest tornadoes were both rated EF2. One hit Mountainburg in northwest Arkansas while the other struck Montrose in the southern part of the state. EF1 tornadoes were confirmed in Lavaca, Ozone, Gamaliel, Umpire, Crossett and southwest Ashley County. An EF0 tornado was confirmed in Oppelo in Conway County.

36. First Horizon Starts Off 2018 With Strong Q1 Results -

The first full quarter with Capital Bank integrated into the operations of Memphis-based First Horizon National Corp. saw a pickup year-over-year in several key areas like loans, deposits and growth in net income.

37. Last Word: Mud Island Changes, Zoo Parking and Capitol Hill Revolt On UT Board -

This could be your last chance to see the Mississippi River Museum at Mud Island River Park as it has been for about the last 30 years. The park on the southern half of Mud Island opens for the season Saturday. The museum will be open only through July 4 is what is billed as a “limited run” followed by a public engagement process for “reimagining how we tell the story of the Mississippi River in a 21st century way,” according to park general manager Trey Giuntini in a Thursday press release.

38. Opioid Trials to Begin in 2019 as Settlement is Also Pushed -

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) – A federal judge with an audacious plan to settle hundreds of lawsuits filed by local governments against the drug industry over the destruction wrought by prescription opioid painkillers has altered his course.

39. Report: Many State Pension Systems Have Huge Funding Gaps -

CHERRY HILL, N.J. (AP) – A public employee pension crisis for state governments has deepened to a record level even after nearly nine years of economic recovery for the nation, according to a study released Thursday, leaving many states vulnerable if the economy hits a downturn.

40. Lots of Noise, But Few Results in Legislature -

Just when you think the Tennessee Legislature is going off the deep end, someone will throw them a bungee cord. Maybe a rope made out of hemp would work better because a bungee cord leaves people bouncing, never quite reeling them in.

41. Last Word: I Am A Man Plaza, Graceland Clears EDGE and Filing Deadline Action -

Sometimes the simplest concepts say more than an elaborate explanation can – even when the history it depicts is complex. A plaza dedicated to the 1,300 city sanitation workers who went on strike in 1968 formally opened Thursday on what had been a vacant lot just across Pontotoc from the south side of Clayborn Temple. And the occasion included more of the small moments that have made this week so compelling. Watching civil rights icon Rev. James Lawson walk around the plaza and discover it includes one of his quotes from the 1968 strike.

42. Tennessee Legislature Passes School Spanking Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Legislature has passed a bill that would require public schools in Tennessee to report to the state Department of Education on their use of corporal punishment.

43. Tennessee Bill on Defense of School Bathroom Policy Fails -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A Tennessee bill that would have required the state attorney general's office to defend local school districts over their bathroom policies for transgender students appears dead for the year.

44. Perry Leading Fire Museum Forward as Executive Director -

Shannon Perry became executive director of the Fire Museum of Memphis earlier this year, a role that brings her back to the institution she helped launch in the 1990s, when she served as its first curator. As executive director, Perry is the Fire Museum’s only full-time employee, and she handles a range of functions – including its collection, exhibits and facilities, budgets, fundraising, public relations, special events, staff and volunteers – while also working directly with the museum’s board.

45. Selfie Medicine: Phone Apps Push People to Take Their Pills -

SEATTLE (AP) – Take two tablets and a selfie? Your doctor's orders may one day include a smartphone video to make sure you took your medicine.

Smartphone apps that monitor pill-taking are now available, and researchers are testing how well they work when medication matters. Experts praise the efficiency, but some say the technology raises privacy and data security concerns.

46. AP-NORC Poll: 50 Years After MLK, Civil Rights Goals Unmet -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Fifty years after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., only 1 in 10 African Americans think the United States has achieved all or most of the goals of the civil rights movement he led, according to a new poll by the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

47. Last Word: Graceland's New Lawsuit, Memphis March For Our Lives and Trolley Test -

Remember the comment from last week’s EDGE meeting by EDGE board member Tom Dyer who said the economic development body was likely to be sued no matter what it did on Graceland’s application for tax breaks on its “convention center” plan in Whitehaven? At week’s end, Graceland followed through with a lawsuit in Chancery Court against EDGE for delaying a decision on the matter. The lawsuit contends EDGE has no intention of making a decision on incentives and that Graceland is entitled to those incentives.

