» Subscribe Today!
More of what you want to know.
The Daily News
X

Forgot your password?
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search
Search results for 'State Systems' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:0
Shelby Public Records:1306
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:1
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

The Daily News subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Sewer Cut-Off Aligns With Developing Densely -

When the city decided in August to end all new connections to the sewer system by developments outside of the Memphis city limits effective immediately, it was about much more than the sewer system.

2. Auto Supplier Denso: $1B Investment in Tennessee Plant -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Automotive supplier Denso announced plans Friday to invest $1 billion and create more than 1,000 new jobs in its main Tennessee facility to meet growing demand for electric vehicle parts.

3. Last Word: Corker on Meet The Press, Summer School and Crosstown Cautions -

The Slider Inn’s second location to come in South Main is an indication that investment and other activity just below the radar continue to come to the surface in an area known for lots of apartment construction recently. The second location is in a brick building that was a place to store and service vintage cars. Look for a public art element and a back patio as well. All of those plans recently clearing the Landmarks Commission.

4. DHL Planning New Memphis Distribution Facility -

0 Tchulahoma Rd.
Memphis, TN 38118

Tenant: DHL Supply Chain

Landlord: Belz Enterprises

5. Equifax CEO Steps Down in the Wake of Damaging Data Breach -

NEW YORK (AP) – Equifax CEO Richard Smith stepped down Tuesday, less than three weeks after the credit reporting agency disclosed a damaging hack to its computer system that exposed highly sensitive information for about 143 million Americans.

6. County Delays Convention Center Funds -

Shelby County commissioners again delayed passage Monday, Sept. 25, of a resolution that would allow the city of Memphis to use surplus hotel-motel tax revenue for Memphis Cook Convention Center renovations.

7. Commission Again Delays Convention Center Hotel-Motel Tax Flow To City -

Shelby County Commissioners again delayed passage Monday, Sept. 25, of a resolution that allows the city of Memphis to use surplus hotel-motel tax revenue to go toward Memphis Cook Convention Center renovations.

8. Federal Government Notifies 21 States of Election Hacking -

The federal government on Friday told election officials in 21 states that hackers targeted their systems before last year's presidential election.

The notification came roughly a year after U.S. Department of Homeland Security officials first said states were targeted by hacking efforts possibly connected to Russia.

9. Memphis Independent Schools Offer Varied Approaches to Early Childhood Learning -

Research has shown show early childhood education sets the foundation for academic success in elementary school, and Memphis’ independent schools boast a number of high-quality preschool programs with expert educators, innovative approaches and state-of-the-art technology.

10. New Headmasters Take the Helm At Hutchison, Memphis University School -

Kristen Ring, the new head of school at Hutchison School, dispels the notion that data on student achievement is only a function of state and federal requirements for public school systems.

11. Tennessee Approves Merger of Hospital Systems -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The Tennessee Department of Health has approved a proposed merger between two hospital systems.

News outlets report that the department announced Tuesday that Commissioner John Dreyzehner approved Kingsport-based Wellmont Health System and Johnson City-based Mountain States Health Alliance's application for a Certificate of Public Advantage to oversee the merger.

12. Are Achievement Schools a Problem or the Solution? -

Forgiveness or farewell: What should be the fate of the Achievement School District?

Among Memphis legislators, it just depends.

State Rep. Mark White calls the task to pull Shelby County’s poorest performing schools out of the state’s bottom 5 percent a “heavy lift.”

13. FedEx Takes Profit Hit From Cyberattack in Q1 -

FedEx’s earnings per share for the first quarter were down year over year, as the Memphis-based shipping company continues to feel the effects of a June 27 cyberattack on subsidiary TNT Express that ended up costing $300 million.

14. Effects of June Cyberattack Cost FedEx $300 Million in Q1 -

FedEx’s earnings per share for the first quarter were down year over year, as the Memphis-based shipping company continues to feel the effects of a June 27 cyberattack on subsidiary TNT Express that ended up costing $300 million.

15. SCS Graduation Rate Inches Up, Arlington Tops 96 Percent -

Shelby County Schools posted a graduation rate of 79.6 percent for the 2016-2017 academic year, up almost a full percentage point from the previous school year. And Arlington Community Schools was one of 43 public school districts in the state with a graduation rate at or above 95 percent.

