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Editorial Results (free)

1. UTHSC Taps Director For New Plough Center -

Dr. Harry Kochat has been named the new director of the Plough Center for Sterile Drug Delivery Systems at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

Recruited by Dr. Ken Brown, executive vice chancellor and chief operations officer at UTHSC, Kochat will direct the Plough Center’s two pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities on campus.

2. State Systems Makes Its Fifth Acquisition in 2 Years -

Memphis-based total protection company State Systems Inc. has acquired Community Fire Safety Systems in Thompson’s Station, Tennessee, marking the company’s fifth acquisition in less than two years and the second in Middle Tennessee.

3. State Systems Makes Its Fifth Acquisition in 2 Years -

Memphis-based total protection company State Systems Inc. has acquired Community Fire Safety Systems in Thompson's Station, Tennessee, marking the company’s fifth acquisition in less than two years and the second in Middle Tennessee.

4. For New Plough Center Director, Job is a Calling -

For Dr. Harry Kochat, the best parts of working in pharmaceutical development are the interactions with grateful patients. Like the one he remembers from early in his career, when Kochat – whose work has focused on the development of life-saving drugs for more than three decades – encountered a mother and her young son.

5. Boyd Leaving Haslam Administration As He Ponders Gov's Bid -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – Randy Boyd is stepping down as commissioner of the state Department of Economic and Community Development as he ponders a bid to succeed term-limited Gov. Bill Haslam in 2018.

6. Task Force Prepared for Juvenile Justice Legislation -

A General Assembly-led panel is backing legislation to change juvenile sexting laws and adopt measures to stop teens from being held in detention for minor offenses as part of an effort to improve juvenile justice.

7. UTHSC Taps New Director For Plough Center -

Dr. Harry Kochat has been named the new director of the Plough Center for Sterile Drug Delivery Systems at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

Recruited by Dr. Ken Brown, executive vice chancellor and chief operations officer at UTHSC, Kochat will direct the Plough Center’s two pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities on campus.

8. Trump’s Turn -

If the election of Donald Trump was a mystery, there are even more questions about what will he do once he takes office Jan. 20. The clues may or may not be in the conduct of his campaign.

“Donald Trump campaigned without being tied to the traditional parameters of conservative-liberal dialogue that we’ve come to know over the past 20 or 30 years,” said Memphis attorney John Ryder, who is legal counsel to the Republican National Committee. “The hopeful part about that is that allows him to move past those divisions and enter new territory.”

9. Griffin Becomes New SCS Chief of Schools -

The leader of Shelby County Schools’ successful Innovation Zone schools, Sharon Griffin, has been named chief of schools for the SCS system. Superintendent Dorsey Hopson announced his appointment of Griffin to the new position Wednesday, Jan. 4, as part of a restructuring of the school system’s office of academics.

10. I-Zone Leader Appointed SCS Chief of Schools -

The leader of Shelby County Schools’ successful Innovation Zone schools, Sharon Griffin, is the new chief of schools for the system.

11. Last Word: A Rainbow's Tale, The Two Holiday Peaks and Crosstown High Plans -

I saw it all so clearly on a very cloudy and very rainy Monday in the city. A strong rainbow with bold colors across town from the setting sun on the river. Not some play rainbow that you create with a garden hose or some alleged double rainbow that depends on where you stand. As we were fond of saying in these parts in the 1980s and the 1990s – this was a “world class” rainbow.

12. Riding Momentum -

Around this time each year, everyone tends to start fetishizing the blank slate a bit, with its attendant allure of reinvention and that sweeping away of the old order to make way for what comes next.

13. Memphis Health Care Thrives With Investments, Growth -

Methodist Healthcare made a “great commitment” to Memphis this year. Those are the words of Methodist University Hospital CEO Jeff Liebman, who referenced the health care system’s multimillion-dollar investment into its flagship hospital at 1265 Union Ave., part of a master plan that will give the facility a modern overhaul.

14. Change Defines Education Landscape in 2016 -

By the time Rhodes College trustees made their choice in December of Marjorie Hass as the college’s new president, higher education in Memphis had been through quite a few changes.

Hass succeeds William Troutt, president of Rhodes for the last 18 years.

15. Three Closing ASD Charter Schools Signal Larger Changes -

KIPP Memphis Collegiate Schools plans to close a middle school it operates under the state-run Achievement School District at the end of the current school year.