48. What Do Statewide Candidates Say About Infrastructure Investment? -

Is investment in public infrastructure important? And should Tennessee have more dedicated revenue sources to pay for construction and maintenance of infrastructure across the state, or is the existing tax structure – primarily the state tax on fuel, and wheel taxes – sufficient to pay for what Tennessee needs to sustain and grow its economy?

49. Tenn.'s Road, Infrastructure Systems Problem Shared Across State -

Though we often complain about our government, we count on it every day, in large ways and small.

An example of a small way … potholes. Which don’t seem like a small issue after they cause your tire(s) to blow out.

50. Parkinson to Introduce Bill Phasing Out State’s Achievement School District -

NASHVILLE – Rep. Antonio Parkinson is set to make a push to remove Memphis schools from the state’s Achievement School District and dissolve the state district because of its failure to pull them out of Tennessee’s bottom 5 percent for performance.

51. FedEx Talks Texas Bombs, Walmart In Q3 Earnings -

It was a busy Tuesday for FedEx Corp. as the Memphis-based company discussed the San Antonio facility explosion, $2.5 billion in hub modernizations, and a new deal with Walmart all while posting higher than expected returns during its March 20 third quarter earnings call.

52. Last Word: SCS Plans For $15, IRIS Matinees and The Hard Hit Fund -

“From a financial standpoint, we need our fans back and we need them back now.” University of Memphis president David Rudd breaking the university’s silence on the basketball coaching change that was made formal Tuesday with the announcement that Penny Hardaway is indeed the new coach. And Hardaway had a lot to say that Tigers fans and Memphians wanted to hear.

53. FedEx Talks Texas Explosion, Walmart, and Increased Profits during Earnings Call -

It was a busy day for FedEx Corp. as the Memphis-based company discussed the San Antonio facility explosion, $2.5 billion in hub modernizations, and a new deal with Walmart all while posting higher than expected returns during its March 20 third quarter earnings call.

54. Walker Named President Of Black Swan Digital Forensics -

Jim Walker has been named president of Memphis-based Black Swan Digital Forensics, the only forensics lab in the U.S. that focuses exclusively on data recovery from digital devices such as cellphones, vehicle systems, computers and social media accounts. Walker comes to Black Swan after more than 30 years of military and public service at the federal, state and local level, including eight years as Alabama’s director of homeland security and more than 20 years in the U.S. Army, where he was an Airborne Ranger and retired as a lieutenant colonel.

55. Small Cell Legislation Advancing, But Rural Options More Limited -

NASHVILLE – Unable to get cell-phone service at a football game in Nashville or Knoxville? Can’t send a text from a Broadway honky tonk or Beale Street blues bar? Wondering how autonomous cars will ever work?

56. Last Word: The Memphis Hub Modernization, Gun Protests and MLK 50 Plans -

Back in January, the FedEx board approved a $3.2 billion package that had pay raises, bonuses and similar items that have become the corporate reaction to federal tax reform that set a lower rate of taxation for companies that repatriate money they have overseas. There was a mention of $1.5 billion for the Indianapolis hub and unspecified plans for the Memphis hub to come later. And later was yesterday in a pretty modest announcement at Signature Air given the scope of what FedEx has planned for its Super Hub here.

57. FedEx Investing $1 Billion in Memphis Hub Modernization -

Memphis-based FedEx Corp. will spend $1 billion on a modernization of its Memphis hub over a six-year period, company founder, chairman and CEO Fred Smith announced Wednesday, March 14.

58. Arkansas Works to Overhaul Juvenile Justice System -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Judges and youth advocates say Arkansas' patchwork juvenile probation system needs an overhaul to treat children in the system more fairly.

Efforts are underway in at least 18 of the state's 75 counties to improve probation and the overall juvenile justice system. The goal is to reduce the number of children in detention and to keep them out of court, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported .

59. Olympus Opens Expanded Bartlett Campus -

Medical device manufacturer Olympus celebrated the grand opening of its $12 million expanded Bartlett campus at 2937 Appling Road on Tuesday, March 6. The state-of-the-art facility expands Olympus’ existing R&D and surgical manufacturing building on Appling Road, which has operated in Bartlett since 1984.