16. UTHSC’s Roth Appointed To Autism Council -

Jenness Roth, family disability training coordinator at the UT-Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has been appointed to Gov. Bill Haslam’s Tennessee Council on Autism Spectrum Disorder.

17. Skipping School -

The farm field at East Shelby Drive and Sycamore Road is “growing” steel beams, classroom walls and concrete floors. Nearby, the athletic fields of the new $90 million Collierville High School are being traced and laid out at summer’s end next to the framework of the large school.

18. Last Word: Juvenile Court Return, Berlin Boyd's Week and Tony Allen Thoughts -

Two weeks ago Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael was on Behind The Headlines in a half-hour conversation about the court and federal oversight that drew quite a bit of reaction to Michael’s strong opinions about the need to end that oversight. Even before that reaction we had planned to do a second part of the conversation with those who favor continued federal oversight of the court.

19. AG: SCS Must Release Student Info To ASD -

Shelby County and Metro Nashville Schools cannot withhold student data from the state-run Achievement School District, according to a legal opinion released Thursday, Sept. 14, by Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery.

20. UTHSC’s Roth Appointed to Autism Council -

Jenness Roth, family disability training coordinator at the UT-Boling Center for Developmental Disabilities at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, has been appointed to Gov. Bill Haslam’s Tennessee Council on Autism Spectrum Disorder.

21. Education Expert Cites Need for Preschool Access, Higher Teacher Pay -

Education research continues to show that early intervention sets the foundation for students’ future academic success. On Friday, Memphis’ Hutchison School hosted nationally acclaimed education researcher Dr. Amanda VanDerHeyden for a talk titled "How Critical Is a Strong Early Childhood Education.”

22. Wizards Return -

The past couple of years has seen the return of pinball tables across the Mid-South, with groups like Memphis Pinball hosting weekly gatherings at places like Memphis Made Brewing and the new pinball arcade in Millington, The Retro.

23. Last Word: Game Day, Corker at Southwind on Taxes and Trump and Hotel Stats -

The game is on rain or shine at the Liberty Bowl Thursday. And the start of the Tigers football season could be a very soggy start with remnants of Hurricane Harvey arriving. So while tailgating on Tiger Lane may involve umbrellas, none are allowed in the Liberty Bowl itself. Ponchos it is for your face time on CBS Thursday evening.

24. Last Word: Tri-State's New HQ, TnReady Scores and Return of the Frayser Dump Plan -

On Elvis Presley Boulevard in Whitehaven, executives and board members of Tri-State Bank did the honors on the bank’s new headquarters Tuesday which follows a move earlier of its operations infrastructure to Union Avenue near Cleveland after leaving its long time headquarters and operations center Downtown at Beale and Main.

25. Commission Votes Down Health Coverage Change -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a switch Monday, Aug, 28, of the county’s health insurance administration contract from Cigna to an $11 million, two-year contract with two one-year renewal options with Aetna.

26. County Commission Votes Down Health Coverage Change -

Shelby County Commissioners voted down a switch Monday, Aug, 28, of the county’s health insurance administration contract from Cigna to Aetna in an $11 million two-year contract with two renewals of one year each.

27. Yellen Defends Bank Regulations Passed After 2008 Crisis -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) – Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen on Friday emphatically defended the web of regulations the Fed helped enact after the 2008 financial crisis, saying it helped restore the banking system's health and disputing criticism that the rules have hurt lending.

28. UTHSC Readies New Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Facility -

UTHSC is putting the final touches on its new $20 million Plough Center for Sterile Drug Delivery Systems, a pharmaceutical manufacturing facility at the site of a former warehouse at 208 S. Dudley St. in the Memphis Medical District.

29. Freshman Impact: Vols’ Best Rookie RBs -

Butch Jones let us in on a little secret recently when he said his freshman running backs will play for Tennessee this season.

That’s plural – running backs.

Jones’ plan is to use all three freshman backs – Ty Chandler, Tim Jordan and Trey Coleman – in some sort of rotation behind junior John Kelly. Given the nature of the game, putting the football in the hands of freshmen is risky business. But Jones is taking the plunge.

30. New Collierville High Signals Shift In Education -

A year from now, the $90 million Collierville High School will open for classes with an estimated 2,600 students.

Collierville Schools superintendent John Aitken is keenly aware that for many citizens the construction work is what they know about the school system entering its fourth school year.