And the ASD is nearing an early January deadline for organizations to run two other Memphis schools currently run by the Gestalt Community Schools charter organization until the end of the current school year.

16. RNC Counsel Says Russians Probed But Didn’t Hack System -

Russian computer hackers did not hack the Republican National Committee during the 2016 presidential campaign, according to the Memphis attorney who serves as the RNC’s legal counsel.

Attorney John Ryder commented on the claims reported in recent weeks during a Thursday, Dec. 15, forum at the Memphis chapter of The Federalist Society.

17. Empty Seats -

Shelby County Commissioner David Reaves can still see it clearly: “Take the whole map of the county and lay a grid on it. Then I’d like you to say, ‘Where’s the population? Where’s the projection?’ And then let’s strategically place schools all over the county based upon that and make them all of equal offerings.”

18. New State Education Plan Limits ASD -

The state of Tennessee is about to change the rules for how the Achievement School District takes over a failing school.

Schools that are in the bottom five percent of schools statewide in terms of student achievement and growth would no longer automatically be eligible for takeover by the state-run school district that began in the 2012-2013 school year.

19. New State Education Plan Limits ASD Ability to Take Over Failing Schools -

The state of Tennessee is about to change the rules for how the Achievement School District takes over a failing school.

Schools that are in the bottom five percent of schools statewide in terms of student achievement and growth would no longer automatically be eligible for takeover by the state-run school district that began in the 2012-2013 school year.

20. TNReady Report Cards Dip With New Test -

Shelby County Schools leaders have a math literacy program that will rollout in phases starting next year. The plan was already in the works before new state test results were released Tuesday, Dec. 13, for school districts across the state.

21. Last Word: TNReady Scores, Ikea Day and 901REnews -

Snap goes the streak. Cavs over the Grizz in Cleveland Tuesday 103-86. The Cavs are here Wednesday without LeBron James, Kevin Love or Kyrie Irving. For the Grizz, we shall see about Deyonta Davis who came out of Tuesday’s game with a left foot injury.

22. Hiring Teachers Year-Round Effort for Shelby County Schools -

It used to be that Shelby County Schools and its predecessor Memphis City Schools had a season for hiring teachers that began around the end of the school year and ended the first day of classes.

The season featured a teacher hiring fair, and having connections to someone in the school system counted for a lot. Those who didn’t have the connections often left the fair confused and bound for another school system.

23. Last Word: MemphisWorks App, Tyler Talks and Millington Home Sales -

A busy annual Greater Memphis Chamber Chairman’s Circle luncheon Wednesday topped by the debut of a jobs app that is more than ye olde classified ads reformatted on a digital device.

MemphisWorks is several parts of the jobs search and filling jobs all put together.

24. Last Word: Boca, Poe Killed by Politics and Embedding In The Real Memphis -

BOCA BOWL – As expected, the University of Memphis Tigers football team is going south for the post season. They got and accepted Sunday the formal invitation to play in the Boca Raton Bowl on Dec. 20 against Western Kentucky. Ticket information should be forthcoming Monday for those of you who didn’t get enough during the Emerald Coast Classic with the basketball Tigers not too long ago.

25. CBU Campus Expanding in Several Ways -

Christian Brothers University’s campus overhaul includes a new college of education that aims to make the university a major player in the training and development of teachers.

The impact goes beyond the bricks-and-mortar changes coming to the campus starting in 2020 in the second phase of a $70 million capital campaign.

26. Plybeah Helps Memphians Get the Health Care They Need -

If Erica Plybeah has enjoyed success, she says it’s because of her mother. Growing up in rural Mississippi, it would have been easy to go through the motions with regard to her education. But her mother demanded more. She taught Plybeah the importance of persistence, a theme that has followed her throughout her life.

27. FedEx Express’ Brown Named To Savoy’s ‘Power 300’ List -

Shannon A. Brown, senior vice president and chief human resource/diversity officer at FedEx Express, has been named to Savoy Magazine’s Power 300: 2016 Most Influential Black Corporate Directors list. Brown, who was honored as a member of the BancorpSouth Inc. board of directors, also holds board memberships with several universities and nonprofit organizations in the Mid-South and beyond.