60. University Clinical Health Launching Telemedicine Network -

Going to the doctor is going high-tech at two rural West Tennessee clinics in a few weeks, thanks to a project University Clinical Health plans to launch within the next 30 days.

UCH is a physician group and affiliated faculty practice plan of the University of Tennessee College of Medicine in Memphis. It encompasses about 130 physicians, covering 18 specialties, and all of its physicians are also faculty members with the College of Medicine.

61. Council and Commission Talk Pre-K and Workforce Development -

When 20 of the 26 Memphis City Council members and Shelby County Commissioners got together Thursday, March 1, at Beale Street Landing, the idea of county government providing funds to expand access to prekindergarten got resistance on the county side.

62. Council and Commission Talk Pre-K and Workforce By The River -

When 20 of the 26 Memphis City Council members and Shelby County Commissioners got together Thursday, March 1, at Beale Street Landing, the idea of some kind of county government funding for expanding access to pre-kindergarten ran into some resistance on the county side.

63. This Week In Memphis History: March 2-8 -

2008: On the front page of The Daily News, a rogue commodities trader at the Memphis regional office of MF Global Ltd. rings up $141.5 million of losses in just a few hours, costing the company almost a fifth of its market value.

64. Lawmakers Consider Armed Off-Duty Officers for Schools -

Saying “this is Tennessee, not Florida” and school officers here will face trouble head-on, state Rep. Antonio Parkinson is co-sponsoring legislation to arm off-duty police to patrol public schools.

65. Defying the NRA, Dick's Takes a Harder Line Against Guns -

NEW YORK (AP) – Dick's Sporting Goods will immediately stop selling assault-style rifles and ban the sale of all guns to anyone under 21, the company said Wednesday, as its CEO took on the National Rifle Association by demanding tougher gun laws after the massacre in Florida.

66. Report: Inequality Remains 50 Years After Kerner Report -

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) – Barriers to equality are posing threats to democracy in the U.S. as the country remains segregated along racial lines and child poverty worsens, says a study examining the nation 50 years after the release of the landmark 1968 Kerner Report.

67. Last Word: Post Parkland, May County Primary Ballot and Friedman on the Mid East -

In the wake of the Parkland, Florida school massacre, local school systems here are talking about their preparations for such instances. And for those who don’t have a child in schools currently, it is something of a commentary about the times many of our children live in. The Shelby County Schools statement Thursday includes the following safety measures already in place:

68. Agency-By-Agency Highlights of Trump's 2019 Budget -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Here are highlights from President Donald Trump's budget for fiscal year 2019...

___

DEFENSE

Trump's budget for 2019 shows the administration's concern about the threat from North Korea and its missile program.

69. Luttrell Calls For ‘High-Wage Job Growth’ in Final State of the County -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell said at his last State of the County address this week that what Shelby County struggles with is “economic diversification and high-wage job growth.”

70. Digest -

Memphis Toys R Us

To Remain Open

A representative with Toys R Us has confirmed to The Daily News that the retailer’s Memphis location, at 7676 Polo Ground Blvd., won’t close after all.

71. Last Word: Wiretaps in the Wright Case, Target Layoffs and SCS Looks To Move -

Democratic Congressman Steve Cohen of Memphis among those boycotting the State of the Union address Tuesday evening by President Donald Trump. “The president is unworthy of the podium, the position and the power.” Republican Congressman David Kustoff of Germantown among those not boycotting SOTU. “Just one year after president Trump took the oath of office, our economy is the strongest it has been in decades. … We passed historic tax reform and we bolstered our military and support our veterans. Last year, the president kept his promises and tonight, he told the American people that he is not done.”

72. Federal Judge Wants Opioid Lawsuits To End In Settlement -

The goal is impressive: Hammer out a legal deal that starts guiding the nation out of an epidemic of opioid addiction.

How and when that can happen, if at all, is the subject of talks scheduled to begin Wednesday in a federal courthouse in Cleveland.

73. Report: 538 Public Records Exemptions in Tennessee Law -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – A report has found that there are now 538 exemptions to Tennessee's public records law, about six times as many as there were three decades ago.

According to the state comptroller's office, the Tennessee Public Records Act only had two statutory exceptions when it was enacted in 1957. By 1988, a legislative committee reported there were 89 exceptions.