31. Vandiver Growing Customer Relationships at Agritech Firm The Seam -

The Seam, a technology firm founded by agribusiness companies that specializes in commodity trading and management systems, has added Rex Vandiver in a customer development role. Vandiver helps with customer support and project management, and he’s also taking a greater role in involvement with the peanut industry to help The Seam better serve its customers’ needs.

32. First Day of School Begins With Greetings, Hopes -

The school year began Monday, Aug. 7, with some parents registering children on the first day, other children finding their way back into academic routines on their own and Shelby County Schools leaders awaiting the release of achievement test scores from the state that will set a new baseline for where students are academically.

33. UTHSC’s Dr. David Stern Focusing on a Healthier Tennessee in New Role -

Getting invited to make a presentation at the White House last fall as part of a meeting on drug addiction turned into an epiphany of sorts for Dr. David Stern.

The discussion about substance use disorders and addictions – and how multidisciplinary clinical care can go a long way in addressing those challenges – touched a nerve with Stern. He’s spent the last six years as the Robert J. Kaplan executive dean and vice chancellor for clinical affairs at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, where his work has included recruiting more than 30 nationally recognized chairs and directors.

34. New Academic Year Brings Changes, Familiar Issues -

The school year for most students in Shelby County begins Monday, Aug. 7. But teachers and school administrators mentally remain at least a few weeks ahead, if not more – a permanent condition for educators.

35. Hundreds Show Up for Jobs at Amazon Warehouses in US Cities -

FALL RIVER, Mass. (AP) – Hundreds of people showed up Wednesday for a chance to pack and ship products to Amazon customers, as the e-commerce company held a giant job fair at nearly a dozen U.S. warehouses.

36. Commission Tries to Stop Charter School Plan -

Shelby County commissioners called on a charter school that planned to open in Memphis but instead wants to set up shop in Bartlett to stick by its original plan or put off opening Gateway University Charter School next week.

37. County Commission Calls For Halt to Gateway Charter Plans in Bartlett -

Shelby County Commissioners called on a charter school that planned to open in Memphis but instead is setting up shop in Bartlett to stick by its original plan or put off the opening of the Gateway University Charter School next week.

38. U of M Grads Say Bye to Student Loan Debt -

Student loan debt looms large for most college graduates, but one local professional has created a system to knock out $150,000 in student loans in five years, and he wants to put those tools in the hands of a generation that is struggling toward financial freedom.

39. Michael Calls Out Juvenile Court Critics -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

40. Michael Talks About Move to End Federal Oversight of Juvenile Court -

Memphis-Shelby County Juvenile Court Judge Dan Michael acknowledged Monday, July 24, that the court still has a problem with disproportionate minority contact. That is African-American youth who not only show up in the court more often than white youth, but get disproportionately harsher punishments and are more likely to be transferred for trial as adults than white children charged with the same offenses.

41. Revival of Ranked Choice Voting Marks Phillips’ Attention to Detail -

The use of Ranked Choice Voting or instant-runoff voting in Memphis elections was a moot point even before Memphis voters approved it in 2008 in a city charter amendment.

The Shelby County Election Commission had concluded before the charter referendum that its voting systems couldn’t accommodate a method of voting that ranked candidates in a single race by a voter’s preference, instead of a voter picking one and only one candidate.

42. Last Word: Freeze Warning, Corker on Obamacare Repeal and The Disney Example -

What do you call it when you expect a lot of trouble coming from a specific direction – with a detailed roadmap -- and a completely different controversy comes in from a different direction, hits and leaves a crater. Whatever you call it, that is what happened to Ole Miss football coach Hugh Freeze Thursday evening. Or did it?

43. Mock Election In ‘19 Could Test Ranked Choice Voting -

The Shelby County Election Commission could hold a public mock election of what is called Ranked Choice Voting in 2019, ahead of city of Memphis elections that year.

But the earliest the election commission could move to new machines that would provide such an option is the 2022 elections, says Shelby County Elections Administrator Linda Phillips. And that’s provided the state certifies the use of a voting system that includes the option, which it currently doesn’t.

44. Hobby Lobby Fined $3M for Smuggling Iraq Religious Artifacts -

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – Hobby Lobby Stores has agreed to pay a $3 million federal fine and forfeit thousands of ancient Iraqi religious artifacts smuggled from the Middle East that the government alleges were intentionally mislabeled for import, federal prosecutors said.

45. Germantown Approves 21-Cent Property Tax Hike -

The Germantown Board of Mayor and Aldermen approved a 21-cent property tax hike Monday, June 26, on third and final reading.