28. Last Word: Early Vote Numbers, Crime Q&A and School Suspensions in Memphis -

The last weekend of early voting is done and now we get the early vote surge through Thursday, which is the last day for early voting at the 21 polling places across Shelby County.

Through this past Friday, 161,239 early votes had been cast in Shelby County. That compares to 156,645 to the same point in 2008 and 151,809 in 2012.

29. Vols Prepare for ‘Grind’ of Weaker Foes -

Tennessee begins the easy part of its football schedule Saturday, Oct. 29, at 7:15 p.m. (ESPN2) against South Carolina in Columbia. Just don’t tell UT coach Butch Jones this is the easy part of the schedule.

30. MATA Ready to Develop Strategic Plan -

The Memphis Area Transit Authority in November will begin developing a new strategic plan to rebuild Memphis’ transit system, according to MATA chief executive officer Ron Garrison.

31. Claims Pushing ACA Marketplace Rates Higher, Some Providers Out -

Memphians with health care insurance through the state’s marketplace exchange or those looking to acquire health care insurance are bracing for rate increases that come on Jan. 1.

Rates for the two remaining insurers with marketplace plans available for the Memphis market next year – Cigna and Humana – are set to increase roughly 45 percent each.

32. Early Voting Opens with Raw Election Appeals -

U.S. Rep. Steve Cohen’s choice of cap usually has some logo related to the University of Memphis or the Grizzlies and, occasionally, to baseball legend and childhood inspiration Minnie Minoso.

33. Deadly Cat Poop Causes Rift Among Animal Defenders -

HONOLULU (AP) — Two wildlife issues have collided in Hawaii, pitting one group of animal defenders against another in an impassioned debate. The point of contention? Deadly cat poop and the feral felines that produce it.

34. Frustration Runs Deep for Customers Forced to Change Marketplace Plans -

Andrea Schankman’s three-year relationship with her insurer, Coventry Health Care of Missouri, has been contentious, with disputes over what treatments it would pay for. Nonetheless, like other Missourians, Schankman was unnerved to receive a notice from Coventry last month informing her that her policy was not being offered in 2017.

35. Early Results Show Graduation Rate Gains In Shelby County, With Exceptions -

From 96.4 percent in Arlington Community Schools to 78.7 percent in Shelby County Schools, the high school graduation rate in five of the public school systems in Shelby County increased in the 2015-2016 school year compared to the previous year.

36. U of M Will Share $3M Grant for Cybersecurity Preparedness -

The Center for Information Assurance at the University of Memphis will share a $3 million grant from the Department of Homeland Security and Federal Emergency Management Association with four other universities.

37. Green Renaissance -

As director of Shelby Farms Park Conservancy, Jen Andrews has been on the front lines of what can fairly be called a green revival in Memphis. And she is amazed at how much change has occurred over the last decade, a rebirth that spans not just across the miles but now seems embedded in the city’s psyche.

38. Electoral College Scenarios Emerge Early in 2016 -

More than a month after all of the votes are counted in the Nov. 8 presidential general election, the real decision is made on who will be the next president.

Dec. 19 is when the Electoral College meets in state capitals across the nation including in Nashville where Tennessee’s 11 electors will put an end to an election in which former Tennessee Attorney General Robert Cooper says Tennessee voters have been “bystanders.”

39. Tennessee Ranks 13th In Tax Competitiveness -

Tennessee has the 13th most competitive tax code in the nation, according to the 13th annual State Business Tax Climate Index just released by the nonpartisan Tax Foundation.

The report measures how well-structured each state’s tax code is by analyzing more than 100 tax variables in five different tax categories: corporate, individual income, sales, property and unemployment insurance.

40. Tennessee Approves $600K Job Training Grant for VW Supplier -

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) – State officials have approved a $600,000 job training grant for a Volkswagen supplier in Chattanooga.

The Chattanooga Times Free Press reports (http://bit.ly/2cZ5tEF) that the State Funding Board OK'd the FastTrack Job Training funds in a meeting last week.

41. Last Word: FedEx Changes, The Blue Cross Exit and Armageddon -

Was that really autumn Monday or was the drop in humidity a prank to get the trees to drop their leaves?

The FedEx shareholder’s meeting Monday included some changes in the management chart at FedEx Corp. – more like some changes in the seating with one retirement by Mike Glenn, whose office is next to company founder Fred Smith.