74. Haslam Proposes Completion Condition for Tennessee Promise -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam’s final State of the State address Monday, Jan. 29, included a call to continue education reform with some changes to the administration’s signature higher education reforms.

75. Haslam Proposes Credit Hours Minimum on Higher Ed Access -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam’s final State of the State address Monday, Jan. 29, included a call to continue the state’s reforms in education with some changes to the administration’s signature higher education reforms.

76. Last Word: End of the Camp Out, Megasite Views and The Glory Years -

No camp out this year for the opening of applications for optional schools because it is online at Shelby County Schools this year. Also the applications are available at the same time – Monday morning at 10 a.m. – for the open enrollment at any other SCS school that has available space. Those were some hardcore campers that in some cases had been at this for a couple of generations. Persisting through barcodes and a 99.9 percent probability that their first choice of school would happen without the tent, generator and heaters.

77. Distillers Struggle to Comply With Water Quality Regulations -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – As the whiskey industry continues to grow, Tennessee's two largest distilleries struggled to comply with water quality regulations last year.

Jack Daniels and George Dickel exceeded their limits for chlorine and other pollutants that can harm aquatic wildlife. After investigating the violations, the distilleries traced the problems to broken or inadequate machinery and faulty testing. State officials say the companies have fixed the problems and are now back in compliance.

78. This week in Memphis History: Jan. 26-Feb. 1 -

1997: On the front page of The Daily News, Wolfchase Galleria, the city’s largest shopping mall, is about to open and “stores are scrambling to hire managers and clerks in a market that currently has one of the lowest unemployment rates in years.” University of Memphis researcher David Ciscel says, “The impact will be similar to the impact that Tunica has had and is having on the Memphis economy," referring to the opening in the early 1990s of casinos in Tunica.

79. MEGA HYPE -

In physics the larger an atom is, the more polarizing it can become. The same can be said of real estate development. So it’s not surprising that something referred to as a megasite can incite a range of opinions that are as vast as the site itself.

80. State Voters Have More to Fear Than Russian Meddling -

About 30 years ago, my wife and I were hanging out with another couple and decided to make a big night of it. We’d go out for Mexican food and then rent a movie.

After we had some Mexican grub, we went to Kroger to find a flick. As we perused the selections, my friend said, “What about a Russian spy movie?” To which his girlfriend (future wife, now ex-wife) whined, “John, you know I don’t speak Russian.” (His name is changed to protect the innocent.)

81. Boyd Says Reprisals For Removal Of Monuments Possible -

The city is bracing for some kind of backlash in the Tennessee Legislature for the December sale of two city parks to a private nonprofit and the removal of Confederate monuments in those parks.

Memphis City Council chairman Berlin Boyd says state officials could retaliate by refusing to approve the city’s request for an expansion of the Downtown Tourism Development Zone.

82. Solar Industry on Edge as Trump Weighs Tariffs on Panels -

DALLAS (AP) – Some in the U.S. solar-power industry are hoping a decision this week by President Donald Trump doesn't bring on an eclipse.

Companies that install solar-power systems for homeowners and utilities are bracing for Trump's call on whether to slap tariffs on imported panels.

83. Last Word: The Snow Split, Amazon Post-Mortem and Intermodal Comeback -

A split verdict on Snow Day 4. Some school systems and colleges and universities are out again Friday, others are not and still others are opening later in the day. Shelby County Schools, which is out, says it has 13 extra days built into its schedule for just such an event or events – that is 13 days extra beyond the 180 days the state requires as the bare minimum for a school year.

84. Norris Acknowledges Stall in Federal Judicial Nomination -

State Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville says he will continue with his legislative duties unless or until the U.S. Senate confirms his appointment to the federal judiciary.

85. Orpheum CEO Batterson Honored For Excellence in Performing Arts -

Brett Batterson, president and CEO of the Orpheum Theatre Group, has been named the North American Performing Arts Managers and Agents’ 2017 Presenter of the Year. The award honors individuals in the performing arts field for their excellence in exemplifying mentoring; setting an example of best practices, achievement and leadership in their discipline; and cultivating diversity, practicing inclusion, and creating equity for underserved members of the community.

86. Roland Pulls Petition For Mayor, Running As ‘Uniter’ -

Shelby County commissioner Terry Roland has been campaigning for Shelby County mayor since last year.