Passage of the tax hike seems to end discussions with Shelby County Schools about the Germantown Municipal School District buying Germantown Elementary, Middle and High schools from SCS.

46. Germantown Approves 21-Cent Property Tax Hike -

The Germantown Board of Mayor and Aldermen approved a 21-cent property tax hike Monday, June 26, on third and final reading.

Passage of the tax hike seems to end discussions with Shelby County Schools about the Germantown Municipal School District buying Germantown Elementary, Middle and High schools from SCS.

47. UTHSC Hosting Pharmaceutical Safety Conference -

The University of Tennessee Health Science Center is working toward playing a major role in the safety and quality of medical products and the global pharmaceutical supply chain.

Its latest step in that direction is the university’s designation as a Center of Excellence in global medical product quality and pharmaceutical supply chain security. That comes from the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation, an international forum supporting economic growth in the Asia-Pacific region.

48. Experts: Takata Bankruptcy Means Air Bag Victims Get Less -

DETROIT (AP) – A bankruptcy filing by Japanese air bag maker Takata will leave little money for dozens of people who sued the company over deaths and injuries caused by its exploding air bag inflators, according to outside legal experts and lawyers suing the company.

49. Norris to Oversee Second Panel Reviewing Juvenile Justice -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris is set to oversee a comprehensive review of Tennessee’s juvenile justice system in an effort to reshape the lives of offenders.

50. The Health Of Care -

There's a school of thought in some industries that says it's ideal to have a narrow focus, to pick just one or a few things to excel at and not try to be all things to all people – that when you do so and go broad, you’re likely to end up instead being a master of nothing.

51. 3-Attorney Panel to Review Mackin's Allegations Against Shelby County Schools -

A panel of three attorneys, including former U.S. Attorney Ed Stanton are investigating allegations of a cover-up, sexual harassment, theft and widespread grade tampering made last week by former Trezevant High School principal Ronnie Mackin.

52. Forum Shines Light on Rural Hospital Woes -

President Donald Trump’s proposal to cut billions from Medicaid’s budget would have “serious implications” on rural Tennessee hospitals.

That was the assessment of researchers from the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families, the University of Tennessee Health Science Center’s Department of Family Medicine, Healthcare Management Partners and local stakeholders who gathered in Jackson, Tenn., Wednesday for a public forum on the impact of federal health policy on the health of rural Tennessee.

53. Law Could Allow Guns at Nashville Bus Hub Used By Schools -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Police and security guards keep watch as thousands of children zigzag through Nashville's downtown bus hub each morning and afternoon, catching buses between home and school.

54. Mississippi River Mayors: Paris Pullout Hurts US Ag Exports -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) – Mayors along the Mississippi River say President Donald Trump's decision to pull out of a worldwide climate agreement could severely damage U.S. agricultural exports.

55. Mississippi River Mayors: Paris Pullout Hurts US Ag Exports -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) – Mayors along the Mississippi River say President Donald Trump's decision to pull out of a worldwide climate agreement could severely damage U.S. agricultural exports.

The Mississippi River Cities and Towns Initiative says in a news release Friday that nations remaining in the Paris agreement will impose carbon pricing through taxes or trading systems, without any say from the United States.

56. JLL Signs Contract in Tennessee Outsourcing Plan -

Real estate giant Jones Lang LaSalle has signed a five-year contract in Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to privatize property management on the campuses of Tennessee’s public colleges and universities.

57. Frayser Recovery Efforts Before Storm Continue Afterward -

Recovery efforts in Frayser aren’t just about the weather and they didn’t just start after the Memorial Day weekend storm that did plenty of damage in neighborhoods with old, large trees.

58. View From the Hill: GOP Points True North on State’s Moral Compass -

It was billed as the start of the 2018 governor’s race, but the GOP’s Reagan Day Dinner in Murfreesboro last week often sounded more like a tent revival.

Vote for one of these candidates and you’re guaranteed a place in heaven, ran the subtext of the evening, because, after all, everyone knows only Republicans know the road to salvation.

59. Tennessee Governor Signs NRA-Backed Metal Detector Gun Bill -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Many Tennessee city and county buildings, parks and buses will either have to buy metal detectors, hire security guards and check people's bags, or let handgun permit holders bring in their guns, under a law signed Friday by Gov. Bill Haslam.