42. Tools for Addressing Generational Poverty -

We recently had the opportunity to learn from three women and the approaches they use to help vulnerable children and their families. We attended two local presentations coordinated by the Assisi Foundation of Memphis Inc. and want to share just a little of what we learned.

43. Projects Position UTHSC For Transformation in 2017 -

The campus of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center is as much a home to a major health care education institution these days as it is ground zero for major development projects poised to come online soon.

44. National Experts to Explore Parking, Transit Solutions for City’s Core -

Billions of public and private dollars being invested in the urban core of Memphis have civic leaders thinking about long-term transportation and parking solutions that will best serve the area as it evolves.

45. Feds Preview Rules of the Road for Self-Driving Cars -

WASHINGTON (AP) – Obama administration officials are previewing long-awaited guidance that attempts to bring self-driving cars to the nation's roadways safely – without creating so many roadblocks that the technology can't make it to market quickly.

46. Panel Endorses Arkansas Insurance Marketplace Fee Plan -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Arkansas lawmakers have endorsed an agency's plan to collect a 3 percent fee on plans offered through the state's health insurance exchange.

The Arkansas Health Insurance Market Place Legislative Oversight Committee on Wednesday backed the marketplace board's plan to begin collecting the fee in December. The 3 percent fee would replace a 3.5 percent fee that has been collected by the federal government since enrollment in the exchanges began two years ago.

47. Kirkpatrick Named CFO At Commercial Advisors -

Lori Kirkpatrick has joined Cushman & Wakefield/Commercial Advisors as chief financial officer. In this role, Kirkpatrick oversees all finance and accounting functions at the commercial real estate services firm, including lease administration services provided to clients. 
She focuses on driving projects and innovations and ensuring quality and commitment to our clients. 

48. New Data Tracking System Will Save Memphis Educators Hours Every Week, Officials Say -

The system for sharing student data with educators in Tennessee’s largest school district has been laborsome and time-intensive at best, but that’s about to change.

Shelby County Schools has begun trainings with team leaders from each school as part of this year’s rollout of a new database system called Ed-Fi.

49. State Systems Expands With Acquisition in Conway, Ark. -

Memphis-based total protection company State Systems Inc. has acquired Dunk Fire and Security’s Conway, Arkansas, operations.

50. State Systems Expands With Acquisition in Conway, Ark. -

Memphis-based total protection company State Systems Inc. has acquired Dunk Fire and Security’s Conway, Arkansas, operations.

51. Last Word: Hyde Lake, Global Ministries Exits and Another Big 12 Rumor -

A big day at Shelby Farms Park Thursday as the Heart of the Park renovations were formally opened. And it was also a cause to look back on where the park has come from.

52. Concerts, Pop-Up Events and Beer Gardens Are Feeding Business at The TapBox -

A traveling beer-mobile with a variety of taps on the side for easy pouring might sound like a dream straight from Homer Simpson’s head, but partners McCauley Williams, J.R. Kingsley and Justin Brooks of The TapBox have turned that dream into a reality, creating several multi-tap refrigerated devices that are popping up at more events across Memphis.

53. FBI Warns of Possible State Election-System Hacks -

NEW YORK (AP) – The FBI is warning state officials to boost their election security in light of evidence that hackers breached related data systems in two states.

In a confidential "flash" alert from its cyber division, first reported by Yahoo News and posted online by others, the FBI said it's investigating the pair of incidents and advised states to scan their systems for specific signs of hacking.

54. Evergreen Packaging Expands in East Memphis -

Evergreen Packaging has renewed and expanded its lease at the 5350 Poplar Ave. office building in East Memphis.

55. Methodist Signs $12.9M Technology Contract -

Methodist Healthcare has signed a $12.9 million technology contract with Johnson Controls, the North American headquarters of which is in Milwaukee, to help modernize Methodist University Hospital, the system’s flagship.

56. The World at your Doorstep -

There is nothing you can’t get delivered these days. If you can imagine owning it, it’s only a matter of time before it can be in your possession, brought to your front door within minutes, hours or days from the first moment you even conjured the thought of having it.

57. Methodist Signs $12.9M Technology Contract -

Methodist Healthcare has signed a $12.9 million technology contract with Johnson Controls, the North American headquarters of which is in Milwaukee, to help modernize Methodist University Hospital, the system’s flagship.