When he pulled his qualifying petition Thursday, Jan. 11, to formally enter the May Republican primary for mayor, Roland did so with a slogan of bringing “positive change to Shelby County.”

87. 'F' is for Fraud -

Just before the winter break, Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen had a lot of questions for the Shelby County Schools system. She had just read a 258-page report from an independent investigation of the school system’s grade-changing scandal at Trezevant High School.

88. Two New Distribution Facilities, Southaven ‘Town Square’ In the Works -

2481 Appling Road, Memphis, TN 38133: Salt Lake City, Utah-based aftermarket auto body parts distributer Certifit Inc. is planning to construct a 604,800-square-foot distribution facility at the southwest corner of Appling and Reese roads.

89. Events -

The third TEDxMemphis conference, themed “The Slant” is Saturday, Jan. 6, at the Halloran Centre, 225 S. Main St. The one-day event will include 24 speakers – 12 at each of two programs (8:30 a.m. to noon and 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.). Single-session tickets are $30; all-day tickets are $50. Visit tedxmemphis.com.

90. Memphis Experts See Economic Growth Building Off 2017 Into 2018 -

With resolutions made and the new year now, another annual exercise rises to the forefront – predictions on what Memphis and its economy can expect in 2018.

If 2017 taught us anything, it’s that there’s so much we won’t be able to even remotely see coming, from Memphis bidding to become the potential home for Amazon’s second headquarters to action finally being taken on the Confederate monuments in city parks and so much more.

91. Attorney, Former Political Activist Lewis Donelson Dies at 100 -

In a century of life that began in Memphis, Lewis Donelson was many things including an attorney, politician and strategist. In all of those pursuits and others, he was one of the city’s most influential citizens and a force in some of the most historic moments in the city’s history as well as the state’s history.

92. Last Word: The Stay Away Plan, Kroger and the Lamar Gateway and Silo Square -

City Hall says ignore and avoid the two parks that used to have Confederate monuments and the Tennessee Welcome Center Saturday. All could be the scene of gatherings Saturday by groups opposed to the removal of the monuments including white nationalist groups. If this sounds familiar it’s because this was the city’s strategy in 1998 when a Klan group from Indiana rallied on the courthouse steps and there was a marked departure from that in 2013 when another Klan group – also from Indiana also rallied at the courthouse – different set of steps though. More on the history behind all of this when next we meet.

93. Boyd Reports Earning $42.4M With Release of 2015, 2016 Tax Returns -

Republican contender for governor Randy Boyd has released federal and state income tax returns for 2015 and 2016 that show he and his wife earned $42.4 million from business investments across both years.

94. CBU President Smarrelli Joins DACA Alliance -

Christian Brothers University president John Smarrelli Jr. has joined a national alliance with other university presidents to show support for DACA and immigration policies while he focuses on finding solutions for CBU students in the program.

95. CBU President Smarrelli Joins DACA Alliance -

Christian Brothers University president John Smarrelli Jr. has joined a national alliance with other university presidents to show support for DACA and immigration policies while he focuses on finding solutions for CBU students in the program.

96. Panel Finds Juvenile Court Standards Lacking -

There is a lack of guidance from the state to juvenile courts across the state and a lack of consistency among those courts in how they deal with juveniles, according to a 25-page report issued this month by a joint ad hoc Tennessee Blue Ribbon Task Force of the Tennessee Legislature.

97. Fall Creek Falls: Sound Plan or Political Payback -

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! Now go find a job. That’s the message the state of Tennessee is sending nearly 60 employees at Fall Creek Falls State Park this joyous holiday season.

98. Party Leaders: Voter Turnout Trumps Trump -

The chairmen of the local Democratic and Republican parties are leading very different game plans into the 2018 elections.

While the focus may be local politics and voter turnout, Shelby County Democratic Party chairman Corey Strong and Shelby County Republican Party chairman Lee Mills are not blind to what is happening nationally.

99. Leaps and Bounds -

Memphis’ health care industry was packed with activity in 2017, everything from a slew of new hires and personnel changes to new facility openings, major research announcements and expansions.

100. Memphis Fusion -

With more than 40 life science companies operating in the Greater Memphis area and Shelby County ranking second in the U.S. for orthopedic device manufacturing, the Mid-South can stake its claim as one of the top medical device markets in the world.