60. JLL Signs Contract In Tenn. Outsourcing Plan -

Real estate giant Jones Lang LaSalle has signed a five-year contract in Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to privatize property management on the campuses of Tennessee’s public colleges and universities.

61. FedEx Supply Chain Ramps Up New Medical Distribution Warehouse -

FedEx Supply Chain, formerly known as Genco, is ramping up activity at its 1.1 million-square-foot multitenant distribution warehouse on East Holmes Road. Memphis-based FedEx Corp. acquired Genco, a third-party logistics provider, for $1.4 billion in early 2015 and announced a network expansion last October.

62. Trump Team Eyes Public Asset Sales to Pay for Infrastructure -

WASHINGTON (AP) – The Trump administration is eyeing plans to encourage the sale of public assets, such as airports and bridges, to help pay for a $1 trillion overhaul of the nation's aging infrastructure, an administration official said Wednesday.

63. Unwilling Private Sector Gives Park Workers a Victory -

Two state parks are celebrating victories in an atmosphere of uncertainty created by the governor’s penchant for privatizing state functions.

Fall Creek Falls drew no bidders for a $20 million plan to hire a vendor who would tear down its inn, construct a new one and take over operations for 10 years. Henry Horton State Park, meanwhile, is set for $10 million in improvements this coming fiscal year, including upgrades to its hospitality facilities, plus a new visitors center, rather than a proposal to raze its inn and not rebuild.

64. Vaco Risk Solutions' Brian Prentice Talks Data Breaches, Safety -

Vaco Memphis has added Brian Prentice as managing partner of Vaco Risk Solutions, a national consulting firm that works with organizations that have IT security, risk or compliance needs; have had a recent breach; are moving data centers; require a penetration test; or have any other project-based risk management needs.

65. County Certified Property Tax Rate Comes In At $4.13 -

Shelby County Commissioners set the certified county property tax rate at $4.13 Monday, May 22, a 24-cent drop from the current tax rate of $4.37.

The resolution approved reflects the state-approved estimate of a tax rate that will produce the same amount of revenue for county government as the current tax rate once new property values from the 2017 countywide property reappraisal are factored in.

66. Luttrell: Mend Issues That Divide Region -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell says his hope for a more civil national political discourse may be “a little Alice in Wonderland.” And there are times when he sees local discussions veering in the direction of “Nashville and Washington,” he told the Memphis Rotary Club Tuesday, May 16.

67. Cyberattack Wave Ebbs, But Experts See Risk of More -

LONDON (AP) – The "ransomware" cyberattack that has hit companies and governments around the world ebbed in intensity on Monday, though experts warned that new versions of the virus could emerge.

68. Haslam: Achievement School District Still Needed, But Changes Near -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says there is a continuing need for the state-run Achievement School District. But the school district for the bottom 5 percent of schools in the state, in terms of academic achievement, is being “streamlined,” Haslam said last week during a visit to the Aspire Coleman Elementary School in Raleigh.

69. View From the Hill: Gas Tax Rancor Lingers as Session Coasts to Close -

Remnants of rancor over Republican leadership roiled the House, a reminder of outrage over roguish behavior as representatives reached the finish line.

Alliteration is probably better suited for poetry. But in a case of what could be considered poetic justice, at least for some, this literary device – goofiness maybe – is suitable for legislative action requiring a score card to keep up with the characters and a bit of history to put it all together.

70. House Approves Education Fund Concept, But Senate Action Put on Hold -

House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh pushed his K-12 education fund to passage Tuesday, May 9, but the possibility of funding and Senate approval will have to wait until 2018.

Dubbed the “K-12 Block Grant Act,” the measure calls for setting aside $250 million in excess state revenue for interest-generating investment to provide grant money for school systems statewide. Each system could use the funds for state-approved programs such as reading coaches or dual enrollment, items not funded through Tennessee’s Basic Education Program.

71. Physical Education Bill Gets Tripped Up in Legislature -

Legislation requiring one hour of physical education per week for elementary students stumbled and fell Monday, May 8, when it hit a procedural hurdle.

The bill sponsored by Rep. Roger Kane went down in the House Finance, Ways and Means Subcommittee after a recount of sorts, one in which a member didn’t vote and then was allowed to cast a “no” vote killing the bill.

72. Beyond Tax Bottom Line, County Budget Goes Deep -

On a sunny and clear opening weekend for the Memphis In May International Festival, Shelby County commissioners were in a conference room with a lake view at Shelby Farms Park crunching budget numbers.