58. Toast to the Achievement School District -

Somebody forgot to tell the Achievement School District it had to follow a few simple rules when the Legislature formed it a few years ago to save failing schools: Primarily, don’t party with the money.

59. Dolly Parton Sharing Love of Reading -

“You can never get enough books into the hands of enough children.” – Dolly Parton.

For the last several years, the Dollywood Foundation, headquartered in Pigeon Forge, Tenn., has been promoting a program known as Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library. The idea is, essentially, that every preschool child born in a given community should have the opportunity to receive 60 books between his/her true birthday and his/her fifth birthday. One per month. In the mail. Free of charge.

60. Evergreen Packaging Expands in East Memphis -

Evergreen Packaging has renewed and expanded its lease at the 5350 Poplar Ave. office building in East Memphis. The 40,000-square-foot location will be the global headquarters for Evergreen, a spinoff of International Paper’s paper packaging division located in Memphis since 2007. Evergreen recently merged with Indianapolis-based Closure Systems International and York, Pa.-based Graham Packaging Co., creating a combined company with $5.5 billion in annual revenue.

61. A1 Electrical Sparks Successful Move To Predominantly Commercial Work -

A1 Electrical Contractors president Willie Frazier knows how to adapt his company’s business model to achieve success. Over the company’s history, A1 has shifted from doing only residential work in its early years to today handling 95 percent commercial work.

62. Last Word: Malco in South Main, Suburban Deadline and Chiwawa -

The Malco movie theater in South Main is to begin construction in September, the latest piece of the Central Station development where construction of apartment units on the Front Street side of the property has been underway for some time.

63. School Leaders, Teachers Not On Same Page -

A survey of 30,000 educators across Tennessee shows significantly more school administrators than teachers tend to believe disciplinary policies are effective.

And teachers tended to believe that more of their students had gone on to college than actually did.

64. Last Word: One Beale Delay, Memphis Banks and The Other Anniversary -

Changing the city’s skyline comes with some challenges. That’s a reflection of ever-changing economic conditions and the terrain by the Mississippi River on which the city’s skyline is built.

65. Work Continues on New Internet Network for Arkansas Schools -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – Arkansas officials say the continuing process of providing high-speed internet to each of the state's 276 school districts should be completed by June.

Progress on the network, which is being maintained by the Department of Information Systems, will temporarily stop for about a month to allow district information technology departments to deal with the return of students to school.

66. Jordan Takes Leading Role At Child Advocacy Center -

Mark Jordan has joined the Memphis Child Advocacy Center as development director, responsible for connecting people in a meaningful way to the critical services MCAC provides to vulnerable children. In his new role, Jordan will create and administer a comprehensive development plan to both enhance connections and build new relationships with volunteers and the philanthropic community to grow fundraising, donor relations and public engagement. 

67. Changes Abound in New Shelby County Schools Year -

On his fourth opening of a school year, Shelby County Schools Superintendent Dorsey Hopson knows what comes after it seems like all of the preparations for the school year are completed and sealed airtight.

68. Last Word: Using the ACT, Murmuration and We Grow -

The superintendents of the Bartlett and Germantown school systems say they have a remedy to the testing complaints state education officials are grappling with.

David Stephens and Jason Manuel, of Bartlett and Germantown respectively, tell us on WKNO's Behind The Headlines that they support using the college ACT test for high school students in place of the end-of-course exams.

69. Municipal Districts Tout ACT for Testing -

The superintendents of at least two of Shelby County’s suburban school systems say the state should use the ACT college entrance exam to gauge the achievement levels of high school students.

“We have universities who are giving full-ride scholarships based on their ACT scores,” said Germantown Municipal School District superintendent Jason Manuel on the WKNO/Channel 10 program Behind The Headlines. “Let’s use that test. It has a math component. It has a science, a reading and social studies component. Let’s use that as a measure.”

70. Blue-Collar High School -

For all of the changes in public education Memphis has seen in the past six years, there is at least one more big one still on the way.

And it is coming from the city’s post-recession economic development effort.

71. Public School System in Shelby County Continues Evolution -

The new school year that begins Aug. 8 is four academic years since the start of the state-run Achievement School District, three academic years past the merger of public education in Shelby County and two years since the demerger into seven school systems.

72. Shelby County Seeing Low Early Voting Turnout -

At the end of the first full week of early voting in advance of the Aug. 4 election day, Shelby County Election Commission data shows Democratic and Republican primary turnout closely matched.

And overall, early voting turnout is much lower than it was for the same election cycle four years ago, but ahead of where it was eight years ago.

73. County Leaders Face New Budget Anxiety -

Shelby County commissioners meet in special session Wednesday, July 23, to cross the last “t” of the spring budget season some 27 days after the start of the new fiscal year.

That’s “t” for taxes.

74. Last Word: Return of the Balloon Note, SCS and Migrant Teens & Greensward Doubts -

One of the prime culprits in the housing bubble burst that played a role in the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression is back – the adjustable rate mortgage.

Numbers from Chandler Reports, the real estate information company that is part of The Daily News Publishing Co. Inc, show the number of such loans has spiked in the first half of this year and are the highest they’ve been since 2008, the year after the bubble burst nationally.

75. State Moves TCAP, Shortens Testing Parts -

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen said Thursday, July 14, public schools across the state will have achievement tests for students in one assessment window at the end of the school year. And the tests for four subjects will be divided into shorter subparts.

76. State Moves TCAP, Shortens Testing Parts -

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen said Thursday, July 14, public schools across the state will have achievement tests for students in one assessment window at the end of the school year. And the tests for four subjects will be divided into shorter subparts.

77. McQueen Announces Single TCAP Testing Window At End of School Year -

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen said Thursday, July 14, public schools across the state will have achievement tests for students in one assessment window at the end of the school year. And the tests for four subjects will be divided into shorter subparts.

78. MSU’s Mullen Defends Simmons At Media Days -

HOOVER, Ala. – In another year and another circumstance, Mississippi State coach Dan Mullen might have spent all his time at SEC Media Days answering questions about having to replace Dak Prescott at quarterback.

79. Education Leaders Reboot TNReady Tests, Re-Examine Process -

The disastrous rollout of the new TNReady student achievement tests has gone from finding a new test vendor to a re-examination of the role such testing plays in public education.

Tennessee Education Commissioner Candice McQueen announced Wednesday, July 6, the state has a letter of intent with the Minneapolis-based testing service Questar Assessment to develop and deliver both pen-and-paper and online student achievements tests starting in the school year that begins in August.

80. Questar Gets State Schools Testing Contract With On-Line Phase-In -

The Tennessee Department of Education intends to hire Questar Assessment of Minneapolis, to be the state’s new student achievement test vendor.

State education commission Candice McQueen announced the letter of intent Wednesday, July 6, which should be finalized by the state in a week’s time as a two-year contract at $30 million a year, with renewal options beyond that.

81. CDC Awards Tennessee Funds to Fight Zika Virus -

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has awarded Tennessee $377,376 to support efforts to protect citizens from Zika virus infection and associated adverse health outcomes, including microcephaly and the other serious birth defects.

82. Last Word: Democrats Settle, Scotty Moore and the Top Cop Search -

Tennessee Democratic Party Chairman Mary Mancini ordered the Shelby County Democratic Party to settle its differences with former local party chairman Bryan Carson Tuesday and accept his offer to repay the party $6,000 at $100 a month..

83. Long-Term Issues Push County Budget To Deadline -

It’s not the basics that are keeping Shelby County Commissioners from a majority vote on school funding in the new operating budget.

It is the broader questions and budget assumptions some commissioners want to change in the process.

84. Schools Funding Again Center Stage For County Commission -

Shelby County commissioners could wrap up most of the formalities Monday of their budget season.

But it will probably take a while.

The biggest issue of the season – school funding – appeared to be resolved with a compromise last week in committee sessions.

85. Tennessee Lagging On Alternative Energy -

Tennessee has never been at the forefront of alternative energy. If California is the cool kid tapped in on all the latest advances, we could be considered the behind-the-times cousin always trying to play catch up.

86. Last Word: Back On, EDGE and Diversity and Jungle Room Sessions -

Are your lights on yet? How is your air conditioning? First came the rain Wednesday night and then came the power outages that stretched into Thursday.

So the last Twitter update from Memphis Light Gas and Water at 8 p.m. Thursday shows 248 outages in the MLGW service area with 2,746 customers still in the dark and the worst heat of the year so far. Those numbers translate to 95 percent of the customers impacted having their power restored Thursday evening.