73. Tennessee House Abandons Amendments Before Approving State Budget -

Putting a day of acrimony behind it, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a $37 billion budget plan on Friday, May 5, stripping away nearly $320 million in amendments placed on it the previous day.

74. Republican In-fighting in Tenn. House Stirs Up Budget Mess -

The House of Representatives adjourned in apparent disarray Thursday, May 4, after arguing over amendments to a $37 billion budget plan, some saying discord stemmed from votes on the governor’s IMPROVE Act.

75. Luttrell Shuns Tax Cut In Proposed $1.2B Budget -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has taken a $1.2 billion consolidated county government budget proposal to the Shelby County Commission that would maintain a stable property tax rate but shift a part of the tax rate to establish a capital projects pay-as-you-go fund.

76. Luttrell Proposes $1.2 Billion County Budget with Stable Tax Rate -

Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell has taken a $1.2 billion consolidated county government budget proposal to the Shelby County Commission that would maintain a stable property tax rate but shift a part of the tax rate to establish a capital projects pay-as-you go fund.

77. Sales of 2 Mississippi Hospitals Close as Ex-Owner Cuts Debt -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Two small Mississippi hospitals have been sold as a large Tennessee-based company tries to pare down hospitals to reduce debt.

Community Health Systems said Monday that it completed the sale of a 95-bed hospital in Amory and a 112-bed hospital in Batesville to Curae Health of Clinton, Tennessee.

78. Last Word: DNA Unit Trouble, 100 Years After Ell Persons and Gas Tax Hike Redux -

The suspension of Ouita Knowlton, the Memphis Police detective overseeing the MPD's DNA Unit, appears to involve more than alleged violations of police policies. The unit oversees testing and processing of all current rape kits and those left unprocessed for decades that the city is currently working its way through five years after the admission. The District Attorney General’s office is part of the investigation of Knowlton, the office confirmed Monday. There are no specifics about what is involved here. But the police investigation will go to District Attorney General Amy Weirich who will then determine if criminal laws were violated and if there is a case to be made.

79. $250M K-12 Education Fund Hits Legislative Hurdle -

NASHVILLE – Legislation by Tennessee House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh seeking to create a $250 million education fund may have to fit through the eye of a needle to get into Gov. Bill Haslam’s $37 billion budget plan.

80. Questions About Shelby County Schools Voucher Bill Postpone It for the Year -

NASHVILLE – Questions about student testing within a proposed pilot voucher bill affecting Shelby County Schools forced the bill’s sponsor to postpone it until next year.

Rep. Harry Brooks, R-Knoxville, sent the bill to the first calendar of the 2018 House Finance, Ways and Means Subcommittee Wednesday, April 26, telling lawmakers he needs more time to work out details in the legislation. One of those questions dealt with the effective date of the voucher program and the other with an amendment enabling private schools that would accept public students to opt out of state-required testing, the TNReady.

81. Last Word: Election Day, Game 6 and School Vouchers Get Rolled -

Intermission in the NBA playoffs as tipoff of Game 6 approaches Thursday evening at the Forum. Look at all of the clouds as the lights dimming and letting you know it’s time to take your seats for the show that is reigniting the local passion for basketball.

82. Proposed $250M K-12 Education Fund Hits Legislative Hurdle -

Legislation by Tennessee House Minority Leader Craig Fitzhugh seeking to create a $250 million education fund may have to fit through the eye of a needle to get into Gov. Bill Haslam’s $37 billion budget plan.

83. Shelby County Schools Voucher Bill Postponed for the Year -

Questions about student testing within a proposed pilot voucher bill affecting Shelby County Schools forced the bill’s sponsor to postpone it until next year.

Rep. Harry Brooks, R-Knoxville, sent the bill to the first calendar of the 2018 House Finance, Ways and Means Subcommittee Wednesday, April 26, telling lawmakers he needs more time to work out details in the legislation. One of those questions dealt with the effective date of the voucher program and the other with an amendment enabling private schools that would accept public students to opt out of state-required testing, the TNReady.

84. Mississippi State to Lead Major Drone Research Project for US Government -

STARKVILLE, Miss. (AP) – Mississippi State University officials say the school will lead a ma-jor research and development project involving drones.

School officials say the U.S. Department of Homeland Security selected Mississippi as the new base of operations for small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS), commonly known as drones.