87. County Schools Funding Compromise to Be Tested -

Fragile is probably the best way to describe the compromise that emerged this week from county commissioners to fully fund the Shelby County Schools budget for the fiscal year that begins July 1.

The plan that closes a $27.4 million gap between what the school system wants and what Shelby County Mayor Mark Luttrell proposed in April had eight votes on the 13-member commission in Wednesday, June 15, committee sessions.

88. State Attorney General Says Changes in Judicial Selection Have Added Stability -

Of the state’s 29 appellate court judges, 14 of them have been appointed during the tenure of Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam.

And this year, two of them – Tennessee Supreme Court Justice Roger Page and Tennessee Appeals Court Judge Ross Dyer – became the first appellate court appointees to be confirmed by the Tennessee Legislature.

89. Parking Was Key in ServiceMaster Deal -

Parking concerns for ServiceMaster Global Holdings’ move to Downtown Memphis have been resolved.

On June 14, the Downtown Parking Authority granted ServiceMaster access to the parking garage at 250 Peabody Place.

90. Last Word: Orlando, Rain Delay At Southwind and Church Health Center's Move -

Many of us were watching the streets of our own city closely this weekend – the places where people gather for good times when the weather is warm and the sky is clear. Lately some of those places have been the settings for vivid and sudden reminders that all is not well in our city.

91. Carver High Closing Likely Not Last -

Over the last 30 years, there have been proposals to close Carver High School. The nearly 60-year-old South Memphis high school survived them all until last week when Shelby County Schools board members voted to close it effective immediately.

92. Show Time -

For the first time in years, the Peabody Place mall was packed. On June 3, hundreds of ServiceMaster employees and a handful of business and government leaders ushered in One ServiceMaster Center, a multimillion-dollar headquarters for Memphis’ fourth-largest public company.

93. More Travelers Sign Up for Airport Programs, Only to Wait -

NEW YORK (AP) – A growing number of travelers are signing up for the government's expedited airport screening programs, only to face another wait.

After angry fliers missed flights this spring because of lengthy security lines, government officials promoted the PreCheck and Global Entry systems. The number of applicants for PreCheck more than tripled in a few months, climbing to 16,000 a day in May.

94. Streetcars En Vogue, But Study Urges Use Beyond Tourists -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) – As Oklahoma City prepares to break ground on its first streetcar line in seven decades, and as other cities adjust to having them again, authors of a federally backed study suggest their routes move people with a purpose – not just target the tourist trade.

95. ServiceMaster Disrupting Its Culture With Move Downtown -

ServiceMaster is converting Peabody Place into a corporate headquarters that would rival a Silicon Valley tech outfit.

On Friday, June 3, ServiceMaster laid to rest months of speculation about whether the company would relocate to a larger city like Atlanta or Dallas. Memphis’ available Class A office space can’t currently accommodate ServiceMaster’s needs, so it looked to the retail sector for its new home.

96. Editorial: Empowerment, Competition and Urgency -

The empowerment zone taking shape in six Whitehaven-area schools starting over the summer break may not work for every set of schools trying to improve.

In six years of historic change for public education in Shelby County, we’ve hopefully learned that no single, specific solution will work for every group of students.

97. ‘Critical Mass’ -

Shelby County Schools superintendent Dorsey Hopson calls it “a brave new world” after four years of unprecedented changes: the merger and demerger of the county’s public schools systems, the rise of charter schools, the formation of both the state-run Achievement School District and locally run Innovation Zone model, and declining SCS enrollment.

98. Last Word: South Main and Main, More Wheel Tax Mileage and City Hall Shark Tank -

When we talk about South Main these days and all that is happening in that area, we aren’t talking about Main Street Memphis further south of that, even though it’s the same road.

99. Snapshot: How Memphis-Based Public Companies are Faring -

Acquisitions have been a common theme among many Memphis-based public companies the past few quarters. Here is a roundup of those transactions and other business highlights from each of the companies.

100. Shelby County Schools Wraps Up a Calmer, But Still Eventful, Year -

Given the last six years of historic change in public education locally, you could be forgiven if you thought of Friday’s half day of classes for Shelby County Schools as the end of an idyllic school year.