85. Unfinished Business Fuels Boyd’s Gubernatorial Bid -

By any measuring stick, Randy Boyd is a renaissance man. The founder of Radio Systems Corp. served as commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development for two years before he stepped down earlier this year.

86. Regulators Sue Ocwen Financial, Say It Mishandled Mortgages -

NEW YORK (AP) – State and federal authorities have sued mortgage servicer Ocwen Financial Corp., saying the company botched the handling of millions of mortgage accounts. The action sent Ocwen's shares plunging about 50 percent.

87. Strickland Willing To Talk About Schools Funding, But Budget Set -

Memphis Mayor Jim Strickland says his budget proposal to the Memphis City Council is set and ready to deliver next week. But he added Tuesday, April 18, that he is willing to talk with the citizens who drafted a letter to him last week calling on the city to put up $10 million in funding for schools in his proposal.

88. Trump Targets Visa Program for Highly Skilled Workers -

KENOSHA, Wis. (AP) – President Donald Trump hopes to revive the economic populism that helped drive his election campaign, signing an order Tuesday in politically important Wisconsin to tighten rules on technology companies bringing in highly skilled foreign workers.

89. Fuel-Tax Bill Short of Votes in the House -

NASHVILLE – Votes aren’t adding up in the House of Representatives for passage of the governor’s gas tax/tax cut legislation.

With floor debate scheduled Wednesday morning, not only is a Republican head count showing lack of support, Democrats aren’t exactly lining up behind the measure. The minority party says it wants concessions on other items from the governor before it can vote for the IMPROVE Act, and some Democrats say they won’t go for a combination of tax cuts for wealthy investors tied to a higher gas tax.

90. The iPhone of Cars? Apple Enters Self-Driving Car Race -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) – Apple is joining the fiercely competitive race to design self-driving cars, raising the possibility that a company that has already re-shaped culture with its iPhone may try to transform transportation, too.

91. Gas Tax, Health Care Complicate Tennessee Governor's Race -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – The repeal of former President Barack Obama's health care law was supposed to provide a springboard for U.S. Rep. Diane Black's entry into the Tennessee governor's race.

92. Career Interference -

The job market often offers twists and turns you’d never expect. My first twist happened during college.

I grew up in the ’90s, along with the internet. Companies like AOL were just starting. With a “fast” dial-up modem, you could connect through your phone line. It was just the sort of thing a teenager dying to go to college out of state needed. It was an exciting time. Everything and everyone suddenly seemed magically intertwined in a new way.

93. Report: Centralize System for Indigent Counsel -

There should be one central statewide data and reporting system for how the poor are represented in civil and criminal matters in Tennessee, according to a state task force that reported its findings Monday, April 10, to the Tennessee Supreme Court.

94. House Committee Postpones School Voucher Bill Again -

A House committee amended legislation setting up a pilot voucher program for low-income students in Shelby County, enabling private schools who take students from struggling public schools to opt out of state-required tests.

95. Early Voting in District 95 Primaries Begins Friday -

Early voting opens Friday, April 7, in the special primary elections for state House District 95 as other elections – including some 2018 races – already show plenty of signs of political life.

96. Tennessee Overhauls Approach to Low-Performing Schools Under Plan Sent to Secretary DeVos -

Tennesseans who have been waiting to see which low-performing schools have improved enough to avoid consequences — and which ones are struggling so much that the state might step in — will have to wait longer.

97. Collierville Mayor Stan Joyner Says Political Path Kept Calling -

Before he ever ran for anything in Collierville, Stan Joyner spent a dozen years on the town’s planning commission. And he was an elected alderman for another 12 years before he ran for and was elected mayor of the town of 48,000 people.

98. Norris’ Broadband Bill Clears State Senate Hurdle -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris’ broadband internet access bill is rolling through the General Assembly.

99. Genetic Code -

While the anachronistic farmer trope may be a common pop-culture perception, these stewards of the land have in fact been on the cutting edge of technology for thousands of years.

And every milestone since the Neolithic period, from the first plows to today’s automated tractors, has allowed farmers to increase their yields and support a perpetually growing population.

100. Shelby County Schools Voucher Bill Advances in House -

NASHVILLE – Despite a packed room of Memphis-area people opposed to vouchers for public school students, a House Education Committee advanced a pilot program targeting low-income children in Shelby County Schools system’s low-performing schools.